Carrier Qualifications in the Eastern Pacific; workup off the coast of Southern California, underway in the Eastern Pacific; underway in the Eastern Pacific from 30 March to 1 April 2009 during which time USS Shoup (DDG-86) completed a Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) exercise while conducting operations off the coast of Southern California

13 October 2008 to 15 April 2009

Chapter XXIII

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2008 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XXIII, Appendix I

 

 

Shipboard Life is a Family Affair Aboard Carrier

 

As reported on 27 October 2008, “One of the biggest challenges Sailors face is deploying for several months at a time away from their families; while USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was deployed to the Persian Gulf this summer, one Sailor enjoyed shipboard family reunion.

Information Systems Technician 3rd Class (SW) Jaron Franck, of
Lincoln's combat systems department, reunited with his dad when his father, Chief Gunner's Mate (SW) Arron Franck, currently weapons department G-2 Division leading chief petty officer, reported on board Aug. 20 as a new crew member. The younger Franck said it was awesome to see his dad after being away for so long. "I hadn't seen him in almost six months," he said. "It was a great feeling when he arrived."

"Jaron turned 21 underway, so we didn't get that first father-son beer," Chief Franck said. "But, I got on board two days before
Lincoln's beer day, so we got to do that together. It was really cool." Although the Francks are stationed on the same ship, they haven't seen each other as much as one might think.

"We are in different duty sections. During deployment, I was working nights, and with the shifts and watches in my department we never saw each other," Petty Officer Franck said. "We had dinner together for the first time a few weeks before returning to Everett October 12." The Francks did, however, manage to get together during the ship's port visit in Hawaii, where the chief was stationed 2000-03 when his son was 12.

"Pearl Harbor was the best day we had," Chief Franck said. "I was stationed in Pearl, and we revisited all of Jaron's hangouts and saw where we used to live. It was awesome." Petty Officer Franck said having his dad aboard is great for many reasons. One of them is support.

 

"He provides a great support system to say the least," he said. "But, it's not like I get special treatment. A lot of people on board think just because my dad is a chief, I can get away with anything, but it's really the opposite. I have eyes watching me. It's like having your parent as your teacher in high school. He gets reports on what I am doing."

Chief Franck said he hears nothing but good things. "He stays on the straight and narrow," he said. "He gets poked fun of a bit, and I do hear about what he's doing, but I don't interfere with him and his department. His chief runs the show, and I'm not going pull any punches."

This deployment was Petty Officer Franck's first, and he said it has given him a new perspective. "Growing up, my dad was gone a lot, and when he was gone, he was just gone," he said. "Now I understand the stress and stuff he was going through. I have a much better understanding, and it's cool to see what he did and what he's still doing." For Chief Franck, it was his 10th deployment. He said he is proud his son joined the Navy.

"The Navy will help him grow and become more independent," he said. "I'm also glad that he gets to see what I do -- and I get to keep an eye on him." While on board, Petty Officer Franck earned his Enlisted Surface Warfare qualification pin. His father was able to do the honors of pinning him Sept. 30.

"I know how much work goes into getting your pin," Chief Franck said. "It was an honor to be able to be the one to pin him, and I am so grateful to combat systems for allowing me to do so. Now, I have to get requalified, and he's going to help me."

The Francks also intend to go up for their Enlisted Aviation Specialist Warfare qualification pin together. Chief Franck will be aboard Lincoln until 2010, while his son, Petty Officer Franck will be aboard until 2011. The Francks both agreed their homecoming in Everett, Wash., was a good one.

"My wife and my daughter were back at home without us," Chief Franck said. "It's nice to be back doing all the things men do around the house again"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS081027-06 - Release Date: 10/27/2008 10:33:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arianne Anderson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40453

 

Lincoln Honored for Retention Record

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) achieved a milestone by making the Navy's Retention Honor Roll fourth quarter fiscal year and received the Retention Excellence Award on 19 November 2008 for the first time in five years.

Commands must have 48 percent or more of their first-term Sailors reenlist to get the award for retention excellence. Last quarter, 61.9 percent of
Lincoln's reenlistments were by first-term Sailors. In the quarter before that, 65.6 percent were first term, said Senior Chief Navy Counselor (AW/SW) Dena Scott, of Littleton, Colo.

"We have a very proactive career development team," Scott said. "They ensure Sailors receive career development boards along with the proper tools and information to make an informed decision about staying Navy."

Commands that receive the retention honor roll for the quarter are allowed to fly the honor roll pennant for the next quarter; those that receive retention excellence may fly the pennant for a year and can paint their anchors gold.

Incentives for Sailors, such as educational benefits and selective reenlistment bonuses (SRB), were major contributions to
Lincoln receiving the award.

Depending on the award level for a given rating and Navy enlisted classification (NEC) code, Sailors can receive an SRB from $5,000 to as much as $100,000 for reenlisting.

Lincoln Sailors received nearly $2.5 million this past quarter in combined SRBs. Sailors who reenlisted the quarter before that raked in more than $1.7 million, bringing the grand total to roughly $4.2 million.

Although incentives often make the decision to stay Navy that much easier, some continue to serve simply because they like what they do and the people with whom they work. Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Eric Schmidt,
Lincoln's command master chief, said a command's ability to retain its talented personnel is a direct reflection of morale.

"If morale is high, retention is high. If morale is low, retention is low," Schmidt said. "The fact that this command hadn't earned the recognition several years is an indicator of just how far we have come. Bravo Zulu to the command career counselors for their great work"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS081203-06 - Release Date: 12/3/2008 6:00:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffery Lewis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=41111

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 1 December 2008 for a scheduled workup in the Eastern Pacific, conducting training and Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California upon departure from departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 1 to 3 December 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 4 December 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, for training and Carrier Qualifications on 5 December 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Leatrice Koenig guides a T-45 Goshawk.

 

081210-N-7981E-401- PACIFIC OCEAN (December 10, 2008) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Leatrice Koenig guides a T-45 Goshawk assigned to Carrier Training Wing (CTW) 1 onto the No. 1 steam-powered catapult to be launched from the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln is conducting training and carrier qualifications. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=67343

 

Naval Aviators Conduct First Carrier Landings Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln

 

“For the first time since 2008, USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) flight deck served as a training ground for student pilots flying the Navy's advanced jet training aircraft, the T-45 Goshawk from 10 to 13 December 2008. Student pilots assigned to Carrier Training Wing (CTW) 1 Training Squadrons (VT) 7 and 9, based in Meridian, Miss., and CTW 2 squadrons VT-21 and VT-22, based in Kingsville, Texas, flew aboard Dec. 10 for four days of initial carrier qualifications off the coast of southern California. For these new pilots, the arrested landings and catapult launches they completed aboard Lincoln are the culmination of many months of intense flight training.

"This is the first jet they've flown, and it's their first time on a carrier," said Lt. Cmdr. Mark Schadt, Chief of Naval Air Training's (CNATRA) senior landing signal officer (LSO). "They've spent the last 10 months learning to fly the T-45 and before that they flew T-34s (a propeller driven trainer) for up to 10 months. This is one of the last things they'll have to do before they go to a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) and learn to fly their assigned aircraft."

After the training wing's arrival and early qualification flights Thursday, students gathered in
Lincoln's ready room four to critique their landings with LSOs like Schadt. Many were still visibly excited from their first "traps" and conversations were animated as student pilots reenacted their final seconds before hitting the deck.

"It's a totally surreal experience," said 1st Lt. David Fickle, a prior-enlisted Marine assigned to "Eagles" of VT-7, who completed his first arrested landing aboard
Lincoln Thursday. "I had seen all the videos and documentaries on the military channel, but when you actually get here, it's not like anything you perceived. Coming in, everything on the deck – the planes, the people − looks so much smaller, and then you definitely know it when you catch the wire. It's a huge adrenaline rush."

Fickle said that despite all the practice and instruction students receive flying carrier landing patterns and approaches at their home fields, nothing can fully prepare a pilot for the task of catching a wire on the comparatively tiny deck of a carrier while it's in motion. In the ultra-competitive environment of naval aviation, students who had distinguished themselves flying over land found themselves, quite literally, in the same boat with everyone else.

"You develop a certain pride in competition, and I was in the upper echelon flying "the ball" at the field," said Fickle. "But for me and a lot of others, this was a big punch in the guts. Today I was boltering like crazy, and I don't know if it was from the lens being a lot farther in front of me or seeing all the people and planes parked out there, but it was a very humbling experience."

 

Despite the sweat-drenched, white-knuckle landings, Shadt and Fickle both described launching from a steam-powered catapult for the first time as a more memorable experience. "Most of the students are so focused flying the approach and getting their numbers right that they barely remember the landings, but for the launch they're just kind of along for the ride," said Schadt. "If you've ever been to Magic Mountain at Six Flags in California, they have a Superman ride there. It's a lot like the Superman ride."

The T-45
Goshawk is the U.S. Navy's version of the British Aerospace Hawk. Using the same airframe, it incorporates aspects of the F/A-18's avionics suite and the ability to land on an aircraft carrier to better prepare pilots to fly the Navy's premier fighter aircraft. One pilot who trained aboard Lincoln has experience in both the Hawk and the Goshawk.

Lt. Stephen Collins is an exchange pilot who has flown the Hawk for the British Royal Navy and is now training in the
Goshawk with the "Tigers" of VT-9. Collins and four student pilots from India flew aboard Lincoln to train, as they have for the entire curriculum, alongside their U.S. counterparts. His goal is to qualify to the same standard as U.S. pilots so that he can fly U.S. F/A-18E/F Super Hornets as part of his exchange program.

"The U.S. and the Royal Navy have worked together very closely on the Joint Strike Fighter program," said Collins. "The ultimate aim is for us to get some experience flying a jet with very similar capabilities to that one. It's a good trade, the U.S. gets a pilot out of it and the Royal Navy gets the experience."

 

While student pilots of Carrier Training Wings 1 and 2 worked to overcome their inexperience, for Lincoln's flight deck and air traffic control personnel, the challenge was putting their own experience to work and avoiding complacency.

"For most of the people up there right now, having just completed a 7-month deployment, it's was almost business as usual," said Lt. Cory Pope, a catapult and arresting gear officer and
Lincoln's V-5 Division officer. "We just had to be a little extra cautious and remember that these folks had never done this before. We wanted to keep them safe too"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS081215-02 - Release Date: 12/15/2008 11:25:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, at sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=41423

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Assists in Medevac At Sea

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) assisted in a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) from a Liberian-flagged merchant ship on 13 December 2008, nearly 300 miles off the coast of Southern California.

At approximately 9 p.m.,
Lincoln received word from the U.S. Coast Guard that a cargo ship, Marie Rickmers, issued a distress call of an injured Sailor on board who needed emergency medical attention.

"We were told the [cargo] ship had an injured sailor and was over 600 miles off the coast," said Coast Guard Cmdr. Sean Cross, the helicopter pilot who performed the MEDEVAC.

"We didn't think it would be able to happen because they were just too far away. Then we were told
Lincoln was out there and we'd be able to use the ship." Lincoln was on its transit home to Naval Station Everett, Wash., after completing squadron carrier qualifications off the coast of southern California when the call came in.

Through coordination with
Lincoln, Marie Rickmers and the U.S. Coast Guard, Lincoln was positioned between the San Diego Coast Guard station and the cargo ship to act as a lily pad for the San Diego-based helicopter to refuel and expedite the MEDEVAC of the injured sailor.

"We were told someone was down on the other ship and needed help," said
Lincoln's Senior Medical Officer Cmdr. Benjamin Lee. "We contacted the ship's captain to find out the status of the patient." The Coast Guard helicopter landed on Lincoln's flight deck at about 1:30 a.m. to pick up a doctor and a hospital corpsman and to be refueled before heading to the cargo ship for the rescue.

 

"I was really impressed with Lincoln's crew on the [flight] deck," Cross said. "They had everything tied down and fueled quickly. There were some frustrations at first, with different hand signals and getting everything coordinated, but once everyone got on the phones and were able to talk it all came together quickly."

 

At the cargo ship, the helicopter crew realized there was very little space for them to perform their hoists. "There were a lot of cranes and things on the deck that made dropping the hoists more difficult," Cross said. In all, the helicopter crew performed four total hoists. The rescue swimmer went first, followed by the litter, which held the injured sailor as he was lifted into the helicopter.

 

After the patient was packaged onto the back board and brought up to the deck of the cargo ship, Coast Guard Aviation Survival Technician 3rd Class Robyn Hamilton, the rescue swimmer on the helicopter, attached the back board to the hoist and the injured sailor was brought up into the helicopter where Lincoln's corpsman and doctor took over care.

Hamilton was hoisted back into the helicopter and the crew began their journey back to
Lincoln. After landing on Lincoln's flight deck, Health Services Department took over care of the patient, but had help from many different departments on the ship to get the patient down to main medical.

With the help of
Abe's Weapons Department, the patient transited from the flight deck to main medical through various weapons elevators. "It was great to see all the cooperation with the different departments on the ship," Lee said.

 

"Everyone played a small role in the bigger picture. From Weapons [Department] to the flight deck crew, everyone knew their part." Once with in main medical, Lincoln's doctors and corpsman stabilized the patient and prepared him for the next leg of his journey to shore.

The members of the helicopter crew perform three to four MEDEVACs each month, but never as far from shore as this one. For
Lincoln, MEDEVACs aren't a common occurrence, but aren't a complete rarity.

"We're not specifically designed for this, like [an amphibious ship] but the corpsman are trained for emergency care," said Senior Chief Hospital Corpsman Donald Singleton,
Lincoln's Health Services Department leading chief petty officer.

"It wasn't out of the realm for us," Lee said. "We do patient transports and MEDEVACs with other ships in our strike group. This MEDEVAC went very well. In all levels of involvement and coordination, it went very seamlessly. It was just one example of how the Navy is willing to help out an injured sailor anywhere in the world. We changed our course to help the sailor get the medical treatment he needed. This is a great example of how the Navy isn't afraid to help someone who needs us."

The patient was transported via Coast Guard C-130 cargo plane to a medical facility in San Diego the following afternoon to receive follow-on care as
Lincoln and its crew set sail back toward home” (Ref. Story Number: NNS081218-07 - Release Date: 12/18/2008 12:41:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kat Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=41468

 

An injured merchant sailor from the Liberian cargo ship

 

081214-N-5386R-046 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Dec. 14, 2008) - An injured merchant sailor from the Liberian cargo ship "Marie Rickmers" is loaded onto a Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter after receiving basic medical attention aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). The Sailor was taken to Abraham Lincoln the previous night by a San Diego Coast Guard helicopter and medically stabilized before being flown to San Francisco for treatment. Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training and carrier qualifications. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Robert A. Robbins/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=67455

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was off the coast of Southern California from 5 to 16 December 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 17 December 2008 Everett, Washington on 1 December 2008, concluding a scheduled workup, conducting training and Carrier Qualifications in the Eastern Pacific from 1 to 3 December 2008, arriving Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 4 December 2008 and upon departure the following day, the crew began conducting training. For the first time since 2004, Abraham Lincoln's flight deck served as a training ground for student pilots flying the Navy's advanced jet training aircraft, the T-45 Goshawk from 10 to 13 December 2008. Student pilots assigned to Carrier Training Wing (CTW) 1 Training Squadrons (VT) 7 and 9, based in Meridian, Miss., and CTW 2 squadrons VT-21 and VT-22, based in Kingsville, Texas, flew aboard Dec. 10 for four days of initial carrier qualifications off the coast of southern California. For these new pilots, the arrested landings and catapult launches they completed aboard Lincoln are the culmination of many months of intense flight training. "This is the first jet they've flown, and it's their first time on a carrier," said Lt. Cmdr. Mark Schadt, Chief of Naval Air Training's (CNATRA) senior landing signal officer (LSO). "They've spent the last 10 months learning to fly the T-45 and before that they flew T-34s (a propeller driven trainer) for up to 10 months. This is one of the last things they'll have to do before they go to a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) and learn to fly their assigned aircraft." Abraham Lincoln assisted in a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) from a Liberian-flagged merchant ship on 13 December 2008, nearly 300 miles off the coast of Southern California and was off the coast of Southern California conducting training and carrier qualifications from 5 to 16 December 2008 (1 to 17 December 2008)” (Ref. 76, Story Number: NNS081215-02 - Release Date: 12/15/2008 11:25:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, at sea (NNS) & Story Number: NNS081218-07 - Release Date: 12/18/2008 12:41:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kat Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=41423

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=41468

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2009 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

“The Navy announced that it would reassign Abraham Lincoln Security Division from the Weapons Department to the Operations Department prior to October 2005. The ship proactively accomplished this move by August 2005, which thrust the division into a new environment. Abraham Lincoln rendesignated her Ship Self Defense Force the Naval Security Force, and utilized ship’s company to augment the force. She thus established the Integrated Security Force; each department on board supported a team of 102 sailors who melded into the Security Division to protect the ship while she visited ports. This involved extensive training regimens for crewmembers that included tactical team movements and basic law enforcement procedures” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Creates New Intel Department

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) became the fifth out of 10 aircraft carriers to add the Intelligence Department (INTEL) to her roster of departments on 1 January 2009.

What once was the
OS and OZ Divisions of the Operations Department are now the divisions that make up INTEL on the ship. The 43 Sailors who make up the department are from the intelligence specialist (IS), and cryptological technician (CTT, CTM, CTR) ratings. "There are so many cryptologic and intelligence challenges on the horizon," said Ensign Nicholas Bleeker, a Philadelphia native and the ship's OZ Division officer. "Having an intelligence department increases the capabilities for providing information to the commanding officer, and enhances mission success."

INTEL operates out of two primary spaces on board
Lincoln. CTs make up the OS division and work out of the ship's signals exploitation space, and ISs make up the OZ Division and work out of the carrier intelligence center (CVIC). The CTs in SSES specialize in electronic warfare. They prosecute radars and search for signals of interest in whatever area Lincoln is operating in. They analyze intelligence and put it together in a package to give a clear explanation of what is going on in the area. "We are the electronic warfare coordinators for the entire strike group," said Lt. Brad Abramowitz, a Spring, Texas, native and the ship's OS Division officer. "We search for signals of interest as tasked by national agencies and the Department of Defense." CVIC provides indication and warning intelligence. "We provide support to the air wing to aid with locating and nominating targets," said Bleeker. "We work with the pilots to provide all the intelligence necessary before they leave the flight deck toward a target."

Each division will keep the same responsibilities they carried in the
Operations Department, but becoming their own department allows for faster and more thorough processing of gathered information, said Abramowitz. With the addition of the Intelligence Department, Lincoln is reinforcing the chief of naval operations' commitment to restore naval intelligence to a position of prominence. The addition of the department elevates information operations as a core warfighting capability of the U.S. Navy” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090128-02 - Release Date: 1/28/2009 5:54:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Dennis Irwin, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) – Article released late, in port at the time).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42148

 

Abe's Leaders Pleased by Shipyard Efforts

 

“Leaders from commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) in Bremerton, Wash. on 10 January 2009.

Rear Adm. Scott Swift, CCSG 9,
Lincoln's Commanding Officer Capt. Patrick Hall, Executive Officer Capt. Jeffery Ruth and Command Master Chief Eric Schmidt toured the amenities at PSNS and Naval Base Kitsap Bremerton (NBKB). Lincoln's leaders traveled to the shipyard to ensure the working and living facilities in Bremerton were up to standards in order for the crew to have the proper equipment and adequate working environment. During the visit, Lincoln's leaders toured NBKB's newly renovated bachelor's quarters and the recently renovated base gym.

For
Lincoln's 2009 stay in Bremerton, both the shipyard and NBKB have made numerous upgrades in preparation for the ship's arrival. In addition to the upgrades to the base, the shipyard is providing the use of two berthing barges. During Lincoln's previous stay in the yards, only one barge was used, making living conditions cramped.

Hall said Sailors' quality of life and communication are very important to mission readiness. Leadership will keep the crew informed of the ship's schedule in advance so Sailors can plan their work schedules, commutes and time with family. The changes to PSNS and NBKB will make the transition from
Lincoln's homeport of Naval Base Everett to NBKB smoother for all hands.

"There has been exceptional coordination between the commanding officer of Bremerton and the commanding officer of Everett," said Hall. "The Bremerton leadership has looked into how things work in Everett and they will try to mirror them at their base." In order to prepare for the transition,
Abe Sailors need to maximize the two month time period in Everett before the trip across the sound.

 

The work accomplished in Everett will shape the ship's success in the shipyard, according to Hall. Sailors who completed the 2008 deployment need to mentor the new crew members and show them how things are done, the right way, on board Lincoln, added Hall.

"We ended deployment on a high note. New crew members need to carry on the tradition of success we built while on deployment," Hall said. "We want to get everything done the right way and in a timely manner to keep us on track to finish our shipyard work to keep us on schedule for work ups"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS090129-04 - Release Date: 1/29/2009 1:58:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kat Corona, Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)) – Article released late, in port at the time).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42145

 

Lincoln Tests New Environment-friendly Flight Deck Agent

 

Initial testing for the Mobile Cleaning Reclaim Recycle System (MCRRS) vehicle developed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), was held on the flight deck of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 10 January 2009.

Lincoln recently became the test bed for a new environmentally safe method for cleaning the ship's non-skid coating on the flight deck. It took teamwork to bring this project to its testing stage. The team consisted of numerous naval commands such as the Naval Surface Warfare Center and civilian groups such as the Mid-Atlantic Maintenance Center.

"There are currently only two methods of cleaning non-skid coating on aircraft capable ships," said Tracy J. Harasti, an environmental protection specialist and contract manager for the ONR. One method of cleaning the coating on aircraft capable ships is Sailors manually using a broom and soap to scrub the deck, which limits where the scrubbing can take place. The other method uses a mechanical device on board, uses agents that restrict its usefulness. The MCRRS doesn't use any chemicals or brush technology and recycles the water. The water is then reused and discharged into an environmentally friendly discharge system. Another feature of the MCRRS is the user-friendly functionality of the equipment. Virtually any Sailor can be trained to operate the machinery in less than eight hours and be certified to clean within 16 hours. "We're bringing a benefit to the Navy that will allow the Navy to conduct missions more safely and be environmentally friendly at the same time," said Harasti. "The MCRRS is a revolutionary piece of equipment for cleaning non-skid coating on aircraft capable naval ships."

The ship can have the decking cleaned while in port which helps mission requirements significantly. The MCRRS improves the co-efficient of friction, which is the stickiness of the flight deck for aircraft landings and movement of aircraft on the deck. After flight operations on aircraft carriers, the deck gets slippery and worn down. Through a normal deployment, this degradation causes hazards for aircraft as well as personnel. The MCRRS looks to cut this down. "Having [the MCRRS] on board will help us reduce and mitigate mishaps, and at the same time maintain a good, environmentally-safe atmosphere," said Lt. Clinton Stonewall,
Lincoln's aircraft and maintenance officer” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090129-07 - Release Date: 1/29/2009 2:23:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Colby K. Neal, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)) – Article released late, in port at the time).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42174

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 15 January 2009, for a scheduled workup off the coast of Southern California, underway in the Eastern Pacific” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a scheduled workup off the coast of Southern California, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 15 to 19 January 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 20 January 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 27 January 2009, visiting from 20 to 26 January 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln Sailors Improve Fall Fitness Scores

 

As reported on 29 January 2009, “USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) of fall 2008 results has been calculated and the result is a 50 percent reduction in PFA failures. "Lincoln cut PFA failures by 50 percent from 120 failures last cycle, and the progress over the previous cycle by Lincoln Sailors has been tremendous," said Operations Specialist 1st Class Sandra Lebron, an El Paso, Texas, native and a command fitness leader (CFL). One major factor that contributed to the score improvement was the Commanding Officer Capt. Patrick Hall's emphasis on personal well-being by incorporating programs such as "Wildly Important Goals" (WIGs), which included a shipwide push to improve one full PFA category over the last test.

The crew took great strides to improve their fitness and PFA scores. Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Adam Hernandez, also of El Paso, Texas, and a CFL, said being on deployment helped, but the WIGs were brilliant because it showed the captain is concerned about the wellness of the crew.
Lincoln had just returned home from deployment prior to the testing. Despite the long work hours while on deployment the crew still found time to attend many of the high-cardio aerobic classes offered, such as kickboxing and spin classes, which helped to improve the crew's test scores. Hernandez said the real test of maintaining the higher level of physical activity will come when the ship goes to the shipyard in Bremerton, Wash., in the late spring of 2009 and a lot of these types of classes won't be available on board.

However, Bremerton's newly renovated gym will help Abe Sailors remain fit as long as they stay motivated. Lebron said the next PFA is right around the corner and Sailors should have already starting taking steps to prepare. Weigh-ins are set to begin in April with PFA testing to follow during the first week of May. "There is no time to relax with exercising because we are already getting right back into it," said Lebron” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS090129-01 - Release Date: 1/29/2009 5:54:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Colby Neal, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42144

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Embarks Dozens of Local Leaders

 

“Five groups of distinguished visitors including congressional aides and the mayors of Everett and Marysville, Wash., experienced life aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 28 January to 3 February 2009 during her recent underway period off the coast of Southern California.

Lincoln's guests observed routine flight operations – both during the day and at night – and interacted with Lincoln's crew. Such interaction was especially meaningful for Mayor Ray Stephanson of Everett, where Lincoln is homeported. "These Sailors are our neighbors and friends," said Stephanson. "They live in our community, go to our churches and schools, attend sporting events. It's great to see them here, in their own environment, and doing their jobs so well."

Stephanson was joined on his Feb. 2-3 visit by Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Michael Schanche, Naval Station Everett's command master chief. Both watched from the flight deck as F/A-18s and E-2Cs from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 were launched and recovered by
Lincoln.

"I came out here for two reasons – to see this incredible ship, and to talk to these Sailors in their work environment. They're all incredibly talented," said Schanche. "Seeing the way these young men and women do their jobs heartens me for the future of the Navy when I retire." Another Puget Sound-area mayor, Dennis Kendall of Marysville, Wash., toured
Lincoln with his wife from 31 January to 1 February 2009. The Kendalls were part of a group led by retired Rear Adm. J.J. Quinn, who commanded Lincoln from 1998 to 2000.

Other notable visitors to
Lincoln during the past week included three aides from the offices of U.S. Reps. John Murtha and Maurice Hinchey; a group of wives and husbands of prospective squadron commanding officers and executive officers; and Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps midshipmen from the University of Southern California. All visitors met with Rear Adm. Scott Swift, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, as well as Lincoln Commanding Officer Capt. Patrick Hall and Executive Officer Capt. Jeffrey Ruth.

"I'm very impressed with the professionalism of the Sailors here, especially the quality of the job they do," Stephanson said. "Obviously, what they do here is dangerous work, but they make it look easy." Visitors will have another opportunity to experience life aboard
Lincoln during a Family Day Cruise slated for April 16” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090212-02 - Release Date: 2/12/2009 6:18:00 AM - By Lt. Ed Early, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42539

 

Sailors participate in Command Fitness Leader Training at Naval Station Everett.

 

090205-N-5324I-001 - EVERETT, Wash. (Feb. 5, 2009) - Sailors participate in Command Fitness Leader Training at Naval Station Everett. The course covers everything from exercise physiology and nutrition to Navy Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) instruction and policies. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Irwin/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=68712

 

DESRON 9 NSFS Certified, Ready to Support Maritime Strategy

 

“Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, completed Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) recertification on 5 February 2009, off the coast of San Clemente Island. Having re-attained this certification allows the destroyers USS Shoup (DDG 86) and USS Momsen (DDG 92) to support the nation's maritime strategy by coming to the aid of forces ashore under enemy fire.

NSFS is an exercise in which destroyers and cruisers train to fire deck guns ashore in support of ground troops.

"This exercise is an important test of a ship's firing capabilities," said Lt. Lawrence Repass, a Chicago native and prospective training and readiness officer for DESRON 9. "There is a slim margin of error involved with firing over the heads of friendly forces and the point of this is to ensure ships can hit their targets without endangering civilians or our troops."

According to Repass, the exercise began in January when the Expeditionary Warfare Training Group Pacific (EWTGPAC) visited
Shoup and Momsen. EWTGPAC monitored the skills of the ships' firing teams, ensuring that they were ready for the test at sea.

The live test was a scenario-based exercise in which
Shoup and Momsen fired their five-inch, 62-caliber guns at practice targets. The destroyers were presented with the challenge of having to use indirect fire to shoot at targets that may not even be visible from the ship. Momsen and Shoup fired approximately 45 rounds each Feb. 3 and Feb. 5, respectively.

In order to hit targets at great distances with shells, the ships relied on the report of a ground-based observer. The observer radioed the coordinates of the enemy to the ship which then used a global grid system to aim its cannons and eliminate the threat.

"We have accomplished our mission in total; it has been a grand success," said Repass. "In reality, everyone is involved in this. It takes a big team effort to make this exercise happen."

The completion of NSFS was a major step forward for DESRON 9 in accomplishing their
Sustainment Exercise (SUSTAINEX). "The overall purpose of the SUSTAINEX is to ensure that the ships of DESRON 9 are major combat ready," said Repass. "They always have been, and always will be ready for action"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090212-01 - Release Date: 2/12/2009 6:16:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Gallagher, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). 

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42536

 

Air Traffic Controller 3rd Class Ayanna Hodge, from St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, leads a choreographed dance skit in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

090206-N-2937R-169 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 6, 2009) - Air Traffic Controller 3rd Class Ayanna Hodge, from St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, leads a choreographed dance skit in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during an African American Heritage Month celebration. Lincoln is underway on a scheduled work-up conducting training and carrier qualifications. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Adam Randolph/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=68649

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 6 February 2009, concluding operations that supported Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) recertification on 5 February 2009, off the coast of San Clemente Island. Having re-attained this certification allows the destroyers USS Shoup (DDG 86) and USS Momsen (DDG 92) to support the nation's maritime strategy by coming to the aid of forces ashore under enemy fire” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090212-01 - Release Date: 2/12/2009 6:16:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Gallagher, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42536

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 9 February 2009, visiting from 6 to 8 February 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 9 to 10 February 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 11 February 2009, conducting a scheduled workup off the coast of Southern California, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 15 to 19 January 2009, pulling in for a port call at NASNI on 27 January 2009, visiting from 20 to 26 January 2009. Five groups of distinguished visitors including congressional aides and the mayors of Everett and Marysville, Wash., experienced life aboard Lincoln from 28 January to 3 February 2009 during her recent underway period off the coast of Southern California. Lincoln's guests observed routine flight operations – both during the day and at night – and interacted with Lincoln's crew. As reported on 29 January 2009, Lincoln's Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) of fall 2008 results have been calculated and the result is a 50 percent reduction in PFA failures. "Lincoln cut PFA failures by 50 percent from 120 failures last cycle, and the progress over the previous cycle by Lincoln Sailors has been tremendous," said Operations Specialist 1st Class Sandra Lebron, an El Paso, Texas, native and a command fitness leader (CFL). Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 6 February 2009, concluding operations that supported Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) recertification on 5 February 2009, off the coast of San Clemente Island. Having re-attained this certification allows the destroyers USS Shoup (DDG 86) and USS Momsen (DDG 92) to support the nation's maritime strategy by coming to the aid of forces ashore under enemy fire. Abraham Lincoln departed NASNI on 9 February 2009, visiting from 6 to 8 February 2009. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 9 to 10 February 2009 (15 January to 11 February 2009)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090129-01 - Release Date: 1/29/2009 5:54:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Colby Neal, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS090212-02 - Release Date: 2/12/2009 6:18:00 AM - By Lt. Ed Early, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS) & Story Number: NNS090212-01 - Release Date: 2/12/2009 6:16:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Gallagher, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42539 / http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42144

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42536

 

Lincoln Receives Ney Memorial Award

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) received the 2009 Edward F. Ney Memorial Award for outstanding food service for the category of aircraft carriers on 20 February 2009. "It gives us a great deal of pride to say that we were the best and it gives us bragging rights," said Culinary Specialist 1st Class Clinton B. Berke, of Alberta, Canada.

Lincoln underwent an inspection by Ney officials last November to become a finalist for the Carrier class award category. Officials visited various locations aboard Lincoln owned by the food services division to evaluate the efficiency, management and budgeting skills, safety and accuracy of Lincoln's food services.

"We think we were noticed because of our teamwork and customer service," said Chief Warrant Officer Michael A. Hill of Johnson City, Tenn., the food service officer. "Our crew has great morale." Hill showcased the command atmosphere to the Ney inspectors and how well the command supports the food service goals. The inspection team commented on
Lincoln's immaculate spaces. The team also noted had the highest inventory validity in the fleet.

This year marks the 51st anniversary of the prestigious award. The program is named after Capt. Edward Francis Ney, a World War I enlisted member of the Navy who was later appointed as a supply officer.

His work in resolving difficulties within the military's food service industry during World War II contributed to a higher standard of rationing in the Navy. That higher standard and increased morale is what the Ney Award program tries to signify on a yearly basis.

"It gives the junior Sailors some accreditation and something to put on a resume for culinary schools if they choose to go that route," said Berke.
Lincoln's culinary staff will be recognized during the Joint Military and International Food Service Executives Association (IFSEA) conference April 4, in Atlanta. Rear Adm. Mike Lyden, commander, Naval Supply Systems Command, will present the award during the IFSEA Ceremony that evening.

The last time
Lincoln was awarded the Ney was April 13, 2003 when the ship won two consecutive years. Knowing the difficulty of winning the award, Lincoln's crew understands the privilege of being recognized. "Most definitely it was our teamwork," said Berke. "Not one person outshined anyone, it was all about our planning and preparation that was key to helping us get the recognition"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090313-23 - Release Date: 3/13/2009 7:23:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Colby Neal - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43435

 

Abraham Lincoln's AIMD Nominated For Phoenix Award

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was nominated for the Secretary of Defense Maintenance (Phoenix) Award on 20 February 2009 by the commander of Naval Air Forces for its maintenance accomplishments. Vice Adm. Tom Kilcline Jr., Commander, Naval Air Forces nominated Lincoln.

Competing against aircraft carrier finalists
USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) in the category of large command, Lincoln will be judged in several criteria including effective use of maintenance resources, innovative management accomplishment, personal quality-of-life programs and mission accomplishment.


"The award proves to the Navy and the rest of the Department of Defense that
Lincoln consistently completes outstanding maintenance," said Lt. Cmdr. Dan Olvera, Lincoln's aviation maintenance officer. "It's a team effort across the board to win this award," added Olvera, a New Plymouth, Idaho, native. Lincoln has a history of prior maintenance excellence, having won this award in 2004.

"The men and women of
Abraham Lincoln maintained and operated one of the most complex integrated weapon systems ever designed with tremendous skill and success," said Kilcline. "Their demonstrated ability to excel in the most demanding operational circumstances makes them clearly deserving of this prestigious award."

Award categories include small, medium and large commands with two commands in each category able to win the award.  "I think we stand a very good chance of winning because of how well we have done from
Dry-Dock Planned Incremental Activity (DPIA) to the end of cruise," said Olvera. Kilcline was highly impressed with Lincoln's maintenance efforts as well, giving his full recommendation as the commander in charge of fleet air forces.

"Effective use of financial, maintenance and personal resources, combined with a total integrated team approach shaped
Abraham Lincoln into a lethal and highly efficient weapon system," said Kilcline. "The overwhelming operational success achieved by this ship is testimony to the professionalism and skill of its crew."

According to Olvera, the award winner is expected to be announced in July” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS090313-26 - Release Date: 3/13/2009 7:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Gallagher, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43438

 

Habitat For Humanity, Abe Help Seattle-area Locals

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) volunteered on 7 March 2009 to take part in a Habitat for Humanity program, offered through the Fleet and Family Support Liberty Program. Sailors were transported to the South King County area where they took part in an experimental Habitat for Humanity program still in the trial phases.

 

This experimental program takes volunteers into older neighborhoods in disrepair and actually rebuilds existing houses rather than build from the ground up like other Habitat programs, according to Mike Taggart, site supervisor for Habitat for Humanity. "A lot of these neighborhoods were pretty bad with crime so first the police came in and cleaned them up. Then we come in," said Taggart. "One thing I noticed was the attitude changed. Before, people were not very neighborly, but now people talk to neighbors they might not have talked to before. I think it's changed the attitude of the people living here.

 

It's become like a real neighborhood. Sailors were rewarded with praise from the Habitat crew and fellow civilian volunteers for their effort. "We were looking forward to the Sailors because we had a lot of back-breaking work today. I knew it would probably be a bunch of young, tough Sailors," said Taggart. Most of the day consisted of dedicated crews repairing the roof by tearing off worn shingles and patching holes and leveling the backyard with fresh dirt. Another crew spent the day jackhammering concrete near the house and taking the concrete fragments to a nearby dumping site. "We couldn't have done it without them.

 

I really can't see myself with a jackhammer. They can come back anytime. We can use the help," said Casey Rountree, a member of AmeriCorps and one of the quality control supervisors for the day's project. "I volunteered purely to see the faces and how grateful they are for the end product. I do it for the smiles on their faces," said Chief Master-at-Arms (SW/AW) Michael L. Mathis, Lincoln's Security division leading chief petty officer, who is orignially from Dededo, Guam. "They will walk away having learned something new about remodeling or building a home.

 

You know that you'll use that information again sometime in your life. Also a kind of camaraderie forms. You may meet new people and maybe even build a long lasting friendship," said Taggart. Aviation Support Equipment Technician 1st Class (AW) Alfonso Navos, a native of Daly City, Calif., and a member of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation office aboard Lincoln said he learned an important lesson and didn't have to travel far to volunteer. "We are right next to my house and, really, I wanted to help out and learn something. Guess what, I learned how to build a roof without falling off of it," said Navos.


"We really want to get the word out to people. We are here for them and if there are any volunteer opportunities or activities they want us to provide, they can contact us," said Marijo Umlor, Fleet and Family Support Liberty and Deployed Forces program manager for Naval Station Everett. "Sailors go out and help the community. In exchange they get recognition for volunteer hours. It's a win-win situation for everybody"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS090313-16 - Release Date: 3/13/2009 5:22:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kirk T. Putnam, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43439

 

Abe Sailor Named Radiation Health Technician of the Year

As reported on 13 March 2009, “a Sailor from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was recognized with the Navy's 2008 Radiation Health Technician of the Year Award. Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Sherriel Johnson, of Aiken, S.C., received the award the first week of February for her outstanding performance as a radiation health technician. "I was really surprised." Johnson said. "I was called to the front of quarters by the radiation health officer and he announced I was the winner." Johnson competed against all other nominated radiation health technicians in the Navy.

"I was excited." Johnson said. "I didn't think I would get it because there were so many people with so many more years of experience." Radiation health technicians deal primarily with nuclear-trained personnel. They handle anything from screenings and physical exams to processing Thermo-Luminescent Dosimeter (TLD) paperwork.

"She really cares about doing her best all the time. People don't have any idea of how hard it is to be a radiation health technician. We have really strict guidelines to go by, and we are always being audited by organizations outside of the command, said Lt. Barry Cooper, Lincoln's radiation health officer. According to Johnson, most radiation health technicians spend most of their time at hospitals, but she is one of the few radiation technicians with sea time.

 

Of all the finalists, she was one of two with an enlisted surface warfare specialist pin. "I feel really good. I didn't know that our job was even rewarded like that," said Johnson. "Radiation health techs are overlooked a lot because our job is mostly administrative, but I feel really good about it." Johnson explained the course to becoming a radiation health technician is challenging.

"Radiation Health School is pretty tough. You have to do a lot of physics and a lot of trigonometry. You really have to want it," Johnson said” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS090313-09 - Release Date: 3/13/2009 3:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Aaron Hubner, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43437

 

Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Ryan Allshouse uses the intrusion detection system to monitor unclassified network activity from the automated data processing workspace.

 

090310-D-5972N-009 - SAN DIEGO, Calif. (March 10, 2009) - Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Ryan Allshouse uses the intrusion detection system to monitor unclassified network activity from the automated data processing workspace aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76). IDS is part of the integrated shipboard network system and serves as an important computer network defense enabler protecting the unclassified shipboard network from cyber attack. (U.S. Navy photo by Rick Naystatt/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=69987

 

CCSG9 hosts Prosperity Partnership Military Cluster

 

“Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 hosted a Prosperity Partner Military Cluster tour on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 13 March 2009.

The Prosperity Partnership Military Cluster is part of the Puget Sound Regional Council, which consists of local business, civic, and government leaders learning about different industries, including the military.

Rear Adm. James Symonds, Commander, Navy Region Northwest, co-chairman for the Military Cluster, led the tour, along with Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson, and other regional leaders.

Once on board
Lincoln, they were greeted by Rear Adm. Scott Swift, CCSG 9, who explained the importance of maintaining a strong Navy. "USS Abraham Lincoln is an icon of global stability." said Swift. "The Navy's Maritime Strategy is about security, stability and sea power. Eighty percent of the world lives on or near the coastline and 90 percent of our commerce sails across it. Any disruption in that chain caused by instability has a direct impact on American quality of life."

Swift, however, explained that Sailors, not equipment or technology, are what creates "the magic" once these ships deploy. "Don't be enamored by the technology you see here today," Swift said. "While the technology can seem overwhelming, the power is not this ship or Strike Group 9, it's the 8,000 Sailors who work and operate within these ships who make the magic happen."

The visit was part of a Commander, Navy Region Northwest business leader tour. The group also toured Naval Station Everett and Naval Base Kitsap, all in one day.

During the visit on board
Lincoln, Stephenson thanked Swift for the job he and his Strike Group Sailors are doing.

"Everything you have done and are doing is very much appreciated," Stephanson said. "I'm impressed with the diversity and mission capabilities of this Strike Group."

Lincoln is currently in a maintenance availability status while in port Everett, preparing for its Planned Incremental Availability at Naval Base Kitsap beginning in April” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090319-16 - Release Date: 3/19/2009 2:13:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).  http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43579

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 30 March 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

On Short Notice, Shoup Fires for Effect

 

“USS Shoup (DDG-86) completed a Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) exercise while conducting operations off the coast of Southern California on 30 March 2010.

A key component of the nation's Maritime Strategy, fire support includes the ability for the Navy's destroyers and cruisers to provide supporting fire from the sea to protect Marines operating on the shore. NSFS is often the Navy's key advantage in counter-piracy and drug interdiction operations.

Shoup Sailors received weapons training from the Expeditionary Warfare Training Group Pacific in February, after which the ship was scheduled for a range shoot to put their newly acquired skills to the test. The shoot was cancelled due to poor weather conditions.

Then, while underway conducting other operations, the ship received notice from the San Clemente Island range operators that there was an unexpected opening on the range that day. The ship was able to move quickly and take advantage of the opening and successfully completed several challenging scenarios.

"On two hours notice, we came to 25 knots and arrived to put ordnance on target, on time. It validated our ability to support troops ashore under real-world conditions," said Lt. Paul Willis,
Shoup's weapons officer.

Effective NSFS requires a high degree of coordination. The pilothouse and Combat Information Center (CIC) must work together to position and prepare the ship to fire. CIC receives inputs from spotters on the ground, using the information to fire with precision.

"It's all about timing, so you need a good team," said Ensign Philip Ibbitson, the ship's ordnance officer. "Sailors with a wide spectrum of jobs, from gunner's mates to fire controlmen and operations specialists, must work together to quickly and accurately put rounds downrange."

Gunner's Mate 1st Class Jonathan Eddy was glad to be able to put his skills to use, "It's exciting to finally get to shoot," he said. "We can move on to our next task knowing we've successfully completed this one."

Shoup is homeported in Everett, Wash., as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100405-15 - Release Date: 4/5/2010 7:04:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Shoup Public Affairs, CORONADA, Calif. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52424

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 30 March to 1 April 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 2 April 2009” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 3 April 2009, visiting on the 2nd” (Ref. 76).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 4 April 2009, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 30 March to 1 April 2009, pulling in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 2 April 2009, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 30 March to 1 April 2009 during which time USS Shoup (DDG-86) completed a Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) exercise while conducting operations off the coast of Southern California on 30 March 2010. A key component of the nation's Maritime Strategy, fire support includes the ability for the Navy's destroyers and cruisers to provide supporting fire from the sea to protect Marines operating on the shore. NSFS is often the Navy's key advantage in counter-piracy and drug interdiction operations. Abraham Lincoln departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 3 April 2009, visiting on the 2nd (30 March to 4 April 2009)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100405-15 - Release Date: 4/5/2010 7:04:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Shoup Public Affairs, CORONADA, Calif. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52424

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 6 April 2009, to off-load ordnance in the Eastern Pacific, in preparation for a scheduled Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) off-loaded ordnance in the Eastern Pacific from 6 to 9 April 2009, in preparation for a scheduled Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 10 April 2009, off-loading ordnance in the Eastern Pacific from 6 to 9 April 2009, in preparation for a scheduled Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington (6 to 10 April 2009)” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2008 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XXIII

Appendix I

 

 

1. Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2008” (Ref. 378A):

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 2008 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President George Walker Bush, 2001 -2009 - 43rd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Donald H. Rumsfeld
20 Jan 2001 - 18 Dec 2006 -
13th & 21st

The Honorable Robert M. Gates 
18 Dec 2006 - 1 Jul 2011 - 22nd

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Donald C. Winter - 74th

3 Jan 2006 - 13 May 2009

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Michael Mullen - 28th

22 Jul 2005 - 29 Sep 2007

ADM Gary R. Roughead - 29th

29 Sep 2007 - 23 Sep 2011

COMPACFLT, former *CINCPACFLT

ADM Robert F. Willard - 58th

8 May 2007 - 25 Sep 2009

ADM Patrick M. Walsh - 59th

25 Sep 2009 - 20 Jan 2012

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM James M. Zortman - 29th

Aug 2002 - Aug 2004

Carrier Strike Group 9

RDML Scott Van Buskirk

26 Mar 2007 - 9 Oct 2008 /

RDML Scott Swift

9 Oct 2008 - 29 Jan 2001

 

*Between 1907 and December 6, 1922, and between February 1, 1941 and October 24, 2002.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CINCPACFLT

 

CCSG-9 Holds Change of Command

 

“Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 held a change of command ceremony on 9 October 2008 aboard Abraham Lincoln moored at Naval Air Station North Island. Rear Adm. Scott Swift relieved Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. Van Buskirk served as CCSG-9 since March 26, 2007. Under his leadership, the strike group completed a Western Pacific deployment and Navywide standardization in counter-targeting, missile defense and network defense tactical doctrine” (Ref. Story Number: NNS081010-14 - Release Date: 10/10/2008 12:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Ahron Arendes, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - NORTH ISLAND, Calif. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40257

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2008 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT Patrick D. Hall

Executive Officer - XO

Cmdr. Timothy Kuehhas

Administrative Officer

 

Administrative Officer

 

Air Officer

 

AIMD Officer

Staff: Lt. Cmdr. Robert Gustafson

Combat Systems Officer

 

Religious Department - RMD - Command Chaplain

 

Legal Department - Command Judge Advocate

Lt. Cmdr. David C. Peck

Dental Officer

 

Engineering Officer

Cmdr. Bradford P. Bittle. Staff: Lt. Cmdr. David C. Grattan, the engineering training coordinator; Lt. Cmdr. Gilbert Lara, damage control assistant

Deck - First Lieutenant

 

Communications Officer

 

Maintenance Officer

 

Senior Medical Officer

 

Navigator

 

Operations Officer

 

Public Affairs - PAO

 

Reactor Officer

 

Safety Officer

 

Supply Officer

 

Training Officer

 

Weapons Officer

 

 

Organizational Structure. During calendar year 2008, Captain Patrick D. Hall served as Commanding Officer.

 

“Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 held an airborne change of command ceremony on 6 October 2008. In a display of aerial power and maneuverability, Capt. John C. Aquilino, of Huntington, N.Y., handed over the reins of CVW 2, to Capt. Alton Ross, of Baton Rouge, La.. Aquilino, flying an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the "Kestrels" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137, passed command of CVW 2 to Ross, flying in an F/A-18C Hornet from the "Blue Blasters" of VFA-34, while performing a fly-by of the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, operating in the Pacific Ocean. Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9, officiated the ceremony from an F/A-18F Super Hornet from the "Bounty Hunters" of VFA-2” (Ref. Story Number: NNS081009-12 - Release Date: 10/9/2008 5:46:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James Bournes, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40211

 

The following accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 2008:

 

Abraham Lincoln conducted Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California from 23 January to 1 February 2008 and then steamed to her home port of Naval Station, Everett, Washington” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

Abraham Lincoln conducted her ninth “Westpac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, on her ninth Indian Ocean deployment during which time ships and aircraft from Carrier Strike Group 9 and the Republic of Singapore Navy will conduct a Passing Exercise (PASSEX) while underway near Singapore, her 1st Gulf of Oman deployment in support of Exercise Khunjar Haad, consisting of air defense, surface, visit, board, search and seizure and joint gunnery exercises, which focused on joint interoperability training and proficiency, a four-day multinational exercise, on her seventh Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment (two cruises to the area during deployment), where she will relieve USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) operating in the Persian Gulf in support of her 2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea and 2nd Maritime Security Operations (MSO), supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States' commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity, on her second North Arbian Sea in support of her  2nd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001(13 March to 12 October 2008)” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377, 378A & Story Number: NNS081015-01 - Release Date: 10/15/2008 12:12:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brandon C. Wilson and Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40332

 

“During the deployment, the air wing flew more than 10,000 sorties and worked more than 28,000 flight hours while under Aquilino. The air wing also conducted more than 7,900 traps, or landings, aboard Lincoln. Ross is the 41st commander of CVW-2, which is composed of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 47 and Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 2, Carrier Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30, Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116, Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131, VFA-151, VFA-34, VFA-2 and VFA-137” (Ref. 378A & Story Number: NNS081009-12 - Release Date: 10/9/2008 5:46:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James Bournes, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40211

 

“During its deployment, Abraham Lincoln worked alongside coalition partners in the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. While supporting OEF and OIF from the Persian Gulf and North Arabian Sea, Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 flew approximately 7,100 sorties -- including 2,307 combat sorties, providing more than 22,000 flight hours -- and dropped 255,963 pounds of ordnance supporting coalition ground forces. During this time, CVW-2 flew more than 3,600 sorties and worked more than 10,000 flight hours for OIF. For OEF, they flew more than 3,500 sorties and worked over 11,000 flight hours. "Getting everybody back safely after such a strenuous mission half way around the world is a great accomplishment," said Cmdr. Terrance Hoeft, commanding officer of HS-2. "All of our hard work had led up to this moment, and it really puts everything into perspective"” (Ref. 378A & Story Number: NNS081015-01 - Release Date: 10/15/2008 12:12:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brandon C. Wilson and Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40332

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XXIII (13 October 2008 to 15 April 2009) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2008 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter XXIII, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4