25% of CVW-11 air wing supporting Flight Deck Certification at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California and SOLCA OPAREA; Training Operations and Victoria, B.C., Canada, her 3rd visit, while conducting training; Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA) in the Eastern Pacific in waters off California’s coast and seventh “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, on her seventh Indian Ocean deployment in support of PASSEX and what would turn out to be Operation Unified Assistance in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia, extending operations in the the Java Sea via the South China Sea, Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean. Indonesia (15 October 2004 to 4 March 2005).

8 May 2004 to 4 March 2005

Chapter XVII

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2004 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XVII, Appendix I

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained in port from the end of Sea Trials upon completion of Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) from 25 June 2003 to 7 May 2004” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 2 June 2004, embarking 25% of CVW-11 air wing supporting Flight Deck Certification at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California and SOLCA OPAREA. Getting Abe’s flight deck re-qualified is vital for the carrier’s preparation to deploy and to be active in the Navy’s Fleet Response Program (FRP). “We’re going to be one of the few certified carriers on the west coast for the next year,” said Lt. Mark Sibon, a "shooter" from air department. “Until we deploy, once we get certified and qualified to conduct flight ops, we’ll have several air wings or fleet replacement squadrons to do training and carrier qualifications”” (Ref. 76 & Story Number: NNS040621-12 - Release Date: 6/22/2004 3:01:00 AM - By Journalist Seaman Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13849

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 2 to 4 June 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) area of operations were not reported from 5 to 6 June 2004.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to embark 25% of CVW-11 air wing supporting Lincoln's Flight Deck Certification on 7 June 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

Actors Joe Morton, left, and actor/comedian Jamie Fox, center visit  USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

040615-N-8497H-077 - Pacific Ocean (Jun. 15, 2004) - Actors Joe Morton, left, and actor/comedian Jamie Fox, center, watch as Commander 3rd Fleet, Vice Adm. Michael J. McCabe greets Aviation Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Chuck Brodous on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). The actors are aboard while filming the upcoming motion picture “Stealth.” After ten months of dry docked Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) maintenance, Lincoln is conducting local operations in the Pacific Ocean in preparation for an upcoming deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Lewis Hunsaker (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=15110

 

A Landing Signal Officer (LSO) monitors an S-3B Viking.

 

040619-N-6817C-050 - Pacific Ocean (June 19, 2004) – A Landing Signal Officer (LSO) monitors the arrested landing of an S-3B Viking assigned to the “Shamrocks” of Sea Control Squadron Four One (VS-41) aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln is conducting local operations in preparation for an upcoming scheduled deployment after 10 months of dry docked Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Tyler J. Clements (RELEASED) Lincoln is conducting local operations in preparation for an upcoming scheduled deployment after 10 months of dry docked Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Lincoln is one of seven aircraft carriers involved in Summer Pulse 2004. Summer Pulse 2004 is the simultaneous deployment of seven aircraft carrier strike groups (CSGs), demonstrating the ability of the Navy to provide credible combat power across the globe, in five theaters with other U.S., allied, and coalition military forces. Summer Pulse is the Navy’s first deployment under its new Fleet Response Plan (FRP). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Tyler J. Clements (RELEASED) For more information go to: www.chinfo.navy.mil/navpalib/news/surge04.html / http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=15293

 

Lincoln's Flight Deck Readies for Prime Time

 

As reported on 22 June 2004, “in order to re-qualify the ship's flight deck, Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted a slew of aircraft squadrons (25% of CVW-11) during their June workups. Getting Abe’s flight deck re-qualified is vital for the carrier’s preparation to deploy and to be active in the Navy’s Fleet Response Program (FRP). “We’re going to be one of the few certified carriers on the west coast for the next year,” said Lt. Mark Sibon, a "shooter" from air department. “Until we deploy, once we get certified and qualified to conduct flight ops, we’ll have several air wings or fleet replacement squadrons to do training and carrier qualifications.” In order to get flight deck qualified, the ship's crew has to go through a number of exercises and drills.

 

“We have to demonstrate our capabilities in damage control and Material Maintenance and Management (3M),” said Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (SW) Daniel Harrell, air department’s leading chief petty officer. “Also, we have to be able to man all four catapults and have all four wires manned up with qualified personnel and launch aircraft safely during day and night operations without any incident.” None of these qualification flights would be possible if the ship hadn’t gone through an 11-month docking planned incremental availability (DPIA) in Bremerton, Wash. As a result of the DPIA, even the new equipment has to be certified. “When we were in DPIA, we had a major overhaul on the number three catapult,” said Sibon.

 

“We have to get the catapult recertified to conduct day and night flight qualifications.”

Getting the planes into the air requires a lot of preparation prior to the first plane launching. The squadrons prepare the aircraft,” said Sibon. “Then, air department prepares the catapults, arresting gear, flight deck and support equipment. Engineering provides steam and electrical power." “There’s at least two or three hours prior to the first launch or recovery of an aircraft, and our crew, throughout the ship, helps get the gear up and ready to go,” he continued. Abe’s flight deck has been a revolving door for squadrons, as 12 different groups showed up during a two-week period. Thanks to the help of those squadrons and the crew, Lincoln is almost finished with flight qualifications.

 

“We’ve got all our qualifications except for one, and we’ll get that in August,” said Capt. Kendall Card, commanding officer, addressing the crew. “It’s been 13 months since we’ve been under way and had flight ops. I’m proud of each and every one of you.” With qualifications for the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier almost out of the way, the crew can concentrate on the upcoming work-up period in August, completion of which will make the ship the surge carrier under FRP, and the next deployment in 2005” (Ref. Story Number: NNS040621-12 - Release Date: 6/22/2004 3:01:00 AM - By Journalist Seaman Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13849

 

Hollywood Joins Abe Underway to Film 'Stealth'

 

As reported on 23 June 2004, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) welcomed aboard more than 80 people from Columbia Pictures and Backbreaker Films, actors Josh Lucas, Jessica Biel, Jamie Foxx, Sam Shepard and director Rob Cohen for the filming of the major motion picture, "Stealth," in June. Abe's flight deck hosted 12 squadrons for carrier qualifications and the film crew, along with a 53-foot-long futuristic stealth fighter named “Talon.” “Filming a major Hollywood movie during flight (operations) is a very tricky and different thing,” said Cohen. “This is real life out here, and it’s amazing that the Navy is allowing us to be here and bring our own aircraft on the ship.” Cohen also acknowledged the Navy for allowing the current movie to see the light of day. “I’m very grateful to the Navy for this. The Navy passed every page of the script, so they feel good about it, and I feel good about what this film will say about the Navy.”

 

 In the film, Navy officials decide to use an unmanned version of the “Talon,” but when one of the planes begins attacking friendly forces, Navy pilots are called in to save the planet from artificial intelligence. Although the plot may sound far-fetched to some, Cohen found out firsthand that filming aboard Lincoln is very real. “I have a deeper appreciation for what (the crew) does on the Lincoln,” Cohen said. After spending his first night aboard the warship, Cohen had a startling experience that awoke him from a sound sleep. “They primed the catapults about two in the morning, and I thought, ‘Oh my God, we’ve been torpedoed!’ I jumped so high out of my bunk that I hit my head on the shelf,” he said. Adjusting to life on the 97,000-ton carrier also proved to be difficult for some of the cast. “I’ve been lost every day,” Biel said. “I still can’t get to my room. I have to ask people all of the time just to help me find the bathroom, but it’s been incredible how helpful everyone has been.”

 

Biel, who plays Lt. Kara Wade, the only female pilot in the stealth squadron, also expressed her appreciation for the hard work of Abe’s crew. “You really have no idea how hard everybody works until you come on to a carrier,” Biel said. “The teamwork on this ship is absolutely amazing.” Teamwork seemed to be the word of the week, as both the movie and ship’s crews worked together to complete the ship’s mission and lend a hand in the production. Abe Sailors were given numerous opportunities throughout the week to be extras in the film and share the spotlight with the Hollywood lineup. Donning float coats and cranials, the Sailors, producers and actors looked alike on the flight deck as the cameras rolled. “In my 16 years in the Navy, this is one of the top things I’ve done,” said Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW) Anthony Whetstone, of Abe’s safety department. Whetstone, an Alexander City, Ala., native, was an extra with a speaking role during one of the production’s night scenes, and was grateful to have such an opportunity. “Nothing like this has ever happened to me before,” he said.

Foxx, who plays the role of Lt. Henry Purcell, said Abe’s crew was a big help during the filming and commented on their hard work. “This really changes your perspective on things, when you get a chance to see from the ground up how hard these men and women work,” he said. “The crew was really down to Earth,” Whetstone said. “I was surprised to find out that they were just like us.” Whetstone’s thoughts seemed to be echoed by Abe’s crew throughout the week. Meanwhile, the film crew couldn’t seem to give enough praise to Lincoln Sailors. “Thank God for these decent people that are on this ship doing the job they do,” Cohen said. “I have a deep appreciation for Sailors and what (they) do for people like me who live in the freedom (they) secure”” (Ref. Story Number: NNS040623-07 - Release Date: 6/23/2004 1:57:00 PM - By Journalist Seaman Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13848

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 23 June 2004, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, while 25% of CVW-11 air wing supporting Flight Deck Certification from 8 to 23 June 2004. For a little over a week, CVW-11 was operating in two different oceans and two different hemispheres simultaneously. After a short visit, Abe steamed to her home port. Getting Abe’s flight deck re-qualified is vital for the carrier’s preparation to deploy and to be active in the Navy’s Fleet Response Program (FRP). “We’re going to be one of the few certified carriers on the west coast for the next year,” said Lt. Mark Sibon, a "shooter" from air department. “Until we deploy, once we get certified and qualified to conduct flight ops, we’ll have several air wings or fleet replacement squadrons to do training and carrier qualifications.” Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 2 to 4 June 2004, conducting operations in the California operating area from 5 to 6 January based on reported date of arrival at NASNI to embark 25% of CVW-11 air wing supporting Lincoln's Flight Deck Certification on 7 June 2004, departing the next day. As reported on 23 June 2004, “Abraham Lincoln welcomed aboard more than 80 people from Columbia Pictures and Backbreaker Films, actors Josh Lucas, Jessica Biel, Jamie Foxx, Sam Shepard and director Rob Cohen for the filming of the major motion picture, "Stealth," in June. Abe's flight deck hosted 12 squadrons for carrier qualifications and the film crew, along with a 53-foot-long futuristic stealth fighter named “Talon.” “Filming a major Hollywood movie during flight (operations) is a very tricky and different thing,” said Cohen. “This is real life out here, and it’s amazing that the Navy is allowing us to be here and bring our own aircraft on the ship.” Cohen also acknowledged the Navy for allowing the current movie to see the light of day. “I’m very grateful to the Navy for this. The Navy passed every page of the script, so they feel good about it, and I feel good about what this film will say about the Navy.” (2 to 23 June 2004” (Ref. Story Number: NNS040621-12 - Release Date: 6/22/2004 3:01:00 AM - By Journalist Seaman Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) and Story Number: NNS040623-07 - Release Date: 6/23/2004 1:57:00 PM - By Journalist Seaman Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS)).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13849 / http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13848

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained in port from 1 June to 12 July 2004” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 13 July 2004, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, for Training Operations in the Eastern Pacific prior to visiting Victoria, Canada” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377 & 378A). 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)

(13 to 18 July 2004)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet

EastPac

 

 

13 Jul 2004

18 Jul 2004

Training

6-days

Training Operations and Victoria, B.C., Canada, her 3rd visit, while conducting training.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 13 to 15 July 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Victoria, B.C., Canada from 15 to 18 July 2004. Over 1,700 guests embarked for the return family cruise, and enjoyed a continental style breakfast and lunch during the eight hours of the transit back to NS Everett” (Ref. 76 & 378A). 

 

“On 18 July 2004, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington, conducting Training Operations in the Eastern Pacific from 13 to 15 July 2004, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, visiting Victoria, B.C., Canada from 15 to 18 July 2004. Over 1,700 guests embarked for the return family cruise, and enjoyed a continental style breakfast and lunch during the eight hours of the transit back to NS Everett” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

Carrier Strike Group and Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) on Change of Command

 

“Rear Adm. William Crowder relieved Rear Adm. Jacob Shuford as commander of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group and Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) on 20 July 2004, in a change-of-command ceremony held on Lincoln's flight deck.

Shuford reported to CCDG-3 in the fall of 2003 shortly before
Lincoln departed Everett, Wash., for a 10-month Dry-docked Planned Incremental Availability at Bremerton’s Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Naval Station Bremerton.

“This ship is a national treasure,” said Shuford during the ceremony. He went on to thank the Sailors of CCDG-3 for helping him along the way.

“The people and crew that I’ve worked with here have been absolutely magnificent,” Shuford said. “I have a great deal of pride in sharing the decks with these absolutely incredible Sailors. I couldn’t ask for a more capable bunch of men and women.”

Shuford’s next assignment is to assume command as the 51st president of the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. Crowder is reporting from the Naval Operations Group on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations in Washington, D.C.

After Crowder gave the order to “break” his flag, marking the beginning of his command, he thanked Shuford, a longtime friend, and commented on his excitement to lead CCDG-3.

“Thank you, Rear Adm. Shuford, for over two decades of your friendship and counsel,” Crowder said. “To the staff, your reputation is beyond reproach. I am humbled and proud to be given the chance to work with every single one of you”” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS040729-13 - Release Date: 7/29/2004 3:19:00 PM - By Journalist Seaman Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=14488

 

CVW-2 was reassigned to the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group on 1 August 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained in port from 18 July to 2 August 2004” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 3 August 2004, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, for Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA) in the Eastern Pacific in waters off California’s coast, embarking CVW-2 out of Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California” (Ref. 76).

 

“Rear Adm. William D. Crowder relieved Rear Adm. Jacob L. Shuford as Commander Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, during a ceremony on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) flight deck on 20 July 2004. The Naval War College at Newport, Rhode Island, then installed Rear Adm. Shuford as the institution’s 51st president on 12 August 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 3 to 16 August 2004, conducting Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA)” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to embark CVW-2 on 17 August 2004, conducting Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA)” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 19 August 2004, to continue Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA), in port NASNI from 17 to 18 August 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

“As an F/A-18C Hornet from VFA-151 operating from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) at NAS North Island it skidded off the runway on 26 August 2004. The pilot could not stop and ejected into the bay, where San Diego Harbor Police rescued him. The aviator recovered in stable condition at Naval Medical Center, San Diego. The Hornet remained partially submerged just beyond the runway until sailors recovered the aircraft” (Ref. 378A).

 

Due to the position that the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group occupied for the inter-deployment training cycle, the Navy designated the group as the “Emergency Surge Asset” for the Seventh Fleet. As the ships of the group entered at NASNI, San Diego, California for a brief respite on 3 September 2004, they received word that they would deploy to the Seventh Fleet in mid-October as part of the FRP (3 September). These orders impacted the ship much earlier then her crew had originally expected, and forced sailors to accomplish training and maintenance that they normally required months to complete in barely six weeks. Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SIX, the Sun Kings first time, flew aboard in September for Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA).

 

The squadron flew numerous strike and air defense missions and controlled many aircraft from different locations, in order to provide training in air intercept control and tactics. This exercise also aided the squadron in gaining necessary training and readiness objectives needed for future operations. TSTA provided VAW-116 and Carrier Air Wing TWO (CVW-2) a great opportunity to work together and refine tactics and techniques in preparation for their upcoming surge deployment in October. The Command History Report for VAW-116 covers all Operations of VAW-116 for the - calendar year 2004” (Ref. 76 & VAW-116/26 February 05 – 842-2004 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 15 September 2004, conducting Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA) from 19 August to 17 September 2004, in port Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, from 17 to 18 August 2004. Due to the position that the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group occupied for the inter-deployment training cycle, the Navy designated the group as the “Emergency Surge Asset” for the Seventh Fleet. As the ships of the group entered at NASNI, San Diego, California for a brief respite on 3 September 2004, they received word that they would deploy to the Seventh Fleet in mid-October as part of the FRP (3 September). These orders impacted the ship much earlier then her crew had originally expected, and forced sailors to accomplish training and maintenance that they normally required months to complete in barely six weeks. Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SIX, the Sun Kings first time, flew aboard in September for Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA). The squadron flew numerous strike and air defense missions and controlled many aircraft from different locations, in order to provide training in air intercept control and tactics. This exercise also aided the squadron in gaining necessary training and readiness objectives needed for future operations. TSTA provided VAW-116 and Carrier Air Wing TWO (CVW-2) a great opportunity to work together and refine tactics and techniques in preparation for their upcoming surge deployment in October. The Command History Report for VAW-116 covers all Operations of VAW-116 for the - calendar year 2004” (Ref. 76 & VAW-116/26 February 05 – 842-2004 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington in late September 2004, conducting operations in the Eastern Pacific from 3 to 16 August 2004, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, before making a port visit at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, disembarking CVW-2 from 17 to 18 August 2004, followed by operations in southern Californian waters conducting Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA) from 19 August to 17 September 2004, in port NASNI, San Diego, California, from 17 to 18 August 2004. Due to the position that the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group occupied for the inter-deployment training cycle, the Navy designated the group as the “Emergency Surge Asset” for the Seventh Fleet. As the ships of the group entered at NASNI, San Diego, California for a brief respite on 3 September 2004, they received word that they would deploy to the Seventh Fleet in mid-October as part of the FRP (3 September). These orders impacted the ship much earlier then her crew had originally expected, and forced sailors to accomplish training and maintenance that they normally required months to complete in barely six weeks. As an F/A-18C Hornet  from VFA-151 operating from Abraham Lincoln at NAS North Island it skidded off the runway on 26 August 2004. The pilot could not stop and ejected into the bay, where San Diego Harbor Police rescued him. The aviator recovered in stable condition at Naval Medical Center, San Diego. The Hornet remained partially submerged just beyond the runway until sailors recovered the aircraft. Due to the position that the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group occupied for the inter-deployment training cycle, the Navy designated the group as the “Emergency Surge Asset” for the Seventh Fleet. As the ships of the group entered at NASNI for a brief respite on 3 September 2004, they received word that they would deploy to the Seventh Fleet in mid-October as part of the FRP. These orders impacted the ship much earlier then her crew had originally expected, and forced sailors to accomplish training and maintenance that they normally required months to complete in barely six weeks. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at NASNI on 17 September 2004, conducting TSTA from 19 August to 17 September 2004. Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SIX, the Sun Kings first time, flew aboard in September for Tailored Ships Training Activity (TSTA)for TSTA. The Command History Report for VAW-116 covers all Operations of VAW-116 for the - calendar year 2004. The squadron flew numerous strike and air defense missions and controlled many aircraft from different locations, in order to provide training in air intercept control and tactics. This exercise also aided the squadron in gaining necessary training and readiness objectives needed for future operations. TSTA provided VAW-116 and Carrier Air Wing TWO (CVW-2) a great opportunity to work together and refine tactics and techniques in preparation for their upcoming surge deployment in October (3 August 2004 to late September 2004)” (Ref. 76 & VAW-116/26 February 05–842-2004).

 

“A change in leadership for the Sun Kings occurred on 1 October 2004. Commaander John Sears was relieved by Commaander Pete Tomczak as the Commanding Officer for VAW-116. Commaander Jim McHugh was also welcomed aboard as the new Executive Officer” (Ref. 76 & 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

“The Navy began to test changes to operational methods with Summer Pulse 04, an exercise designed to investigate the Fleet Response Plan (FRP) of the service’s Sea Power 21 strategy in June 2004. Under the “six-plus-two” concept of FRP, the Navy projected power by providing six carrier strike groups in less than 30 days for contingency operations across the globe, with two more such groups to follow within three months to reinforce or rotate with them, or to respond to other crises. Ships would rotate through 27 to 32 month (average) cycles. Aircraft carriers USS Enterprise (CVN 65), USS George Washington (CVN-73), USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) deployed near-simultaneously in five theaters (June to August). Their operations included scheduled deployments, surge operations, joint and international exercises, other advanced training and port visits. After they returned the Navy ordered USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to deploy on a non-scheduled cruise to fill the ensuing gaps in forward presence as part of the FRP (September)” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained in port from late September to 14 October 2004” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Rear Adm. William Crowder, Carrier Strike Group Nine and Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington 15 October 2004, embarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, on her seventh “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, on her seventh Indian Ocean deployment in support of PASSEX and what would turn out to be Operation Unified Assistance in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia, extending operations in the the Java Sea via the South China Sea, Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean. She will under go her ninth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 (NE)

(15 October 2004 to 4 March 2005)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet & 7th

7th WestPac

PASSEX

SCS

Java Sea

OUA

Andaman Sea

7th IO

CVW-2

NE

18 Oct 2004

4 Mar 2005

Western Pacific

9th FWFD

138-days

PASSEX and Operation Unified Assistance in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-2

Bounty Hunters -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter - Trainer

NE100

FA-18F

VFA-137

Kestrels - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE200

FA-18E

VFA-151

Vigilantes - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE300

 

FA-18C (N)

VFA-82

Marauders – Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE400

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-131

Lancers - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NE500

EA-6B

VAW-116

Sun Kings –

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C 2000

HS-2

Golden Falcons - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -      Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

HSL-47 Det.

Saberhawks - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light)

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine

700

SH-60B

VRC-30 Det. 2

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

 

Grumman - Greyhound

20, 35

C-2A

 

 

 

 

 

F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) CSG consists of the guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile destroyers USS Benfold (DDG-65), both homeported in San Diego. Other ships include Everett, Wash.-based destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86); and Bremerton, Wash.-based fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE-7) surge deployed as part of the FRP; and attack submarine USS Louisville (SSN-724). Rear Adm. William Crowder, Carrier Strike Group Nine and Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) broke his flag from the carrier, in conjunction with Capt. Jon W. Kaufman, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 9, and Capt. Craig Geron, who led CVW-2 on 18 October 2004(Ref. 76, 377, 378A & 681E).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 16 October 2004, embarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 19 October 2004, embarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California from 16 to 18 October 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in southern Californian waters from 19 to 21 October 2004 to enable aircraft to accomplish as much accelerated training as possible before they flew combat missions” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

“After a two week period spent back at Hangar 553, Pt. Mugu, Ca., VAW-116 embarked in USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) for an emergency surge deployment that would carry them through the end of the calendar year. The deployment began with carrier qualifications conducted off the coast of California, followed by a transit to the Hawaiian operating area where we began Integrated Warfare Training (IWT) under the evaluation of Carrier Strike Force Training Pacific. The squadron flew a large number of hours in support of Carrier Strike Group training and had great success during the entire period.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) area of operations was not reported from 22 to 23 October 2004.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and her group, which comprised USS Shiloh (CG-67), guided missile destroyers USS Benfold (DDG-65) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Louisville and fast combat support ship USS Rainier (AOE-7), surge deployed as part of the FRP underway in the Pacific from 25 October to 4 November 2004. The group transited to Hawaiian waters for an advanced training period where they emphasized flying for the air wing to gain what sailors humorously referred to as “Blue Water Certification.” During these busy days the ship monitored and maintained 250 tactical voice and data circuits to also support Carrier Strike Group 9, CVW-2 and Destroyer Squadron 9” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port visit at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 5 November 2004, for a nice port call and a break from training. The entire CVW-2 squadron spent some much needed time on liberty, and left Waikiiki with a lasting impression of Sun King camaraderie. The squadron went back out to sea shortly thereafter and completed IWT” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

Abraham Lincoln is the flagship for Rear Adm. William Crowder, Carrier Strike Group Nine, commander, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group. Abraham Lincoln is also home to Commander, Destroyer Squadron 9, commanded by Capt. Jon W. Kaufman, and Commander, Carrier Air Wing 2, commanded by Capt. Lawrence D. Burt., reliving Capt. Craig Geron, who led CVW-2 on 18 October 2004 during the deployment, while Capt. Kendall L. Card, of Fort Stockton, Texas, commands Abraham Lincoln at the center of the strike group” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050126-03 - Release Date: 1/26/2005 7:12:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Off the coast of Sumatra (NNS), Story Number: NNS050118-10 - Release Date: 1/18/2005 10:17:00 PM - By Chief Journalist (SW) Douglas H. Stutz, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, OFF THE COAST OF SUMATRA (NNS), Story Number: NNS050129-03 - Release Date: 1/30/2005 11:09:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS) & Story Number: NNS050118-10 - Release Date: 1/18/2005 10:17:00 PM - By Chief Journalist (SW) Douglas H. Stutz, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, OFF THE COAST OF SUMATRA (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16642 / http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16741 / http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16644 / http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16642

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 9 November 2004, in port from 5 to 8 November 2004, for an advanced training period where they emphasized flying for the air wing to gain what sailors humorously referred to as “Blue Water Certification.” The entire VAW-116 squadron spent some much needed time on liberty, and left Waikiiki with a lasting impression of Sun King camaraderie. The squadron went back out to sea shortly thereafter for IWT” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 9 to 19 November 2004. The group transited to Hawaiian waters for an advanced training period where they emphasized flying for the air wing to gain what sailors humorously referred to as “Blue Water Certification.” During these busy days the ship monitored and maintained 250 tactical voice and data circuits to also support Carrier Strike Group 9, CVW-2 and Destroyer Squadron 9. VAW-116 completed IWT and was lauded as outstanding in airborne command and control during this evaluation period” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) area of operations was not reported from 20 to 21 November 2004.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a second port visit at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 22 November 2004 for more liberty time. The chance to spend Thanksgiving Day on dry land was much appreciated, and VAW-116 squadron officers gathered together for a traditional Thanks Giving Day meal at the Hickam AFB Officer's club” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).   

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a second port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 22 to 24 November 2004. We pulled out of Pearl Harbor on 28 November and began the trek west to conduct more Carrier Strike Group operations” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).   

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) area of operations was not reported from 30 November to 2 December 2004.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 29 November to 3 December 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

Aircrew members assigned to the Golden Falcons of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Two (HS-2) prepare for the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) in the hangar bay aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

041221-N-6074Y-073 - Pacific Ocean (Dec. 21, 2004) - Aircrew members assigned to the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Two (HS-2) prepare for the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) in the hangar bay aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). HS-2 is embarked aboard Lincoln as part of Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) during their present at sea period in the Western Pacific Ocean. Carrier Strike Group Nine (CSG-9) is the first carrier strike group to be used in the Surge Role in support of the Chief of Naval Operations Fleet Response Plan (FRP). U.S. Navy photo by Photographer Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=19770

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific from 4 to 23 December 2004. The month of December was spent conducting numerous air wing training exercises in support of contingency operations in South East Asia, we took the time to fly and conduct exercises off of Wake Island, Guam, and Okinawa” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port visit at Hong Kong on 24 December 2004, as ship/air wing personnel looked forward to celebrating the Christmas holiday with a new and different culture. Many members of the VAW-116 squadron took advantage of the great shopping and atmosphere of Hong 'Kong and Stanley Market. They also saw some beautiful scenery and vistas from high atop Victoria's Peak” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).   

 

“Horrible news of a giant earthquake and tsunami in the Eastern Indian Ocean came on 26 December 2004, and many members of the squadron began wondering if we would receive the call to aid in a large relief effort. We left Hong Kong on 27 December 2004, and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a turn to the South instead of to the North as was expected. We all knew at that time that we had received the call for help from the people of South East Asia” (Ref. 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Hong Kong on 28 December 2004, and headed to Indian Ocean regions devastated by earthquakes and Tunami on 28 December 2004, visiting from 24 to 28 December 2004. A magnitude 9.0 earthquake occurred off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, which triggered multiple tsunamis across the Indian Ocean. The waves reached 30 feet high in shallow waters and sometimes six-miles wide, and killed nearly 200,000 people in what became one of the deadliest maritime disasters hitherto recorded. Relief workers and service members designated the multinational response to this disaster as Operation Unified Assistance (OUA) under Combined Support Force (CSF)-536. U.S. naval forces became vital to relief efforts and often reached the disaster areas before many aid agencies, as aircraft delivered supplies and emergency people to otherwise inaccessible inland areas. Abraham Lincoln had visited Hong Kong when the disaster struck. “This was a horrible event. A lot of human suffering is involved” Rear Adm. Crowder empathized. “We’ve got the capability to go in to an area and provide some help.” Many sailors began preparations to reach out to victims upon their own initiative, and the Navigation Department began to set up charts for the Indonesian and Thai coasts. When orders directed the ship to assist relief efforts she sailed from Hong Kong (28 December) and rushed to the region” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea from 28 to 29 December 2004” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Java Sea in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia on 30 December 2004. VAW-116 squadron conducted one day of fixed wing flight operations in the Gu1f of Thailand prior to transiting the Straits of Malacca and arrived on scene in the vicinity of Banda Aceh, Indonesia on New Year's Day, 2005” (Ref. 76, 378A & 26 February 05–842-2004).

 

Abraham Lincoln Answers the Call in Banda Aceh

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 have been answering the call for volunteers to support humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, since the ship arrived on station in the Indian Ocean on 1 January 2005 in support of Operation Unified Assistance. Crew members ensure that vital food, water and medicine supplies are ferried to the survivors of the devastating tsunami that struck the Aceh province on the island of Sumatra Dec. 26. “It gives you a sense of doing the right thing,” explained Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW) Dallas Smith. “I saw what it (tsunami damage) looked like, and it gives me a good feeling in my heart knowing I’m doing something good for someone else.” The Sailors catch the morning’s helicopters to Sultan Iskandar Muda Air Force Base in Banda Aceh, the logistics hub for relief efforts in northern Indonesia. There, they unload trucks and airplanes full of aid supplies, such as food and medicine, and then load it all back into the helicopters of CVW-2 for delivery to towns and villages isolated by the destructive wave. According to Machinis's Mate 1st Class William Gregory, of Redding, Calif., helping out just feels right. “It makes me feel like I did something good for my country and for this country,” said Gregory. For related news on Navy tsunami relief operations, visit the Focus on Tsunami Relief Operations page at www.navy.mil/local/tsunami” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050129-03 - Release Date: 1/30/2005 11:09:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS)).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16644

 

ATO Keeps Relief Workers, Supplies Flying

 

“Since the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) arrived off the coast of Indonesia on 1 January 2005 in support of Operation Unified Assistance, Lincoln's Air Transportation Office (ATO) has logged many hours ensuring that Sailors and supplies are getting to Banda Aceh, Sumatra, as well as other points on the compass. ATO is the organizational hub for much of what is leaving from and arriving aboard the ship. They keep constant close tabs on the C-2 Greyhound Carrier Onboard Delivery (COD) flights that are being used to ferry personnel, cargo, supplies and mail across the region, from Thailand to Singapore to Indonesia to the Lincoln flight deck.

“We deal with all the passengers coming and going on all aircraft, along with incoming mail and cargo,” said Storekeeper 2nd Class Heidi Atkins, from San Diego. “We make sure there’s 100 percent accountability coming and going, as well as tracking which aircraft each person or piece of cargo goes on.” According to Storekeeper 2nd Class (SW/AW) Michael Poole, ATO leading petty officer, their role goes beyond just the organizational aspect. “I make sure that all the passengers are accounted for and get to the helicopter or COD,” said Poole. “We also help around the clock in the onloading and offloading of all aircraft.” Coordinating extra flights, accommodating additional passengers and loading relief supplies are a challenge for the ATO.

Operation Unified Assistance has increased our job easily by ten-fold, if not more,” said Chief Torpedoman’s Mate (SW/AW) Michael Holt, ATO’s leading chief petty officer. “Every visitor has to report to our office. We get their names, and then every morning before anyone leaves for Banda Aceh, people come check out with us. We put them on a roster, and then we fly them out on a helicopter or COD. “After their day is done in Banda Aceh,” continued Holt, “they check back in with us because we have to maintain 100 percent accuracy of who has reported back from the beach.” Even though ATO’s workload has increased since Abe started its humanitarian relief efforts, Holt mentioned teamwork has brought them together.

“I couldn’t ask for a better team to work with,” said Holt. “I think for such a small division that we have, the amount of work and amount of production that comes out of this office is very impressive.” For related news on Navy tsunami relief operations, visit the Focus on Tsunami Relief Operations page at
www.navy.mil/local/tsunami” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050126-03 - Release Date: 1/26/2005 7:12:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Off the coast of Sumatra (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16741

 

Lincoln Sailors Protect Against Tropical Diseases

 

“Since USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived on station off the coast of Indonesia on 1 January 2005 to provide support for Operation Unified Assistance, the ship's medical department has been focused on making sure none of the Sailors who have volunteered to go ashore to help out are accessible to tropical diseases.

The preventative medicine implementation for combating any possible tropical disease began almost as soon as the Lincoln Carrier Strike Group received word to steam to the stricken area after a port call visit to Hong Kong. Every Sailor off
Lincoln that has stepped ashore has had to go through a screening process by medical department, which included a healthy dose of education.

“And DEET, DEET, DEET,” emphasized Cmdr. Jamin T. McMahon, about the insect repellent lotion that has been issued to all hands going ashore. “We made sure we told people how to put it on, have reinforced the notion that when people are ashore working in the heat and humidity, that they need to reapply it. And people need to take their doxycycline tablets.”

Individuals are required to take doxycycline tablets one to two days prior to entering country, and are required every day while there, and for 28 days after leaving the malaria transmission zone.

"Our plan is to take everyone back home without one single case of tropical disease,” said Cmdr. Jamin T. McMahon,
Lincoln senior medical officer, of Gig Harbor, Wash. “The number one goal here in medical is to protect our troops, as well as help others. We don’t put our people in harm’s way or on a operation such as this without protecting them the best we can.”

McMahon and the entire
Medical Department on Lincoln constantly stress awareness in dealing not only with tropical-borne diseases, but also food-borne diseases. All are preventable, he stressed, by following proper sanitary habits and procedures.

“What we’re doing is the same as going into port with a force protection plan,” explained McMahon. “We’re taking no chances. If everyone follows the rules laid down, we’ll go home healthy.”” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050127-06 - Release Date: 1/27/2005 8:00:00 PM - By Chief Journalist (SW) Douglas H. Stutz, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16740

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia on 4 January 2005” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln Sailors Design Potable Water System, Deliver Water to Banda Aceh

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln’s (CVN-72) Engineering Department Repair Division designed a potable water manifold to help bring fresh water to Aceh Province, Sumatra, in the wake of the December 26, 2004 tsunami tragedy. The system began shipping the much-needed fresh water on 4 January 2005. The initial concern for Lincoln was to devise some way to fill as many water containers as possible in a timely manner. “The initial ideas, like cutting a 55 gallon drum in half and using that as a source to then fill water bottles, just wasn’t efficient,” said Chief Hull Maintenance Technician Kevin Swem, Repair Division leading chief, from Coquille, Ore. “After finding out that our Reactor Department is producing the potable water, we then sat down and went over a number of ways to make this happen. We needed a system that was quick and was controlled to not spill.”

According to Swem, the system that he and his crew came up with is modeled after the concept of how a dairy farm efficiently fills milk containers. They constructed a manifold - a pipe with multiple spigots and connections to the ship’s water main system. “As soon as we had the concept, we collected all the parts and worked all night,” Swem said. “I kept reminding everyone that the entire world was watching, and we had to get this right. The Indonesian people need the water, and we had the means to get it to them. The teamwork that everyone showed making this job come together was about the best I’ve ever seen. I only wish that we could do more.” Once the faucets were turned on and the assembly line manned,
Lincoln Sailors rapidly got the water supply line ready to transfer. “We’ve sent 5,068 gallons of water in two days,” said Ensign Marcus Machart of Engineering E Division.

 

“As long as there is any room on any helicopter going ashore, that space will have a water container in it. It took our Reactor Department volunteers around 45 minutes to fill and stack 800 five-gallon containers. We’re only limited by the number of containers we have and the weight limit the helicopter can carry.” “The rapid response we demonstrated by constructing the potable water manifold shows we’re willing to use all of our resources and the abilities of our Sailors to help,” said Lt. Cmdr. Richard Hager, Lincoln damage control assistant, from Atlanta. “I am as proud as can be that we can be contributing any way we can.” Lt. j.g. Bradley Dandurand, repair officer, found out firsthand just how vital the precious liquid was needed. “The fresh water is so vital to the people in the region,” the Klamath Falls, Ore., native explained. “Even something as simple as filling five-gallon and two-and-a-half gallon containers helps to make a difference.”

Since the start of the New Year, Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (CSG) Sailors have lent help and support in needed areas, such as search and rescue operations, delivery of food, water and medicine to stabilize life-threatening situations, providing limited transportation of displaced persons to designated areas from areas inaccessible to host nation transportation assets, and engineering support for sanitation and mobility to affected areas. For related news on Navy tsunami relief operations, visit the Focus on Tsunami Relief Operations page at www.navy.mil/local/tsunami” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050118-10 - Release Date: 1/18/2005 10:17:00 PM - By Chief Journalist (SW) Douglas H. Stutz, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, OFF THE COAST OF SUMATRA (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16642

 

Personnel make final preparations for the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) while getting the ship underway from her homeport at Naval Station Everett.

 

060105-N-8825R-116 - Everett, Wash (Jan. 5, 2005) - Personnel make final preparations for the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) while getting the ship underway from her homeport at Naval Station Everett. Lincoln is getting underway to conduct work-up training operations in the Pacific Northwest in preparation for deployment later this year. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Aramis Ramirez (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=31024

 

Crew members aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) fill jugs with purified water from a Potable Water Manifold.

 

050110-N-6817C-026 - Indian Ocean (Jan. 10, 2005) - Crew members aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) fill jugs with purified water from a Potable Water Manifold. The Repair Division aboard Lincoln constructed the manifold in eight hours. The water jugs will be flown by Navy helicopters to regions isolated by the Tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia. Helicopters assigned to Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) and Sailors from Abraham Lincoln are supporting Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian operation effort in the wake of the Tsunami that struck South East Asia. The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is currently operating in the Indian Ocean off the waters of Indonesia and Thailand. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Tyler J. Clements (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=20443

 

“More than 1,200 crewmembers from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and wing volunteered to go ashore in Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, to reach out to victims, and the rewind shop repaired three motors from the sewage pumping and treatment station at Banda Aceh University Hospital that the rising waters had submerged, a crucial task to prevent the spread of disease. Sailors also displayed their ingenuity by manufacturing special adaptors for some U.S. equipment that utilized the English system of measurements for use in the Metric system.

 

Servicemembers also produced over 20,000 images to document to the world the plight of the people from the stricken area, and weather forecasters too approximately 1,000 observations and produced nearly 90 Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts that directly supported aircraft. Maintaining such a pace challenged crews, however, and Hunter 613, an SH-60F (BuNo 165085) from HS-2, experienced a hard landing at Sultan Iskandarmuda Airfield near Banda Aceh, during the morning watch (0733 on 10 January). A light rain fell and a mist rose at various times during the watch, which rendered visibility to an average of five statue miles, and at one point the temperature reached up to a maximum of 91° F.

 

After a flight of approximately 25 minutes, Hunter 613 executed a steep approach to an unprepared landing site located at the airfield (the Indonesian facilities prior to the disaster lacked certain refinements familiar to Western crews, which the damage from the tsunamis further reduced). As they reached about 150 feet above the site and flying at perhaps 50 knots indicated air speed, the helo yawed to port. The aircraft climbed out to the left and approached again, however, Hunter 613 rotated uncontrollably to the left, descended rapidly, spun to the left and impacted the ground in a slightly right wing down, nose level attitude, and rolled over onto its right side. Three of the 10 people on board (four crewmembers and six passengers: all three of the injured people were passengers) suffered minor injuries and commanders placed the ship’s Medical Department on high alert. Many of the department’s sailors had gone ashore to help victims, however, and the potential of the incident before the ship learned of details threatened to tax capabilities as crewmembers made preparations to receive mass casualties.

 

Once they learned of the limited scope of the mishap, the doctors and nurses of the team resolutely cared for all of the people as they returned, and only sent several for treatment on board USS Bonhomme Richard LHD-6), which had expanded medical facilities. All of the patients received attention and returned to the carrier within 24 hours, except for the several people who required Category 4 treatment and returned stateside to Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, Wash., and to U.S. Naval Hospital, Bremerton. The Seahawk sustained such damage during the mishap that the Navy struck it from inventory. Meanwhile, a total of 103 Australian servicemembers also reached out to victims from Abraham Lincoln, where the Supply Department provided them with berthing and meals during the Australians’ relief efforts” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD-2) relieved USS Bonhomme Richard LHD-6) on 18 January 2005 and commenced relief operations the next morning. Because some marines had deployed to Iraq, the ships eventually gathered reinforcements that included four MH-53E Sea Dragons from Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM)-15 Detachment 2, based in Bahrain, six CH-46E Sea Knights from Okinawa, Japan, and two more MH-60Ss from Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HC)-5 embarked on board MSC-operated combat store ship Niagara Falls (T-AFS-3). A wide range of other naval aviation forces also supported the operation, including Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC)-30, HC-11, Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR)-352, and a Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules. In addition, Lockheed P-3C Orions from VP-4 and VP-8 relayed images of ravaged areas to support centers, which enabled analysts to direct relief efforts where victims most needed help” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Sailors and marines assisted people as far apart as Thailand and Sri Lanka, and grateful Indonesians called USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) the “Gray Angel.” Indonesian Gen. Ryamizard, that army’s chief of staff, arrived on board to personally thank sailors as relief efforts drew to a close on 26 January 2005. Global interest in the catastrophe brought 220 distinguished visitors, journalists and foreign dignitaries on board during Operation Unified Assistance (OUA). The ship came about from Indonesian waters on 3 February 2005 and CSF-536 ceased relief operations 11 days later. “It’s the most worthwhile thing I’ve ever done in my naval career,” Lt. Matt Frauenzimmer, an operations administration officer on board Abraham Lincoln who helped to coordinate efforts, noted. “It’s very rewarding to help your fellow man, and bring life and hope to people without hope. For a ship whose primary job is warfighting, it was neat being able to take all the capabilities we have, and to use it for humanitarian assistance. We were well equipped for that”” (Ref. 378A).

 

A C-2A Greyhound prepares to launch off the flight deck aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

050120-N-4336M-028 - Indian Ocean (Jan. 20, 2005) - A C-2A Greyhound, assigned to the “Providers” of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron Three Zero (VRC-30), prepares to launch off the flight deck aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Aircraft assigned to Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) and Sailors from the Abraham Lincoln are supporting Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian operation effort in the wake of the Tsunami that struck South East Asia. The Abraham Carrier Strike group is currently operating in the Indian Ocean off the waters of Indonesia and Thailand. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Cristina R. Morrison (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=20937

 

Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and members of the Royal Australian Army load boxes of relief supplies onto an MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter, assigned to the Providers of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HC-5).

 

050127-N-0057P-012 - Banda Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia (Jan. 27, 2005) - Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and members of the Royal Australian Army load boxes of relief supplies onto an MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter, assigned to the “Providers” of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HC-5). Helicopters and Sailors assigned to the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group are supporting Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian operation effort in the wake of the Tsunami that struck South East Asia. The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is currently operating in the Indian Ocean off the waters of Indonesia and Thailand. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Seth C. Peterson (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=21214

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia in support of Operation Unified Assistance (OUA) from 1 January to 2 February 2005” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) headed out of Indonesian waters on 3 February 2005. Global interest in the catastrophe brought 220 distinguished visitors, journalists and foreign dignitaries on board during Operation Unified Assistance (OUA) from 28 December to 3 February 2005. The ship came about from Indonesian waters on 3 February 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port visit at Changi Naval Base, Singapore from 5 to 9 February 2005, concluding strike group operations while aircraft flew 1,747 missions in support of Operation Unified Assistance (OUA), due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia, carried about 5.7 million pounds of supplies, including 16,308 gallons of water, and transported 3,043 passengers from 1 January to 5 February 2005” (Ref. 76).

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea on 9 February 2005 and the Pacific on 10 February 2005” (Ref. 76).

 

“CSF-536 ceased relief operations on 14 February 2005. “It’s the most worthwhile thing I’ve ever done in my naval career,” Lt. Matt Frauenzimmer, an operations administration officer on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) who helped to coordinate efforts, noted. “It’s very rewarding to help your fellow man, and bring life and hope to people without hope. For a ship whose primary job is warfighting, it was neat being able to take all the capabilities we have, and to use it for humanitarian assistance. We were well equipped for that”” (Ref. 378A).

 

Disbursing Officer, Lt.j.g. Elizabeth Williams, left, and Disbursing Clerk 1st Class Michael Brett, display their Navy Cash Cards in front of a K80 terminal aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70).

 

050215-N-3228G-002 - Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (Feb. 15, 2005) - Disbursing Officer, Lt.j.g. Elizabeth Williams, left, and Disbursing Clerk 1st Class Michael Brett, display their Navy Cash Cards in front of a K80 terminal aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG-70). The system, which began March 23, 2004, eliminates cash and coins from the entire ship and instead requires Sailors to add money from their personal bank accounts to one of two systems held on the cash card. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class William R. Goodwin (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=21941

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 10 to 22 February 2005, entering the Third Fleet as she sailed easterly courses for home on 23 February 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a third port visit at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 24 February 2005, departing Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on or after 24 February 2005” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island North Island (NASNI) to disembark CVW-2 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore on 1 March 2005” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 2 March 2005, disembarking CVW-2 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore on 1 March 2005” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 2 to 3 March 2005” (Ref. 76).

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) transits the Strait of Juan De Fuca as they prepare to return to Naval Station Everett, Wash., after a deployment to the Western Pacific Ocean.

 

050304-N-8921O-002 - Strait of Juan De Fuca, Puget Sound, Wash. (Mar. 4, 2005) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transits the Strait of Juan De Fuca as they prepare to return to Naval Station Everett, Wash., after a deployment to the Western Pacific Ocean. The Lincoln Carrier Strike Group and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) supported Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian relief effort to aid the victims of the tsunami that struck Southeast Asia. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd class Chris Otsen (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=22471

 

“On 4 March 2005, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Rear Adm. William Crowder, Carrier Strike Group Nine and Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington, disembarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, ending her seventh “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, on her seventh Indian Ocean deployment in support of PASSEX and what would turned out to be Operation Unified Assistance (OUA) in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia, extending operations in the Java Sea via the South China Sea, Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Java Sea in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia from 30 December 2004 to 1 January 2005. Upon arrival she maneuvered off the Indonesian coast from positions near Banda Aceh on the northern tip of Sumatra, which provided strategic locations near to the areas which the tsunamis devastated to facilitate reaching people as quickly as possible. Four SH-60B Seahawks from HSL-47 and some SH-60Fs and HH-60Hs from HS-2 embarked on board began to ferry supplies from collection points in Sumatra to disaster victims in the vicinity during the early morning hours on 1 January 2005. Sailors from Abraham Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 have been answering the call for volunteers to support humanitarian assistance and disaster relief in Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, since the ship arrived on station in the Indian Ocean on 1 January 2005 in support of OUA. Crew members ensure that vital food, water and medicine supplies are ferried to the survivors of the devastating tsunami that struck the Aceh province on the island of Sumatra Dec. 26. The Sailors catch the morning’s helicopters to Sultan Iskandar Muda Air Force Base in Banda Aceh, the logistics hub for relief efforts in northern Indonesia. There, they unload trucks and airplanes full of aid supplies, such as food and medicine, and then load it all back into the helicopters of CVW-2 for delivery to towns and villages isolated by the destructive wave. According to Machinist's Mate 1st Class William Gregory, of Redding, Calif., helping out just feels right. Since the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) arrived off the coast of Indonesia on 1 January 2005 in support of Operation Unified Assistance, Lincoln's Air Transportation Office (ATO) has logged many hours ensuring that Sailors and supplies are getting to Banda Aceh, Sumatra, as well as other points on the compass. ATO is the organizational hub for much of what is leaving from and arriving aboard the ship. They keep constant close tabs on the C-2 Greyhound Carrier Onboard Delivery (COD) flights that are being used to ferry personnel, cargo, supplies and mail across the region, from Thailand to Singapore to Indonesia to the Lincoln flight deck. Since Abraham Lincoln arrived on station off the coast of Indonesia on 1 January 2005 to provide support for OUA, the ship's medical department has been focused on making sure none of the Sailors who have volunteered to go ashore to help out are accessible to tropical diseases. The preventative medicine implementation for combating any possible tropical disease began almost as soon as the Lincoln Carrier Strike Group received word to steam to the stricken area after a port call visit to Hong Kong. Every Sailor off Lincoln that has stepped ashore has had to go through a screening process by medical department, which included a healthy dose of education. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia on 4 January 2005. Sailors from Engineering Department Repair Division designed a potable water manifold to help bring fresh water to Aceh Province, Sumatra, in the wake of the December 26, 2004 tsunami tragedy. The system began shipping the much-needed fresh water on 4 January 2005. More than 1,200 crewmembers from Abraham Lincoln and wing volunteered to go ashore in Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia, to reach out to victims, and the rewind shop repaired three motors from the sewage pumping and treatment station at Banda Aceh University Hospital that the rising waters had submerged, a crucial task to prevent the spread of disease. Sailors also displayed their ingenuity by manufacturing special adaptors for some U.S. equipment that utilized the English system of measurements for use in the Metric system. Service members also produced over 20,000 images to document to the world the plight of the people from the stricken area, and weather forecasters too approximately 1,000 observations and produced nearly 90 Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts that directly supported aircraft. Maintaining such a pace challenged crews, however, and Hunter 613, an SH-60F (BuNo 165085) from HS-2, experienced a hard landing at Sultan Iskandarmuda Airfield near Banda Aceh, during the morning watch (0733 on 10 January). A light rain fell and a mist rose at various times during the watch, which rendered visibility to an average of five statue miles, and at one point the temperature reached up to a maximum of 91° F. After a flight of approximately 25 minutes, Hunter 613 executed a steep approach to an unprepared landing site located at the airfield (the Indonesian facilities prior to the disaster lacked certain refinements familiar to Western crews, which the damage from the tsunamis further reduced). As they reached about 150 feet above the site and flying at perhaps 50 knots indicated air speed, the helo yawed to port. The aircraft climbed out to the left and approached again, however, Hunter 613 rotated uncontrollably to the left, descended rapidly, spun to the left and impacted the ground in a slightly right wing down, nose level attitude, and rolled over onto its right side. Three of the 10 people on board (four crewmembers and six passengers: all three of the injured people were passengers) suffered minor injuries and commanders placed the ship’s Medical Department on high alert. Many of the department’s sailors had gone ashore to help victims, however, and the potential of the incident before the ship learned of details threatened to tax capabilities as crewmembers made preparations to receive mass casualties. Once they learned of the limited scope of the mishap, the doctors and nurses of the team resolutely cared for all of the people as they returned, and only sent several for treatment on board Bonhomme Richard, which had expanded medical facilities. All of the patients received attention and returned to the carrier within 24 hours, except for the several people who required Category 4 treatment and returned stateside to Madigan Army Medical Center at Fort Lewis, Wash., and to U.S. Naval Hospital, Bremerton. The Seahawk sustained such damage during the mishap that the Navy struck it from inventory. Meanwhile, a total of 103 Australian servicemembers also reached out to victims from Abraham Lincoln, where the Supply Department provided them with berthing and meals during the Australians’ relief efforts. Amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD-2) relieved USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) on 18 January 2005 and commenced relief operations the next morning. Because some marines had deployed to Iraq, the ships eventually gathered reinforcements that included four MH-53E Sea Dragons from Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM)-15 Detachment 2, based in Bahrain, six CH-46E Sea Knights from Okinawa, Japan, and two more MH-60Ss from Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HC)-5 embarked on board MSC-operated combat store ship Niagara Falls (T-AFS-3). A wide range of other naval aviation forces also supported the operation, including Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC)-30, HC-11, Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR)-352, and a Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules. In addition, Lockheed P-3C Orions from VP-4 and VP-8 relayed images of ravaged areas to support centers, which enabled analysts to direct relief efforts where victims most needed help. Sailors and marines assisted people as far apart as Thailand and Sri Lanka, and grateful Indonesians called Abraham Lincoln the “Gray Angel.” Indonesian Gen. Ryamizard, that army’s chief of staff, arrived on board to personally thank sailors as relief efforts drew to a close on 26 January 2005. Global interest in the catastrophe brought 220 distinguished visitors, journalists and foreign dignitaries on board during OUA. The ship came about from Indonesian waters on 3 February 2005 and CSF-536 ceased relief operations 11 days later. “It’s the most worthwhile thing I’ve ever done in my naval career,” Lt. Matt Frauenzimmer, an operations administration officer on board Abraham Lincoln who helped to coordinate efforts, noted. “It’s very rewarding to help your fellow man, and bring life and hope to people without hope. For a ship whose primary job is warfighting, it was neat being able to take all the capabilities we have, and to use it for humanitarian assistance. We were well equipped for that.” Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia in support of OUA from 1 January to 2 February 2005, visit the Focus on Tsunami Relief Operations page at www.navy.mil/local/tsunami. Abraham Lincoln headed out of Indonesian waters on 3 February 2005. Global interest in the catastrophe brought 220 distinguished visitors, journalists and foreign dignitaries on board during OUA from 28 December to 3 February 2005. The ship came about from Indonesian waters on 3 February 2005. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port visit at Changi Naval Base, Singapore on 5 February 2005, concluding strike group operations while aircraft flew 1,747 missions in support of OUA, due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia, carried about 5.7 million pounds of supplies, including 16,308 gallons of water, and transported 3,043 passengers from 1 January to 5 February 2005. Abraham Lincoln departed Changi Naval Base, Singapore on 9 February 2005, visiting from 5 to 9 February 2005, underway in the South China Sea on 9 February 2005 and the Pacific on 10 February 2005. CSF-536 ceased relief operations on 14 February 2005. “It’s the most worthwhile thing I’ve ever done in my naval career,” Lt. Matt Frauenzimmer, an operations administration officer on board Abraham Lincoln who helped to coordinate efforts, noted. “It’s very rewarding to help your fellow man, and bring life and hope to people without hope. For a ship whose primary job is warfighting, it was neat being able to take all the capabilities we have, and to use it for humanitarian assistance. We were well equipped for that.” Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Pacific from 10 to 22 February 2005, entering the Third Fleet as she sailed easterly courses for home on 23 February 2005, pulling in for a third port visit at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 24 February 2005, underway in the Eastern Pacific on or after 24 to 28 February 2005, pulling into Naval Air Station, North Island North Island (NASNI) to disembark CVW-2 on 1 March 2005, departing Naval NASNI on 2 March 2005, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 2 to 3 March 2005. Several times during the deployment the carrier’s Re-Fueling Station No. 21 caused additional problems, and on two separate occasions a weak link parted during replenishments with Benfold. The ensuing loss of tension caused birdcage on No. 2 saddle whip and spanwire. In addition, Abraham Lincoln endured a more severe problem while alongside Shiloh during a separate evolution, when a loss of tension damaged two four foot sections of hose, Nos 1 and 2 whip wires. The station sustained minimal damage in the first two incidents and required little more than two hours of repairs to return to ready condition; however, more extensive damage ensued in the accident with the cruiser, which rendered the No. 1 whip wire inoperable until sailors fabricated a replaNaval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California. CVW-2 on 1 March 2005, departing Naval NASNI on 2 March 2005, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 2 to 3 March 2005. Several times during the deployment the carrier’s Re-Fueling Station No. 21 caused additional problems, and on two separate occasions a weak link parted during replenishments with Benfold. The ensuing loss of tension caused birdcage on No. 2 saddle whip and spanwire. In addition, Abraham Lincoln endured a more severe problem while alongside Shiloh during a separate evolution, when a loss of tension damaged two four foot sections of hose, Nos 1 and 2 whip wires. The station sustained minimal damage in the first two incidents and required little more than two hours of repairs to return to ready condition; however, more extensive damage ensued in the accident with the cruiser, which rendered the No. 1 whip wire inoperable until sailors fabricated a replacement within 44 hours. Ports of call: Aceh Province, Sumatra, Indonesia; Changi Naval Base, Singapore; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California. Squadrons: VFA-2, FA-18F; VFA-137, FA-18E; VFA-151, FA-18C (N); VFA-82, FA-18C (N); VAQ-131, EA-6B; VAW-116, E-2C Hawkeye 2000; HS-2, SH-60F / HH-60H; HSL-47 Det., SH-60B; and VRC-30 Det. 2, C-2A. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) CSG consists of the guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile destroyers USS Benfold (DDG-65), both homeported in San Diego. Other ships include Everett, Wash.-based destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86); and Bremerton, Wash.-based fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE-7) surge deployed as part of the FRP; and attack submarine USS Louisville (SSN-724). Abraham Lincoln is the flagship for Rear Adm. William Crowder, Carrier Strike Group Nine and Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG), commander, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group. Abraham Lincoln is the flagship for Rear Adm. William Crowder, Carrier Strike Group Nine, commander, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group. Abraham Lincoln is also home to Commander, Destroyer Squadron 9, commanded by Capt. Jon W. Kaufman, and Commander, Commander, Carrier Air Wing 2, commanded by Capt. Lawrence D. Burt., reliving Capt. Craig Geron, who led CVW-2 on 18 October 2004 during the deployment, while Capt. Kendall L. Card, of Fort Stockton, Texas, while Abraham Lincoln is at the center of the strike group. Her ninth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October cement within 44 hours (18 October 2004 to 4 March 2005)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A, Story Number: NNS050129-03 - Release Date: 1/30/2005 11:09:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS); Story Number: NNS050126-03 - Release Date: 1/26/2005 7:12:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Off the coast of Sumatra (NNS); Story Number: NNS050127-06 - Release Date: 1/27/2005 8:00:00 PM - By Chief Journalist (SW) Douglas H. Stutz, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS) & Story Number: NNS050118-10 - Release Date: 1/18/2005 10:17:00 PM - By Chief Journalist (SW) Douglas H. Stutz, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, OFF THE COAST OF SUMATRA (NNS). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16644

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16741

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16740

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16642

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16642

 

18/10/05 to 04/03/05

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  WEST COAST

Humanitarian Service Medal

Humanitarian Service Medal (HS)

28 Dec 2004–12 Feb 2005

7th “WestPac”

Ref. 378A & 378B-2000 to 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XVII (8 May 2004 to 4 March 2005)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4