Ninth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, on her ninth Indian Ocean deployment during which time ships and aircraft from Carrier Strike Group 9 and the Republic of Singapore Navy will conduct a Passing Exercise (PASSEX) while underway near Singapore, her 1st Gulf of Oman deployment in support of Exercise Khunjar Haad, consisting of air defense, surface, visit, board, search and seizure and joint gunnery exercises, which focused on joint interoperability training and proficiency, a four-day multinational exercise, on her seventh Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment (two cruises to the area during deployment), where she will relieved USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) operating in the Persian Gulf in support of her 2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein continues, beginning on 20 March 2003 with the firing of Tomahawk missiles from U.S. ships in the Arabian Gulf and Red Sea and her 1st Maritime Security Operations (MSO), to protect off shore infrastructure, including Iraqi oil platforms, which provide a critical source of income for the new Iraqi government and supporting operations that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States’ commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity; to ensure that ships could "operate freely while transiting the world's oceans" during the Global War on Terrorism, on her second North Arabian Sea in support of her 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001 (13 March to 12 October 2008).

Chapter XXII (13 March to 12 October 2008)

Part I of III - 13 March to 27 May 2008

Part II of III - 28 May to 11 October 2008

Part III of III - 12 October 2008

 

Ninth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XXII, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call.

Chapter XXII, Appendix I

 

 

Kestrels Doing Their Part Since 1985

 

As reported on 28 May 2008, “the "Kestrels" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 are helping provide regional security as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Since their establishment July 2, 1985, VFA-137 has flown a variety of missions in support of operations throughout the world.

Lt. j.g. Brett Kirwan said providing strike capability and regional security are just a few of the squadron's roles they provide
Abraham Lincoln and its embarked air wing.


"We are flexible enough to do surveillance and reconnaissance as well as tanking missions; not to mention air-to-air and air-to-ground missions. We do it all."

In October 2004, during the Kestrels first deployment aboard
Abraham Lincoln, the squadron provided support to the victims of the tsunami in Southeast Asia. During Operation Unified Assistance, the squadron helped deliver more than two million pounds of food, medical supplies and potable water to Indonesia.

Johnson said the F/A-18E
Super Hornet is a relatively easy aircraft to fly. "The hardest part is the employment, validation, and doing it 100 percent right all the time; that's where all the training comes in," he said. Johnson noted he and the other pilots of VFA 137 feel fortunate to support Abraham Lincoln and CVW-2's mission while on deployment.

"We are very thankful we're getting to use our training to help out they men and women who are fighting on the ground," he said. "It makes us feel validated, like we're doing something special out here."

VFA-137 has operated with more than 80,000 mishap-free flight hours throughout the past 22 years” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS080505-21 - Release Date: 5/5/2008 3:49:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36831

 

CG 53, Abe's blanket of defense

 

As reported on 4 June 2008, “Guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) keeps a close watch on Abraham Lincoln Strike Group, providing air defense during Maritime Security Operations (MSO) in the Arabian Persian/Gulf. A versatile crew, Mobile Bay's personnel and arsenal protect Lincoln from all manner of attack, whether land, air or sea. Many of the Sailors responsible for providing that protection man the Combat Information Center (CIC), communicating with each other and the rest of the strike group.

 

CIC watch officer Ens. Eric Moss said a team of professionals keep the ship safe. "We accomplish this through a series of watchstanders," Moss said. "We have an air side and a surface side who all talk to the Tactical Action Officer (TAO) who puts all the pieces together and determines any actions we need to take." The process begins with the radar and electronics systems, which can identify and track anything in the air, incoming missiles and other threats, said Capt. Denny Wetherald, USS Mobile Bay commanding officer.

 

"We have a phenomenal radar; the Spy-1A, which works with the spy radars on the destroyers and the carrier," Wetherald said. "It puts up an electric bubble around the strike group so we know anything that flies near the carrier whether it's friendly, commercial or hostile aircraft." In the worst-case scenario, the guided-missile cruiser stands ready and able to defend Lincoln and the other ships in Strike Group 9, said Lt.j.g. John Patterson, Mobile Bay's force protection officer."Mobile Bay, being the closest ship to the carrier, we're taking on a lot of responsibility should small boats try and attack the carrier," Patterson said.

 

"In that situation, we'd try to position ourselves between the carrier and the threat and take on a lot of the force protection responsibility for protecting the ship." Moss said Mobile Bay's weapon system is key in defending the strike group. "Everything ties into the Aegis Weapon System," Moss said. "We have our radars to track air contact, vertically launched missiles, Tomahawks, Harpoons and torpedoes for anti-ship defense." Mobile Bay is also equipped with a five inch gun for use in air or surface contacts, Moss added. Inside the five-inch gun mount, Gunner's Mate Seaman Alaina McDonald stands watch.

 

She only shoots the guns during training exercises, so her days mostly consist of cleaning, but she knows all about her station. "It holds 20 rounds in the drum, 13 nautical miles maximum range, approximately 10 miles effective range," said McDonald. "It doesn't miss too often; during one recent exercise we used it and shot with 97 percent accuracy." Approximately 350 Sailors live on board Mobile Bay to keep a watchful eye on the strike group and accomplish the normal daily missions of any ship in the fleet.

 

 

"I'd like to think that as a smaller ship and a smaller crew, we have a tighter crew," Wetherald said. "I'm very proud of this ship and I'm very proud of our Sailors, there's a lot of teamwork, camaraderie and investment in our junior Sailors"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080604-18 - Release Date: 6/4/2008 7:27:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason Segedy, USS Abraham Lincon Strike Group Public Affairs - ABOARD USS MOBILE BAY (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37617

 

Sailors perform a hula dance in the hangar bay of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

080605-N-5617R-134 - PERSIAN GULF (June 5, 2008) - Sailors perform a hula dance in the hangar bay of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during a celebration of Asian Pacific Heritage Month. Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Rialyn Rodrigo (Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=59965

 

GQ Drills Increase Lincoln Sailors' Readiness to Respond

 

As reported on 9 June 2008, “after completing a work day of 12 hours or more, Sailors aboard Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) practice the highest state of combat readiness during general quarters (GQ) drills. GQ is imperative to the survival and mission of the ship, but preparing for an actual GQ situation is even more crucial. As Sailors practice countless situations that could take place on the ship, they learn the fundamental basics of what it takes to fight and survive in any battle that confronts them. Lincoln's new chief engineer and damage control officer Cmdr. Brad Bittle explained the importance of GQ.

"General quarters is the safest condition of the ship. It gets Sailors away from the danger and allows us to localize the problem so our teams can attack the situation in a planned response." Deciding the scenario of a GQ requires a lot of planning for each occasion. "We think of the worst possible occurrence that could go wrong in a certain area, and then we can practice it during GQ and train our Sailors," Damage Controlman 1st Class (SW/AW) Phillip Losier. "We want a space that's not easily accessible so it gives us a challenge when we perform for general quarters."

Recently, the exercises and scenarios for GQ have been reviewed and changed to enhance the skills of Sailors participating. "We are changing the pace a bit," Bittle said. "We are building on different scenarios to the ones we have done in the past. We want to try new drills to see how we'll react to the new conditions." It is of utmost importance that Sailors know what to expect during GQ and to obtain their damage control qualification.

"General quarters prepares all Sailors for the event of an actual casualty," Losier said. "It improves the ship's mission readiness by allowing Sailors to become aware of what could happen and how to deal with it if it actually does. "Every Sailor should become Basic Damage Control qualified," Bittle said. "It will teach them how to properly set fire boundaries, what to look for before opening a hatch or door, what kind of personal protective gear they need and will use, and how to use portable extinguishers. Sailors can review Damage Control books on Abenet (the ship's intranet)."

GQ involves teams of Sailors throughout every portion of the ship, from the flight deck, hangar deck, repair lockers, combat systems, to watch teams, each are as valuable as the next, Losier noted. "Everybody is involved in GQ; it's an all hands evolution. If one person doesn't participate, that's one more person who doesn't know their job. Everybody needs to be aware of what to do to keep the ship afloat." Damage Controlman 3rd Class Joshua Garrison, of the
Engineering Department and a team leader for general quarters explained that the importance of GQ is to fight for the ship.

 

"A team leader controls and directs the fire team inside a specific space on the best and safest way to put out the fire or combat the casualty," Garrison said. "If the ship takes a hit or has a mass casualty, it is our job and the rest of the ship's duty to save our lives. Whether it's training or the real deal, we treat everything as a real scenario." Repair lockers count as a big ingredient in the evolution of GQ.

"In each repair locker on the ship, there are 5 teams," Garrison said. "There's Fire Team 1 and 2, a pipe patching team, shoring team, de-smoking team, and dewatering team. My job is a damage controlman, but our entire job isn't just fighting fires, we also deal with anything that can cause the ship to sink or any irreparable damage. So all damage controlman have multiple jobs and are trained for multiple situations."

The ship's first line of defense on the ship is the flying squad. Before general quarters mode, it is the flying squad that attempts to fix a problem. "The flying squad is the ship's emergency fire team," said Ship's Serviceman 3rd Class Henry Ramirez. "The flying squad is manned to handle small fires and protect the ship from undergoing further damage. If a problem gets out of control, the ship goes into GQ mode and locks everything down."

Garrison explained that Sailors must possess a teamwork mentality to ensure tasks get completed in a safe and quick manner during GQ. "You meet a lot of people and we all look out for each other," said Garrison. "There are [yeomen] and [personnel specialists] fighting right along side us. The closer you are to the people you practice with, the more willing you'll be to help that person out. That's the family-oriented teamwork we want to instill."

Abraham Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet area of responsibility to support Maritime Security Operations” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080618-20 - Release Date: 6/18/2008 4:46:00 PM - By Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Ashley Houp, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37900

 

Coalition Officers Visit USS Abraham Lincoln

 

Members of the Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) serving in Bahrain visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 19 June 2008 while conducting operations in the Arabian/Persian Gulf. Coalition liaison officers -- 16 in all -- from various countries including Italy, New Zealand and Pakistan came aboard Lincoln to gain insight into the ship's capabilities and experience life aboard a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier. Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, and Lincoln's Commanding Officer Capt. Patrick D. Hall met the officers to welcome them aboard.

"As coalition maritime leaders, we have a special kinship and espirit de corps," Van Buskirk said. "It's a great opportunity to learn from and interact with our coalition partners." The officers toured the ship, viewed flight operations and spoke with members of the crew. Danish Cmdr. Per Petersen, director of future CMF operations and senior representative for Denmark, said the visit gave him an opportunity to learn about the capabilities of an aircraft carrier in the region.

"CMF puts a lot of emphasis on maritime security in the region," Petersen said. "There is a lot of smuggling of illicit drugs, persons and piracy. It is of great importance to the welfare of all countries that we have a stable region here." Petersen also said visiting
Lincoln was a very positive experience. "We're collaborating with different regional representatives from coalition countries, and it helps us better understand why things are the way they are," he said.

 

"We have a different way of doing business in Europe and getting down here, talking to people helps us understand how we can help and what they need." Director of Coalition Coordination Center at CMF, Cmdr. Paul Bunnell, said CMF aims to have all coalition countries work together as one. "We want to work as one cohesive unit to further the goals of CMF and U.S. Naval Central Command," Bunnell said. "There are approximately 20 countries that are part of the Coalition, and 15 are represented here today by the senior person from each country."

Abraham Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet area of operations to support Maritime Security Operations (MSO). MSO help develop security in the maritime environment, which promotes stability and global prosperity. These operations complement the counterterrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to disrupt violent extremists' use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080622-03 - Release Date: 6/22/2008 7:23:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arianne Anderson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37978

 

New Medical Officer Takes Reins of Lincoln's Health Services

 

“A new senior medical officer charged with taking care of the physical and mental healthcare of all Sailors aboard took the helm of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Health Services on 13 June 2008. "I am excited to be here. To me, being here is an awesome opportunity and challenge," said Cmdr. Ben Lee. "Lincoln is a premier platform out here in the Gulf, and I am very pleased to be a part of our mission."

Lee sees the assignment to
Lincoln as a positive opportunity as Lincoln is underway on a seven-month deployment to the Persian Gulf in support of Maritime Security Operations. Lee noted the effective way the staff works together. "When Cmdr. [Jon] Umlauf departed, he left a great team. They all work really hard, and I appreciate all their efforts. We are responsible for the care of all on board, and the team I have here is fully capable of accomplishing any task."

Lee arrived to
Lincoln from Pensacola, Fla., where he served as chief resident at the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute. He is a graduate of the University of California and holds a master's degree from San Diego State University and his medical degree from the Albany Medical College in N.Y.

Previous assignments for Lee include a family medicine internship and family medicine resident at Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton, Calif., and staff family physician at the Branch Medical Clinic in Iwakuni, Japan. Lee served as department head for family medicine at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Lemoore, Calif., as well as the senior medical officer at the Flight Line Clinic, U.S. Naval Hospital in Sigonella, Italy” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS080711-02 - Release Date: 7/11/2008 2:27:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Quinn Liford, USS Abraham Lincoln Public, Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38169

 

Lincoln Welcomes New Dental Officer

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Health Services Department welcomed its new senior dental officer on 22 June 2008.

Cmdr. Benjamin Young, who arrived aboard from Naval Hospital Rota, Spain, relieved Cmdr. Nevanna Koicheff.

Young, a native of Salinas, Calif., earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree in 1985 at the University of California in Los Angeles. In 1992, he  joined the Navy and received his certificate of residency in comprehensive dentistry in 2000.

Although Young has worked aboard ships before, he is adjusting to some changes that have occurred since his last sea tour. Not only is
Lincoln the first aircraft carrier Young has been assigned to, but it is also his first carrier since the merger of hospital corpsman and dental technician rates.

"The merger of hospital corpsmen and dental technicians has left a lot of us asking, 'what's my role?' Before, I would just be a dental officer. Now I'm the principal assistant to the senior medical officer. I've been more involved with the medical community, and overall, I think this merger has gotten us all to work toward what will benefit both the medical and dental divisions of health services department. We're not changing anything about what we do; we're just providing more service."

With more than 20 years of experience in dentistry, Young is more than qualified to take on the responsibilities of keeping the dental health of
Lincoln's crew optimal, Cmdr. Benjamin Lee, senior medical officer aboard Abraham Lincoln, explained.

"Commander Young has a way of pulling everyone together around him. He has been such an encourager and leader in the health services department. I feel so fortunate to work closely with him and enjoy his friendship and camaraderie as we work hard together in serving our Sailors"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS080730-15 - Release Date: 7/30/2008 8:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brandon C. Wilson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38758

 

Lincoln SAR Swimmers Make Waters Safer

 

“As USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) approaches the midway point of its scheduled seven-month deployment on 24 June 2008, the services of the aircraft carrier's search and rescue swimmers have not been required; however, the training for their vital mission continues.

Imagine a typical day for
Lincoln while operating on station, when the calm is interrupted by a distress announcement from the tactical action officer, calling "man overboard."

Within one minute,
Lincoln's search and rescue (SAR) swimmer team launches two rigid-hull inflatable boats, (RHIBs), from the starboard boat deck and heads out to comb the waters several miles off the carrier for a shipmate who has fallen overboard.

While en route, the SAR officer back on
Lincoln guides them to the location where the Sailor has fallen. Within minutes, they are at the site and make the rescue.

This particular time it is only their training dummy, "Oscar," who needs to be rescued. Next time, it may be an injured shipmate or pilot in need of rescue.

Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) Chris Boyce, assigned to Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 and one of three members of
Lincoln's SAR swimmer team, explained that this realistic training ensures the SAR swimmers are at the top of their abilities, ready to go, in the event of an actual man overboard situation.

 

"We're always ready to go just in case something happens," said Boyce, who started swimming competitively at 8 and has been a certified Navy SAR swimmer since 2000.


"It's dangerous out there due to sea conditions, the presence of sharks and debris in the water. We're putting our lives in danger to save another one's life," Boyce said.

Seaman Jordan Macaraeg, another member of
Lincoln's SAR team and assigned to deck department's 2nd division, said through constant training and exercises, the SAR swimmer team remains ready to respond to emergencies.

While both in port and underway, the SAR team has conducted several drills, simulating real-world events. The scenarios range from individuals falling overboard to civilian vessels experiencing engine problems.

"We want to make sure we are confident in all areas of search and rescue," Macaraeg said.


Ensign Darrell Cook assist
Lincoln's assistant first lieutenant for deck department and SAR officer, coordinator and trainer. He praised his Sailors, whom he described as a team with the flexibility, strength and endurance that enables them to function for a long period of time in heavy, rough seas.

 

"It takes hard work to stay physically fit and also it takes motivation to maintain your equipment at high level," said Cook, who is in charge of screening Sailors who want to try out for his team.

"SAR swimmers have to get in waters they have no idea about and that they don't know what is in it. So, in order to do this it takes bravery to jump in the water and save someone you don't even know."

Cook explained all of the
Lincoln SAR swimmers have successfully completed training while confined in a stressful environment at A-school. They are also expected to excel in military education, close-quarter living, teamwork and physical fitness tests.

The SAR crew also completed an emergency medical training course, providing basic pre-medical life support for rescued individuals, Cook noted.

"The skills of a SAR swimmer are outstanding because they have to always be top-notch swimmers, first-aid qualified and in great physical readiness," Cook said. "They also have to be the best in their required field of the Navy and be ready at a moment's notice. They are well-rounded lifeguards of the sea."

Cook explained
Lincoln's surface SAR swimmers and their air crew SAR swimmer counterparts can respond to maritime rescue operations at a moment's notice while at flight operations or even during special evolution.

 

"They play a vital role in this deployment knowing that if any one falls over the side, either the helo or surface SAR swimmer will have to respond, and respond is what they will do," Cook said.

 

Candidates who pass the screening attend a month-long training program in San Diego or Jacksonville, Fla. After completing the training, candidates return to Lincoln and must qualify for the carrier's SAR swimmer requirements and be designated in writing by Lincoln's commanding officer” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080624-08 - Release Date: 6/24/2008 4:42:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Johndion Magsipoc, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - ABOARD USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37899

 

HS-2 Changes Command While Underway

 

“Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 2, held a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 1 July 2008. Cmdr. Terence A. Hoeft took the reigns as commanding officer of the squadron, relieving Cmdr. Edward J. Iocco. Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, spoke to members of the squadron during the ceremony on the flight deck.

"It's sad to see a shipmate leave here." Van Buskirk said. "It's great to be associated with this group. You all are doing a tremendous job." Iocco will attend the National War College in Washington. Hoeft is a 1990 graduate of the University of Florida and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics. He was commissioned as a naval aviator in 1993.

Hoeft received his Master of Science degree in operations research from Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., in 1999. His thesis received runner-up honors for the Military Operations Research Society-Tisdale award. Hoeft's sea tours include
USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Dubuque (LPD-8). During these tours Hoeft received numerous qualifications including combat information center watch officer, command duty officer and inspection and survey coordinator.

"I've seen the Golden Falcons in action," Hoeft said. "There is no other squadron I'd rather be associated with. No other place I'd rather be. It's an honor to be the commanding officer of HS-2." In 2002, Hoeft reported to the "Chargers" of HS-14, forward deployed in Atsugi, Japan. During his department head tour, Hoeft served as safety officer, training officer and operations officer.

During his tenure as squadron operations officer, the Chargers earned back-to-back (2003/2004) Battle 'E' awards, the 2003 Isbell award and the 2003 Thach award for anti-submarine warfare and carrier-based operational excellence. Hoeft was also named Commander Anti-submarine Helicopter Squadron Pilot of the Year for 2003. In 2004, Hoeft reported to the Navy Staff (Assessments Division) as a staff analyst and action officer, working closely with the Joint Staff (J8). During this assignment, Hoeft deployed to Kuwait as an individual augmentee for six months, from August 2005 through February 2006.

Hoeft's awards include the Air Medal (strike/flight), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (5), Combat V, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (2) and other various campaign and service medals. HS-2 is embarked with Carrier Air Wing 2 aboard
Abraham Lincoln” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080710-22 - Release Date: 7/10/2008 10:28:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Adam Randolph, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38341

 

“080702-N-7981E-434 ARABIAN GULF (July 2, 2008) - “An SH-60B Seahawk piloted by incoming commanding officer Cmdr. Jack Olive takes the lead in formation from one piloted by outgoing commanding officer Cmdr. Shawn Malone as squadron personnel watch from the flight deck of Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during an aerial change of command ceremony for "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 47 on July 2, 2008. Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet area of responsibility to support Maritime Security Operations (MSO). MSO help develop security in the maritime environment, which promotes stability and global prosperity. These operations complement the counterterrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to disrupt violent extremists' use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans” (Ref. 080702-N-7981E-434 ARABIAN GULF (July 2, 2008)). http://www.cvn72.navy.mil

 

HSL-47 Leaders Change Command In-Flight

 

An air lead change took place within Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 47 for the first time in the command's history aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 2 July 2008. An air lead change is a change of command ceremony, done with the off-going and on-coming commanding officers flying their aircraft for the change of command, representing the passing of responsibility of the flight from one aircraft to another. Cmdr. Jack P. Olive assumed command of HSL-47, relieving Cmdr. Shawn P. Malone as commanding officer.

 

The ceremony and lead change took place on Lincoln's flight deck with members of HSL-47. The squadron looked skyward as Olive took the lead in the air for the first time. Malone assumed command of HSL-47 May 1, 2007. During his tour, the "Saberhawks" deployed to the Western Pacific and completed the second "Bravo to Sea" deployment with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 attached to Abraham Lincoln. Malone received transfer orders to Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, or OPNAV, in Arlington, Va. Olive enlisted in the Navy in 1986 and graduated from Naval Nuclear Power School in 1988.

 

He was selected for an NROTC scholarship to Jacksonville University, where he graduated magna cum laude in 1991 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in political science. Olive was designated as a naval aviator in 1993 and reported to Naval Air Station North Island, Calif. for flight training in the SB-60B Seahawk. Olive's sea tours include USS Lake Champlain (CG-57), USS Fife (DD-991), USS Dubuque (LPD-8) and USS Fletcher (DDG-992). During these tours Olive has served in numerous positions including air boss, safety and maintenance officer and aircraft division officer.

 

In 1998, Olive reported to Monterey, Calif., as the flag aide to the superintendent of Naval Postgraduate School. During this time, Olive graduated from the Marine Corps Command and Staff College. In 2004, Olive was ordered to Naval Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn., where he served as the strike helicopter placement officer. While there, Olive received a Master of Science Degree in operations management from the University of Arkansas and graduated from the Joint Forces Command and Staff College.

 

Olive's awards include the Air Medal (Strike/Flight), Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (Five), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and other various service and campaign medals. HSL-47 is embarked with CVW-2 on board Abraham Lincoln” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080710-23 - Release Date: 7/10/2008 10:32:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Adam Randolph, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38342

 

VAW-116 'Sun Kings' Change Hands While Deployed

 

“Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116 changed hands during a change of command ceremony conducted aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 3 July 2008.

Cmdr. Herb Carmen relieved Cmdr. Randy Blackmon of the "Sun Kings" in the presence of the crew, all of whom were assembled in the aircraft carrier's hangar bay.

Blackmon is transferring to Carrier Strike Force Training, Pacific, in San Diego.

Carmen served as the executive officer of the "Sun Kings" prior to becoming the new commanding officer. Carmen originally came to the "Sun Kings" from Commander, Airborne Command Control and Logistics Wing staff as operations officer.

Carmen was designated a naval aviator in 1993 and has served with the Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40 out of Norfolk. He also served aboard
USS George Washington (CVN-73) as part of Operations Joint Endeavor and Southern Watch. From there, Carmen cross-trained with the "Bluetails" of VAW 120 in Norfolk, and served as the aviation safety officer and assistant operations officer.

In 1999, Carmen became an instructor pilot with VAW 120 as well as the assistant training officer, quality assurance officer and E-2C flight demonstration pilot.

Carmen served with the "Liberty Bells" of VAW 115 in Atsugi, Japan, and also deployed with
USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Carmen has logged more than 3,700 flight hours and has been awarded the Defense Meritorious Service medal, three Strike/Flight Air Medals, four Navy Commendation Medals, the Joint Service Achievement Medal and five Navy Achievement Medals.

Based at Point Mugu, Calif., VAW-116 is embarked with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aboard
Abraham Lincoln” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080710-24 - Release Date: 7/10/2008 10:35:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Quinn Liford, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38343

 

Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Travis Prater, from Paris, Texas, checks components on an interconnection box used for inputting information on circuit cards used in the aircraft.

 

080712-N-1281H-129 - NORTH ARABIAN SEA (July 12, 2008) - Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Travis Prater, from Paris, Texas, checks components on an interconnection box used for inputting information on circuit cards used in the aircraft aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility to support Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as well as maritime security operations. U.S. Navy photo by Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Ashley Houp (Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=61312

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf (5th Fleet Theater of Operation), concluding her second cruise while on deployment from 27 May 2008 to 7 July 2008 and then steamed to the Gulf of Oman via the Strait of Hormuz” (Ref. 76).

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Gulf of Oman on 8 July 2008 and steamed to the North Arabian Sea” (Ref. 76).

 

Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Ferdinand Ajel laughs after taking a pie in the face.

 

080726-N-7981E-418 - NORTH ARABIAN SEA (July 26, 2008) - Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Ferdinand Ajel, from Avenel, N.J, laughs after taking a pie in the face as part of a Morale, Welfare and Recreation fundraiser during a steel beach picnic on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility supporting Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as well as maritime security operations. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans (Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=61905

 

Steel Beach Picnic Brings Abe Sailors Together

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) gathered on the flight deck for a steel beach picnic on 26 July 2008.

Sailors put work on the back-burner and played sports, listened to music performed by
Lincoln's own rock band, "Death by Chicken," and disc jockey Onitap of the ship's KRUZ Radio and enjoyed barbequed food.

"A steel beach picnic is a great morale booster," said Culinary Specialist 1st Class (AW) Joseph Tenorio, of
Lincoln's Supply Department. "It's a one-of-a-kind experience. Nowhere else in the world can you have a barbecue on a flight deck. It's definitely unique."

Machinist's Mate Fireman Phillip Smith, a native of Brooklyn, N.Y., and a member of
Lincoln's Engineering Department, said he had a good time at the steel beach picnic.

"The steak was really good, and I liked the band. It boosts morale and makes us [Sailors] feel normal again. It gives me that 'home' feeling."

Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Rashad Jones, a Los Angeles native, and member of
Lincoln's Engineering Department, added, "I think events like this make us more civilized to one another. We get to relax and hang out and not deal with the stresses of deployment for a few hours. I think we should do these more often."

As Sailors tossed a football around, ate steaks and burgers, members of
Lincoln's Supply Department's S-2, S-5 and S-11 divisions were busy cooking, organizing and making sure everything went as planned, Tenorio said.

"It's a lot of hard work, but it's definitely worth it. I am happy to do this for the crew. It feels like the Fourth of July. I just hope everyone enjoys it. It's meant to allow the crew unwind and relax."

Lincoln's Commanding Officer, Capt. Patrick Hall, said the steel beach picnic was a well-deserved event.

"You guys earned this, so enjoy it. I'd like to say 'thank you' to all the people putting this on for us. You all worked together to get things done and I think everyone had a good time overall. Good job to everyone"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS080730-23 - Release Date: 7/30/2008 9:20:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arianne Anderson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38829

 

Lincoln Sailors Rock Steel Beach Picnic

 

“Sailors performed as the band "Death by Chicken," during USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) steel beach picnic on 26 July 2008.

The five Sailors who make up the mixed-genre band aim to relieve stress, have fun and further their musical skills while deployed to the North Arabian Sea supporting Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom.

"We play all genres," said Operations Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Stefan Tillman, lead guitarist. "We want to play a little to cater to most listeners out there. Some rock, some metal, some alternative, some country, mellow rock - a blend to please the majority."

For Tillman, a native of Vacaville, Calif., playing the guitar is more than a hobby. It's a passion.

"[I enjoy playing in the band] for the love of just playing. I've always felt when I play my guitar that I cease to exist on this plane of existence. I become the music; I get lost in it; it becomes me."

Tillman said the band is a morale booster.

"It's also the camaraderie -- a chance to mentally 'get away' from the ship and deployment for a few hours. Music just makes people happy, and I definitely dig that."

Aviation Support Equipment Technician Airman Apprentice Christopher Youngblood of
AIMD, lead vocalist who plays several instruments, noted he's been singing his entire life. He was even selected to be a part of the Air Force, Air National Guard and Navy bands.

"I enjoy [the band] because we're all diverse," said the native of Toledo, Ohio. "Every one of them is married with children, and I'm 20, single and completely different from them, but the music brings us together"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS080728-04 - Release Date: 7/28/2008 12:44:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arianne Anderson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38601

 

USS Momsen Visits Cyprus

 

As reported on 5 August 2008, “USS Momsen (DDG-92) departed on 27 July 2009 after a two-day port visit to Cyprus.

During the visit,
Momsen hosted seven members of the Cypriot Navy, including Cypriot Navy Deputy Commander, Capt. Andreas Loannides. They toured the ship's pilot house, including all navigation systems, the combat information center and an exhibition of two embarked SH-60B helicopters.

Following the tour, Cypriot Navy officials hosted an informal dinner reception for the commanding officers and executive officers of
Momsen and USS Dallas (SSN-700), a U.S. submarine also visiting Limassol.

The rest of
Momsen's crew engaged in several tours, including a scuba diving tour, to explore coral gardens and sea life, swimming just inches away from barracudas, jellyfish and clams.

"The conditions were unbelievable, with crystal clear clarity even below a hundred feet, and very warm, comfortable temperatures," said
Momsen's Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Russ Smith.

"The wide variety of sea life and the ease with which we were able to move in and around the wreck made it the best dive I've made in over 20 years of diving. It is easy to see why the M/V Zenobia is considered by many to be one of the best wreck dives available in the world."

Several Sailors participated in a tour of several palaces and monuments throughout the island country. This marked
Momsen's fifth port visit during its deployment with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group.

Momsen, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, is homeported in Everett, Wash., and is part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, which is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations to support Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as well as Maritime Security Operations” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080805-04 - Release Date: 8/5/2008 12:51:00 PM - By Lt.j.g. Courtney Thraen, USS Momsen Public Affairs, LIMASSOL, Cyprus (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38920

 

Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen speaks to Sailors gathered in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

080827-N-9898L-064 - NORTH ARABIAN SEA (Aug. 27, 2008) - Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen speaks to Sailors gathered in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations supporting Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as well as maritime security operations. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis (Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=63216

 

USS Abraham Lincoln hosts Chairman, Key Commanders

 

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and several senior military officials visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) while operating in the North Arabian Sea from 26 to 27 August 2008. The visitors included Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of Multinational Force Iraq; Army Gen. David McKiernan, commander of NATO's International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan; Navy Adm. Eric Olson, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command; and Army Lt. Gen. Martin Dempsey, acting commander of U.S. Central Command.

 

The senior officers toured the ship, attended briefings, visited with Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing 2 crew members and awarded a Helicopter Squadron 2 Sailor the Navy-Marine Corps Medal. Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class Jesse P. Hubble was recognized for his efforts in rescuing seven crew members following the crash of a Navy HH-60H helicopter off the coast of Southern California in November 2007. "It was completely unexpected, but extremely appreciated," Hubble, a San Diego native, said.

 

"It's a really big day for me." Mullen congratulated Hubble and addressed the Helicopter Squadron 2 and Lincoln crews. "Thank you," he said. "You represent the thousands of shipmates who couldn't be here. I want to express my -- our -- gratitude for everything you do out here." Mullen said he believes today's Navy is the best it's been. "I've been around for a very long time," he said. "Hands down, you're the best I've ever seen. We couldn't do this without you and your families' support. It's truly been spectacular in the last seven years." Mullen said the visit was a wonderful experience. "Thank you for the hospitality," he said over the ship's announcing system.

 

"It's a terrific ship, a terrific crew, and I can't say enough. From the captain down to the folks that prepare the meals and make the screws turn, you're doing an excellent job." Mullen reminded Lincoln Sailors not to become complacent in their jobs as they near the end of their deployment. "You've done a great job so far," he said. "Keep your heads in the game, and get Lincoln home safely." Petraeus and Mullen walked throughout the crowds meeting Sailors, and Mullen posed for pictures and passed out coins.

 

Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class James E. Harrison, from Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department, said meeting Mullen was a unique experience. "He gave me my first coin," Harrison said. "I doubt I'll be able to top it. I think it's really neat that he took time out of his busy schedule to hang out with us and see how we live out here on the ship." The chairman had more words of praise for the deployed Sailors. "Thanks for what you are doing -- for serving your country, especially during this critical time," Mullen said.

 

"Lincoln and [Carrier Strike Group 9] have an exceptional reputation." Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, the strike group commander, congratulated the crew for a job well done in facilitating the visit. "Thank you for all of the hard work and helping out to make this visit a success," he said. "The visit went very well, and I think they had a good time visiting with you guys. Good job"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080904-18 - Release Date: 9/4/2008 3:56:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arianne A. Anderson).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=39426

 

Reagan Launches First Sorties in Support of OEF

 

“The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group assumed the duties as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 50 on 28 August 2008, and launched its first sorties into Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 departed the decks of the strike group’s flagship, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) bound for Afghanistan to support coalition ground forces. “This is the mission we’ve been training for almost a year to carry out,” said Rear Adm. Phil Wisecup, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 7.

 

“Every Sailor in this strike group has tremendous focus right now; our pilots and maintenance crews are extremely sharp, and we’ll do our part to help coalition troops and foster security in Afghanistan.” Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group relieved the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group who has operated in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations (AOO) since April. Ronald Reagan is joined by the guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) and relieves Abraham Lincoln on station. The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group performed the CTF 50 mission for just over four months.

 

Other CSG-7 ships are supporting Maritime Security Operations (MSO) while deployed to the region. The guided-missile destroyers USS Decatur (DDG-73), USS Howard (DDG-83) and USS Gridley (DDG-101), as well as the guided-missile frigate USS Thach (FFG-43) joined Coalition Task Forces 152 and 150 help deter destabilizing activities and ensure a lawful maritime order in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, Arabian Sea, Gulf of Oman and Gulf of Aden. “Abraham Lincoln and her Sailors performed incredibly well,” said Capt. Kenneth Norton, Ronald Reagan’s commanding officer. “We received an outstanding turnover from Lincoln, and we’re here to provide the same high level of support to our coalition troops.”

 

The squadrons of CVW-14 include the “Redcocks” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22, the “Fist of the Fleet” of VFA-25, the “Stingers” of VFA-113, the “Eagles” of VFA-115, the “Black Eagles” of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 113, the “Cougars” of Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 139, and the “Black Knights” of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 4. The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the region. Operations in the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command area of operations are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States’ commitment to security, which promotes stability and global prosperity” (Ref. By Lieutenant Ron Flanders USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs).

http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/111.html

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed from the North Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean and Strait of Malacca shortly after 28 August 2008, operating in the North Arabian Sea in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from 9 July to shortly after 28 August 2008.

 

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) approaches the Military Sealift Command dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Richard C. Byrd (T-AKE 4) during an underway replenishment.

 

080907-N-7981E-148 - INDIAN OCEAN (Sept. 7, 2008) - The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) approaches the Military Sealift Command dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Richard C. Byrd (T-AKE 4) during an underway replenishment between Byrd and ships from USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group. The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans/Released) “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) area of operations was not reported from 29 August to 9 September 2008 area of operations not reported http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=63713

 

Cambodian Officials Pay Visit to Abe

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea on 10 September 2008, during which time Cambodian military and embassy staff members paid a visit to Abraham Lincoln on the 10th, in a display of camaraderie for military-to-military servicemembers.

 

The visitors were escorted by Charges de Affairs, Piper Campbell of the U.S. Embassy to the Kingdom of Cambodia and included Cambodian Deputy Prime Minister H.E. General Nhek Bun Chhay; advisor to the Cambodian Prime Minister, H. E. Om Yentieng; Secretary of State to Civil Aviation, H.E. Mao Havannal; Commander, Cambodian Army and Deputy Commander in Chief, Gen. Meas Sophea; and Commander, Royal Cambodian Air Force, Lt. Gen. Soeung Samnang.

 

Nhek said the guests greatly enjoyed the tour, as it was a first-time experience for all present. "This is my first time to visit this great ship, and this is a great honor for us in joining in this visit," Nhek said. "I think that this visit is helping build up stronger relationships between Cambodia and the United States." The visit on board Lincoln marks an event that is part of a turning point in the relationship between Cambodian military and U.S. military forces.

 

Campbell said for a country, whose past is full of militant strife, the new era is one that many are looking forward to with optimism. "We brought a range of Cambodian military and civilian leaders as well as a number of Cambodian press today," Campbell said. "We have been really working to strengthen the U.S.-Cambodian relationship, and a big part of that is having Cambodian officials both on the military and civilian side understand the goals and the capabilities of the U.S. military, so a visit like this is a great opportunity to expose them to what an aircraft carrier does when it is underway."

 

This type of is a key stepping-stone in the re-establishment of military-to-military relationships for the two countries, Campbell said. "As you may know, the U.S. did not have any diplomatic relationship with Cambodia for almost 30 years," she said. "When you go through a process of having almost no military-to-military relationship you really have to take small steps to start to build up the understanding."

 

The guests watched flight operations on Lincoln's flight deck and viewed a static display of an SH-60F helicopter from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 and an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the Kestrels of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137. As the visit drew to a close Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk and Meas exchanged gifts in the captain's in-port cabin.

 

Meas expressed his joy and gratitude for the tour on board Lincoln by saying he hopes the visit will be a precursor to continued good relationships between the militaries of Cambodia and the U.S. The USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. Operating in the Indian Ocean, South China Sea and Western Pacific, the U.S. 7th Fleet is the largest of the forward-deployed U.S. fleets covering 52 million square miles, with approximately 60-70 ships, 200-300 aircraft and 40,000 Sailors and Marines assigned at any given time” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080913-06 - Release Date: 9/13/2008 7:32:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Quinn Liford, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - SOUTH CHINA SEA (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=39715

 

An SH-60F Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the

 

080909-N-7981E-072 - SOUTH CHINA SEA (Sept. 9, 2008) - An SH-60F Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 2 patrols near the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) as the ship and its strike group transit the Straits of Malacca. The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=63791

 

Senior Cambodian civilian and military officials observe flight operations aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

 

080910-N-7981E-118 - SOUTH CHINA SEA (Sept. 10, 2008) - Senior Cambodian civilian and military officials observe flight operations aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). The Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=63798

 

Thai Navy, Embassy Officials Visit Lincoln

 

Thailand military and embassy staff members visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to tour the ship and meet with the crew on 11 September 2008.

The visitors included Deputy Chief of Staff, Royal Thai Navy, Vice Adm. Soopakorn Booranadiloak; Royal Thai Navy Foreign Liaison Department Capt. Chonlathis Navanugraha; Col. Joe Corso, U.S. Embassy; and Col. Jacques LeBlanc, Canadian Embassy. Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9 Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk welcomed the guests.

"Welcome aboard and thank you for coming. It's an honor to have you here," Van Buskirk said. "Thailand's naval forces and those of the United States have many shared traditions. Working together with partner nations is critical to ensuring peace and stability in the region.

We look forward to our ongoing professional exchanges and the continued development of our Pacific Rim relationship."

The distinguished visitors were shown flight operations on
Lincoln's flight deck, a static display of an SH-60F helicopter from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 and an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the Kestrels of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137. Soopakorn said he enjoyed flight operations and the visit as a whole.

"It's great to be here," he said. "It was great to see the aircraft take off and land. I think the visit went very [well]." Soopakorn also said he would like the Royal Thai Navy and the U.S. Navy to work together in the future.

"I appreciate your time," he said. "We found it [gave my staff and I] a lot of information, and I hope that we can understand your Navy and coordinate in the future."

The visit was a prelude to
Lincoln's port visit to Thailand, where Lincoln will host several other distinguished visitors during a banquet and scheduled tours” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080913-14 - Release Date: 9/13/2008 9:26:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialists 2nd Class Arianne A. Anderson - SOUTH CHINA SEA (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=39716

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port of call at Laem Chabang, Thailand on 12 September 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific on 16 September 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

The aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) is underway during a transit of the Pacific Ocean.

 

080927-N-7981E-922 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 27, 2008) - The aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is underway during a transit of the Pacific Ocean. The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=64716

 

The guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG 71) steams in the Indian Ocean supporting maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

 

080923-N-2183K-024 - INDIAN OCEAN (Sept. 23, 2008) - The guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71) steams in the Indian Ocean supporting maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Dustin Kelling/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=64447

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 16 to 29 September 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port of call at Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 30 September 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

The guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG 97) steams alongside USS Peleliu (LHA 5).

 

081001-N-2183K-075 - INDIAN OCEAN (Oct. 1, 2008) -  The guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) steams alongside USS Peleliu (LHA-5) in preparing for a refueling at sea. Peleliu and Halsey are part of the Peleliu Expeditionary Strike Group deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Dustin Kelling/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=64805

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) departed Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 3 October 2008 with friends and family aboard for a “Tiger Cruise”, visiting from 30 September to 2 October 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

CVW-2 Changes Command in Elevated Style

 

“Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 held an airborne change of command ceremony on 6 October 2008. In a display of aerial power and maneuverability, Capt. John C. Aquilino, of Huntington, N.Y., handed over the reins of CVW 2, to Capt. Alton Ross, of Baton Rouge, La.. Aquilino, flying an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the "Kestrels" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137, passed command of CVW 2 to Ross, flying in an F/A-18C Hornet from the "Blue Blasters" of VFA-34, while performing a fly-by of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), operating in the Pacific Ocean.

Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9, officiated the ceremony from an F/A-18F
Super Hornet from the "Bounty Hunters" of VFA-2. Aquilino said he will take a lot of great memories away from this tour. "I'll never forget this whole tour. The entire team Broadsword and Lincoln team completely melded. To come out here, to the amount of flying we did, the amount of support for our troops on the ground, to do every bit of it safely will be my absolute greatest accomplishment," Aquilino said, adding, "To bring everybody back with all our airplanes, that's all I ever wanted to do.

 

On top of that we just did everything so well. I'm so proud of all of the guys and girls that supported this whole Broadsword, Lincoln team." Aquilino has commanded CVW-2 since August 2007. While deployed with Lincoln, the air wing conducted maritime security operations with regional allies and supported Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. During this time, CVW-2 flew more than 3,600 sorties and worked more than 10,000 flight hours for OIF. For OEF, they flew more than 3,500 sorties and worked over 11,000 flight hours.

 

During the deployment, the air wing flew more than 10,000 sorties and worked more than 28,000 flight hours while under Aquilino. The air wing also conducted more than 7,900 traps, or landings, aboard Lincoln. Ross is the 41st commander of CVW-2, which is composed of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 47 and Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 2, Carrier Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30, Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116, Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131, VFA-151, VFA-34, VFA-2 and VFA-137.

Aquilino is awaiting orders to his next command, but says he feels good about how he left
CVW-2. "The flight was terrific; like any aviator I love to fly. It's a passion that only aviators understand. It was a great way for me to go out- to go with the air wing- and turnover the air wing to a great new CAG," Aquilino said” (Ref. Story Number: NNS081009-12 - Release Date: 10/9/2008 5:46:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James Bournes, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40211

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a “Tiger Cruise” en route to San Diego, Ca. from 3 to 7 October 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

Cmdr. Terrence Hoeft kisses his girlfriend after landing at Naval Air Station North Island.

 

081007-N-7643B-002 - SAN DIEGO (Oct. 7, 2008) - Cmdr. Terrence Hoeft, commanding officer of the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2, kisses his girlfriend after landing at Naval Air Station North Island. HS-2 returned from a seven-month deployment supporting maritime security operations with the USS Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class David A. Brandenburg/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=65064

 

Lincoln Strike Group Returns to San Diego, Air Wing Departs

 

“The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI) on 8 October 2008, after a seven-month deployment supporting maritime security operations in 5th and 7th Fleet areas of operation.

Sailors and aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 disembarked the strike group's flag ship USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). The ship will get underway Oct. 9 to return to her homeport of Everett, Wash.

"There is no greater feeling in the world than coming back home safe and sound after a long and challenging deployment," said Senior Chief Aviation Structural Mechanic (AW/SW) Woody Behrends, of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2. "In that regard, we have the best job in the world."

During its deployment,
Abraham Lincoln worked alongside coalition partners in the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. The strike group, along with CVW 2 successfully flew more than 7,100 sorties and completed more than 22,000 flying hours, supporting coalition ground forces.

"Getting everybody back safely after such a strenuous mission half way around the world is a great accomplishment," said Cmdr. Terrance Hoeft, commanding officer of HS-2. "All of our hard work had led up to this moment, and it really puts everything into perspective."

In addition to their port visit to San Diego,
Abraham Lincoln will host a change-of-command ceremony Oct. 9, when Rear Adm. Scott H. Swift will relieve Rear Adm. Scott R. Van Buskirk as commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, before departing San Diego for Everett” (Ref. Story Number: NNS081009-10 - Release Date: 10/9/2008 5:38:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW/AW) James Seward, Fleet Public Affairs Center, Pacific - SAN DIEGO (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40245

 

Rear Adm. Scott Swift, incoming commander of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, right, Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, the strike group outgoing commander, and Vice Adm. Sam Locklear, Commander of the U.S. 3rd Fleet, salute the national ensign.

 

081009-N-7981E-089 - SAN DIEGO (Oct. 9, 2008) - Rear Adm. Scott Swift, incoming commander of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, right, Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, the strike group outgoing commander, and Vice Adm. Sam Locklear, Commander of the U.S. 3rd Fleet, salute the national ensign during a change of command ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln is returning from a seven-month deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans (Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=65082

 

CCSG-9 Holds Change of Command

 

“Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 held a change of command ceremony on 9 October 2008 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) moored at Naval Air Station North Island. Rear Adm. Scott Swift relieved Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk. Van Buskirk served as CCSG-9 since March 26, 2007. Under his leadership, the strike group completed a Western Pacific deployment and Navywide standardization in counter-targeting, missile defense and network defense tactical doctrine.

During his speech, Van Buskirk thanked the strike group's warfare commanders for the job they did during his tenure. "Their collective teamwork and superb leadership of their respective organizations and their sage advice and counsel were the catalyst for sustained mission success," Van Buskirk said. His next assignment is Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Plans, Policy, and Strategy in Washington. Swift grew up in San Diego, attended San Diego State University and received his commission in 1979 through the Aviation Reserve Office Candidate Program. Swift most recently served as Deputy Commander, Naval Forces, U.S. Central Command.

"In large part, due to the values instilled in me by example, I am secure in the knowledge that any strengths that I may lack are more than compensated for by the staff that support me," said Swift. "The confidence and self assurance I bring to the strike group is simply a reflection of so many who have, do and will support the strike group." Commander 3
rd Fleet Vice Adm. Samuel J. Locklear, served as guest speaker for the ceremony.

"This great strike group, centered around this magnificent carrier, is an extension of American will, the will of the people and is a guarantor of peace and ensures our success in war," said Locklear. "Assuming command is creating a vision and leading your team to attainment of that vision. Today the mantle of that responsibility for strike group commander has been passed to you (Swift)."

Abraham Lincoln is the flagship for CCSG 9. The Everett-based strike group is comprised of Carrier Air Wing 2, Destroyer Squadron 9 and its associated ships: USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Ingraham (FFG-61), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Ford (FFG-54), USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Curts (FFG-38), USS Rodney M. Davis and USS Russell (DDG-59).

 

The strike group commander's duties are to oversee operational training and readiness for the entire group and to maintain administrative functions and material warfighting readiness support for ships and squadrons” (Ref. Story Number: NNS081010-14 - Release Date: 10/10/2008 12:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Ahron Arendes, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - NORTH ISLAND, Calif. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40257

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 8 to 9 October 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) conducted a Tiger Cruise” en route to Everett, Washington from 9 to 11 October 2008” (Ref. 76).

 

Chapter XXII (13 March to 12 October 2008)

Part II of III - 28 May to 11 October 2008

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4