Abraham Lincoln pulled into homeport at Naval Station Everett, Washington on 30 June 2007, completing Drydocking Phased Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Kitsap Bremerton, Washington; Flight Deck Certification, Carrier Qualifications for FRS, Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) and Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of Southern California; Carrier Qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California and will visit Victoria, British Columbia; Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX) off the coast of Southern California; Holidays Season and Christmas Stand Down; Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California.

1 July 2007 to 12 March 2008

Chapter XXI

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2007 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XXI, Appendix I

 

Chapter XXI & Appendix I

 

“Approximately 5,000 visitors toured USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) brow, hangar bay and flight deck during Independence Day festivities at NS Everett on 4 July 2007” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

Lincoln Provides Everett Closer Look

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) opened its brow, hangar bay and flight deck to members of the public on 4 July 2007, as part of Naval Station Everett’s Family Freedom Festival. Approximately 5,000 visitors were treated to an up-close look at the Everett-based, Nimitz-class aircraft carrier during the event, which lasted from noon to 6 p.m. For many of the guests, it was a once-in-a-lifetime chance to stand inside an aircraft carrier’s cavernous hangar bay and atop its four-acre flight deck. “My brother was in the Navy and I always wondered what it’s like on a Navy ship,” said Alice Rumsey, a retiree who lives in Everett. “Seeing how massive everything is -- I’m just flabbergasted, and it’s such a patriotic experience being here on the Fourth of July.”

Under sunny skies and warm weather,
Lincoln’s Sailors rolled out the red carpet for the visitors, who were invited to roam and ask questions, and to ride one of the ship’s four aircraft elevators up to the flight deck. Sailors also hosted interactive displays to show off the facilities and technology aboard the ship. “We’ve been tying a lot of knots for people, showing off the man overboard dummy, and just answering general questions about what it’s like to live and work on a carrier,” said Seaman Brandon Anderson, assigned to Deck Department’s display booth. “I’m having fun; I’m a show-and-tell kind of guy and I love seeing people take an interest in what we do.” According to Lincoln’s executive officer, Capt. Thomas Nosenzo, the public visiting was a way of giving back to a community that has supported Lincoln so well over the years.

 

“Everett is a great community and a fantastic homeport and we wanted to take advantage of the opportunity we had to let the public come on board so we could show them a little of what Lincoln and the Navy are all about,” Nosenzo said. Following the public visiting, Lincoln Sailors and their families were treated to Fourth of July fireworks viewing and refreshments on the ship’s flight deck. Lincoln recently returned to Everett following a nine-month shipyard availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070705-10 -Release Date: 7/5/2007 12:57:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs , EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30417

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 7 July 2007, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, for Flight Deck Certification, Carrier Qualifications for FRS, Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) and Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

An F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the Fighting Vigilantes of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 takes off from the bow of Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) during flight operations.

 

070712-N-5384B-186 - PACIFIC OCEAN (July 12, 2007) - An F/A-18C Hornet assigned to the "Fighting Vigilantes" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 takes off from the bow of Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during flight operations. Lincoln conducted fixed-wing flight operations today for the first time since completing a nine-month dry-dock planned incremental availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. Lincoln is conducting carrier qualifications off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Justin R. Blake (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=48271

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Flight Deck Certification Carrier Qualifications for four west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS), while sailing in southern Californian waters from 12 to 15 July 2007 and then commenced Carrier Qualifications. The arrival of SH-60B Seahawks from HS-2 to provide search and rescue capabilities enabled the ship to begin flight operations. F/A-18E Super Hornets and F/A-18C Hornets from VFA-137 and VFA-151 followed them shortly thereafter. Test pilots from VX-23 performed precision approach drills to make sure that the ship’s equipment operated within close tolerances” (Ref. 378A).

 

Flight Deck Certification Gets Lincoln Back In Business

 

As reported on 18 July 2007, “Flight operations began with the arrival of SH-60B Seahawk helicopters from Helicopter Squadron (HS) 2 to provide search and rescue capability in support of fixed-wing launch and recovery cycles. F/A-18C Hornets and F/A-18E Super Hornets from Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 151 and 137 followed soon after and for the first time since the ship’s 2006 Western Pacific deployment the fumes of burning JP-5 jet fuel permeated the flight deck.

 

“We’re all really excited to see all the work we’ve done over the past year paying off,” said Lincoln’s Air Mini-boss, Cmdr. Keith Mims, during the certification. “It’s been almost a full year since we’ve had aircraft on board and so far it’s been as good as it gets; we’ve had great weather, great seas, and we haven’t had any emergencies or major problems.”

 

Mims said one major focus of the FDC process was certifying Lincoln’s Precision Approach Landing System (PALS). PALS tracks approaching aircraft and relays information to aircraft on board instrumentation, guiding pilots onto the flight deck and even landing the aircraft remotely if necessary. “(Air Test and Evaluation Squadron) VX-23 test pilots are performing precision approach drills to make sure the ship’s equipment is within very close tolerances,” Mims said.

 

“They have special instrumentation aboard their aircraft that allows them to plot their landings and lets them know how much diversion they’re getting; almost like a shotgun grouping.” The other side to FDC Qualifications was the human element of qualifying and re-qualifying the air crews of Carrier Air Wing 2 for carrier landings, and getting Lincoln’s flight deck personnel back into the swing of things.

 

A team from Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, critiqued every aspect of air operations before certifying Lincoln for full flight operations. “This is one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. Before they’ll give us 60-plus planes, we have to re-certify the pilots and ourselves to make sure that we’re capable of doing this in a safe and timely manner,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Brian Turner, a member of Air Department’s crash and salvage team.

 

“It’s baby steps; we did a few cycles in the day time and a few at night, building up to here we needed to be.” Besides launching and recovering aircraft, Turner said the Air Department performed taxi drills both at night and during the day, shuffling aircraft around the flight deck and hangar bays, and perfecting the complex choreography needed to operate aircraft from a carrier at sea. “For a lot of our senior people, it’s a matter of shaking the dust off and getting back into it after a year of not flying,” Turner said.

 

“But we also have a lot of new guys who up until now have been reading manuals and doing drills without aircraft. For them there was a lot to learn.” Mims said that FDC Qualifications are generally completed in three to four days, after which, the ship begins the process of qualifying new pilots on their first carrier landings.  Abraham Lincoln conducted Carrier Qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California from 16 to 21 July 2007” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070718-13 - Release Date: 7/18/2007 3:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). 

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30602

 

Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) conducts a fueling at sea (FAS) with Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO 187).

 

070717-N-7981E-903 - PACIFIC OCEAN (July 17, 2007) - Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducts a fueling at sea (FAS) with Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oilier USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO-187). Lincoln is underway conducting Carrier Qualifications as part of a scheduled work-up off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=48396

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived for a scheduled port visit to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 22 July 2007, conducting Carrier Qualifications for FRS from 16 to 21 July 2007 and Flight Deck Certification while sailing in southern Californian waters from 12 to 15 July 2007” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

Lincoln Leaves San Diego, Begins TSTA

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 24 July 2007, for Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) and Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of Southern California, designed to prepare the ship and crew for full integration into Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, visiting NASNI from 22 to 24 June 2007” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

Lincoln’s crew enjoyed two full days of liberty in the San Diego area while the ship took on personnel and equipment from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 in preparation for the next phase of operations. Prior to the visit, Lincoln spent its first two weeks underway since completing sea trials and a nine-month Dry-dock Planned Incremental Availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash. During the time underway, Lincoln completed carrier qualifications for the ship’s flight deck, including certification of its Precision Approach Landing System and Carrier Air Traffic Control, and performed carrier qualifications for four west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS), according to Lincoln’s operations officer, Cmdr. Paul Mackley.

 

“We spent the first two weeks out to sea getting our basic qualifications so that we could move on to the next phase of training,” Mackley said. “We met all of our objectives and got good reviews from COMNAVAIR (Commander, Naval Air Forces) and AIRPAC (Air Forces Pacific). In all, we did 275 arrested landings for our own (flight deck) certification and another 652 for FRS carrier qualification.” Lincoln also hosted a ship’s Materials Maintenance Management assessment assist team from Air Forces Pacific, performed two fueling at sea evolutions with USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO-187), and conducted a number of shipwide training evolutions including man overboard drills and live-fire exercises.

“The primary objective of
TSTA is to ensure that we can perform all of our self-sustained combat missions within the ship,” Mackley said. “It’s also our first chance to integrate with our air wing. Once we complete TSTA, we basically graduate and join the strike group.” For Lincoln's crew, TSTA will mean a busy few weeks as the ship’s operational tempo ramps up to ensure that they are ready for the challenges of the next deployment.

 

“There will be flight operations pretty much every day, a lot of general quarters drills to ensure that the crew is ready and able to fight the ship in any situation, and a few underway replenishments,” Mackley said. “The other major component is our air defense [qualifications], including Close-In Weapons System shoots and a NATO Sea Sparrow shoot.” The three-phase TSTA will lead up to a Final Evaluation Problem, in which the entire ship’s performance over a two-day event will be graded by Afloat Training Group and Air Forces Pacific before the ship can be certified by CSG 9” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070726-08 - Release Date: 7/26/2007 11:46:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30787

 

Legendary NCAA Football Coach Lou Holtz poses for a photo with Storekeeper 3rd Class Eric Davidson after signing a football for Davidson’s father.

 

070725-N-4166B-005 - PACIFIC OCEAN (25 July, 2007) - Legendary NCAA Football Coach Lou Holtz poses for a photo with Storekeeper 3rd Class Eric Davidson after signing a football for Davidson’s father. Holtz, also a best-selling author and motivational speaker, visited Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to tour the ship and meet Sailors. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordon Beesley (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=48750

 

Lou Holtz Talks Teamwork on Lincoln

 

Legendary football coach Lou Holtz paid a visit to the Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 24 to 25 July 2007. Holtz, also a best-selling author and motivational speaker, visited the aircraft carrier to meet the crew and to give his thanks for their service. Holtz observed flight deck operations, toured Lincoln spaces, and delivered a speech in the wardroom regarding the importance of leadership and teamwork. He spent the evening in the first class mess talking to the crew and signing autographs and had breakfast with the chief petty officers the following morning.

“I’m not here because of me, I’m here because of the sacrifice you people make,” Holtz said. “I can live a free life and have freedom of choices and sleep safely and not worry about my family because of the sacrifices our armed services make.” Sailors who grew up watching Holtz's coaching career were excited to see him, but it was Holtz who showed his appreciation. "Holtz said that he was proud of us for serving our country and defending freedom. It means a great deal to him," said Storekeeper 3rd Class (SW) Eric Davidson.

This isn’t the first time Holtz has shown his appreciation for service members. Just last year he visited seven military posts in Iraq over the course of a week.”I try to show the military how much I appreciate them,” Holtz said. “I just wish everybody could come and see the commitment and the talent and the ability of these young people.” Holtz is renowned for his inspirational speeches and his dedication and belief in teamwork. Holtz led six college football teams to bowl games within two years of joining each program. To date, Holtz is the only coach to ever guide four different programs to final top 20 rankings.

“If you want to fail you have a right to fail,” Holtz said. “But you don’t have the right to cause other people to fail. I mean if you want to fail by yourself, go do it, but nobody has the right to cause other people to fail. So any time you’re part of the team, part of a family, part of an organization, you have an obligation to other people. And you must honor that commitment to other people.” “That’s what’s made our armed services great,” he continued. “Commitment to your fellow [service members] and your fellow human beings is what motivates you to do that job to the best of your ability even though you’re tired, unappreciated, overworked, underpaid. You still feel that obligation and that’s what keeps you going and that’s what keeps us free, safe, and makes our military the best in the world: the obligation and commitment we have to other people.”

Holtz said he was astounded by the sheer magnitude of
Lincoln, and realized the importance of each and every Sailor’s role on board. “The commitment of people here is great,” Holtz said. “You go up on the flight deck and everybody has a role and everybody does it.

 

The magnitude of 5,000 Sailors on [board] when it’s fully equipped, that’s bigger than the city I was born in. Just to see how big this is, how well run it is, how efficient it is and how important it is.” “I love this country, I love our way of life [and] I love our freedom. But, you have to be willing to defend it,” Holtz said. Holtz said his father was in the Navy and when he was asked what he did he said, “I did my duty.”

 

Holtz said only much later in his life did he find out that his father was at Midway, Iwo Jima, and all the various major battles in the Pacific after 1942. “That was his duty,” Holtz said. “I just appreciate what you do. Not many people will say that. It’s never been more important than it is at the present time, amidst the dangers that we face”” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070804-04 - Release Date: 8/4/2007 1:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordon R. Beesley, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30831

 

Movie Exec Brings New Flick to Lincoln Sailors

 

Sailors had a chance to see the newly released movie, “Rescue Dawn,” while underway aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 3 August 2007. Simon Swart, Fox Home Entertainment general manager and executive vice president for North America, visited the ship and brought a copy of the new film, which premiered in theaters on 27 July 2007. Swart said it was perfect timing that the release of this movie came at about the same time he was coming to visit the ship.

“When I found out I was coming on board I asked the Theatrical Distribution Group at Fox for a burned copy,” Swart said. “I thought it was a small way to say thank you for what you do.”
Lincoln began its Tailored Ship’s Training Availability on 7 July 2007and has hosted distinguished visitors almost daily; giving influential people the opportunity to see what life is like on a U.S. Navy warship.

Cryptologic Technician (Maintenance) Seaman Ren Minutola enjoyed being able to see the show and having something else to talk about with her family at home. “It is awesome to be connected to what is happening on land, even though we are out in the
Pacific Ocean,” she said. The movie is about a Navy pilot’s tale of survival after his plane crashes in Laos during the Vietnam War. In the movie there are depictions of courage, camaraderie and of life on an aircraft carrier in the Gulf of Tonkin.

“It’s an intense, dramatic film,” Minutola said. “I like how the film showed how family-oriented the Navy really is.” Before Swart left, Sailors had four opportunities to view the movie over the Ship’s Information, Training and Entertainment TV system. Swart said visiting the ship was an incredible experience. Interacting with Sailors gave him a new perspective of Navy life. It gave him a chance to see what Hollywood has tried to portray in many films.

“You have no idea what it is like to live in confined quarters and the daily sacrifice involved until you see it firsthand,” Swart said. “For a moment you get a bird’s eye view of what is really going on.” He said he was blown away by the compassion and pride from every rank on the ship. “I don’t think any warrior exhibits as much compassion and professionalism as warriors from the United States military,” said Swart. “It is truly an inspiration”” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070809-23, Release Date: 8/9/2007 6:27:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Dennis Irwin, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31088

 

A RIM-7P NATO Sea Sparrow Missile launches the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) during a stream raid shoot exercise.

 

070813-N-4166B-003 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 13, 2007) - A RIM-7P NATO Sea Sparrow Missile launches the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during a stream raid shoot exercise. Lincoln's self-defense systems fired four Sea Sparrow missiles, engaging and destroying two BQM-74E turbojet-powered drone aircraft and a High-Speed Maneuvering Surface Threat (HSMST) remote controlled Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boat (RHIB) during the event. Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 are underway off the coast of Southern California conducting Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordon R. Beesley (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=49453

 

Lincoln Sea Sparrow Missiles Impact Multiple Targets During Exercise

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) tested its defensive capabilities on 13 August 2007 when it fired four RIM-7P NATO Sea Sparrow missiles during a live-fire training exercise. Two of the missiles were fired on BQM-74E remote operated drones and two were fired on a remotely-operated rigid hull inflatable boat rigged for remote operation to simulate a High-Speed Maneuvering Surface Threat. “The purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the ability of a carrier to defend itself against a coordinated air and surface attack,” said Lt. Cmdr. Matt Hendrickson, the ship’s tactical action officer (TAO) for the event. For Lincoln’s Combat Systems and Weapons Departments, the shoot was the culmination of several weeks preparation to ensure that every system was functioning at peak performance.

“This evolution really started four weeks ago,” said Fire Controlman 1st Class Adam Acker, Combat Systems work center supervisor. “Everyone in my work center has been working 16-hour days ‘tweaking and peaking,’ performing quality control and preventative maintenance on the systems and making sure we got a good look at everything before the event.” As Firing Officer’s Console Operator during the exercise, Acker actually pushed the button to fire two of the missiles. Acker said that the event, which pitted
Lincoln’s self-defense systems against fast-moving aircraft and a quickly maneuvering surface threat simultaneously, was designed to simulate the types of threats a carrier could be faced with while deployed in support of the global war on terrorism.

“They’re not going to send just one thing to try to take out a carrier,” said Acker. “This was a chance for us to see what a combined attack looks like on our scopes and learn how to defend against it.” For many of the personnel involved, this was the first time they’ve been able to put all of their training to the test and engage real targets with live missiles. “It was definitely a thrill,” said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Lee Johnson, a radar console operator for the event, who has been aboard
Lincoln for just over a year. “I have a lot more confidence in the ship’s ability to engage a target now that I’ve seen how everything comes together.”

 

For Lincoln, the live-fire missile exercise fulfilled the ship’s final qualification in anti-air defense for Tailored Ship’s Training Availability (TSTA), as well as qualified Combat Systems Department for a possible Battle Efficiency Award. “We accomplished our goals for visual shot and the event was graded as a success,” said Acker. Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 are underway off the coast of Southern California conducting TSTA” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070814-24 - Release Date: 8/14/2007 5:16:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31186

 

Lincoln Gym Offers Exercise With an Ocean View

 

As reported on 14 August 2007, “jogging with an incredible view of the ocean is now possible aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Normally on an aircraft carrier, flight deck operations and the safety precautions that go with them prevent such routines.

Instead, the Oceanside Aerobics Center recently opened in a sponson below the flight deck aft of the ship’s “island” superstructure and starboard boat launch. The new gym features treadmills, elliptical machines, and stairclimbers.

Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Leading Chief Petty Officer, Chief Personnel Specialist Brian Luckett said the new gym offers something to the Lincoln crew that none of the other gym facilities on board can. “It’s our newest gym, and it is a completely outdoor facility,” Luckett said. “It gives people a chance to get outdoors and actually enjoy some fresh air while they’re exercising.”

Whereas a newly renovated gym inside the ship and nearer the water line focuses on free weights and strength training, another gym is meant for toning, and there are several multi-purpose gyms, the Oceanside Aerobics Center focuses on low-impact cardiovascular exercise. Luckett said all the equipment in the gym is brand new.

“I’ve got six elliptical machines out there, four exercise bikes, and two rowers that are about to be put together,” Luckett said. While he admits demand is high, Luckett said having facilities like the Oceanside Aerobics Center on board gives the crew another way to stay fit and relieve stress.

“It gives them a chance to wind down,” Luckett said. “When the crew is exercising, they’re staying healthy, and not having to focus on their jobs all the time. It gives them the chance to do something else.”

Luckett said the reason for installing the Oceanside Aerobics Center was to offer more variety to the crew. “It just gives people another choice when it comes to exercising,” Luckett said. “
MWR is just trying to create many different possibilities to keep things new and exciting.”

Luckett said
MWR will continue to add new activities for the ship’s crew in an effort to improve Lincoln's quality of life. “We should be starting bingo here soon, and we’re looking at other things to keep it fun,” Luckett said” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070814-19 - Release Date: 8/14/2007 4:15:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brad Wages, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31035

 

Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) rolls off the high sea toward home at Naval Station Everett.

 

070820-N-8029B-035 - EVERETT, Wash. (Aug. 20, 2007) - Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) rolls off the high sea toward home at Naval Station Everett. Lincoln is returning from performing operations as a part of Tailored Ship’s Training Availability and Final Evaluation problem off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jason Beckjord (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=49760

 

Lincoln Achieves Outstanding Grade During TSTA/FEP

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) blazed through its Tailored Ship’s Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) on 20 August 2007, achieving an “Outstanding” grade, operating off the coast of Southern California from 24 July to 20 August 2007. TSTA is designed to prepare the ship and crew for full integration into a carrier strike group, and FEP is its final, graded exercise. According to Cmdr. Chip Gaber, Lincoln’s strike operations officer, TSTA is a 25-day training period broken into three phases. “Phases one and two are eight days long, phase three is seven days long and then FEP is three days,” Gaber said. “Each phase builds on the last one.” During TSTA, Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 conducted over 1,000 fixed-wing sorties. The team also completed five at-sea replenishments and participated in 18 general quarters (GQ) drills. FEP is a graded 48-hour evolution. From GQ drills to flying squad drills and mass casualties, the afloat training group graded Lincoln and CVW-2 Sailors on what they learned during TSTA.

 

Since leaving Naval Station Everett, Wash., on 7 July 2007, Lincoln also completed carrier qualifications for the ship’s flight deck, including certification of its precision approach landing system and carrier air traffic control, and performed carrier qualifications for four West Coast fleet replacement squadrons, according to Lincoln’s Operations Officer, Cmdr. Paul Mackley. “We spent the first two weeks out to sea getting our basic qualifications so that we could move on to the next phase of training,” Mackley said. “We met all of our objectives and got good reviews from COMNAVAIR (Commander, Naval Air Forces) and AIRPAC (Air Forces Pacific). In all, we did 275 arrested landings for our own [flight deck] certification and another 652 for FRS Carrier Qualification.”

Lincoln hosted a ship’s materials maintenance management assessment assist team from Naval Air Forces Pacific, a Supply Department assist visit, performed two fueling at sea evolutions with USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO-187), and conducted a number of shipwide training evolutions such as man overboard drills, precision anchorages and live fire exercises, including a successful Sea Sparrow Missile shoot that impacted multiple air and surface targets. Lincoln’s crew was also able to enjoy two full days of liberty in San Diego July 22-24 while the ship took on personnel and equipment from CVW-2 in preparation for TSTA. With TSTA and FEP completed, Lincoln Sailors can look forward to a few weeks in Everett before the ship goes underway again to continue the next phase of integrated training. braham Lincoln conducted Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of Southern California from 24 July to 16 August 2007” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070822-07 - Release Date: 8/22/2007 2:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Kathleen Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, 76 & 378A).   

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31355

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 20 August 2007, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, disembarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California conducting Flight Deck Certification, Carrier Qualifications for FRS, Tailored Ship’s Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) off the coast of Southern California. Flight operations began with the arrival of SH-60B Seahawk helicopters from Helicopter Squadron (HS) 2 to provide search and rescue capability in support of fixed-wing launch and recovery cycles. F/A-18C Hornets and F/A-18E Super Hornets from Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 151 and 137 followed soon after and for the first time since the ship’s 2006 Western Pacific deployment the fumes of burning JP-5 jet fuel permeated the flight deck from 16 to 21 July 2007. The arrival of SH-60B Seahawks from HS-2 to provide search and rescue capabilities enabled the ship to begin flight operations. F/A-18E Super Hornets and F/A-18C Hornets from VFA-137 and VFA-151 followed them shortly thereafter. Test pilots from VX-23 performed precision approach drills to make sure that the ship’s equipment operated within close tolerances. Abraham Lincoln conducts a fueling at sea (FAS) with Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oilier USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO-187), while underway conducting Carrier Qualifications as part of a scheduled work-up off the coast of Southern California, arriving for a scheduled port visit to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 22 July 2007, conducting Flight Deck Certification Carrier Qualifications for four west coast FRS, while sailing in southern Californian waters from 12 to 15 July 2007, to include certification of its Precision Approach Landing System and Carrier Air Traffic Control, according to Lincoln’s operations officer, Cmdr. Paul Mackley. “We spent the first two weeks out to sea getting our basic qualifications so that we could move on to the next phase of training,” Mackley said. “We met all of our objectives and got good reviews from COMNAVAIR (Commander, Naval Air Forces) and AIRPAC (Air Forces Pacific). In all, we did 275 arrested landings for our own (flight deck) certification and another 652 for FRS carrier qualification.” Lincoln also hosted a ship’s Materials Maintenance Management assessment assist team from Air Forces Pacific, performed two fueling at sea evolutions with USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO-187), and conducted a number of shipwide training evolutions including man overboard drills and live-fire exercises. “The primary objective of TSTA is to ensure that we can perform all of our self-sustained combat missions within the ship,” Mackley said. “It’s also our first chance to integrate with our air wing. Once we complete TSTA, we basically graduate and join the strike group.” For Lincoln's crew, TSTA will mean a busy few weeks as the ship’s operational tempo ramps up to ensure that they are ready for the challenges of the next deployment. “There will be flight operations pretty much every day, a lot of general quarters drills to ensure that the crew is ready and able to fight the ship in any situation, and a few underway replenishments,” Mackley said. “The other major component is our air defense [qualifications], including Close-In Weapons System shoots and a NATO Sea Sparrow shoot.” The three-phase TSTA will lead up to a Final Evaluation Problem, in which the entire ship’s performance over a two-day event will be graded by Afloat Training Group and Air Forces Pacific before the ship can be certified by CSG 9. Abraham Lincoln with CVW-2 embarked departed NASNI on 24 July 2007, for FEP and TSTA off the coast of Southern California, designed to prepare the ship and crew for full integration into Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, in port NASNI from 22 to 24 June 2007. Lincoln’s crew enjoyed two full days of liberty in the San Diego area while the ship took on personnel and equipment from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 in preparation for the next phase of operations. Legendary football coach Lou Holtz paid a visit to the Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln from 24 to 25 July 2007. Holtz, also a best-selling author and motivational speaker, visited the aircraft carrier to meet the crew and to give his thanks for their service. Holtz observed flight deck operations, toured Lincoln spaces, and delivered a speech in the wardroom regarding the importance of leadership and teamwork. He spent the evening in the first class mess talking to the crew and signing autographs and had breakfast with the chief petty officers the following morning. Sailors had a chance to see the newly released movie, “Rescue Dawn,” while underway aboard Abraham Lincoln on 3 August 2007. Simon Swart, Fox Home Entertainment general manager and executive vice president for North America, visited the ship and brought a copy of the new film, which premiered in theaters on 27 July 2007. Swart said it was perfect timing that the release of this movie came at about the same time he was coming to visit the ship. Abraham Lincoln tested its defensive capabilities on 13 August 2007 when it fired four RIM-7P NATO Sea Sparrow missiles during a live-fire training exercise. Two of the missiles were fired on BQM-74E remote operated drones and two were fired on a remotely-operated rigid hull inflatable boat rigged for remote operation to simulate a High-Speed Maneuvering Surface Threat. “The purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the ability of a carrier to defend itself against a coordinated air and surface attack,” said Lt. Cmdr. Matt Hendrickson, the ship’s tactical action officer (TAO) for the event. For Lincoln’s Combat Systems and Weapons Departments, the shoot was the culmination of several weeks preparation to ensure that every system was functioning at peak performance. Abraham Lincoln blazed through its Tailored Ship’s Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) on 20 August 2007, achieving an “Outstanding” grade, operating off the coast of Southern California from 24 July to 16 August 2007. TSTA is designed to prepare the ship and crew for full integration into a carrier strike group, and FEP is its final, graded exercise. According to Cmdr. Chip Gaber, Lincoln’s strike operations officer, TSTA is a 25-day training period broken into three phases. “Phases one and two are eight days long, phase three is seven days long and then FEP is three days,” Gaber said. “Each phase builds on the last one.” During TSTA, Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 conducted over 1,000 fixed-wing sorties. The team also completed five at-sea replenishments and participated in 18 general quarters (GQ) drills. FEP is a graded 48-hour evolution. From GQ drills to flying squad drills and mass casualties, the afloat training group graded Lincoln and CVW-2 Sailors on what they learned during TSTA. According to Lincoln’s Operations Officer, Cmdr. Paul Mackley. “We spent the first two weeks out to sea getting our basic qualifications so that we could move on to the next phase of training,” Mackley said. “We met all of our objectives and got good reviews from COMNAVAIR (Commander, Naval Air Forces) and AIRPAC (Air Forces Pacific). In all, we did 275 arrested landings for our own [flight deck] certification and another 652 for FRS Carrier Qualification.” Lincoln hosted a ship’s materials maintenance management assessment assist team from Naval Air Forces Pacific, a Supply Department assist visit, performed two fueling at sea evolutions with USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO-187), and conducted a number of shipwide training evolutions such as man overboard drills, precision anchorages and live fire exercises, including a successful Sea Sparrow Missile shoot that impacted multiple air and surface targets. Lincoln’s crew was also able to enjoy two full days of liberty in San Diego July 22-24 while the ship took on personnel and equipment from CVW-2 in preparation for TSTA. Upon conclusion of TSTA off the coast of Southern California from 24 July to 16 August 2007, Lincoln returned to her home port, steaming in the Eastern Pacific from 16 to 20 August 2008. With TSTA and FEP completed, Lincoln Sailors can look forward to a few weeks in Everett before the ship goes underway again to continue the next phase of integrated training (24 July to 20 August 2007)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070718-13 - Release Date: 7/18/2007 3:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, Story Number: NNS070726-08 - Release Date: 7/26/2007 11:46:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, Story Number: NNS070804-04 - Release Date: 8/4/2007 1:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jordon R. Beesley, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, Story Number: NNS070809-23, Release Date: 8/9/2007 6:27:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Dennis Irwin, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, Story Number: NNS070814-24 - Release Date: 8/14/2007 5:16:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs Story Number: NNS070822-07 - Release Date: 8/22/2007 2:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Kathleen Corona, 76 & 378A).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30602 http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30787

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30831

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31088

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31186

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31355

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Everett, Washington on 20 September 2007, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, for Carrier Qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California and will visit Victoria, British Columbia” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377).

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet

EastPac

CVW-2

NE

20 Sep 2007

6 Oct 2007

Training

Operations

17-days

Victoria, B.C., Canada, her 4th visit while conducting training and Carrier Qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California from 22 to 28 September 2007, joining other U.S. Navy ships and aircraft parading through San Diego Bay during the annual Port of San Diego Sea and Air Parade, which is the flagship event of San Diego's month-long Fleet Week celebration on 29 September 2007.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific on 20 September 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln a Star in San Diego's Sea and Air Parade

 

“The Sea and Air Parade is the flagship event of San Diego’s month-long “Fleet Week” celebration, an annual event paying tribute to the city’s close ties to the military. The parade consistently draws upward of 100,000 spectators and is visible from most of downtown San Diego as the ships steam through the bay. Lincoln’s crew manned the rails in dress whites as the 90,000-ton aircraft carrier passed in front of the San Diego skyline and moored at Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 21 September 2007.

 

The Sea and Air Parade is the flagship event of San Diego’s month-long “Fleet Week” celebration, an annual event paying tribute to the city’s close ties to the military. The parade consistently draws upward of 100,000 spectators and is visible from most of downtown San Diego as the ships steam through the bay.

Lincoln’s crew manned the rails in dress whites as the 90,000-ton aircraft carrier passed in front of the San Diego skyline and moored at Naval Air Station North Island.

“This is a good way for us to show our pride in service and to give back to San Diego,” said Airman Hollie Hall, who manned the rails as the ship entered San Diego Bay. “You feel kind of like a star knowing that many people are watching as we come into port.”

Onlookers and Sailors were treated to sunny weather, perfect for a series of fly-bys and demonstrations from a variety of Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard aircraft.

“It’s just a beautiful day to be rolling into San Diego and it’s nice to be out here participating in an important event in an important city,” said Chief Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Glen Morris.

Lincoln is home ported in Everett, Wash., and was in San Diego as part of a scheduled port visit to Naval Air Station North Island following completion of Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications last week” (Ref. Story Number: NNS071001-20 - Release Date: 10/1/2007 5:34:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32227

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 22 September 2007, visiting from 21 to 22 September 2007, for carrier qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Carrier Qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California from 22 to 28 September 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) joined other U.S. Navy ships and aircraft parading through San Diego Bay during the annual Port of San Diego Sea and Air Parade, which is the flagship event of San Diego's month-long Fleet Week celebration on 29 September 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 30 September to 2 October 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln Friends and Family See the Crew in Action

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) stopped in Victoria for a port visit on her way back to her home port of Everett, Wash., after being underway nearly three weeks on 3 October 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, commander of Carrier Strike Group 9, and Capt. Patrick D. Hall, commanding officer of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), greet guests at a reception in Lincoln's hangar bay.

 

071003-N-9898L-109 - VICTORIA, British Columbia (Oct. 3, 2007) - Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, commander of Carrier Strike Group 9, and Capt. Patrick D. Hall, commanding officer of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) greet guests at a reception in Lincoln's hangar bay. Lincoln was in Victoria for a scheduled port visit after completing Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=51744

 

Lincoln Welcomes Canadian Guests at Reception Banquet

 

“Guests from Victoria, British Columbia, as well as visiting Sailors from Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Calgary (FFH-335) were welcomed to a reception in the hangar bay of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 3 October 2007. “The U.S. and Canadian Navies have had a long-standing tradition of mutual support and cooperation in the defense of our homelands,” said Capt. Patrick D. Hall, Lincoln’s commanding officer. “This relationship has sustained our two countries through exercises, military exchanges, and helped tremendously in humanitarian efforts and the preservation of peace and stability around the world.” Lincoln stopped in Victoria for a port visit on her way back to her home port of Everett, Wash., after being underway nearly three weeks.

“It’s truly great for our Sailors to be able to come here and enjoy a few days in this wonderful city,” said Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, who is commander of Carrier Strike Group 9. “It’s been 20 years since I’ve been here and the great thing is it hasn’t changed. Some of our other ships from our strike group have been able to come up here and enjoy the wonderful hospitality as well and see great things. We really do appreciate it.” One of the guest speakers for the evening was Rear Adm. Tyrone Pile, commander of Maritime Forces Pacific, Joint Task Force Pacific who welcomed
Lincoln to Canada.

“Warships off the shores of your country mean many different things,” Pile said. “To us, seeing the
Lincoln is a welcome sight. We work with you; we’ve been partners for many years and we look forward to many years in the future.” For some, this was their first time attending a reception of this magnitude on an American ship. “Although I’ve operated with the Americans many times before, I’m always impressed with your standards for ceremony and putting on a good show,” said Lt. Blair Saltal, operations officer on board Calgary. “I’ve never met an unfriendly servicemenber that wouldn’t go the extra mile for us.” During the festivities, entertainment was provided by Culinary Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jose Villanueva as he played San Francisco flamenco on his guitar.

Many of the visitors during the event took the opportunity to go on a guided tour led by
Lincoln’s Sailors. “It was wonderful to get to visit with our Canadian brothers and sisters in their Navy and some of the people that serve with us in our carrier strike group,” said Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Eric Schmidt, Lincoln’s command master chief. “This is the ground work for the ambassadorship that we preach. Each and every one of us is an ambassador, not only of our Navy, but for our country” (Ref. Story Number: NNS071011-19 - Release Date: 10/11/2007 4:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, VICTORIA, British Columbia (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32527

 

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Woo Choe helps a young girl into a fire suit at a shipboard fire fighting display in the hangar bay of Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

071006-N-7981E-131 - STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA (Oct. 6, 2007) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Woo Choe helps a young girl into a fire suit at a shipboard fire fighting display in the hangar bay of Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during a "Friends and Family Day Cruise." Friends and family of Sailors stationed aboard the Lincoln joined their Sailors for the ship's afternoon transit from Victoria, British Columbia to its homeport of Everett, Wash. Lincoln returned to Everett following 19 days away conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS CQ), participating in San Diego's Sea and Air Parade, and a three-day port visit to Victoria. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=51641

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Victoria, British Columbia from 3 to 5 October 2007, departing for Friends and Family Day Cruise in the Strait of Juan de Fuca on 6 October 2007. The tour was organized as the ship’s Friends and Family Day Cruise which started in Victoria, British Columbia, ending at Abraham Lincoln’s home port of Everett, Wash. Friends and family members were given access to many of the ship’s spaces and the opportunity to see their Sailors at work as the ship weighed anchor in Victoria and made the six-hour trip to Everett” (Ref. Story Number: NNS071011-19 - Release Date: 10/11/2007 4:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32527

 

“On 6 October 2007, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, conducting FRS Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California and paid a visit to a foreign port. Lincoln’s crew manned the rails in dress whites as the 90,000-ton aircraft carrier passed in front of the San Diego skyline and moored at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 21 September 2007, departing NASNI on 22 September 2007, visiting from 21 to 22 September 2007, for FRS Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California.. The Sea and Air Parade is the flagship event of San Diego’s month-long ““Fleet Week” celebration, an annual event paying tribute to the city’s close ties to the military. The parade consistently draws upward of 100,000 spectators and is visible from most of downtown San Diego as the ships steam through the bay. Lincoln’s crew manned the rails in dress whites as the 90,000-ton aircraft carrier passed in front of the San Diego skyline and moored at Naval Air Station North Island. Abraham Lincoln conducted Carrier Qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California from 22 to 28 September 2007, joining other U.S. Navy ships and aircraft parading through San Diego Bay during the annual Port of San Diego Sea and Air Parade, which is the flagship event of San Diego's month-long Fleet Week celebration on 29 September 2007. Abraham Lincoln conducted Carrier Qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California from 22 to 28 September 2007. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 30 September to 2 October 2007, stopping in Victoria for a port visit on her way back to her home port of Everett, Wash., after being underway nearly three weeks on 3 October 2007. “Guests from Victoria, British Columbia, as well as visiting Sailors from Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Calgary (FFH-335) were welcomed to a reception in the hangar bay of Abraham Lincoln on 3 October 2007. “The U.S. and Canadian Navies have had a long-standing tradition of mutual support and cooperation in the defense of our homelands,” said Capt. Patrick D. Hall, Lincoln’s commanding officer. “This relationship has sustained our two countries through exercises, military exchanges, and helped tremendously in humanitarian efforts and the preservation of peace and stability around the world.” Abraham Lincoln visited Victoria, British Columbia from 3 to 5 October 2007, departing for Friends and Family Day Cruise in the Strait of Juan de Fuca on 6 October 2007. The tour was organized as the ship’s Friends and Family Day Cruise which started in Victoria, British Columbia, ending at Abraham Lincoln’s home port of Everett, Wash. Friends and family members were given access to many of the ship’s spaces and the opportunity to see their Sailors at work as the ship weighed anchor in Victoria and made the six-hour trip to Everett (6 October 2007)” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377, Story Number: NNS071011-19 - Release Date: 10/11/2007 4:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, Story Number: NNS071011-12 - Release Date: 10/11/2007 4:45:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs & Story Number: NNS071011-19 - Release Date: 10/11/2007 4:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Geoffrey Lewis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, VICTORIA, British Columbia (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32227

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32465

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32527

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 18 October 2007, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX) off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76).

 

GQ fire drill aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

071020-N-7981E-056 - PACIFIC OCEAN(October 20, 2007) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Robert Stuns directs hose teams toward a simulated aircraft fire while acting as the on-scene leader in the hangar bay aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during a general quarters (GQ) drill. Lincoln is underway for a scheduled workup to include Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX), an exercise designed to enhance the interoperability of the carrier and its strike group. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=51919

 

'Unexpected Company' Arrives for Lincoln Strike Group's COMTUEX

 

As reported on 29 October 2007, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Strike Group 9 will have a bit of "Unexpected Company" during their Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Twenty four Sailors from Mobile Security Squadron 2 (MSRON-2), Helicopter Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (HVBSS) Team 1, calling itself "Unexpected Company," are embarked to conduct training.

 

The unit is assigned to Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va. It's the first team of its kind to reach operational status and is getting underway on the West Coast-based ships. The team of highly trained personnel specializes in boarding non-compliant ships at sea, using the element of surprise afforded by helicopter insertion. Equipped with night vision and state-of-the-art biometrics, they are capable of boarding a vessel in the dead of night, detaining the crew if necessary, and identifying suspected terrorists or subjects of interest.

 

"Prior to us coming online, the only people who could do what we do were SEAL units," said Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Kevin "M.O.D" Knorr. Knorr said that having a dedicated asset to perform the VBSS mission is important because although many cruisers and destroyers have their own teams, most are not qualified to operate at night or from helicopters. Also, because they are made up of Sailors from all different ratings on the ship, performing a boarding could affect their "mother" ship's operations. "When they stop to do a boarding, it takes away from the operations of the ship in whatever other mission they're supposed to be performing," Knorr said.

 

"For us, this is the only job we do. It's not a collateral duty. We train for it every day." Besides a long list of prerequisite training, including advanced security reaction force school, water survival, and non-compliant boarding school, the master-at-arms, gunner's mates, and boatswain's mates who make up the team are trained in various specialties depending on the role they will play during a mission, according to Knorr. Team members qualified as boarding officers supervise the boarding, operate the ship's controls if necessary, and perform biometrics on suspects, gathering intelligence and checking fingerprints against a database of known or suspected terrorists.

 

Helicopter rope suspension masters are responsible for ensuring that each and every "roper" on the team makes it safely from the helicopter to the deck below or up caving ladders when the boarding is performed from a rigid hull inflatable boat. The team also employs designated snipers who can provide support from the safety of a circling helicopter, and emergency medical technicians to treat injuries. "The best part of this job is being on such a good team," said Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Aaron "Rocky" Fitzgerald. "We're really close knit and we're all really happy to be here.

 

It's a chance to be part of something new and to be the first ones to do this." HVBSS-1 is part of Navy Expeditionary Combat Command, which was formed in 2006. The team stood up Feb. 1, 2007. At least three teams are expected to be stationed on each coast of the U.S., deploying in support of carriers and their strike groups” (Ref. Story Number: NNS071029-05 - Release Date: 10/29/2007 3:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32877

 

“An HH-60H Seahawk from HS-2 crashed while operating from the ship approximately 100 miles from the San Diego area, at about 2045 on 11 November 2007. Rescuers pulled all seven crewmembers from the water” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX) off the coast of Southern California from 18 October to 16 November 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 17 to 18 November 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific on 19 November 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 20 November 2007, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California from 18 October to 16 November 2007. As reported on 29 October 2007, Abraham Lincoln and Carrier Strike Group 9 had a bit of "Unexpected Company" during their COMPTUEX. Twenty four Sailors from Mobile Security Squadron 2 (MSRON-2), Helicopter Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (HVBSS) Team 1, calling itself "Unexpected Company," are embarked to conduct training. The unit is assigned to Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va. It's the first team of its kind to reach operational status and is getting underway on the West Coast-based ships. The team of highly trained personnel specializes in boarding non-compliant ships at sea, using the element of surprise afforded by helicopter insertion. Equipped with night vision and state-of-the-art biometrics, they are capable of boarding a vessel in the dead of night, detaining the crew if necessary, and identifying suspected terrorists or subjects of interest. "Prior to us coming online, the only people who could do what we do were SEAL units," said Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Kevin "M.O.D" Knorr. An HH-60H Seahawk from HS-2 crashed while operating from the ship approximately 100 miles from the San Diego area, at about 2045 on 11 November 2007. Rescuers pulled all seven crewmembers from the water. Abraham Lincoln visited Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 17 to 18 November 2007, underway in the Eastern Pacific on 19 November 2007 (18 October to 20 November 2007)” (Ref. 76, 378A & Story Number: NNS071029-05 - Release Date: 10/29/2007 3:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32877

 

“Vice Adm. Thomas J. Kilcline, Jr., Commander, Naval Air Forces, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 3 December 2007” (Ref. 377).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2008 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

“The Navy announced that it would reassign Abraham Lincoln Security Division from the Weapons Department to the Operations Department prior to October 2005. The ship proactively accomplished this move by August 2005, which thrust the division into a new environment. Abraham Lincoln rendesignated her Ship Self Defense Force the Naval Security Force, and utilized ship’s company to augment the force. She thus established the Integrated Security Force; each department on board supported a team of 102 sailors who melded into the Security Division to protect the ship while she visited ports. This involved extensive training regimens for crewmembers that included tactical team movements and basic law enforcement procedures” (Ref. 378A).

 

 “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 17 January 2008, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, for Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76 & 378A).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to the Southern California operating, pulling in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 19 January 2008” (Ref. 76 & 378A). 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 19 to 20 January 2008” (Ref. 76 & 378A).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway off the coast of Southern California from 21 to 22 January 2008, commencing on the 23rd” (Ref. 76 & 378A). 

 

Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) The Honorable Dr. Donald Winter is briefed by Cmdr. Terence Hoeft, executive officer of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 2, about the capabilities of the SH-60F and HH-60H Seahawk helicopters

 

080126-N-1229B-033 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 26, 2008) - Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) The Honorable Dr. Donald Winter is briefed by Cmdr. Terence Hoeft, executive officer of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 2, about the capabilities of the SH-60F and HH-60H Seahawk helicopters aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Winter is observing an anti-submarine warfare exercise during a joint task force exercise being conducted off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick M. Bonafede (Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=54869

 

SECNAV Views ASW Exercise Aboard Lincoln

 

“The Honorable Donald C. Winter, Secretary of the Navy, and several reporters visited the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (CSG) on 26 January 2008 to observe how the Navy conducts Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) training using mid-frequency, active sonar while protecting marine life.

 

The strike group is off the coast of Southern California conducting the training under the terms of a preliminary injunction that was partially and temporarily stayed in federal district court. Winter and the media representatives visited command and control suites on the aircraft carrier and on the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS Momsen (DDG-92), and flew an ASW mission with Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 2 "Golden Falcons." The strike group was participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) to prepare it for an overseas deployment.

 

"It is incredibly important for me to stay current on what is happening and see the changes that are implemented," Winter said. "It has helped establish a perspective for me that I can use in terms of future briefs, testimony and discussions with the press." Members of the press observed the Navy's protective measures to preserve marine life while staging meaningful exercises in the area. "I think this is a great opportunity to be able to actually demonstrate to the press something outside of the courtroom,"Winter said.

 

"This puts into context what it means to be able to provide proper protection for marine mammals and other elements of the environment at the same time we are conducting what really are some complex and demanding exercises." Before the helicopter flight with the "Golden Falcons,"Winter and the press were invited to the squadron ready room where a pre-flight brief was held, which also allowed time for the press to ask pilots and aircrew questions about marine life and ASW missions.

 

"Part of our mission is to report any activity, even if that may be marine life," said Cmdr. Terence Hoeft, HS-2 executive officer. "If we are going to use sonar, it is required that we start looking for any marine life 10 minutes prior to dipping. If we see marine life, we report it to the controlling unit and tell them the location, direction and type of marine life."

 

Hoeft said the controlling unit takes that information and shares it with other ships. He assured the press in an event any kind of mammal breaches while sonar activities are going on, it is required that the helicopter crew take action to protect it. "We have to stop if any mammal is spotted 200 meters from the sonar dome," Hoeft said. "At that point we will go passive on the sonar dome."

 

On board Momsen, Winter and visitors were given the rare opportunity to watch the glow of consoles in the ship's bridge, Combat Information Center, and Sonar Control suites as Sailors relayed information about a sighting and the ship reduced active sonar output to maintain a safe buffer zone. "What we simulated today was powering down our sonar as we closed within 1,000 meters of a whale," said Lt. Cmdr. Marc Deltete, Momsen's operations officer. "

 

When that happens we power down to 6 decibels, a 75 percent reduction in strength and range." Deltete said ASW is a core mission that the strike group must be able to practice to do well. "It's a science but it's also an art and if we don't have an opportunity to practice it we'll stagnate," he said. " At the same time, we have to strike a balance between our training and the environmental requirements of operating in this area." Before departing the strike group, Winter delivered a universal message for the Sailors he had met.

 

"Thank you for your service and I would like to thank your families for their support," he said. "God bless you all." Lincoln, Momsen, HS-2 and other elements of CSG 9 are conducting JTFEX as their final exercise in preparation for an overseas deployment in March” (Ref.  Story Number: NNS080129-04 - Release Date: 1/29/2008 2:03:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James Evans and Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW/SW) Patrick Bonafede, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34664

 

hips assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group, led by the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) during a straight transit exercise.

 

080126-N-7981E-556 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 26, 2008) - Ships assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group, led by the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG-92) during a straits transit exercise. Ships and aircraft assigned to Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 are underway off the coast of Southern California participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans (Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=54838

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California from 23 January to 1 February 2008 and then steamed to her home port of Naval Station, Everett, Washington” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 4 February 2008, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer, concluding Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California from 23 January to 1 February 2008, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 17 to 19 January 2008, prior to making a port of call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 19 to 20 January 2008, underway off the coast of Southern California from 21 to 22 January 2008, conducting JTFEX from 23 January to 1 February 2008. Abraham Lincoln conducted antisubmarine exercises and JTFEX 03-08 in southern Californian waters. The training again achieved notoriety in the media, however, due to the activists’ ongoing struggle about the effects of mid-frequency sonar upon the creatures of the sea. Activists succeeded in having certain constraints imposed upon naval sonar usage through January 2009, and matters boiled over for Abraham Lincoln a second time when the United States District Court for the Central District of California ordered further limitations upon such sonar use (3 January 2008). The Navy announced that the restrictions “created a significant and unreasonable risk” that impacted sonar training necessary to certify carrier strike groups for deployments, and in particular, that the bathymetric features and extensive ranges of the waters off southern California provided unique opportunities to prepare sailors for battle. President Bush concluded that with the provisions of the Coastal Zone Management Act (27 October 1972), and at the recommendation of Carlos M. Gutierrez, the Secretary of Commerce, that continuing these exercises concerned “the paramount interests of the United States.” The Navy thus announced that the service would take two important steps under existing laws and regulations to allow it to “conduct effective, integrated training with sonar.” That day, Secretary of the Navy Donald C. Winter also signed a decision of memorandum agreeing to the alternative arrangements, which included 29 voluntary adaptive management measures, more thorough reporting procedures and increased public participation (16 January). Secretary Winter subsequently visited command and control suites on board Abraham Lincoln and Momsen, and hunted submarines in a Seahawk from HS-2, to observe the exercise and to see first hand how sonar echoes impacted marine life (26 January). Journalists also embarked to view the training, and to inspect naval protective measures to preserve marine life while sailors still staged realistic exercises to prepare for the rigors of war. “I think this is a great opportunity to be able to actually demonstrate to the press something outside of the courtroom” the Secretary said. “…If we are going to use sonar,” Comdr. Terrence Hoeft, the executive officer of HS-2 explained, “it is required that we start looking for any marine life 10 minutes prior to dipping. If we see marine life, we report it to the controlling unit and tell them the location, direction and type of marine life.” The Honorable Donald C. Winter, Secretary of the Navy, and several reporters visited the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (CSG) on 26 January 2008 to observe how the Navy conducts Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) training using mid-frequency, active sonar while protecting marine life. A NATO Boeing E-3A Sentry Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) deployed from Geilenkirchen AB in Germany for JTFEx 03-08, and defended the carrier and her group from a simulated air attack (30 January). The alliance selected the multi-national crew of the Sentry to represent the European members as a key element of the NATO Response Force (17 January to 4 February 2008)” (Ref. 76, 378A & Story Number: NNS080129-04 - Release Date: 1/29/2008 2:03:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James Evans and Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW/SW) Patrick Bonafede, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34664

 

Abraham Lincoln Award Winners Visit D.C.

 

“Three USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Leadership Award winners visited the nation's capital from 24 to 25 February 2008 for an up-close look at how their government works. The Stennis Center for Public Service hosted Liberty Award winner Hull Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) Dwaine Bryan, Union Award winner Senior Chief Yeoman (SW) Kevin Martin, Statesman Award Winner Chief Warrant Officer Michael Hill and Lincoln's Commanding Officer, Capt. Patrick Hall, for two full days in Washington. The Sailors and their families spent their time seeing the sights and interacting with key decision-makers.

 

The visit included a stay at the Hotel George, personal tours of the Pentagon and the Capitol building, and meetings with the Director of Navy Staff, a senator, and a congressman. Rex Buffington, executive director of the Stennis Center for Public Service, said the trip served to recognize and honor the Sailors for their outstanding service and to increase dialogue between leaders in Washington and deckplate leaders in the fleet.

"We started the leadership awards program on the
Stennis and we've been expanding it to other carriers," Buffington said. "It's been very successful and meaningful both for the winners and for the people that they meet in Washington. It's an opportunity for them to get a glimpse into the quality and character of the men and women who are serving." During their first day in Washington, the group caught the Metro subway to the Pentagon to meet with Director, Navy Staff, Vice Adm. John Stufflebeem.

 

Stufflebeem invited the awardees and their families into his office to talk about key issues facing Sailors in today's Navy. Following the discussion the group was given a tour of the Pentagon, including a visit to the Sept. 11 Memorial, where terrorists flew a hijacked airliner into the building in 2001. After a gourmet lunch at the Ritz Carlton Hotel and a few hours of free time, the Sailors regrouped for an evening trolley tour of the city and its monuments, bathed in light under the clear night skies.

 

The tour included stops at the Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Roosevelt memorials. For the awardees, the words and history etched into the stone facades served as reminders of just how important strong leadership is in times of great adversity.
"Looking back at all the great leaders our country has had, Lincoln and Franklin really stood out," said Bryan, who was in Washington for the first time.

 

"When they were president, the country was in a bad way and they had to turn it around. Lincoln had the hardest job ever because he had to stay neutral. With all the hate and bloodshed between the two sides, he still worked to keep them together." The next morning the awardees and their families headed for the Capitol building to meet with civilian leaders on "The Hill" whose decisions have a direct effect on their careers.

 

At the Longworth House Office Building they met with U.S. Rep. Ray Lahood. Lahood represents the 18th district of Illinois, which contains the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln, and he serves on the House Appropriations Committee. During their meeting, Lahood thanked each Sailor for their service and expressed his interest in USS Abraham Lincoln's participation in the upcoming bicentennial celebration of Lincoln's birth.

 

The group then made their way through the underground trolley system that links the house and senate office buildings to the Capitol to attend a luncheon with a number of congressional delegates and committee members. "My favorite part of the trip was sitting down to lunch with the people from Congress and hearing their concerns and the jobs that they do," Bryan said.

 

"It was really eye-opening to find out how the chain works and how votes get through." Following the meal and conversations, Hall formally introduced each of the winners and spoke of their accomplishments to those attending. Civilian guests then introduced themselves and spoke about the need for such exchanges. "It is as important for military people to understand what's going on in Congress as it is for Congress to understand the military, so I hope you all have learned something," said Frank Sullivan, a retired member of, and current advisor to, the House Armed Services Committee.

 

"In today's government there's the idea that there's a gulf between civilians and the military that didn't exist in the past when nearly everyone in office had some sort of military experience," said Eileen Mackevich, executive director of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration Commission. "We know to be proud, but there's no connection. Abraham Lincoln was among the military all the time and I think we can all take an example from him and work to increase the dialogue between the services and the commissioners."

 

When the luncheon concluded, the awardees embarked on a guided tour of the Capitol, stopping at every major sculpture, painting, and historical point of interest in the colossal structure to learn the history and meaning behind it.

 

Those who followed politics couldn't help but notice that everywhere the group went in the Capitol, they crossed paths with high-profile political figures. "I was just in awe -- it's amazing that anyone can walk around in the Capitol of the United States and see these really powerful people going about their day," said Martin. "It's cool to live in a country where you can just walk right in. In any other country you can't even get near the process. During the tour we saw the Head of the Armed Services Committee in the hallway and then that night in the hotel I watched him testify before Congress on C-SPAN."

 

Before leaving the Capitol, the group took the underground trolley once again, this time to the Dirksen Senate Office Building for a meeting with U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell from Washington State. Cantwell shook hands and posed for photos with each Sailor and their families and thanked them for their service. As the visit drew to a close, each of the awardees was left with a better appreciation for the way government works and its impact on their lives and careers as Sailors. "Visiting D.C. was an incredible experience that I believe all military personnel should have a chance to do," Bryan said.

 

"Every young Sailor should come here and see why their job is so important. All the history that's here is a reflection of what people have done to secure our freedom." The Abraham Lincoln Leadership Awards were established last year by the Stennis Center for Public Service and Lincoln's chain of command based on programs that had been established aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Nimitz (68). The awards recognize officers and senior enlisted personnel who demonstrate exceptional leadership, and awardees are chosen based on feedback from their subordinates” (Ref. Story Number: NNS080328-25 - Release Date: 3/28/2008 4:58:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, WASHINGTON (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35504

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2007 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XXI

Appendix I

 

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2007 (Ref. 378A):

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 2007 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President George Walker Bush, 2001-2009 - 43rd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Robert M. Gates 
18 Dec 2006 - 1 Jul 2011 - 22nd

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Donald C. Winter - 74th

3 Jan 2006 - 13 May 2009

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Michael Mullen - 28th

22 Jul 2005 - 29 Sep 2007

ADM Gary R. Roughead - 29th

29 Sep 2007 - 23 Sep 2011

COMPACFLT, former *CINCPACFLT

ADM Gary R. Roughead - 57th

8 Jul 2005, to 8 May 2007

ADM Robert F. Willard - 58th

8 May 2007 - 25 Sep 2009

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM James M. Zortman - 29th

Aug 2002 - Aug 2004

Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9

RDML John W. Goodwin

7 Sep 2005 - 26 Mar 2007

RDML Scott Van Buskirk

26 Mar 2007 - 9 Oct 2008

 

*Between 1907 and December 6, 1922, and between February 1, 1941 and October 24, 2002. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CINCPACFLT

 

Van Buskirk Assumes Command of Abraham Lincoln Strike Group

 

“Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk relieved Rear Adm. John W. Goodwin as Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 in a change of command ceremony held on 26 March 2007 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) moored at Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070327-19 - Release Date: 3/27/2007 5:52:00 PM - By Mass Communications Specialist Third Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28538

 

Organizational Structure. Captain Patrick D. Hall assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 18 June 2007, relieving Captain Charles A. McCawley, tenth Commanding Officer, serving from 17 March 2005 to 18 June 2007. Captain …..served as Executive Officer. CMDCM  …..served as Command Master Chief” (Ref. 378A).

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2007 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT Patrick D. Hall

Executive Officer - XO

 

Administrative Officer

 

Administrative Officer

 

Air Officer

 

AIMD Officer

 

Combat Systems Officer

 

Religious Department - RMD - Command Chaplain

Cmdr. John Swanson. Staff: Protestant Chaplain, Lt. Cmdr. Michael Green and Catholic Chaplain, Lt. Peter Le.

Legal Department - Command Judge Advocate

 

Dental Officer

Cmdr. Benjamin Young, who arrived aboard from Naval Hospital Rota, Spain, relieved Cmdr. Nevanna Koicheff.

Engineering Officer

 

Deck - First Lieutenant

 

Communications Officer

 

Maintenance Officer

 

Senior Medical Officer

Cmdr. Ben Lee, former Lt. Cmdr. Lewis Diulus, surgeon general

Navigator

 

Operations Officer

 

Public Affairs - PAO

 

Reactor Officer

 

Safety Officer

 

Supply Officer

Cmdr. Martin F. Fields Jr.

Training Officer

 

Weapons Officer

 

 

The following accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 2007:

 

Abraham Lincoln entered Dry Dock #6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) on 8 September 2006 to begin a scheduled Docked Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) period” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060920-03 - Release Date: 9/20/2006 8:33:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25045

 

Abraham Lincoln conducted a six-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington from 29 August 2006 to 26 June 2007, conducting a fast cruise from the Pier B from 23 to 25 June 2007. The principal project at Naval Base Kitsap of which included preservation of the feed and potable water tanks, which required entering dry dock. During the ship’s availability, about one third of the 3,300 sailors on board Abraham Lincoln worked by taking daily ferries that ran between Bremerton and Everett, while many of those who normally berthed on board the carrier housed ashore at the shipyard. The carrier entered Drydock No. 6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, the longest dry dock on the west coast and suitable to accommodate Nimitz class aircraft carriers (6 September to 20 December). After the ship held a fast cruise from the pier (23-25 June) and left Puget Sound (26 June), she conducted sea trials. Abraham Lincoln remained at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 8 August 2006, to several days before arriving at at Naval Base Kitsap in Bremerton for a scheduled DPIA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington on 29 August 2006” (Ref. 378A, 1161 & Story Number: NNS060920-03 - Release Date: 9/20/2006 8:33:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25045

 

Abraham Lincoln pulled into homeport at Naval Station Everett, Washington on 30 June 2007, with Captain Patrick D. Hall as the Commanding Officer. Lincoln and crew spent the last five days being put through their paces, conducting numerous drills, high speed turns and stops, weapons tests, tests of anchoring, boats and other ship’s systems, and communications, navigation and radar checks, during Sea Trials in the Eastern Pacific from 26 to 30 June 2007, completing Drydocking Phased Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Kitsap Bremerton, Washington; conducted from 29 August 2006 to 26 June 2007” (Ref. Story Number: NNS071029-05 - Release Date: 10/29/2007 3:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32877

 

Flight Deck Certification, Carrier Qualifications for FRS, Tailored Ship’s Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) off the coast of Southern California. Flight operations began with the arrival of SH-60B Seahawk helicopters from Helicopter Squadron (HS) 2 to provide search and rescue capability in support of fixed-wing launch and recovery cycles. F/A-18C Hornets and F/A-18E Super Hornets from Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 151 and 137 followed soon after and for the first time since the ship’s 2006 Western Pacific deployment the fumes of burning JP-5 jet fuel permeated the flight deck from 16 to 21 July 2007. The arrival of SH-60B Seahawks from HS-2 to provide search and rescue capabilities enabled the ship to begin flight operations. F/A-18E Super Hornets and F/A-18C Hornets from VFA-137 and VFA-151 followed them shortly thereafter. Test pilots from VX-23 performed precision approach drills to make sure that the ship’s equipment operated within close tolerances” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070703-17 - Release Date: 7/3/2007 12:37:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Brad Wages, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30399

 

Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX) off the coast of Southern California from 18 October to 16 November 2007” (Ref. 76).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XXI (1 July 2007 to 12 March 2008) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2007 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter XXI, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4