Naval Station, Everett, Washington; quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time; Inspection and Survey (INSURV) at sea period; Naval Station, Everett, Washington and her Eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East, South China Sea and Java Sea, joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian, exercises and operations will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and hosted the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports and participated in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea, a month-long exercise designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations (27 February to 8 August 2006).

1 January to 8 August 2006

Chapter XIX

Part I of IV - 1 January to 31 March 2006

Part II of IV - 1 April to 17 June 2006

Part III of IV - 18 June to 7 August 2006

Part IV of IV - 8 August 2006

 

Abe’s In port and Eighth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XIX, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call.

Chapter XIX, Appendix I

 

 

Abe SOYs Discover Land of Lincoln

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors of the Year (SOY) got a chance to get closer to America’s sixteenth president and their ship’s namesake on 9 February 2006.


Air Traffic Controller 1st Class (AW/SW/FMF) Kyle Hempel, Storekeeper 2nd Class (SW/AW) Dametries Holmes, and Aviation Support Equipment Technician Airman Christopher Dionisio visited the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, along with other sites in Springfield, Ill. The trio were greeted by Erik Nelson, a Lincoln Library executive, on arrival at the new museum, which opened in April 2005.

 

Nelson said the new facility, located in the Illinois state capital is unlike any other that honors the life and work of an American president. “Some of our critics have said we are presenting entertainment disguised as history, but when you ask any of our thousands of visitors that come to see us every month, it’s obvious to them we are giving them history disguised as entertainment,” Nelson said.  The SOYs, escorted by Chief Torpedoman’s Mate (SW) Regina Halley, a Lincoln chief with ties to the region, were treated to two interactive presentations during their afternoon. The first was in the library’s $6 million Union Theater.

 

Lincoln Sailors got a chance to experience life in the Civil War era and learned about Lincoln’s legacy; the preservation of the union between the Northern and Southern states. The second attraction was a presentation coined “The Ghosts of the Library,” which gave Lincoln Sailors a more personal perspective on “Honest Abe” and the continuing work of the Lincoln Presidential Library. Following the shows, Abe Sailors toured interactive exhibits throughout the complex, learning about everything from Lincoln’s adverse youth, his days as a lawyer in Springfield, the chaos as the Civil War raged and Lincoln called the White House home, to his tragic death in Washington’s Ford Theater at the hands of John Wilkes Booth.

 

Hempel, who now lives in Oak Harbor, Wash., when he’s not underway aboard the “World’s Greatest Warship,” said he was impressed by the facility. “The combination of historical facts and state-of-the-art special effects created an environment where both young and old could get in touch with who Abraham Lincoln really was,” Hempel said. “Visiting the museum definitely gave me a new found respect for my ship’s namesake,” Hempel said. “I had read various books on him and still found a wealth of untouched knowledge by being a part of this trip” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060214-14 - Release Date: 2/14/2006 2:42:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class David Poe, USS Abraham Lincoln Media Department, SPRINGFIELD, ILL. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22295

 

Sailors assigned to Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) line up outside of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

060302-N-1658A-002 - North Island, Calif. (March 2, 2006) - Sailors assigned to Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) line up outside of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), as the air wing embarks aboard the ship. Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are deploying on a six-month deployment in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Ahron Arendes (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32445

 

Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Daniel Macbride carries a bin for collecting foreign object debris (FOD) aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) .

 

060307-N-7981E-083 - Pacific Ocean (March 7, 2006) - Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Daniel Macbride carries a bin for collecting foreign object debris (FOD) aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during a walk down and flight deck familiarization as part of a scheduled safety stand-down. Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway to the Western Pacific for a scheduled six-month deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans (RELEASED)  http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32566

 

ALCSG Takes A Day To Consider The Importance Of Safety

 

“The men and women of the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) took time during their transit West to the Hawaii Operations Area on 7 March 2006 to pause and consider the importance of safety in all that they do. The planned Safety Stand Down also fell in with a mandatory Aviation Safety Stand Down ordered by the Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) over the weekend in response to the rising number of incidents involving aircraft over the past several months.

According to Cmdr. Troy Johnson, safety officer aboard
Abraham Lincoln, the fact that CNAF ordered a Navywide Aviation Safety Stand Down that fell on the same day merely added to the already strong sense of the importance of keeping safety top priority as ALCSG deploys. “As we prepared for deployment, safety was one of the foremost concerns of both the strike group commander and the captain of the ship,” said Johnson. “Early on, we determined that we were going to do a safety stand down.”

Johnson explained that, at the direction of Commander, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, Rear Adm. John W. Goodwin, the stand down was expanded to encompass all the ships of the strike group, as well as the squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Aircraft safety, including hands-on training regarding Foreign Object Damage, or FOD, was provided by
Lincoln’s air department.

 

Departments and squadrons were mustered in the hangar bay and on the flight deck to perform a FOD walk down, while the importance of keeping the hangar bay and flight deck free of debris that could be picked up by and cause damage to a jet engine was explained on the public address system. Each department and division, as well as the squadrons aboard Lincoln, were mustered together to view a 40-minute long safety video produced by the Lincoln's safety department and Lincoln’s media department.

“We took a different approach this time,” he said. “The video was purely composed of Strike Group Sailors talking to other Sailors about some mishaps they had so that we could have peer-to-peer education. “A large number of the crew was riveted to the tape because they were able to see their peers discuss their mishaps, the causes of it and ways to prevent it," he added. "I think that it had a more positive impact than the standard Navy safety videos that we show people over and over again.”


It can be a challenge to keep Sailors safe on a command such as
Lincoln. “One of the things that we often talk about is that there is a huge turnover on this ship,” Johnson explained. “We average about five new Sailors a day. With that constant turnover, safety has to be constant. It has to be repeated so that each of our new Sailors understand the inherent hazards that exist on an aircraft carrier."


“One of the things we constantly stress is Operational Risk Management (ORM)," continued. "It allows the Sailors to take a measured and specific approach to their daily conduct not only in the professional lives, but in their personal lives.” Johnson explained that one of his goals was that ORM be a part of everything a Sailor does aboard, whether it is working on the mess decks, the flight deck, or even going on liberty in a foreign port.

“My number one concern is empowering each individual Sailor to take each evolution one step at a time," Johnson said. "I really want to make it known that each Sailor has to take a personal responsibility for their own safety. “But also, supervision is the number one key to preventing mishaps aboard. "It is also a priority to hold the khaki accountable for proper supervision,” he said.

According to Aviation Ordnanceman (AW) Richard Anderson, of Fighter Attack Squadron (VFA) 131, having a strike group-wide stand down was helpful. “We could actually interact with the ship and show them [safety while operating around aircraft]. It helps us get the word out,” he added. Toward the end of the stand down, static displays by each squadron and the departments of the ship gave ALCSG Sailors the opportunity to see what they hear about from safety petty officers all the time.

“Instead of having to go out and talk to each individual one at a time, and tell them," he said, "we can point it out in one lump sum” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060309-03 - Release Date: 3/8/2006 10:00:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22608

 

RSEP Briefs Give ALCSG Sailors Heads-Up on Pacific Region

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) have the opportunity to attend Regional Security Program (RSEP) briefs from 2 to 12 March 2006 while underway.

The briefs cover topics ranging from the overall picture of a Security Affairs Program to China’s rise as an economic power in the world.

“These briefs help Sailors better understand how the world works,” said retired Rear Adm. Stephen Loeffler, director of program development and regional security education.

The briefs, which are as varied as the region's naval vessels deploy to, are designed to give Sailors a better view on the foreign ports that they’ll visit at anytime during a deployment.

“There are briefs for everywhere Navy forces go to,” said Loeffler. “The briefs help raise regional awareness for a country’s history, political and economic situation, what influence the United States has in the area, current issues and cultural awareness and diplomacy.”

Loeffler added when Sailors visited foreign ports, they are acting as diplomats for the United States and that by attending these briefs, they realize that fact and become better diplomats.

The information put out, although broad and unspecific due to operational security (OPSEC), left an impression on both
Lincoln and air wing Sailors.

“I think it’s important for everyone to be here at these briefs,” said Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Richard Jensen, of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34. “They can get a better understanding of the Navy’s mission and [that of] other U.S. forces, as well.”

Jensen wasn’t the only one impressed with the brief.

“The subjects covered definitely impact the things we do,” said Intelligence Specialist 1st Class (SW) Jeremy Heyer from operation’s
OZ division. “The brief was a look at the big picture on world events. It was definitely a neat way to look at things going on” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060307-11 - Release Date: 3/7/2006 9:00:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22581

 

Navy Auto Source Provides Sailors Dream Rides

 

As reported on 17 March 2006, “Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with the help of Congress are taking advantage of Navy Auto Source on the mess decks during March. Navy Auto Source has been with the Navy for the past 50 years, helping Sailors stationed overseas find the car of their dreams at bargain prices.

 

Now, through an act of Congress, Sailors 12 miles off shore - or more in international waters - can get the same deals on custom-built Ford and Chrysler cars and even Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

Navy Auto Source Sales Representative Jiae Bennett is aboard
Lincoln, helping Sailors through the process of buying a new vehicle. “I’m not here to sell just any car,” said Bennett. “I’m here to sell the right car to the right customer.” Bennett carefully goes over the process by sitting down with each Sailor and going over their budget to determine what they can afford according to their rank.

 

“I’m not going to try to sell an E-1 through E-4 a car that costs more then $20,000,00” said Bennett. “I usually like to keep it under $15,000.00”

Sailors aboard
Abe found Bennett’s help very useful. “She was very knowledgeable,” said Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Donald Lynn. “The customer service was great.” When going over what each Sailor can afford, Bennett explains every step of the car buying process. “I want to help them (Sailors) understand about financing and insurance payments,” she said.

When a Sailor has finished their purchase with Navy Auto Source, not only are they helping themselves, but they are also helping their ship. The ship’s store earns a commission on each vehicle sold, and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) receives direct funding from car sales, as well.

Bennett will remain aboard to aid Sailors with their car purchases for the first part of the deployment, but if a Sailor misses their chance this time, they can still go to the Navy Auto Source Web site,
www.navyauto.com, where they can buy a car through email. Sailors can also wait until the later in the deployment, when Bennett will be back aboard” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060317-06 - Release Date: 3/17/2006 1:30:00 PM - By Photographer’s Mate Airman Tim Roache and Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22623

 

Lincoln Celebrates CPO Birthday in Style

 

“The chief petty officers (CPO) of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 gathered in the carrier’s hangar bay on 1 April 2006, to honor the 113th birthday of the chief petty officer rank. Command Master Chief, CMDCM (SW/AW/NAC) Michael Anjola, presided over the ceremony, during which he talked about the beginnings of the chief and their role in today’s Navy.

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“The word chief means taking first place, and denotes its senior position among enlisted ranks,” he said. Anjola mentioned some of the Navy’s earliest and most gallant CPOs, such as Chief Quarter Gunner George Hill, the first chief awarded the Medal of Honor. Hill earned the medal on July 9, 1872, while aboard the 836-ton screw steam gunboat, USS Kansas near Greytown, Nicaragua after taking decisive action to save his shipmates’ lives.

 

Also mentioned was Chief Water Tender Peter Tomich, who was killed during the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor aboard USS Utah (AG-16). Tomich stayed in his engineering plant until all the ship’s boilers were secured and all his personnel had left their stations, at the cost of his life. He was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously.

Chief Hull Technician (SW/AW) Carmen Viduya,
Lincoln’s equal opportunity advisor, reminded the group about the success and history of female chiefs. Viduya said that in 1916, women were given a glimpse of Navy life when they were allowed to join as yeomen, however many were released from active duty after World War I ended. Only a few stayed in the Navy as active Reservists, one of whom was Chief Yeoman Joy Bright Hancock.

 

Viduya said Hancock would be proud if she could see today’s Navy and how her accomplishments helped revolutionized the Navy for female Sailors. “Everywhere you see a chief,” said Viduya “you see a new generation, [more fit], smarter, and taking on roles never before imagined.” The ship’s commemorative “Chiefs’ Bell” was then sounded in honor of chiefs who have given their lives in service to their nation. Senior Chief Engineman (EOD/SW) Andy Rodolph read the names of fallen CPOs, as Senior Chief Yeoman (SW) Melissa Sandidge sounded one peal in memoriam of each fallen comrade.

 

Cmdr. Bryan K. Finch, command chaplain, concluded the ceremony with a poem and a prayer. Master Chief Master-at-Arms (SW/AW) C. J. May, who had the honor of cutting the CPO birthday cake, said that making chief was the highlight of his Navy career. “It gave me the opportunity to give something back to the Navy and to those people who have helped me grow along the way,” said May. “They (CPOs) are the Navy’s leaders and the reason the Navy is so successful.”

 

Throughout the years since their inception, CPOs made their impression on the Navy, and are looked to as the definitive leaders of enlisted personnel. Year after year, as CPOs gather to remember their humble beginnings, the importance of their leadership and experience are reinforced. “We are a special group of leaders” said Viduya, “and I feel that it is important that we talk about it in our own words every April 1, so no one forgets the trials the chiefs before us have gone through.”

 

Abraham Lincoln is on a routine deployment to conduct maritime security operations and to train with coalition partners to improve the ability to operate with naval forces from many nations” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060406-25 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 10:25:00 PM - By Journalist Seaman Mary Guiney, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23033

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN 72) 1st Class Association takes part in a Community Relations (COMREL) project at the Bayanihan Trust.

 

060408-N-5384B-037 - Pacific Ocean (April 8, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1st Class Association takes part in a Community Relations (COMREL) project at the Bayanihan Trust during a recent port visit to Hong Kong. Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway in the Western Pacific Ocean for a scheduled six-month deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Justin R. Blake (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33441

 

ALCSG Sailors Paint Childrens’ Home

 

“A group of Sailors from the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) spent a portion of their liberty time in Thailand at the Redemptorist Street Kids Home east of Pattaya on 21 April 2006. The Sailors painted, completed odd jobs, and played with the children at the home.

The visit, one of several command-sponsored community service projects (COMSERV), gave Sailors an opportunity to serve others. The event also provided many Sailors an opportunity to see a different facet of their host country. “I went because it was a chance to see a part of Thailand that I would not otherwise get to see,” said Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Christina Gillen, a Sailor from
Lincoln’s reactor laboratory division.

Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class (SW) Hillari Anderson, another Sailor from reactor department’s laboratory division, said she went because she thought her time was better spent at the children’s home than it would have been walking around the streets in Pattaya. The project was organized and hosted by John Melahee, a retired U.S. Navy chief gunner’s mate and president of the Navy League in Thailand.

The children who live at the home come from a wide variety of backgrounds, but in that variety there remains one constant: their home life was not healthy, said Fr. Larry Pageant, the home’s director. Some of the children live at the home as their permanent residence, while others stay there temporarily as the government works with the families to address issues at home.

 

Airman Jason D. Cox, a Sailor from Lincoln’s fuels division, said, “We heard that a lot of the kids had come off of the streets. Originally some of them had even been sold as sex slaves.”

While many of the children had suffered a horrible past, they were having the time of their life helping the Sailors work around the school or playing soccer and other games in the rain. “After we finished working, we were able to interact with the kids a little bit more, to start playing with them. It was just fun,” Cox said. “They may not understand English, but they certainly knew the fundamentals of having fun.”

While this was the first community service project for many Sailors, they said it was time well spent. As Machinist's Mate 1st (SW) Class Diana J. Godal of reactor laboratory division put it, “I thought it would be worthwhile and interesting...and it was” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060429-10 - Release Date: 4/29/2006 7:42:00 PM -By Photographer's Mate 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, PATTAYA, Thailand (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23393

 

ALCSG Sailors Give Quality Time To Pattaya Orphanage

 

“Sailors from the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group took part in a community service (COMSERV) project at the Pattaya Orphanage on 22 April 2006.

Forty-seven Sailors helped the staff of Pattaya Orphanage relocate their nursery to a new facility by carrying supplies and furniture, as well as bringing a little joy to the lives of the children who live there.

Like any other COMSERV project, the reasons Sailors had for wanting to help out were as diverse as the Sailors participating.

“I’ve always wanted to do a COMSERV but I’ve never had a chance to,” said Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Michael Downey of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137. “It felt really good to do something for someone else, and it’s very humbling for me to realize how good I had it when I was a kid,” he said.

For Storekeeper Seaman Panebi Smith, the calling is a spiritual one.

“I’m a minister and I like to be involved in community service. Anything that gives me the opportunity to meet and help other people, whether it’s spiritual, physical, or charitable is a real blessing,” he said.

After the work was done, the group took a break to spend some quality time with the children of Pattaya Orphanage, enjoying a few tough games of soccer and breaking down language barriers before returning to the
Lincoln” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060428-01 - Release Date: 4/28/2006 9:58:00 AM - By Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, PATTAYA, Thailand (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23392

 

Lincoln Sailor Wins National Leadership Award

 

“A Sailor aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) won a national award recognizing outstanding leadership in the intelligence community on 5 May 2006. Intelligence Specialist 1st Class (SW) Jeremy Heyer, leading petty officer of Operations Department’s OZ Division, Carrier Intelligence Center, won the Edwin T. Layton Leadership Award. The Layton award was formed by the Director of Naval Intelligence, with the assistance of the Naval Intelligence Foundation, in 2001 to recognize outstanding leadership and mentorship in the naval intelligence community. Nominations for the Layton Award are reviewed semi-annually every September and March.

“I was very excited and honored,” said Heyer. “I was the only blue shirt Navywide that won the award. I took pride in knowing that what I’m doing is the right thing in my leadership’s eyes.” “He was already in place when I got here,” said Senior Chief Intelligence Specialist (SW/AW) James Moffatt,
OZ Division’s leading chief petty officer. “I leaned on him greatly when I first got here. He’s a very good leader. Having him has made my job incredibly easier.” Those in Heyer’s chain of command are not the only people who recognize him as a leader; his subordinates think he’s a great boss, as well. “He is an exceptional example of a leader,” said Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class Andrew Dickinson.

 

“He leads by example. He comes in the office during his off time if he needs to, and he’s there to help out personally and professionally.” Heyer said he hopes that his people will look at him and decide how they should act if they ever come to the same position he occupies. “I hope that I can help them pick and choose the good things from me,” he said. “It will help them if they ever find themselves in a supervising position like work center supervisor, leading petty officer, division officer or chief.”

Although Heyer won the award, he said his leadership style was based on numerous building blocks instilled in him throughout his life by others. “I had a couple of first class petty officers and chiefs that showed me what it is to be a true leader,” said Heyer. “But my father, John, who is a perfect example of a good Christian, showed me what was right and wrong.” Heyer said that the foundation his father instilled in him made it easy for leaders in his naval career to build his leadership skills upon.

 

“There’s no better example of what a leader should be than my father,” he said. “My wife helps me out as well,” Heyer added. “She’s always there to keep me honest.” Thanks to the help of his father, wife and shipmates, Heyer has been recognized as a model leader inside the intelligence community. However, being an exemplary leader is not restricted to communities or divisions. “The biggest thing about being a leader - and they talk about this in every leadership class in the Navy - is your people are your best asset,” said Heyer.

 

“I try and take people's skill sets and put them in a position where they can succeed. I try to make sure they have the right tools for their jobs.” By making sure that his people are in a positive position, he has put himself in a positive position, as well. “He is working at a level beyond that of an average first class petty officer,” said Moffatt. “He’s ready to advance now” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060511-05 - Release Date: 5/11/2006 8:45:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23599

 

USC Alumni Discover Common Roots At 20,000 ft

 

“Two Naval Aviators flying an airborne early warning patrol over the South China Sea discovered they had common roots on 8 May 2006. The two University of South Carolina (USC) alumni were Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 embarked aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Lt. Cmdr. T. Michael Santomauro, operations officer in Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116. “We started talking about Columbia and I asked him, ‘how do you know so much about South Carolina’?” said Goodwin. “He said, ‘well, sir, I understand you graduated from USC in ’75. I graduated in ’93’.”

Both Goodwin and Santomauro were Midshipmen in USC’s Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) program. NROTC gave each of them a direction, both educational and career-wise, that has benefited both to this day. “Navy ROTC is one of the best deals going,” said Goodwin. “With the scholarship portion, it’s four years of education. You return that education with service to your country. “The ROTC scholarship is an academically awarded scholarship. It’s not based on your financial situation. You are the person who earns the scholarship through your academics.”

“It’s a great opportunity,” said Santomauro. “My parents had no means to send me to college. I earned a four-year degree out of high school, based on my merits in high school. “I earned a regular commission in the Navy," added Santmauro. "It’s something I wanted to do anyway, but the ROTC unit provided me an opportunity I wouldn’t have had otherwise.”

According to Goodwin, the naval legacy of USC is felt throughout the Navy. Rear Adm. (Ret.) Jacob Schuford, class of ’74, was also commander of CSG 9. Goodwin commanded
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76); a classmate of his, Capt. Dave Logsdon, commanded USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75). “South Carolina has a long-standing tradition of producing naval officers who have served our country very well, whether it was four years or more than four years,” said Goodwin. “It’s funny,” said Santomauro. “A lot of the guys I knew in classes before or after me are still in the Navy. They’re in the E-2 and C-2 (both aircraft are based on the same airframe) community and they’re still in the Navy.

 

“You tend to keep running into people [from USC] in this career.” For both, the education begun at USC continued after their time at the school. Goodwin, who majored in computer science, holds two additional master’s degrees, one from the Naval War College and one from the Naval Post Graduate School. Santomauro holds a Master's in Aerospace Engineering” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060603-03 - Release Date: 6/3/2006 3:36:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23754      

 

Lincoln Focuses On Senior PO INDOC Course

 

As reported on 8 July 2006, “Leaders aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are focusing on a new Senior Petty Officer Indoctrination course during its 2006 deployment to the Western Pacific this summer.

According to Senior Chief Navy Counselor (AW/SW) Brian Schroepfer,
Lincoln’s command career counselor, Lincoln’s leadership recognized the need to “bridge the gap between [petty officer 3rd class] indoctrination and what [a new 2nd or 1st class petty officer] is supposed to do in the 120 days before they are eligible to attend Leadership Development Training.

 

“We wanted to make sure there’s ‘no Sailor left behind,'” said Schroepfer. The process began by drawing together a team to develop a curriculum. Initially, a focus group consisting of petty officers 2nd and 1st class advanced during the September '05 advancement cycle was formed. They were given a standardized leadership test and asked an open-ended question.

“We asked them, ‘what tools would you have liked to have before you walked into your work center with your new rate?’” said Chief Electronics Technician (SW/AW/MTS) Kathleen E. Jackson, who was hand-picked to develop and lead the training along with Chief Torpedoman’s Mate (SW/AW/MTS) Regina Hawley by
Lincoln’s Command Master Chief, CMDCM (AW/SW) Michael Anjola. Jackson said that their survey netted 30 “ideas or concepts” that were developed into 10 topics for the new 2nd class petty officers, and 13 for new 1st class petty officers.

Jackson said that formal instructor guides were forgone; the point of these leadership training sessions was for instructors to facilitate discussion, not dictate a lesson that limits student interaction. Air Traffic Controller 1st Class (AW/SW) Francisco Munoz, one of the Sailors who attended the leadership training, said that the course brought the Navy’s Core Values more into focus for him, and helped him apply them to his leadership abilities.

 

“I appreciated the training because it made me understand what the Navy Core Values & Sailor's Creed represent,” said Munoz. “For the first time I wasn't just reading it, but understanding it. According to Force Master Chief (AW/SW) James Abeyta of Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific, the skills learned during the course are very handy. “You actually have an opportunity to practice [leadership skills learned in the course] almost daily. You can then take that information and share it with your people,” said Abeyta. Schroepfer said that the training had dramatic and measurable results.

 

In comparison with the scores on the leadership test taken by focus group Sailors, test scores increased: 88.2 percent for 2nd class petty officers who went through leadership training vice 52.7 percent for those who didn’t, and 90.7 percent for 1st class petty officers who took the training vice 52.3 percent for those who did not. “If we can show that, by investing 10 hours [of leadership training] in a Sailor who just advanced, they can show more knowledge, isn’t that a good thing?” asked Schroepfer.

 

Jackson and most of the development group, as well as several of the newly frocked 1st and 2nd class petty officers who attended the training, presented the executive summary of the course to Abeyta during his recent visit to the carrier. Abeyta gave them a few words of encouragement, as well as giving them his ideas for the direction of the indoctrination course.


“I think this course is important not only for the ship, but because it is also good for the Navy. We took the creativity of these people here [who put together the senior petty officer indoctrination] and empowered them to make a difference,” he said. “I think it sends a powerful message to the Navy leadership that
Abraham Lincoln is serious about [leadership development] and that we can make a contribution,” Jackson said.

Abeyta said he hopes the program that began aboard
Lincoln, will “catch like a wildfire,” spreading throughout the Navy. “I think that [senior petty officer indoctrination] starting here [aboard Lincoln] is pretty significant.” Lincoln is on a routine Western Pacific deployment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060707-25 - Release Date: 7/8/2006 12:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24484

 

Air Wing 2 Sailor Blue Angel Bound

 

As reported on 17 July 2006, “a Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 master chief petty officer has been selected as a member of the Blue Angels Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. Master Chief Aircraft Maintenanceman (AW) Jerry Welsh, Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 2’s maintenance master chief, will depart on 25 July 2006 to represent the Navy’s premier flight demonstration team. Welsh, who has served in the Navy for more than 25 years, was selected from a list of highly qualified applicants to take over as the Blue Angels’ maintenance master chief.

At the team’s home base at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., Welsh will be responsible for ensuring that the team’s famous blue and yellow F/A-18
Hornets are in perfect flying condition before every show. This is not a small responsibility, considering that the team has never cancelled an air show due to maintenance-related issues. “The most important part of my job will be to ensure that we give the pilots the safest plane possible,” Welsh said. “But equally important is keeping people motivated.”

 

According to the Blue Angels’ Web site, the Blue Angels Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, which first performed in 1946, is made up of seven aircraft flown by the Navy and Marine Corp’s top pilots, as well as a support team consisting of an events coordinator, maintenance officer, flight surgeon, administrative officer, public affairs officer, supply officer, and about 110 enlisted Navy and Marine Corps personnel.

Every individual on the team is extensively screened to ensure that they are the best the Navy has to offer before being selected as a Blue Angel. “First you go to what’s called a ‘rush interview’ where you show the team that you’re interested,” Welsh said. “Then you submit a package for review and if you’re a finalist, you go and talk to all the ‘troops’ -- and it’s interesting because all the people who are going to be working for you decide whether or not you make it.” According to Welsh, the last step in the process is a final board before the Blue Angels’ commanding officer and other senior members of the squadron. In the end, Welsh was selected over three other finalists.

Enlisted personnel who are selected for the Blue Angels serve a three-year tour with the team. Welsh will spend the last half of this summer’s air show season under the wing of the current maintenance master chief before taking over for the next three seasons. At his new command, Welsh said he can look forward to a schedule that is every bit as demanding as deployments aboard
Lincoln. The Blue Angels spend only a few short months every winter in Pensacola and are “on the road” for the rest of the year. “You’re stationed there all winter, and then every weekend in the summer you’re gone,” Welsh said.

 

“I expect to spend about 70 percent of the summer months out on the road with the team.” Despite the hectic schedule, Welsh looks forward to the challenge. He also has a few tips for Sailors who aspire to be Blue Angels. “Work hard, be yourself, and have the drive to be able to do what you do day in and day out,” he said. “It’s a big commitment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060717-19 -Release Date: 7/17/2006 4:36:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24694

 

 

Abe’s In port and Eighth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XIX, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call.

Chapter XIX

Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4