Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington (29 August 2006 to 26 June 2007)

9 August 2006 to 30 June 2007

Chapter XX

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2006 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XX, Appendix I

 

Chapter XX & Appendix I

 

 

“The Navy awarded Todd Pacific Shipyards Corp., Seattle Division, a $10.94 million award fee/performance fee modification under a previously awarded contract (N00024-04-C-4152) to complete a Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 9 August 2006. The ship also returned the two SH-60B Seahawk aviation repairable pack-up kits, including four aviation consumable Vidmar cabinets, to NAS North Island” (Ref. 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 8 August 2006, to several days before arriving at at Naval Base Kitsap in Bremerton for a scheduled six-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington on 29 August 2006” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060920-03 - Release Date: 9/20/2006 8:33:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25045

 

Lincoln Enters Dry Dock

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered Dry Dock #6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) on 8 September 2006 to begin a scheduled Docked Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) period, which is expected to last through March. Under sunny skies and warm weather, a small fleet of tugboats moved Lincoln from her mooring at Naval Base Kitsap and turned the 98,000-ton warship on its axis in Sinclair Inlet before lining the ship up with the flooded dry dock.

 

Once in place, heavy lines were attached to Lincoln’s stern, and a combination of capstans and manpower was used to slowly bring the ship backward into position. The tedious process of aligning the massive vessel then began in earnest as shipyard workers, using precision instruments, worked to ensure that as the drydock was drained, Lincoln remained perfectly centered over the supports which would bear her massive weight. "We have about two inches of leeway, and we got it within a half an inch, so all in all it went pretty well,” said Lt. Holli Klages, a docking officer at PSNS & IMF who supervised the evolution.

 

According to Cmdr. Skip Huck, Lincoln’s chief of engineering and DPIA coordinator, Lincoln is scheduled to undergo a number of refurbishments and improvements during the short time she will spend out of the water. “The package that we have right now is one of the most challenging that we’ve had in the shortest time. We’re only going to be in the dry dock for 100 days, so it’s going to happen extremely fast with very little room for error,” said Huck. Huck added that major projects planned included refurbishment of tanks, work on three of the four catapults, modernization of navigation systems, and updates to the ship’s Local Area Network (LAN).

 

Lincoln is also slated to receive installation of the Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) system, which will improve the ship’s close range defensive capabilities. Some of the contractors involved in the project include Todd Shipyard, Space and Naval Warfare, Voyage Repair Team, and Carrier Air Force Support, among others. “At the height of the dry-dock period, we expect to have about 1,200 men per day working on board from PSNS & IMF,” said Huck. As with any mission undertaken by Lincoln’s crew, safety is one of the command’s top priorities.

 

All Lincoln Sailors have been issued hardhats and safety glasses, which are required to be worn at all times when transiting the ship or working on PSNS & IMF. With so much being done at once, Sailors must take extra steps to protect themselves and their shipmates from the inherent dangers of working in an industrial environment. “Between Lincoln’s safety coordinators and the shipyard safety guys, there will be people on the deckplates at all times ensuring that both the ship’s and the shipyard’s standards of safety are met,” said Huck.

 

According to Huck, Lincoln is expected to leave dry dock in mid-December, but the availability is scheduled to last through the middle of March, when Lincoln will complete a short sea trial before returning to her homeport of Everett, Washington” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060920-03 - Release Date: 9/20/2006 8:33:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25045

 

Lincoln Sailors Help Veterans

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in a community relations (COMREL) project from 13 to 16 November 2006 at the Washington State Veterans Home in Port Orchard, Wash. The veterans facility is undergoing renovation and 112 residents needed help relocating to a new building.

"We are going to tear down the two buildings and use the area to create a park," said Barbara Colley, who is in charge of the move.

Several commands from the Puget Sound area participated in the COMREL event. "We couldn't have done this without the help of the Sailors," said Colley.

Sailors boxed belongings, moved the residents, and even helped unpack and organize the veterans' new rooms.

"When I found out they were veterans, I wanted to help those who served before us," said Legalman 1st Class Lourdie Powell. She said all the veterans had smiles on their faces and seemed to really appreciate all the hard work.

"We wanted to show the veterans that the young generation cares," added Powell.

Abraham Lincoln is currently undering maintenance and upkeep at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton” (Ref. Story Number: NNS061210-02 - Release Date: 12/10/2006 9:09:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Third Class (SW/AW) Patrick Bonefede, Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=26979

 

Lincoln Sailor Reenlists on Monday Night Football

 

“Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 2nd Class David Knoll raised his right hand and pledged another four years to his country in front of family, friends, co-workers, and more than 50,000 Seattle Seahawks football fans, at Qwest Field here on 27 November 2006. He took his oath of service before the Seahawks' Monday night football game against the Green Bay Packers. Knoll, who is from Wisconsin and a Green Bay Packers fan, knew that the game would be a perfect opportunity to combine his two loves; the Navy and the Packers.

“I thought it would be a great time to do it when the Seahawks were playing the Packers,” Knoll said. “This is the first time the Packers have come anywhere to where I’ve been stationed. This was a once in a lifetime opportunity not only to reenlist for another four years and serve my country, but to do it in front of a crowd of 50,000 plus and the Packers.” Knoll reenlisted on the sidelines in the south end zone. Cmdr. Brad Margeson,
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) air boss, reenlisted Knoll.

 

Afterwards, Knoll said they went over to the Seahawks’ sidelines and stood at attention with the players for the National Anthem. Knoll said he had full support from the Seahawks staff who arranged for him to reenlist on the field. “The Seattle Seahawks organization was really receptive to us, to the military, and it was nice at the game too because so many people thanked us for our service,” Knoll said. “It was really something else to get that kind of reception and it made the whole group feel good.”

Knoll said the Seahawks’ organization gave him and his group field passes and took them onto the field an hour before the game. Once the game started, Knoll and his wife took their seats in the stands. Knoll said the rest of his friends and co-workers originally had standing-room-only tickets but were taken up to the Seahawks’ clubhouse during the game.

Knoll said it was an experience he won’t forget. “The most memorable thing of the evening was doing the reenlistment on the field while it was snowing,” Knoll said. “It was something else, being able to have that type of weather because it doesn’t happen all that often out here. It brought a piece of home to me.”

Knoll who will be transferring to Naval Recruiting District Chicago at the end of his Lincoln term said he was grateful to everyone who helped him. “I want to thank all my friends on the ship who were able to attend and share in the experience with me,” said Knoll” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS061215-02 - Release Date: 12/15/2006 9:42:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jeannette Bowles, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SEATTLE, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27058

 

Lincoln Sailor Awarded Bronze Star for Service In Iraq

 

Chief Boatswain’s Mate (SW/AW) Brian Cissell was awarded the Bronze Star Medal on 8 December 2006 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) for his service while in Iraq earlier this year.

Cissell is one of numerous Lincoln Sailors who volunteered to go overseas in support of the global war on terrorism.

While serving with the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division at Camp Victory South from February to August, Cissell helped lead $30 million in reconstruction efforts in Southwest Baghdad.

"To receive this award was a very humbling experience for me. I think of the men whom I led or who supported my team, especially of those who lost their lives or were wounded during our missions. In memory of their sacrifices I received the award with great esteem and honor," said Cissell. "It was a privilege to have served with the 101st Airborne and fight alongside the caliber of such men."

Capt. C.A. McCawley,
Lincoln’s commanding officer, presented Cissell with the award, and commented on his commitment to serve.

“The sacrifices that were made by Chief Cissell exemplify the dedication by those serving all over the world,” McCawley said. “It is in fact an individual award for service, and proves his dedication to the overall team effort.”

The Bronze Star is an individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or military service “(Ref. Story Number:
NNS061215-15 - Release Date: 12/15/2006 4:12:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27057

 

Lincoln Recognizes Diversity

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sponsored diversity training on 8 December 2006 at Naval Base Kitsap, emphasizing how the virtual melting pot of a crew of more than 3,000 Sailors can work together to accomplish the ship's mission.

"Diversity is not about representation, it's about utilization," said Dr. Samuel Betances, a speaker at the event. "Our mission is to add value to the great things that you already do by making sure that everyone has a fair opportunity to be developed to their fullest potential."

Betances holds a docorate degree from Harvard University and has served as a consultant to top U.S. political and military leaders, Fortune 500 company executives, and has lectured to audiences around the world. His firm is located in Chicago.

"It takes 20 years to create a master chief or a captain, so we have to start training now so that those future leaders among us will have the tools they need to lead in an increasingly diverse Navy," he added.

One of
Lincoln's Sailors, Information Systems Technician Seaman Apprentice Norma Shorthair, is from a Navajo reservation in Shonto, Arizona. Shorthair said she realizes her background sets her apart from many of her shipmates, yet she embraces her family's traditions.

"Be proud of who you are; your race, your culture," said Shorthair. "Without it I'd be lost."

"Diversity is an issue that is increasingly critical to the Navy, our organization, and our ship," said Capt. C.A. McCawley, Lincoln's commanding officer. "To be successful we must increase our awareness and our understanding of this important issue."

Lincoln is currently in Bremerton, Wash. at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility undergoing a regularly scheduled Dry-dock Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) period” (Ref. Story Number: NNS061213-20 - Release Date: 12/13/2006 4:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brandon Wilson and Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=26978

 

Lincoln Ahead Of Schedule

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) left the dry dock on 18 December 2006, ahead of schedule and under budget becuase Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) cut the time of ship tank maintenance by more than half. Partnering with Ship’s Force and the Lincoln Project Team, the Tank Value Stream Team accomplished the goal. Through the Lean Continuous Improvement process, the teams completed 18 tanks in 89 days. “Value Streams are main branches of maintenance work that have been identified individually for process improvement through lean technology,” explains Mark Winkler, the team leader. “The goal is to provide improved products and cost performance to the customer. Tank maintenance is one such value stream.” Lincoln's Commanding Officer, Capt. Andrew McCawley, and the ship’s crew turned out to congratulate the Tank Value Stream Team on their success at a recognition ceremony in Hangar Bay 2 onboard the ship on 15 December 2006. “I want to thank you on behalf of Lincoln and congratulate you on your accomplishment,” said McCawley. “This really is significant. I’d like to offer you a ship’s perspective on what you’ve done for Abraham Lincoln. You have inspired the crew through your dedication and staying on schedule while overcoming every challenge. You have also added to the quality of life of the crew and increased the material readiness of the ship.” In August of this year, Abraham Lincoln returned from a six month deployment to the Western Pacific. The Everett, Wash. based aircraft carrier also participated in Iraqi Freedom in 2003 and Operation Unified Assistance in 2005. The ship and crew have been highly successful in their missions. “Those successes are as much yours as the crew who has been deployed,” Captain McCawley told the hundreds of people assembled. “You have produced the material readiness and capability that Abraham Lincoln possesses. Your victory here today is Abraham Lincoln's success tomorrow.” Capt. Dan Peters, Commander, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility, expressed his pride in the remarkable achievements. “I’m proud to stand before you and express my appreciation for what this team has accomplished,” stated Peters. “Members of the Tank Value Stream made a commitment to tackle this extraordinary task of significantly reducing cost and schedule with top shelf enthusiasm and professionalism. You rose to the challenge and far exceeded expectations.” “It’s not possible to have this kind of success without teamwork,” Capt. Peters continued. “You, Ship’s Force, the project team, and our maintenance partners together make these significant improvements possible.” “What you succeeded in accomplishing has just raised the bar for the rest of the maintenance world,” concluded Peters, speaking to the workers and Ship’s Force packing the hangar bay at the end of the celebration ceremony. “Now we have to prove that this wasn’t a one-time success, that it is a sustainable process” (Ref. Story Number: NNS061226-05 - Release Date: 12/26/2006 10:59:00 AM - By Mary A. Mascianica, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27156

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2007 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

“The Navy announced that it would reassign Abraham Lincoln Security Division from the Weapons Department to the Operations Department prior to October 2005. The ship proactively accomplished this move by August 2005, which thrust the division into a new environment. Abraham Lincoln rendesignated her Ship Self Defense Force the Naval Security Force, and utilized ship’s company to augment the force. She thus established the Integrated Security Force; each department on board supported a team of 102 sailors who melded into the Security Division to protect the ship while she visited ports. This involved extensive training regimens for crewmembers that included tactical team movements and basic law enforcement procedures” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Pauses For Safety Stand Down

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) took time to refocus the carrier's ongoing safety efforts during a stand down on 10 January 2007. Planners for the safety stand down used the ship's closed-circuit television station to broadcast programming to help ensure Lincoln's crew maintains a high level of awareness. “After some well deserved holiday leave, it is time to refocus our efforts on the importance of safety as the Lincoln makes its transition to operational readiness,” said Capt. C.A. McCawley, Lincoln’s commanding officer.

 

“We made sea trials in 2006 routine, and the industrial dry dock phase routine, but it took work and we maintained mission readiness and a high level of safety awareness.” said McCawley. Lincoln’s safety officer, Cmdr. Eric Barkdull, followed the brief by the commanding officer to emphasize the importance of keeping Lincoln crew members safe on and off duty. Sailors aboard the Lincoln heard from fellow shipmates who were involved in mishaps. The Sailors spoke of commonly overlooked safety issues and ways to prevent safety mishaps.

Lincoln also invited two women from Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) to speak, and remind Sailors of common dangers off duty. Each woman told a story of a tragic loss because of impaired driving. With the first safety stand down of 2007, Lincoln will now be “back in the saddle,” according to McCawley. “We can now focus on getting major areas on the ship to come back to life,” said McCawley” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070114-03 - Release Date: 1/14/2007 9:50:00 AM - By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Dennis Irwin, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27307

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Gets Navy Cash

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) took time to refocus the carrier's ongoing safety efforts during a stand down 10 January 2007.

Planners for the safety stand down used the ship's closed-circuit television station to broadcast programming to help ensure
Lincoln's crew maintains a high level of awareness.

“After some well deserved holiday leave, it is time to refocus our efforts on the importance of safety as the
Lincoln makes its transition to operational readiness,” said Capt. C.A. McCawley, Lincoln’s commanding officer.

“We made sea trials in 2006 routine, and the industrial dry dock phase routine, but it took work and we maintained mission readiness and a high level of safety awareness.” said McCawley.

Lincoln’s safety officer, Cmdr. Eric Barkdull, followed the brief by the commanding officer to emphasize the importance of keeping Lincoln crew members safe on and off duty.

Sailors aboard the
Lincoln heard from fellow shipmates who were involved in mishaps. The Sailors spoke of commonly overlooked safety issues and ways to prevent safety mishaps.

Lincoln also invited two women from Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) to speak, and remind Sailors of common dangers off duty. Each woman told a story of a tragic loss because of impaired driving.

With the first safety stand down of 2007,
Lincoln will now be “back in the saddle,” according to McCawley.

“We can now focus on getting major areas on the ship to come back to life,” said McCawley” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070114-03 - Release Date: 1/14/2007 9:50:00 AM - By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Dennis Irwin, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27307

 

Lincoln INDOC Sailors Gather for Pizza and Football

 

“More than 100 USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Beach Detachment Sailors joined their shipmates on 21 January 2007 for a pizza party, and watched football games on TV together at Naval Station (NAVSTA), Everett. “We have had these football parties in the barracks common area for the past three weeks to boost the morale of our indoctrination (INDOC) students,” said Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class (AW/SW/NAC) George Dejesus, Abraham Lincoln’s Beach Detachment leading petty officer. “In the past we have also done a lot of Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) events, where money from the ships MWR fund is used to pay a portion, if not all of the fees to make it more affordable to them.”

 

Information Technician 2nd Class Tonikka James of the beach detachment staff said there were 13 pizza pies and 13 boxes of bread sticks for the Sailors to enjoy. “We knew that a lot of the students were going to watch the game so we figured we could give them something to eat while they watched,” said James. “It gives them something positive to do with their time.” James also said that most of the students going through the ship’s INDOC are new to the Navy, and many of them are nervous about going to their first command. “About 90 percent of these students are straight from “A” school,” said James.

 

“They will be here for at least four weeks, so we try to introduce them to the area by doing things like taking them to Jim Creek, bowling, or giving them movie passes to some of the area malls. It gets them more comfortable by placing them in an environment which helps them make some friends so when they do make the move to the ship they don’t do it alone.” Operations Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Fuller said he enjoys being able to give his shipmates a friendly welcome. “I enjoy this part of my job the most,” said Fuller. “We try to make their transition as easy and as fun as we can to give them a friendly welcome.” “The pizza is great for football day,” said Electrician’s Mate Fireman Anthony Garrison, INDOC student. “When I got to NAVSTA, Everett I didn’t know anyone. By coming to events like this, I have made some new friends.”

Other INDOC students agree that going to the ship with new friends is making life a little easier for them. “I try to make it to all these parties,” said Machinist’s Mate 3rd Class Ma Thao. “It makes it easier because you get to know some people before you hop on the [ship].” “I think this is awesome,” said Seaman Brian Harmon. “I am nervous about going to the [ship] and meeting [new people], but an environment like this makes things a little easier” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070124-08 - Release Date: 1/24/2007 3:20:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Douglas G. Morrison, Fleet Public Affairs Center Det Northwest , EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27407

 

Fleet Master Chief Challenges Lincoln First Class Petty Officers

 

“U.S. Pacific Fleet Master Chief (SS/SW) Rick D. West challenged the first class petty officers aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 25 January 2007, to make a difference in the success of their junior Sailors. “I need you, as first class petty officers, to help us challenge our junior Sailors to make the right decisions,” West said. “You are the ones who can make a difference to someone in need.” According to West, the Navy is putting stronger emphasis on issues that may be outside the lifelines, like physical fitness, financial responsibility, alcohol and drug abuse, suicide, domestic violence, sexual abuse and sexual harassment. He said senior enlisted people in the Navy can make the difference in preventing mishaps. West was in the Northwest to meet with senior officers and enlisted leadership and to tour the ship, which is undergoing a dry-dock planned incremental availability at Naval Base Kitsap.

“I am really glad the
Lincoln CMC turned me to the first class petty officers,” West said. “You guys have been doing some outstanding work out to sea and on shore for us." “You are the leaders," West continued, "You are the example. When young Sailors prepare to leave the ship, they need to be squared away. They represent not only Abraham Lincoln, but the U.S. Navy.” The master chief said junior Sailors make up the largest portion of the Navy, and to ensure that up-and-coming Sailors uphold the highest standards senior enlisted Sailors are expected to intervene, teach, listen, and encourage their junior enlisted Sailors.

West also talked to the senior petty officers about the forward progress of the Navy and new missions and opportunities, like humanitarian efforts and Individual Augments (IA’s). “The Navy is using its platforms in different ways,” West said. “We are no longer just a blue-water Navy.” In one example West gave, the Navy is providing medical relief to foreign nations on ships and giving support to the ground troops in the Middle East. New assignment opportunities should be seized by the newest additions to the fleet.

West said the job of the senior Sailor is to operate the ship and rally the troops, to make their junior Sailors aware of opportunities and offer them any support necessary, whether at home or overseas” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070127-07 -Release Date: 1/27/2007 5:37:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Dennis Irwin, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27487

 

Lincoln Dentist Performs New Procedure


As reported on 26 January 2007, “a dentist aboard
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) used a creative solution in dental technology to help a patient aboard the ship. When a patient came to see Lt. Jared Reid with a missing tooth, it gave Reid a chance to perform a new procedure. “The tooth was already dead,” Reid said. “He had a root canal done on it prior to his visit with me.” “This procedure wouldn’t be done in the civilian world because it’s not a permanent solution to the problem,” Reid said.

 

“They would drill a titanium screw into the jaw bone to hold the new tooth in place. With my method, I made a fake tooth out of composite and bonded it to the neighboring teeth.” An impression of the patient’s teeth was made at an earlier appointment and from that impression a mold was made for the new tooth. The mold was placed in the patient’s mouth and the bonding and composite was placed inside the mold.

 

When the composite was dry, Reid cut away the mold, and then shaped and polished the composite into a tooth. The procedure took less than two hours to complete. Reid said he decided to use this method of bridging the gap in his patient’s teeth because it’s a reversible process. “It bridged the gap with no structure loss to the surrounding teeth,” Reid said. “It’s a temporary fix until he can get somewhere where he can get the implant.”

This method is still somewhat rare, according to Reid. The possibility of bone loss in the jaw bone exists because there is nothing for the bone at the site to hold, which is why the procedure is temporary. Reid recommends once the patient is able, to get the implant. There are a few methods to bridge a gap in someone’s teeth, Reid said. One option is a “flipper” which has a fake tooth attached to a piece of acrylic that fits into the mouth like an orthodontic retainer.

There is also a traditional bridge, which uses porcelain teeth but is usually used on back teeth. The porcelain is difficult to match to the color of the existing teeth if it’s in the front, Reid said. “The bridge also damages the surrounding teeth, because it removes the most important part of our teeth, the enamel,” he said. The Navy will do the titanium screw implant, but only on shore duty, he said, because it takes up to a year of follow-up appointments to complete the procedure.

“This wasn’t a permanent fix,” Reid said. “It could last six days, six weeks, six months or six years. We really don’t know how long it will last, but it’s much better than what he came in here with” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070126-04 - Release Date: 1/26/2007 3:40:00 PM - By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Recruit Kathleen N. Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27477

 

Lincoln Fire Team Keeps Workers and Projects Safe

 

As reported on 27 January 2007, “while USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) has been accomplishing its Dry-Dock Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Naval Base Kitsap in Bremerton, Wash., the risk of fire has been a primary concern.

Many of the jobs being accomplished by the shipyard workers and Sailors on board require welding, cutting metal, and drilling, which can easily trigger a fire. To reduce the risk of fire damage for these jobs, the ship organized a fire watch team.

“If a potential danger lies in a shipyard worker’s work order, selected members from the fire watch team accompany the shipyard workers to set up a fire boundary,” said Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Timothy Elwonger, a fire watch stander. “Since the beginning of
DPIA the fire watch division has sent out more than 1,500 fire watches to reduce the risk of fire on board the ship.”

The watches are sent out to monitor work that involves stick-welding, grinding, brazing or anything that requires the use of an open flame. The fire watch teams serve as a first response to notify the inport emergency team if a fire were to become a potential hazard.

“The fire watch teams of one to three Sailors serve not only to protect the worker and the project against fire, but also stop hot work immediately if there is a problem, know escape routes, phone numbers, and fire alarm locations,” said Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) Ernest Miller, fire watch stander. The fire-watch team is scheduled to disassemble in early March.

“At the beginning of
DPIA there were around 150 Sailors temporarily assigned to fire watch,” Miller said. “As the ship progresses toward operational readiness and the demand for shipyard workers reduces, the fire-watch team is now down to around 70. Although it has been a long yard period, the fire-watch teams have been an important part of maintaining safety for the ship and its crew,” Miller said.

The fire watch team has protected the integrity of the ship and the crew on board throughout the
DPIA. The ship has not lost any productivity because of fire, and is steadily moving toward operational readiness.

“The most important reason for a fire watch during the
DPIA is to prevent injury and death from potential fires,” said Michelle Bradwell, contracted fire watch supervisor” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070127-06 - Release Date: 1/27/2007 5:34:00 PM - By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Brett Morton, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27476

 

Sailors Of the Year Visit Abraham Lincoln Museum

 

“Sailors of the Year (SOY) aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited the Abraham Lincoln Museum in Springfield, Ill. on 10 February 2007. Following a brief stay in the greater Chicago area, which included a visit to Recruit Training Command at Naval Station Great Lakes, Lincoln’s Junior SOY Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW/AW) Sylvia Fawson, Bluejacket Of the Year Storekeeper Seaman Jason Wong, and trip facilitator Chief Torpedoman’s Mate (SW/AW) Regina Hawley made their way two hundred miles south of the Windy City to visit the site of the 16th president’s fledgling law practice and aspiring political career.

“In truth, I thought that [the Lincoln museum] was just going to be another boring museum,” Fawson said. “I thought that the ship simply sent us to it because the name of our ship bears Lincoln’s name, but it ended being my favorite part of the trip.” Fawson said that the exhibits and the technology behind them were amazing. The museum, housed many unique and state-of-the-art exhibitions that focused on aspects of Lincoln’s life and legacy. The Sailors found the three-dimensional holographic exhibit presenting the ongoing work of preserving the written words of Lincoln especially interesting. “I felt that it [the holographic exhibit] gave me a connection to Lincoln himself,” Hawley said.

 

“The museum invested a lot to connect us to the man and give us a sense of his life and time.” According to Wong, the information and presentation of Lincoln’s years spent in the White House was especially powerful. “I had no idea that Lincoln was so scrutinized and criticized for what he was trying to do,” Wong said. “He had failed at most everything he had done his whole life, but he overcame the challenges that he faced. It was really inspiring to see the adversity that he endured as president and yet overcame.” As history records, just as the four years of Civil War came to a close, and prior to Lincoln experiencing the result of his unswerving vision, he was murdered.

“Lincoln knew his purpose, and nothing could stop him,” Hawley said. “People hated him, but he had to do it. He had to accomplish his vision.” “He knew that his work would affect America and the world for many generations and many people to come, and he refused to let any obstacle stop him,” Hawley said. Many Sailors said in spite of his premature death, history has conspicuously revealed the value of Lincoln’s vision and efforts to both abolish slavery and preserve the union of the United States of America. “It was eye-opening to see the reality of President Lincoln’s humble beginnings,” Fawson said. “He went from poverty to become one of our country’s greatest presidents who forged, in great part, America’s future” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070226-11 - Release Date: 2/26/2007 1:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28009

 

Lincoln Flight Deck Readies for Operations

 

As reported on 13 February 2007, “while USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) undergoes routine maintenance and repairs at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, the ship’s flight deck is getting some special attention during the month of February.

 

Critical work on Lincoln's arresting cables will ensure aircraft can land safely on the flight deck to accomplish the mission of the carrier. The aviation boatswain’s mates aboard Lincoln who work in the catapult engine rooms are well aware of the importance of the cables. These Sailors have begun the process to remove the old cable and install a new cable from the catapult engine to the flight deck.

“This process isn’t done often,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Equipment 1st Class (AW) Michael O’Rourke. “It’s usually only done when something major has been done to the engine.” There are two main steps to the process: the hand reeve and the re-reeve. The hand reeve process needs about 10 Sailors to accomplish and can take up to six hours to finish, said O’Rourke.

A messenger cable, or a cable that is smaller than the actual cable that is used for the arresting cable, is pulled through the engine. Then the end of the messenger cable is welded to the end of the cable that connects to the new arresting cable, or the new purchase cable.

O’Rourke said the hand reeve process is a critical task and much care must be taken during the process. If the messenger cable isn’t installed into the engine correctly it could cause the cable to cross itself or cause a tangle.

Once the new purchase cable has been welded to the messenger cable, the re-reeve process begins. The messenger cable will be pulled out of the engine, pulling the purchase cable into its place.

“It could put an aircraft in the water if it’s not done right,” said O’Rourke. According to O’Rourke, the entire re-reeve process will take almost 20 hours and requires roughly 25 Sailors to accomplish.

Through the hard work and dedication of O’Rourke and his team,
Lincoln's aviators and Sailors on the flight deck can remain safe during upcoming flight operations later this spring” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070213-01 - Release Date: 2/13/2007 8:52:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kathleen Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27718

 

Lincoln Sailors Visit Seattle Veterans

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Seattle on 13 February 2007 as a part of National Salute to Hospitalized Veterans.

Eleven Sailors from the carrier volunteered their time to visit veterans.

“The administration at the hospital was impressed with the time and attention Lincoln Sailors were giving to the patients,” said Chaplain Candidate Lt j.g. Jason Dart, who is awaiting assignment to
Lincoln.

Community relations projects such as these give Sailors a chance to represent their command and the Navy in a positive light. In addition to benefiting the Navy’s image, the effort benefits Sailors as well as the hospital patients.

“The veterans received a bright spot in their day,” Dart said. “The ‘thank you’ meant a lot for them - our Sailors' visit may affect the patients in ways we’ll never see. I spoke with veterans from various major conflicts and they had a wealth of knowledge that needs to be preserved and passed on.”

Dart added that
Lincoln Sailors’ experiences benefitted them in a personal way.

“No experience is a bad experience,” Dart said. “Any time you have a chance to serve something outside of your comfort zone, take it. It may change your life.”

Dart added that even though he considers this project a success based on the positive response he received from the hospital’s administration, he mentioned that more Sailors and veterans could benefit.

“We know there are other demands on Sailors’ schedules, but I would like to see more Sailors participating if possible," he said. "The effects of those acts of service are immeasurable” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070226-13 - Release Date: 2/26/2007 1:57:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28011

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Selects Senior Sailor Of the Year

 

As reported on 25 February 2007, “the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Senior Sailor of the Year (SOY) is heading to San Diego next month to compete for the Commander, Naval Air Forces top Sailor award. It was a goal of Intelligence Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Jeremy Heyer when he checked onboard Lincoln almost two years ago as a new first class petty officer. “I was surprised when I found out that I was put in for it,” Heyer said. “The competition was tough. There were some really good Sailors up for it, some heavy hitters. These guys are the best the ship has to offer.”

Heyer, who works for
Operations Department in the Intelligence Center (CVIC), said every department picked their top runner and those names were submitted to the department heads. Once it was decided that he would be running for Operations, a package was submitted by his department leading chief petty officer Senior Chief Intelligence Specialist (SW/AW) James Moffatt. “Everything he touches gets better and that’s exactly what we like to see,” Moffatt said. “I think he’s probably one of the rare, few junior first classes right now that I’m totally comfortable with him being ready for chief.” On top of being CVIC’s leading petty officer and managing the day-to-day operations of his shop, Moffatt said Heyer is also the First Class Association president, assistant section leader for the ship, and he helped develop the leadership course for the second and first class petty officers onboard the Lincoln.

“He’s done everything he can do and does everything well,” Moffatt said. “I would have been pretty upset if he hadn’t won.” Once all the packages were submitted, Heyer said an oral board was held where he was asked a lot of questions. Then, it was a waiting game. Heyer said he was elated when
Lincoln’s Commanding Officer Captain C. A. McCawley announced the winner at a recent all hands event. “I was floored when I found out,” Heyer said. “The commanding officer was up on a podium giving his speech and he mentioned Operations. I knew I was the only one up from Operations. It was like being hit by a car. It has taken a while to really set in. It’s pretty incredible.” Heyer said he attributes all his success to both his wife and his Sailors.

“I’m just me,” Heyer said. “Sure I’ve worked hard and had success, but everything that has happened is the result of my Sailors. I take care of my Sailors every way I can, professionally and personally. My career has been successful because of my wife also. I couldn’t have done it without her. She is the cornerstone of [Intelligence Specialist 1st Class] Heyer.” As
Lincoln’s SOY, Heyer will now compete for Commander Naval Air Forces Pacific SOY. “It’s automatic,” Moffatt said. “We have the option of saying we want our Sailor of the Year to compete at the Air Pacific level. There was an assessment done on the ship by the command to look at it objectively and say ‘would he compete with a fleet-level type Sailor of the Year package,’ and obviously the answer was ‘yes’.”

 

Moffatt said Heyer will travel to San Diego the first week of March to compete. Moffatt said he thinks Heyer is definitely competitive at that level. “I’m very happy to see this happening to him, very proud of him,” Moffatt said. “I think he’ll do well. If he’s selected then he’ll compete at Pacific Fleet and I still think he could compete at that level. Everything he does he does because he cares.” Heyer, who’s been in the Navy for almost nine years, said he would definitely think about staying in. “I absolutely enjoy my job,” Heyer said” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070205-09 -Release Date: 2/5/2007 4:27:00 PM - By Mass Communications Specialist First Class Jeanette Bowles, Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27597

 

Navy Cash Now Available Aboard Lincoln

 

Navy Cash, a fully automated money-management system, is now available aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 27 February 2007, making money matters on the ship a little bit easier.

Navy Cash reduces the need for cash through the “smart card” technology. A card similar to an ATM/debit card is used for all purchases and transactions aboard the carrier.

While on liberty, a magnetic strip on the Navy Cash card can be used for ATM withdrawals or purchases. A “chip” on the front of the card provides an electronic “purse” for purchases on the ship.

“Navy Cash is helping move the
Abraham Lincoln into the 21st century,” said Capt. C.A. McCawley, the ship’s commanding officer. “The paperless money system will make life better, easier and more efficient for Lincoln Sailors.”

Ensign Quentin Lease,
Lincoln’s disbursing officer, said the Navy Cash card can be used to pay for anything from the ship’s store, vending machines, money orders, stamps, phone cards and mess bills. The program will improve financial flexibility and security for Lincoln Sailors, Lease said.

The program works by using shipboard LAN and satellite communications as well as the existing commercial banking infrastructure, Lease said. Using the Navy Cash program provides more security by reducing the need to carry cash or coins that can be lost or stolen” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070307-03 - Release Date: 3/7/2007 10:39:00 AM - By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Kathleen Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28157 

 

Lincoln Sailors Judge School Science Fair

 

“Five Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) volunteered their time to talk to students and judge 60 science fair projects at Naval Avenue Elementary School (NAES) in Bremerton on 2 March 2007. The projects ranged from how mold grew on slices of cheese to why diet soda explodes when candy mints are added to it. “I thought (the projects) were really well thought out,” said Fire Controlman 3rd Class (AW/SW) Christian Blanco. “I was really impressed by the students’ work.”

 

“You could tell the students put a lot of effort into their projects,” said Senior Chief Aviation Machinist’s Mate (AW/SW) Jeffrey Borja. The volunteers spent over two hours talking to the students and judging their projects. Each Sailor had different reasons to volunteer for the trip, but each one said they enjoyed their time spent with the students.

“I’m a geographical bachelor,” Borja said. “My 13-year-old son lives in Florida, and I really miss him. I remember helping him with his seventh-grade science project and how excited he was for it to be judged. It’s a good feeling to get out and to become a part of the community.” “My oldest son is seven,” said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Keashia Garner. “He’s very into science, so it’s nice to come out and see what students in this area are doing. It’s great to know that the state of Washington really cares about what its students are learning. I try to volunteer as much as possible.”

The Sailors were not the only ones who enjoyed their time at the elementary school. “I think (the Sailors) were awesome, and I really liked their uniforms,” said Shemira Washington, a fourth grader at NAES. “The children really loved the Sailors,” said Julie Wasserburger, the school’s librarian. “I think coming in their (service dress blue) uniforms really showed the kids that the community cares about them.”

Community Relations (COMREL) projects give Sailors a chance to represent their command and the Navy in a positive light. In addition to benefiting the Navy’s image, the COMREL benefits Sailors as well as the students they met” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070318-01 - Release Date: 3/18/2007 11:50:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Kathleen Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28367

 

“After USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) refloated from the drydock, she moored to Pier B. Adm. Roughead then visited the ship to speak to crewmembers concerning their service during Operation Unified Assistance on 7 March 2007. The admiral also answered questions regarding topics that ranged from the Navy’s plans to create a‘1,000-ship navy’ to hunt terrorists and pirates (combining United States and allied vessels to fill the requisite strength), individual augmentee” (Ref. 378A).

 

Sideboys greet Commander U.S. Pacific Fleet Adm. Gary Roughead aboard Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

070307-N-1229B-006 - BREMERTON, Wash. (March 7, 2007) - Sideboys greet Commander U.S. Pacific Fleet Adm. Gary Roughead aboard Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Roughead spoke with Lincoln Sailors about the at-sea to in-port rotation of operational ships within his area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick M. Bonafede (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=43773

 

Pacific Fleet Commander Visits Lincoln

 

“Commander U.S. Pacific Fleet Adm. Gary Roughead, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 7 March 2007, and spoke to the crew about the Navy’s deployability and employability policies during an all hands call aboard the aircraft carrier. "It's important to understand the deployability and employability policy," he said. "We're committed to having ships in their homeport at least 50 percent of the time in an employment cycle.

 

Homeport tempo is something that we're paying very close attention to." Homeport tempo is the percentage of time a unit is in homeport from the end of one maintenance phase to the end of the next maintenance phase. Roughead, who commands U.S. Naval forces in an area of more than 100 million square miles, addressed the ship’s crew and commended the Sailors’ hard work through a recent deployment and the ship's current overhaul period.

In October 2004,
Lincoln was diverted to Southeast Asia during Operation Unified Assistance following a devastating tsunami to deliver supplies and aid, potentially saving thousands of lives. “Abraham Lincoln projects a positive image of the United States and the U.S. Navy,” he said. “This crew and this ship are making a difference in the Pacific Fleet and throughout the world. The work this ship did a few years ago during the tsunami is not forgotten.

 

What you did is such a powerful thing and the image of this ship is in the minds of people all over the world." Previously, Lincoln was known for a marathon 10-month deployment in support of Operations Enduring Freedom, Southern Watch and Iraqi Freedom. Its most recent deployment, completed in August, was to the Western Pacific where Lincoln participated in Valiant Shield and numerous exercises with foreign navies including Rim of the Pacific 2006.

Roughead took questions from the crew on topics ranging from the 1,000-ship navy, to individual augmentee deployment, to implementation of the Navy's new uniforms. Before departing the ship, Roughead thanked
Lincoln's crew for its dedication. Lincoln is currently moored at Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton, Wash., while completing a Dry-dock Planned Incremental Availability. Based in Everett, Wash., the ship is preparing to deploy later this year.

"I know the maintenance period can be a hard time for the crew," Roughead said, "and I thank you for your great service. I thank you for what you've done, and what I know you'll continue to do” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070309-10 - Release Date: 3/9/2007 2:09:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28213

 

Members of Deck Department's paint team work to reposition a painting barge underneath an elevator on the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).

 

070314-N-7981E-138 - BREMERTON, Wash. (March 14, 2007) - Members of Deck Department's paint team work to reposition a painting barge underneath an elevator on the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Since late August, Sailors from Lincoln's Deck Department have applied haze-gray paint by hand to more than 250,000 square feet of the ship's hull and weather decks, and black paint to an additional 20,000 square feet at the waterline. Lincoln is currently wrapping up the last phase of its Dry-dock Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) in which months of hard work from Sailors and civilians have successfully prepared the ship for its return to full operational capability. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=44047

 

Lincoln’s Hangar Bay Getting a Makeover

 

As reported on 17 March 2007, “at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is taking another step toward operational readiness by giving a makeover to the ship's Hanger Bay Two, which is scheduled to be completed by 26 March 2007.

Hangar Bay Two is usually the first place people see when they come aboard the
Lincoln. It is also where several special events have been staged on the ship. Everything from change-of-command ceremonies, distinguished visitor receptions, and ship talent shows have all taken place there.

Sailors in V-3, part of Air Department, worked in Hangar Bay Two around the clock - cleaning, repainting, and sanding both day and night.

“We worked on it from about 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.,” said Aviation Boatswain's Mate Airman Jim Woodard. “Then we work through happy hour. Then duty section picks it up from 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., and then night shift comes in.”

Cleaning dust and other debris off the deck would normally be done with an air hose, which takes about two days. However, because of
Dry-dock Planned Incremental Availability restrictions, V-3 is limited to cleaning the hangar bay with foxtails and dustpans.

Rehabilitation is expected to be completed before a change-of-command ceremony for Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 on 26 March 2006.

Hangar Bay Two will be Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin’s last glimpse inside the ship, and incoming Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk’s first glimpse at the duties that lie ahead” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS070317-02 - Release Date: 3/17/2007 11:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brandon Wilson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28369

 

Deck Department Gives Abe “That New Ship Look”

 

“As of 17 March 2007, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (Abe) has a new paint job thanks to the Sailors from the ship’s Deck Department.

Since work began in late August, Lincoln
Sailors have applied haze-gray paint using rollers and brushes to more than 250,000-square feet of the ship’s hull and weather decks, and black paint to additional 20,000-square feet at the waterline. Though major work ended when Lincoln left drydock in December, teams are still hard at work keeping it looking like new.

“We’ve used 110 five-gallon cans of paint since we started
Dry-dock Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA),” said Lincoln’s Boatswain, Chief Warrant Officer Carlos E. Rudolph. “And we’re still doing touch-ups.”

Rudolph said that normally this tremendous undertaking would be performed by workers from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, but due to time and budget restraints,
Lincoln’s Deck Department enacted their own aggressive plan to paint the ship themselves within the allotted time.

“No other aircraft carrier’s deck department, at least in the last five years, has taken it upon themselves to paint the ship from the waterline up,” Rudolph said.

He added that the reason for this is the difficulty of ensuring that environmental procedures are followed, equipment is set up properly, and that the work is coordinated with other projects going on around the ship. Rudolph said that
Deck Department foresaw the challenges they would face and took steps to prepare for them before painting even began.

“Our guys got training from the shipyard to ensure that all environmental concerns were understood,” Rudolph said, “We also rented our own aerial work platforms so we could meet the schedule we set for ourselves.”

Rudolph and Chief Boatswain’s Mate (SW/AW) Johnny R. Ford, who supervised most of the work, both estimate that their department’s efforts shaved millions of dollars from the normal cost of painting, based on comparing figures they’ve heard for other carriers.

Teams of junior sailors worked around-the-clock, seven days a week through a wet, windy Pacific Northwest winter to get Lincoln’s hull looking good as new.

 

“We had two teams of 15 people working 8-hour shifts each day and night so we could get the job done on time,” said Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class (SW) Willie Pagan, a team supervisor. “A lot of the work had to be done at night or on the weekends because during the workday the shipyard workers would be working in the areas that we had to get to,” he added.

 

Each team was comprised of a group of 13 seamen and a pair of petty officers who supervised and ensured that quality and environmental standards were being met.

“None of what we accomplished could have been done without the leadership of our second and third class petty officers in charge of the teams,” Ford said. “They were out there every day making sure it was done right and on time.”

Ford said that in addition to compliments from the crew, he and the rest of
Deck Department’s leadership were also impressed with the way the ship looks.

“It actually surprised us -- the day we came out of dry-dock. The boatswain, the First Lieutenant and I went out to have a look and honestly, it looked like a whole new ship.”

The combined efforts of work teams like
Deck Department’s paint crew have helped bring Lincoln closer to achieving operational readiness as DPIA draws to a close and the ship prepares to get underway” (Ref. Story Number: NNS070317-12 - Release Date: 3/17/2007 11:47:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28368

 

Chief Personnel Specialist James Robertson, a member of Lincoln's Damage Control Training Team, debriefs fire team members near the end of a general quarters drill.

 

070320-N-7981E-302 - BREMERTON, Wash. (March 20, 2007) - Chief Personnel Specialist James Robertson, a member of Lincoln's Damage Control Training Team, debriefs fire team members near the end of a general quarters drill aboard Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln held shipwide drills throughout the day as part of a simulated underway in preparation for the ship's return to operational status following a Dry-dock Planned Incremental Availability period at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=44239

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2006 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XX

Appendix I

 

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2006” (Ref.):

 

The ship's chain of command as of 3 1 December 2006 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President George Walker Bush, 2001-2009 - 43rd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Donald H. Rumsfeld
20 Jan 2001 - 18 Dec 2006 -
13th & 21st

The Honorable Robert M. Gates 
18 Dec 2006- 1 Jul 2011 - 22nd

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Gordon R. England - 70th & 73rd

24 May 2001- 24 Jan 2003 and

1 Oct 2003 - 28 Dec 2005

The Honorable Donald C. Winter - 74th

3 Jan 2006 - 13 May 2009

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Michael Mullen - 28th

22 Jul 2005 - 29 Sep 2007

COMPACFLT, former *CINCPACFLT

ADM Gary R. Roughead - 57th

8 Jul 2005, to 8 May 2007

ADM Robert F. Willard- 58th

8 May 2007 - 25 Sep 2009

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM James M. Zortman - 29th

Aug 2002 - Aug 2004

Aug 2004 - 2011 - Not Reported

Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9

RDML John W. Goodwin

7 Sep 2005 - 26 Mar 2007

 

*Between 1907 and December 6, 1922, and between February 1, 1941 and October 24, 2002.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CINCPACFLT

 

Organizational Structure. During calendar year 2006, Captain C.A. McCawley served as Commanding Officer. Captain …..served as Executive Officer. CMC  …..served as Command Master Chief.

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2006 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT Charles A. McCawley

Executive Officer - XO

 

Administrative Officer

 

Administrative Officer

 

Air Officer

 

AIMD Officer

 

Combat Systems Officer

 

Religious Department - RMD - Command Chaplain

 

Legal Department - Command Judge Advocate

 

Dental Officer

 

Engineering Officer

 

Deck - First Lieutenant

 

Communications Officer

 

Maintenance Officer

 

Senior Medical Officer

 

Navigator

 

Operations Officer

 

Public Affairs - PAO

 

Reactor Officer

 

Safety Officer

 

Supply Officer

 

Training Officer

 

Weapons Officer

 

 

The following accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 2006:

 

“Conducted quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2.. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time. This is Lincoln's final training cycle before departing on a scheduled six-month deployment later this year. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 5 to 8 January 2006” (Ref. 378A & 1161).

 

“Conducted a five-and-a-half month deployment, on her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East and South China Sea and Java Sea, Joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian waters from 25 to 27 March 2006, with the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), joined (at various times) attack submarines Cheyenne, Greeneville (SSN-772), Pasadena, Seawolf (SSN-21) and Tucson (SSN-770). Additional exercises and operations during this deployment will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and will host the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports. and participating in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea. The month-long exercise was designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations (27 February to 8 August 2006)” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377, 378A, 1161 & Story Number: NNS060808-07 - Release Date: 8/8/2006 3:38:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25045

 

Abraham Lincoln entered Dry Dock #6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF) on 8 September 2006 to begin a scheduled Docked Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) period, which is expected to last through March 2007” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060920-03 - Release Date: 9/20/2006 8:33:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25045

 

Abraham Lincoln was runner up in 1999 and 2006 for the Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Award, a prestigious Food Services award for the best aircraft carrier galley in the Pacific in the Large Afloat class for Food Service Excellence.

 

 

Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington (29 August 2006 to 26 June 2007) - USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2006 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter XX, Appendix I

 

9 August 2006 to 26 June 2007

Chapter XX and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2006 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XX

Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4