Naval Station, Everett, Washington; quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time; Inspection and Survey (INSURV) at sea period; Naval Station, Everett, Washington and her Eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East, South China Sea and Java Sea, joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian, exercises and operations will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and hosted the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports and participated in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea, a month-long exercise designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations (27 February to 8 August 2006).

1 January to 8 August 2006

Chapter XIX

Part I of IV - 1 January to 31 March 2006

Part II of IV - 1 April to 17 June 2006

Part III of IV - 18 June to 7 August 2006

Part IV of IV - 8 August 2006

 

Abe’s In port and Eighth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XIX, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call.

Chapter XIX, Appendix I

 

Abraham Lincoln Wraps Up Deployment 2006

 

“On 8 August 2006, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, Rear Adm. John W. Goodwin embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington, disembarking CVW-2 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore at San Diego, California prior to arriving her home port, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, ending a five-and-a-half month deployment, on her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East, South China Sea and Java Sea, joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian waters from 25 to 27 March 2006, with the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), joined (at various times) attack submarines Cheyenne, Greeneville (SSN-772), Pasadena, Seawolf (SSN-21) and Tucson (SSN-770). Additional exercises and operations during this deployment that included Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK), while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and will host the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports. and participating in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea. The month-long exercise was designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations. This deployment will be the first WestPac since Lincoln's historic cruise in 2004, when Lincoln and CVW-2 Sailors responded to the Southeast Asian tsunami disaster that occurred Dec. 26, 2004. After OUA, Lincoln returned and has since been conducting readiness training in accordance to the Fleet Response Plan (FRP). Abraham Lincoln is home to the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Commander, Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, who said the 2006 deployment affords the strike group the opportunity to work with many coalition partners. “The strike group will be training with coalition partners to improve our ability to operate with naval forces from many nations,” Goodwin said. “The United States is committed to its alliances and will be working to develop partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security.” The ships passed through Philippine waters via the Balabac Strait, between the Philippine island of Palawan and Sabah, Borneo, crossed the Sulu Sea and transited the Surigao Strait between the islands of Mindanao and Samar. Sailors that comprise the Abe/CVW-2 team relyed on the knowledge gained while performing at sea. All hands aboard are certainly looking forward to coming home to Everett,” said Capt. C. Andrew McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s commanding officer. “The crew is anticipating some well deserved leave and liberty, and we are all looking forward to rejoining our families and loved ones.” According to McCawley, the deployment was a successful one. “From the extremely important mission of projecting U.S. policy abroad to the equally vital mission of presenting an image of America as a global citizen who respects and enjoys the cultures of other nations, the Sailors of Abraham Lincoln have performed in an exemplary fashion,” McCawley said. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 27 to 28 February 2006 en route to southern Californian waters to rendezvous with the remainder of the group and to embark CVW-2, pulling in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 1 March 2006, embarking CVW-2. Abraham Lincoln departed NASNI on 2 March 2006, visiting from 1 to 2 March 2006, embarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California. The S-6 Aviation Support Division of the Supply Department loaded two SH-60B Seahawk aviation repairable pack-up kits, including four aviation consumable Vidmar cabinets, from NAS North Island. The ship required this equipment to support the second iteration on board Abraham Lincoln of the SH-60B-To-Carrier Pilot, a unique program that assigned the carrier to directly support HSL-47, a full squadron of helicopters embarked (dispersed) throughout the carrier strike group. The men and women of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) took time during their transit West to the Hawaii Operations Area on 7 March 2006 to pause and consider the importance of safety in all that they do. The planned Safety Stand Down also fell in with a mandatory Aviation Safety Stand Down ordered by the Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) over the weekend in response to the rising number of incidents involving aircraft over the past several months. Sailors from ALCSG have the opportunity to attend Regional Security Program (RSEP) briefs from 2 to 12 March 2006 while underway. The briefs cover topics ranging from the overall picture of a Security Affairs Program to China’s rise as an economic power in the world. As reported on 17 March 2006, Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln with the help of Congress are taking advantage of Navy Auto Source on the mess decks during March. Navy Auto Source has been with the Navy for the past 50 years, helping Sailors stationed overseas find the car of their dreams at bargain prices. Now, through an act of Congress, Sailors 12 miles off shore - or more in international waters - can get the same deals on custom-built Ford and Chrysler cars and even Harley-Davidson motorcycles. As reported on 17 March 2006, “at the kickoff of its latest Western Pacific deployment, the ALCSG gathered in Hawaiian waters in mid-March to hone its ability to detect, track and counter a threat from beneath the sea. This strike group, centered around Abraham Lincoln, from Everett, Washington, is the third to conduct an undersea warfare exercise near Hawaii this year, illustrating Pacific Fleet Commander Adm. Gary Roughead’s focus on making anti-submarine warfare his top war-fighting priority. As reported on 20 March 2006, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, led by Rear Adm. J. W. Goodwin embarked on Abraham Lincoln, arrived in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in late March as part of a routine scheduled deployment. CSG 9 includes Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Destroyer Squadron 9, Abraham Lincoln, the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86). Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 participated in a PASSEX, teamed up with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force in the Western Pacific area of operations from 22 to 23 March 2006. The purpose of the PASSEX is to exercise basic seamanship and conduct coordinated operations between CSG-9 and the JMSDF, with Japanese guided missile destroyers Harusame (DD-102), Hatakaze (DD-171) and Kirishima (DDG-174) operating under the direction of the JMSDF in the Western Pacific area of operations from 22 to 23 March 2006. During the PASSEX, CSG 9 and the Japanese navy conducted an officer exchange program to allow Japanese Sailors to experience life aboard an American ship and vice-versa. During the exercise, officers from both sides participated in an officer exchange program between ships in order to get a better understanding of how each navy operates. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Pacific from 3 to 25 March 2006. Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, led by Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, embarked on Abraham Lincoln, participated in Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), which began on 26 March 2006 and would run through the end of the month. Marines and sailors with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) embarked aboard the Sasebo Forward Deployed Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) arrived on 25 March 2006 to take part in Exercise Foal Eagle 2006, as well. The war-fighting skill sets Lincoln and CVW-2 rehearsed included close-air support for ground units, air-to-air defense exercises, maritime interoperability training and expeditionary operations. This exercise crystallized Lincoln's role as a command-and-control node. During Foal Eagle 2006, Marines and sailors with the MEU participated in a variety of exercises, including assault climbing, live-fire ranges, urban combat training, community outreach efforts and a combined amphibious landing. In addition to the MEU/ARG arrival, elements of Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment and MEU Service Support Group 31 debarked from the USS Essex (LHD-2), USS Harpers Ferry (LSD-49) and USS Juneau (LPD-10). As the Marines and sailors disembarked, a contingent of over 300 ROK Marines and sailors of the 1st ROK Marine Division's 3rd Regimental Landing Team came aboard the ARG for further combined planning and training in with the Navy-Marine Corp team in amphibious doctrine. Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06) exercise was designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness. The ROK and U.S. navies conducted an officer exchange program during the exercise. Five ROK naval officers embarked Abraham Lincoln to train with the ships' crew. Abraham Lincoln, the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), joined (at various times) attack submarines Cheyenne, Greeneville (SSN-772), Pasadena, Seawolf (SSN-21) and Tucson (SSN-770), and Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian waters from 25 to 27 March 2006. Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, led by Rear Adm. J. W. Goodwin, embarked on Abraham Lincoln is currently participating in RSOI/FE-06, which began on 26 March 2006 and runs through the end of the month. “Foal Eagle provides the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group the opportunity to continue developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s commanding officer. Cmdr. Glen Leverette of Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF-70) based in Yokosuka, Japan, described Lincoln’s role in RSOI/FE-06 as a vital one. “Lincoln is here to support theater security, cooperation and engagement with the ROK and to reinforce the alliance we have,” Leverette said. “Our presence during the exercise is a visible, tangible expression of our nation’s commitment to their [ROK’s] defense.” Following the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group’s participation in bilateral Reception, Staging, Onward-movement & Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE-06) exercises with the Republic of Korea (ROK) on 26 March 2006 through April 1st, Abraham Lincoln continued on her deployment in the Western Pacific. Abraham Lincoln hosted several Republic of Korea (ROK) military officials during Foal Eagle 2006 in the East Sea on 29 March 2006. General B. B. Bell, commander, U.S. Forces Korea, along with Deputy Commander Combined Forces, Gen. Hee Won-lee and other senior members of the ROK military, flew aboard the aircraft carrier to witness an array of power projection from the sea. Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Commander, Rear Adm. J. W. Goodwin, and Abraham Lincoln’s commanding officer, Capt. C. A. McCawley, welcomed the group along with Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Capt. Matthew Klunder, on the flight deck before touring the ship. The group witnessed air operations from the flight deck and interacted with Sailors during the visit. The delegation also had a chance to view a vast display of weapons in the ship’s cavernous hangar bay. Personnel and units of the U.S. military and Republic of Korea (ROK) Combined Forces Command (CFC) conducted their annual combined and joint exercise, RSOI/Foal Eagle 06 from 26 to 31 March 2006. RSOI and Foal Eagle are Korean-theater wide computer-simulated and field exercises designed to evaluate and improve the U.S. and ROK forces' ability to coordinate the procedures, plans and systems necessary to defend the ROK in a contingency. It focuses on ground maneuver, air, naval, expeditionary, and special operations, as well as command and control training. Foal Eagle involved more than 70 U.S. and ROK Navy ships and more than 100 aircraft from all services of both the U.S. and ROK armed forces. “The participation of both nations’ navies demonstrates the solid commitment to the ROK/U.S. alliance and strengthens the combat readiness of ROK and U.S. supporting forces through combined and joint training,” said Rear Adm. James P. Wisecup, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea (CNFK). More than 70 ships and submarines, participated in RSOI/Foal Eagle 06, an exercise to demonstrate United States resolve to support the South Koreans from 27 March to 1 April 2006. U.S. 7th Fleet assets included the Commander, Amphibious Squadron (COMPHIBRON) 11 staff embarked on amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD-2), amphibious transport dock ship USS Juneau (LPD-10), dock landing ship USS Harper’s Ferry (LSD-49), attack submarine USS Houston (SSN-713), mine countermeasures ships USS Guardian (MCM-5) and USS Patriot (MCM-7), guided missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), salvage ship USS Safeguard (ARS-50), as well as the DESRON 15 staff embarked on guided missile destroyer USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG-54), and guided missile frigate USS Vandegrift (FFG-48), guided missile frigate USS Stethem (DDG-63), guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62), guided missile frigates USS Gary (FFG-51) and USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) together, with 70 to 80 aircraft, took part in the training, which included deploying some forces ashore at stations within the Republic of Korea. Abraham Lincoln hosted an entourage of high-ranking South Korean officials (29 March). Meanwhile, Safeguard and South Korean auxiliary Pyong Taek (ATS-27) also salvaged a USAF F-16C Fighting Falcon that had crashed off the South Korean coast on 14 March. Abraham Lincoln also took part in reception, staging, onward movement and integration exercises. In addition, Supply Department sailors deployed ashore to Pusan AFB, South Korea, to facilitate the extended logistics flow through Japanese and South Korean routes. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Western Pacific from 26 March to 1 April 2006. “Foal Eagle provides the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group the opportunity to continue developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s commanding officer. Cmdr. Glen Leverette of Commander Task Force 70 (CTF 70) based in Yokosuka, Japan, described Lincoln’s role in RSOI/FE 06 as a vital one. Lincoln is here to support theater security, cooperation and engagement with the ROK and to reinforce the alliance we have,” he said. “Our presence during the exercise is a visible, tangible expression of our nation’s commitment to their [ROK’s] defense.” The chief petty officers (CPO) of Abraham Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 gathered in the carrier’s hangar bay on 1 April 2006, to honor the 113th birthday of the chief petty officer rank. Command Master Chief, CMDCM (SW/AW/NAC) Michael Anjola, presided over the ceremony, during which he talked about the beginnings of the chief and their role in today’s Navy. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Sea of Japan from 26 March to 3 April 2006; underway in the East China Sea on 4 April 2006; underway in the South China Sea on 5 April 2006 and then pulled into Hong Kong on 6 April 2006, following five weeks of exercises in the Western Pacific. The 5,500 Sailors of the ship’s crew and embarked air wing will have the opportunity to enjoy the renowned hospitality of the city for an extended weekend before heading back to sea to continue their scheduled Western Pacific deployment. The men and women of the ALCSG wrapped up a port call in Hong Kong on 10 April 2006 after four days of liberty. Upon leaving Hong Kong, Abraham Lincoln participated in a PASSEX with the Royal Thai Navy and hosted the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits. Guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) participated in flight operations with the Hong Kong Governmental Flight Service (HKGFS) on 10 April 2006 in the Western Pacific Ocean. The HKGFS consists of helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, and its primary mission is to provide emergency airlift and search and rescue in local and coastal waters of Hong Kong. A crew from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 assisted a vessel in distress in the South China Sea on 15 April 2006. The squadron, known as the “Saberhawks,” were conducting routine flight operations at the time. “We were flying around checking out all the surface contacts near the battle group,” said Lt. j.g. James Bowen, one of the two pilots aboard the SH-60B Seahawk helicopter when the vessel was spotted. “We were flying past and it just looked like an old fishing vessel.” However, the crew noticed the fishermen on deck were trying to signal them, so the crew decided to turn around and make another pass to check it out. “This time there were more people on deck, and they were signaling us to come closer,” said Bowen. The ALCSG performed a pass-in-review ceremony, a time-honored tradition, while sailing in the South China Sea on 16 April 2006. Rear Adm. Goodwin led the exercise from his vantage point on board the carrier, as Mobile Bay, Russell and Shoup passed Abraham Lincoln one-by-one along her port side, and dipped their national ensigns to render honors. The admiral passed over the carrier’s 1MC that sailors not on watch could make their way to the flight deck and photograph the event, which many did, and some of their counterparts on board the cruiser and destroyers took part in the tradition and observed the ships from their weather decks. The ceremony also coincided with Easter Sunday, and afforded sailors a break from their hectic schedules. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the South China Sea from 10 to 17 April 2006. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Gulf of Thailand from 18 to 19 April 2006. Abraham Lincoln made history on 20 April 2006, when it moored in Laem Chebang, Thailand, the first time a U.S. aircraft carrier has done so. Previously, carriers visiting Thailand anchored off the coast and used liberty launches; a lengthy and dangerous way for Sailors to go ashore in Laem Chebang. Previously, carriers visiting Thailand anchored off the coast and used liberty launches; a lengthy and dangerous way for Sailors to go ashore in Laem Chebang, said Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate (SW) Robert W. Dean. According to Dean, a Navy harbor pilot from Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka, being pierside is a much better alternative. A group of Sailors from the ALCSG spent a portion of their liberty time in Thailand at the Redemptorist Street Kids Home east of Pattaya on 21 April 2006.

The Sailors painted, completed odd jobs, and played with the children at the home. Sailors from the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group took part in a community service (COMSERV) project at the Pattaya Orphanage on 22 April 2006. Forty-seven Sailors helped the staff of Pattaya Orphanage relocate their nursery to a new facility by carrying supplies and furniture, as well as bringing a little joy to the lives of the children who live there. Ships of the ALCSG got under way on 24 April 2006 after a four-day port visit to Thailand, pierside in Laem Chebang from 20 to 24 April 2006. Sailors were bused from the busy commercial port to Pattaya in order to take advantage of liberty. Previously, carriers visiting Thailand anchored off the coast and used liberty launches; a lengthy and dangerous way for Sailors to go ashore in Laem Chebang. The ship avoided running liberty boats for sailors going ashore, a sometimes dangerous proposition in rough weather, by berthing pierside at the exotic port. In addition, as Abraham Lincoln sailed from the area, she will commence a passing exercise with Thai vessels, and officers from both nations participating in brief officer exchanges. During the visit, Sailors were able to shop, take tours and participate in community service projects with a local orphanage and two local schools. According to Lt. Cmdr Steven Orren, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 chaplain, more than 200 Sailors participated in the community service projects. Abraham Lincoln, flagship of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, teamed up with the Royal Thai navy 24 April 2006 to conduct a PASSEX in the Gulf of Thailand. During the exercise, officers from both nations participated in an officer exchange program between ships, in order to get a better understanding of how each navy operates. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Gulf of Thailand from 24 to 26 April 2006 and then returned to Singapore on 27 April 2006, after a brief at-sea period following a port call in Thailand. Lincoln last visited Singapore in February 2005 after spending a month off the coast of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, as part of OUA following the December 2004 tsunami disaster. While in port, Sailors plan to perform community service projects including visiting children with special needs, several schools and children’s residential homes. Sailors will also take in tours of the area, including nighttime dinner cruises, shopping in Singapore’s Chinatown, viewing the world-famous zoo and much more. As reported on 29 April 2006, ALCSG, conducted missions in the Western Pacific in April, completed drills designed to keep the high seas safe. A Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) exercise was conducted by a select group of Sailors from the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86). “Our mission is to board and search vessels suspected of transporting drugs and contraband, trafficking in persons, or harboring suspected terrorists,” said Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Richard Isotalo, a member of the VBSS team. Before becoming a part of Shoup’s VBSS team, prospective members attend the three-week Noncompliant VBSS course at the Fleet Training Center in San Diego, in addition to completing both the basic and advanced Security Reaction Force courses. Abraham Lincoln got underway from Changi Naval Base in Singapore on 1 May 2006, after a successful four-day port call to "The Lion City." As part of the port visit, Lincoln hosted a reception April 27th, welcoming the Honorable Patricia Herbold, U.S. ambassador to Singapore, Rear Adm. Ronnie Tay, chief of the Singapore navy, and ambassadors of several other nations to Singapore aboard the ship. ALCSG Sailors also offered their time during the port visit in six different community service (COMSERV) projects, including taking children from a local orphanage swimming and helping disabled children who are undergoing water therapy. Abraham Lincoln conducted freedom of navigation exercises and a PASSEX in the Java Sea once the carrier cleared the South China Sea, most likely on the 2nd, during which time the U.S. ambassador to Indonesia and several Indonesian officials flew out to the ship to once again thank the crew for their efforts to provide humanitarian assistance during OUA in the aftermath of the December 26, 2004, tsunami disaster. B. Lynn Pascoe, U.S. ambassador to Indonesia and several officials from the Indonesian government and military flew aboard Abraham Lincoln on 3 May 2006 for a brief visit. Fifteen months earlier, Pascoe had been aboard Lincoln with a delegation of Indonesian officials to say “thank you” to the crew for their efforts during OUA. While aboard, guests enjoyed a brief luncheon with Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, Capt. C. A. McCawley, were greeted by Commander, ALCSG, Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, and had a brief tour of the ship. The guests viewed flight operations from the flight deck and viewed an air power demonstration from the ship’s signal bridge. The culmination of their tour, however, was a "meet and greet" in the hangar bay, where officials shook hands with Sailors who were aboard and had gone ashore to lend assistance in Aceh during the tsunami relief efforts. Abraham Lincoln completed what her historian noted as “intense flight operations” in the Java Sea. U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia B. Lynn Pascoe, and Indonesian Lt. Gen. Sjafrie Sjamsoeddin, that country’s secretary-general of defense, visited the ship from 2 to 3 May 2006 and thanked crewmembers for their help during OUA relief efforts. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 11, Detachment 9 spent time diving and training with their Singaporean counterparts from 1 to 4 May 2006. EODMU 11, based out of Whidbey Island, Wash., remained in Singapore following the departure of Abraham Lincoln on 4 May 2006, training with the Republic of Singapore Naval Diving Unit (NDU), a unique experience for both the U.S. Navy EOD team and the Singaporean sailors who participated in the exercise. A Sailor aboard Abraham Lincoln won a national award recognizing outstanding leadership in the intelligence community on 5 May 2006. Intelligence Specialist 1st Class (SW) Jeremy Heyer, leading petty officer of Operations Department’s OZ Division, Carrier Intelligence Center, won the Edwin T. Layton Leadership Award. The Layton award was formed by the Director of Naval Intelligence, with the assistance of the Naval Intelligence Foundation, in 2001 to recognize outstanding leadership and mentorship in the naval intelligence community. Nominations for the Layton Award are reviewed semi-annually every September and March. Two Naval Aviators flying an airborne early warning patrol over the South China Sea discovered they had common roots on 8 May 2006. The two University of South Carolina (USC) alumni were Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 embarked aboard Abraham Lincoln and Lt. Cmdr. T. Michael Santomauro, operations officer in Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116. Prince Mohamed, along with several government officials, the heads of Brunei’s armed forces and Charge d’affaires of the U.S. Embassy to Brunei Jeff Hawkins, visited Abraham Lincoln on 9 May 2006, while the ship was off the northwest coast of the island of Borneo. During the officials' visit, Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, and commanding officer, Capt. C. A. McCawley, hosted the group. The group was treated to an up-close view of flight operations, observing aircraft launches from the flight deck before climbing to the ship’s signal bridge to observe an air power demonstration by the embarked aircraft of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. After the air show, the group visited with several pilots and air crew from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47, who showed them an SH-60B “Seahawk” used in OUA in Indonesia during the aftermath of the Dec. 26, 2004, tsunami. Mohamad and several of the military officials accompanying him thanked air crew members from HSL-47 for their efforts in Aceh. As Abraham Lincoln sailed northward toward Japanese waters, Tropical Storm Chanchu (“Pearl”) swept across the Philippines and killed 32 people in mid-May 2006. The storm continued on a westerly track into the South China Sea, where forecasters upgraded Chanchu to a typhoon, which turned northward and wreaked havoc with hundreds of Vietnamese fishermen caught in the tempest’s path. Chanchu increased to such fury that forecasters again upgraded the storm, to a super typhoon–an extreme rarity. The super typhoon barreled northeastward and slammed into the Chinese coastline, where it killed at least another 25 people before the super typhoon finally spent its ferocity. Chanchu forced Abraham Lincoln to change course by a circuitous route to avoid the super typhoon’s powerful winds and heavy seas. The ship passed through Philippine waters via the Balabac Strait, between the Philippine island of Palawan and Sabah, Borneo, crossed the Sulu Sea and transited the Surigao Strait between the islands of Mindanao and Samar. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the South China Sea from 1 to 18 May 2006; the Philippine Sea on 19 May 2006 and the Western Pacific from 22 to 24 May 2006; sailing north to participate in PASSEX and training exercises with the JMSDF before conducting a port call in Sasebo, Japan on 25 May 2006 for a scheduled port visit. While in port, the ship’s crew members will have a chance to participate in friendship-building and goodwill-generating activities and cultural exchanges. “This visit is an outward demonstration of U.S. commitment to Japan and the entire East Asia region,” said Rear Adm. J.W. Goodwin, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9. Goodwin and his staff are embarked on the carrier, homeported in Everett, Wash. Other commands embarked on Abraham Lincoln are Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and Destroyer Squadron 9. Ships in the strike group are USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Mobile Bay (CG-53). “The crew always enjoys opportunities to visit cities in Japan and experience different parts of this fascinating country,” said Capt. Andrew McCawley, commanding officer of Abraham Lincoln. Abraham Lincoln departed Naval Base Sasebo, Japan on 29 May 2006 after spending four days in port. While in Sasebo, Sailors from Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 had the opportunity to learn about Japanese culture through various command-sponsored tours and sporting events. Members of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 11, Detachment 9, from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash., participated in joint training operations with members of the JMSDF Explosive Ordnance Disposal team on 29 May 2006 in Sasebo, Japan. Lt. John Laney, EODMU 11, Det. 9’s officer in charge, said that every opportunity that his EOD unit has to work with JMSDF is a chance to strengthen the bond between the United States and Japan. Abraham Lincoln participated in PASSEX and training exercises and ASW operations in the with the JMSDF in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific from 29 May to 9 June 2006, performing burials at sea for 10 veterans on 9 June 2006 and Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) participated in a PASSEX with the JMSDF in the Western Pacific from 10 to 14 June 2006. This PASSEX was focused on anti-submarine warfare (ASW). “During an ASW exercise, helicopters go out and play their roles, like dropping sonobuoys,” said Lt. Jim Steffen, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9’s submarine liaison officer. “It’s DESRON’s job to take all the information in and make the big picture. When it’s all U.S. forces, it’s easy; there’s no language or equipment barrier.” To overcome such communication and equipment barriers between U.S. forces and Japanese during this exercise, the strike group participated in an officer exchange program, said Steffen. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Western Pacific on 15 June 2006, crossing the equator in June 2006. Air Department’s V-4 Division set a milestone on 15 June 2006 as the ship reached the 25-million gallon mark of fuel pumped aboard during the ship's Western Pacific deployment. The ship pumped fuel aboard during 10 underway replenishments (UNREP), an operation in which fuel lines are sent from a USNS oil tanker to a ship while underway, supplying the fuel needed for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aircraft. According to Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) (SW) William Langdon, “25 million gallons of JP-5 is more fuel than three-and-a-half [oil] tankers full.” “It’s quite an accomplishment, especially on this type of deployment,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) 3rd Class Sam Gregg. “We came out here not expecting to fly this hard. We came up with 25 million, and we did it without any big mishaps.” Lincoln and CVW-2 used approximately 16 million gallons of fuel during Surge Deployment ‘04-05, much less than during the current deployment. According to V-4 Fuels Boatswain Lt. Michael Chanley, USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) held the previous record, pumping 23.5 million gallons of fuel during its maiden deployment. “We’re on track to handle 27 million gallons this cruise,” said Chanley. He added that the ship expected to perform a total of 12 refueling UNREPs. The JP-5 fuel V-4 manages is pumped from stowage tanks below decks and stripped of any water within the tanks. It is then sent through transfer pumps into purifiers. After being cleaned, the JP-5 becomes service fuel ready to be sent to the service tanks and from there to the flight deck. The more jets that are in the air, the more fuel is demanded. “It’s a huge number [of gallons] for the four month period we’ve been underway compared to other deployments that we’ve had,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) 1st Class (AW) Douglas Mohr. From below decks, where the V-4 "purple shirts" provide serviceable fuel, to the flight deck, where they directly fuel the aircraft, V-4 pumps roughly 150,000 to 200,000 gallons of JP-5 per day to the aircraft on the flight deck. V-4 celebrated by having a cake-cutting ceremony in the First Class Petty Officers Mess June 18 with Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9 Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin congratulating them on the achievement. "It is an honor to celebrate the dedication and professionalism of the hard-working Sailors of V-4 division,” said Goodwin. “Their dedication to safely performing this vital job is exemplary of the overall outstanding performance of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group team. As reported on 16 June 2006, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7, along with other ships and military personnel from around the U.S. Pacific Fleet, made preparations for Valiant Shield 2006, one of the largest joint military exercises in this region in more than a decade. USAF Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirits flying from Whiteman AFB, Missouri, along with 28 vessels from groups built around aircraft carriers Abraham Lincoln, Kitty Hawk, Ronald Reagan, and USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) were Valiant Shield 06 participants beginning the exercise by staging a dramatic photographic event as all three carrier strike groups sailed in a formation that brought leading ships within 500 yards of each other, and as a Spirit led a flight of Hornets and Super Hornets overhead. Aircraft flying from Abraham Lincoln performed strike group defence, offensive air-to-air, maritime interdiction and antisubmarine missions, and helicopters not only hunted submarines but also accomplished naval special warfare missions with SEAL Team 1 and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5 AFB. The exercise will involve more than 20,000 Sailors, Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. Valiant Shield 2006 will also see more than 300 aircraft and 28 ships from the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), and Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Groups, as well as the Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard. McCampbell and Decatur are part of the Reagan Strike Group. According to Lt. Cmdr. Andy Liggett, DESRON 7’s plans officer, the squadron will be supporting the exercise in many ways. “DESRON 7’s mission is to support [the] Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group’s undersea warfare and surface warfare commander, while simultaneously coordinating with the Lincoln and Kitty Hawk Strike Groups,” said Liggett. Observers from India, Japan and Russia, as well as media from the Armed Forces Network, Guam, Japan and National Public Radio, arrived aboard Lincoln on 17 June 2007 via a C-2A Greyhound from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30, flying from Anderson Air Force Base, Guam. Twenty-two foreign military officials and civilians visited Abraham Lincoln from 17 to 18 June 2006, commencing Exercise Valiant Shield 2006 in the Pacific Ocean operating off the coast of Guam. Abraham Lincoln operated in the Pacific conducting training from 16 to 18 June 2006, entering the Philippine Sea on the 18th. HS-2, part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked on Abraham Lincoln, was ashore on the island of Guam operating with a detachment of HS-14 “Chargers” in support of Abraham Lincoln operating in the Guam operating area conducting training from 16 to 18 June 2006. After arriving aboard Lincoln, guests were greeted by Capt. C.A. McCawley, Lincoln’s commanding officer. The visitors were aboard Lincoln for two days and enjoyed tours of the carrier, as well as observing operations during the exercise. The guests also attended a video teleconference between Abraham Lincoln, Kitty Hawk, Ronald Reagan and command ship Blue Ridge (LCC-19), that involved Adm. Gary Roughead, Commander, Pacific Fleet, who broke his flag from Blue Ridge. Logistically supporting three carriers and their screens through Anderson AFB challenged sailors, due to the limited infrastructure and long supply lines. The ship commenced Exercise Valiant Shield 2006 in the Marianas Islands area off the coast of Guam on the 18th, the largest Pacific joint exercise in recent history, involving 28 naval vessels including three carrier strike groups, with together more than 20,000 Sailors, Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Coast Guardsmen and more than 300 aircraft including USAF Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirits flying from Whiteman AFB, Missouri; Abraham Lincoln, Kitty Hawk and Ronald Reagan, and USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6). The exercise began with a photo exercise as the three strike groups conducted a passing exercise, sailing in a formation that brought the ships within 500 yards of one another as a flight of F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets, lead by an Air Force B-2 Spirit bomber, flew in formation overhead. Sailors from the Navy Special Warfare (NSW) community, Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technicians and Navy SEALs conduct a static-line parachute jump off the coast of Guam from HH-60H helicopters on 19 June 2006. HS-2, part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked on Abraham Lincoln, was ashore on the island of Guam operating with a detachment of HS-14 “Chargers” in support of Abraham Lincoln operated in the Guam operating area conducting training from 16 to 18 June 2006. As reported on 20 June 2006, the exercise, commencing 19 June 2006, focuses on real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces and detecting, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air and on land in response to a wide range of missions. The exercise included 28 ships, as well as 290 aircraft, in a maritime environment for five days of integrated joint training, and invited 10 countries to observe the exercise near Guam. Valiant Shield '06 is a unique opportunity for U.S. forces to exercise together, allowing participating units to work through a range of skill sets using a capability-based approach in a complex operational environment. Forces will exercise a wide range of skills, including maritime interdiction; defense counter-air and anti-submarine warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and command and control. “Joint interoperability is the key to successfully responding to future contingencies in the Pacific,” said Rear Adm. Michael H. Miller, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 7. “Exercises such as Valiant Shield give us an opportunity to ensure joint command, control and communication procedures are seamless.” CSG 7 and its flagship, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), is one of the three carrier strike groups participating in the exercise. According to Miller, Valiant Shield '06 builds upon the annual Joint Air and Sea Exercise (JASEX), which demonstrated a U.S. commitment in the Western Pacific and has taken place for the past three years. U.S. Pacific Command forces will also take advantage of a series of linked exercises to ensure stability and security throughout the Asia-Pacific Region. According to Miller, in today’s constantly changing threat environment, it's essential to swiftly bring together integrated, versatile military forces in response to any regional contingency. “U.S. forces are extremely flexible and can quickly respond anywhere in the world,” said Miller. “Valiant Shield 2006 is a perfect example of forces rapidly coming together from many different geographic regions to operate together on short notice.” According to Capt. Terry B. Kraft, Ronald Reagan’s commanding officer, this year’s exercise includes forces already operating in the Western Pacific. Kraft said U.S. forces are transforming to meet challenges to regional stability in the Asia-Pacific Region. Participating units include the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group; USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) Carrier Strike Group; Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group; embarked air wings; elements of the 5th Air Force; 8th Air Force; 11th Air Force; 1st Marine Air Wing; U.S. Coast Guard assets; military sealift command ships; and supporting headquarters’ staffs. Valiant Shield '06 is the first of what will become a biennial exercise and has been planned for months. The U.S. routinely deploys forces to the Western Pacific to maintain a stabilizing presence in the region. The exercise allows U.S. forces to exercise joint skills in peacetime to prepare for success during a contingency. USS Shoup (DDG-86) turned 4 years old on 22 June 2006 while participating in Exercise Valiant Shield ’06, a joint exercise designed to reinforce the United States’ commitment to the Pacific Region. As part of Exercise Valiant Shield ‘06, a detachment of Sailors from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 “Golden Falcons” flew to the Island of Guam from 18 to 22 June 2006, to conduct strike warfare mission training. The squadron joined their counterparts from the HS-14 “Chargers”, Navy Special Warfare Unit (SEAL Team) Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class (NAC/AW) Kyle Cannon, of HS-14, discovered that working with another HS squadron in addition to SEAL and EOD teams is challenging and rewarding. Aircraft flying from Abraham Lincoln performed strike group defense, offensive air-to-air, maritime interdiction and antisubmarine missions, and helicopters not only hunted submarines but also accomplished naval special warfare missions with SEAL Team 1 and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5. During Exercise Valiant Shield ’06, the Abraham Lincoln, Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) is taking advantage of the opportunity to train in undersea warfare (USW) detection and tracking in the Western Pacific from 19 to 23 June 2006. While participating in Valiant Shield, the ALCSG successfully located and tracked numerous submarines in the operating area, using some of the Navy’s most advanced technology, including both active and passive sonar, according to Lt. James Steffen, USW officer of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, embarked on Abraham Lincoln. "Valiant Shield 2006 is USW-intensive, with multiple U.S. submarines participating," Steffen said. "Many advanced USW technologies are being used to detect and track the opposing submarines in this exercise by DESRON 9." DESRON 9 is responsible for the surface combatants and anti-submarine warfare aboard Lincoln. The DESRON provides a shield of protection in conjunction with the helicopter squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, which makes approaching or attacking ALCSG a risky proposition for enemy threats. Along with the aircraft carrier, ALCSG is comprised of the destroyers Russell, USS Shoup (DDG-86) and the cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53). The USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Strike Groups also participated in the event. Abraham Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 participated in Exercise Valiant Shield 06 from 19 to 23 June 2006, with more than 200 U.S. military aircraft in the Western Pacific. Two ships from DESRON 7, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS McCampbell (DDG-85) and USS Decatur (DDG-73), operated off the coast of Guam from 19 to 23 June 2006. Valiant Shield joint exercise put those aircraft and support crews who maintain them to the test in a dynamic environment. Stepping up to meet that challenge are CVW-2’s F/A-18 Hornets of the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 “Kestrels," VFA-2 “Bounty Hunters”, VFA-34 “Blue Blasters” and VFA-151 “Vigilantes.” “With the ability to engage air threats, attack ground targets and perform aerial refueling, the Hornets have quickly become the Navy’s “go-to” aircraft for almost every mission that can be launched from the deck of a carrier,” said Lt. Cmdr. Greg Newkirk, a pilot assigned to VFA-137. Throughout Valiant Shield, the Hornet Squadrons flying from Abraham Lincoln were showcasing these abilities. “It is similar to flying sustained strike missions in the (Persian) Gulf,” said Peterson. He explained that the biggest challenge was control – the aircraft would fall under varying controllers, including U.S. Air Force Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS), Navy ships or E-2C “Hawkeyes.” Aircraft also utilized both Navy Super Hornets as tankers and Air Force KC-135 aircraft, making the coordination of events complex. Aircraft flying from Abraham Lincoln performed strike group defense, offensive air-to-air, maritime interdiction and antisubmarine missions, and helicopters not only hunted submarines but also accomplished naval special warfare missions with SEAL Team 1 and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5. In support of Exercise Valiant Shield, from 19 to 23 June 2006, air-intercept controllers (AIC) stationed aboard USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) and other surface ships in the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG), directed air wing assets to intercept hostile aircraft in defense of the strike group. Valiant Shield is the first time three carrier strike groups have operated together in the Pacific in more than a decade and adds an extra challenge for the AICs of ALCSG. “We have to know where to turn aircraft off [of the contact] so that they do not run into each other,” said Lt. Cmdr. Michael T. Koerner, combat systems officer aboard Mobile Bay. “The situation requires constant monitoring to prevent a contact from slipping between two lines of coverage.” Once an aircraft being used for strike group defense has departed the ship and checked in with strike operations, the AIC takes over control of that aircraft, coordinating with the pilot to send him toward an air contact that needs investigation. ALCSG concluded its participation in Exercise Valiant Shield on 23 June 2006, marking the completion of the first such exercise to involve three carrier strike groups in more than 10 years, from 19 to 23 June 2006. USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Strike Groups also participated in the exercise, along with U.S. Air Force, U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Marine Corps personnel. “Exercise Valiant Shield is the most important evolution of our 2006 deployment,” said Lincoln Commanding Officer, Capt. C.A. McCawley. “Our ability to seamlessly integrate with two other carrier strike groups as well as Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard units in order to respond to any situation that could occur in the Pacific region is vital to the transformation of American fighting forces in the Pacific.” Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander of ALCSG, emphasized the importance of joint operations during the exercise. “Valiant Shield is a rare opportunity to bring together platforms that normally do not exercise together,” said Goodwin. “Bringing B-2 bombers and carrier strike groups together is unusual, but exercising these capabilities helps ensure an integrated American air, sea and land force capable of an overwhelming and decisive response in any future contingency.” Prior to the exercise, Lincoln hosted foreign observers from the nations of India, Japan and Russia, as well as media from the Armed Forces Network, Guam, Japan and National Public Radio. The exercise began with a photo exercise as the three strike groups conducted a passing exercise, sailing in a formation that brought the ships within 500 yards of one another as a flight of F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets, lead by an Air Force B-2 Spirit bomber, flew in formation overhead. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Western Pacific from 24 to 26 June 2006 and ALCSG entered the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) on 27 June 2006, after spending the majority of a successful 2006 deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet AOR. While in the 7th Fleet AOR, ALCSG participated in exercises such as Foal Eagle and Valiant Shield. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Western Pacific from 24 to 26 June 2006. While in the 7th Fleet AOR, ALCSG participated in exercises such as Foal Eagle and Valiant Shield. “So far we’ve participated in Foal Eagle with the [Republic of Korea] and a passing exercise with the Japanese,” said Lt. Cmdr. Wayne Goveia of the embarked staff of Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9. “We did exercises with the Thai and Singaporeans as well.” ALCSG also made port calls in Hong Kong; Laem Chebang, Thailand; Singapore and Sasebo, Japan. ALCSG is deployed to conduct maritime security operations and to train with its coalition partners to improve its ability to operate with naval forces from many nations. Though exercises had specific operational goals, they also helped build international relationships between the United States and its allies. “Most important is the relationships we build with these countries,” said Goveia, “if we ever have to operate in a real-world situation, knowing those countries’ [navies] will help us out if we ever have to go into anything together. Goveia added that international exercises help build personal relationships between participants and allow the United States and its allies to have a better understanding of how each other work. Exercises weren’t the only way ALCSG helped build international relations. Sailors’ conduct in foreign ports also made a positive impression. “Abe and the strike group did an outstanding job being ambassadors of the United States and displaying good citizenship,” said Lt. Ryan Stormer of Abraham Lincoln's Legal Department. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) in the Pacific from 27 to 29 June 2006. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on 30 June 2006, before participating in the biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2006 exercise. The ALCSG joined units from Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Peru, the Republic of Korea, and the United Kingdom as well as other ships from the U.S. Navy for RIMPAC. RIMPAC is intended to increase the tactical proficiency of participating units in a wide array of combined operations at sea. “By enhancing interoperability, RIMPAC promotes stability in the Pacific Rim region,” said Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander, Carrier Strike Group 9. More than 400 Lincoln Sailors participated in RIMPAC sporting events throughout the weekend before getting underway for the operational phase. Lincoln hosted more than 1,000 guests aboard for tours of the ship July 2 as part of the weekend celebration. Operationally, embarked Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and helicopters of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 to conduct anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare operations as the fixed-wing aircraft of CVW-2 provide Combat Air Patrol (CAP) support for the exercise's multinational fleet. According to Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) is the United States’ top war fighting priority for the Pacific region. RIMPAC is a key part of the Navy’s efforts to focus on ASW and support the proficiency of U.S. Sailors in this challenging skill. The exercise also offers an opportunity to increase cooperation and interoperability amongst nations’ military forces. During the exercise, Lincoln will host more than 100 distinguished visitors aboard while underway, and will host a reception aboard the carrier upon the ship’s return to Pearl Harbor at the conclusion of RIMPAC exercises. ALCSG is on a routine deployment to the Western Pacific. Abraham Lincoln got underway from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on 5 July 2006, to participate in several weeks of training and exercises as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area. RIMPAC is a multinational exercise bringing together maritime forces from Australia, Canada, Chile, Peru, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. Lincoln serves as the flagship for the exercise, as well as providing combat air patrol and anti-surface and submarine warfare assets from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked on board Lincoln. "As we work with our international partners during RIMPAC, safety and protecting the environment are top priorities for this exercise," said Capt. Matthew Klunder, commander, CVW 2. This year's exercise is the twentieth in a series of RIMPAC exercises conducted biennially since 1971. RIMPAC training operations will include participation by 35 ships, more than 60 aircraft and 18,000 Sailors, Airmen, Marines, Soldiers and Coast Guardsmen. During the exercise, Lincoln will host more than 100 distinguished visitors aboard while underway, and will host a reception aboard the carrier upon the ship's return to Pearl Harbor at the conclusion of RIMPAC exercises. Cmdr. Mark A. Johnson relieved Cmdr. Christopher H. Halton as commanding officer of the Aegis destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86) during a change of command ceremony on the ship's flight deck on 5 July 2006. As reported on 8 July 2006, Leaders aboard Abraham Lincoln are focusing on a new Senior Petty Officer Indoctrination course during its 2006 deployment to the Western Pacific this summer. According to Senior Chief Navy Counselor (AW/SW) Brian Schroepfer, Lincoln’s command career counselor, Lincoln’s leadership recognized the need to “bridge the gap between [petty officer 3rd class] indoctrination and what [a new 2nd or 1st class petty officer] is supposed to do in the 120 days before they are eligible to attend Leadership Development Training. RIMPAC 2006 proceeded with severe anti-submarine warfare training restrictions by participating commands, although the Navy successfully negotiated with plaintiffs to have the temporary restraining order lifted for the remaining phase on 9 July 2006, which involved a fictitious scenario where coalition ‘blue’ forces worked to enforce United Nations Security Council resolutions to prevent country ‘orange’ from overtaking country ‘green.’ As part of the role playing, marines accomplished non-combatant evacuation operations, as well as an amphibious beach assault, and aircraft flew close air support, surveillance, air strikes, anti-ship and antisubmarine warfare sorties. A delegation of 10 Chinese officers also observed part of the exercise. In addition, Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX)-20, augmented by the Air Force’s 452nd Flight Test Squadron, flew the Northrop Grumman RQ-4A Global Hawk Maritime Demonstration system in RIMPAC. The Navy sank several decommissioned ships during RIMPAC 2006, including amphibious assault ship Belleau Wood (LHA-3; sunk on 10 July), ammunition ship Mauna Kea (AE-22), combat store ship Mars (T-AFS-1) and Yacona, an 80 foot sludge removal barge (sunk on 9 July). In addition to various U.S. ships and aircraft that pummeled the ships, Canadian P-3C Orions, area air defense destroyer HMCS Algonquin (DDG-283) and multi-role patrol frigate HMCS Vancouver (FFH-331), and South Korean aircraft, bombed and shot at the decommissioned ships. Abraham Lincoln hosted six members of the Australian Parliament on 9 July 2006 as a part of biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC exercises in the Hawaiian operating area. The Distinguished Visitors (DV) saw various parts of the ship, including medical spaces, the mess decks and the flight deck. As reported on 15 July 2006, Abraham Lincoln hosted more than 3,000 Distinguished Visitors (DV), public visitors and members of the media during the ship’s Western Pacific deployment in 2006. Throughout the deployment, Abe Sailors showed their hospitality through tours, ship visitations, and the overnight program for DVs, which is designed to give guests a taste of Navy life underway. Lincoln showed visitors how Sailors from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 join with ship’s company to form a cohesive unit. During the deployment, Abe hosted guests from the nations of Korea, China, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Brunei and Australia. "This was a great opportunity for this firsthand view of the professionalism of the crew of Lincoln,” said Brig. Gen. Vikra Goswani of India’s Joint Operations and Planning office during his visit aboard Lincoln. Other visitors brought aboard included 400 DVs and media in Hong Kong; 380 DVs and media from Thailand; 600 DVs and visitors from Singapore; 600 DVs, media and visitors from Japan; 16 DVs from Brunei and 1,000 visitors from Hawaii. Lincoln hosted these guests during exercises throughout the deployment, including 21 DVs and media during the JMSDF Undersea Warfare Exercise, 48 DVs and media during Foal Eagle, 11 DVs during Valiant Shield and 100 DVs during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC). “The face-to-face interaction helps with the communications barrier,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Mills, from DESRON 9. RIMPAC includes ships and personnel from the United States, Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Peru, the Republic of Korea and the United Kingdom. This exercise trains U.S. allied forces to be interoperable and ready for a wide range of potential combined operations and missions. As reported on 17 July 2006, a Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 master chief petty officer has been selected as a member of the Blue Angels Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron. Master Chief Aircraft Maintenanceman (AW) Jerry Welsh, Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 2’s maintenance master chief, departed on 25 July 2006 to represent the Navy’s premier flight demonstration team. Welsh, who has served in the Navy for more than 25 years, was selected from a list of highly qualified applicants to take over as the Blue Angels’ maintenance master chief. Upon conclusion of several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area from 5 to 25 July 2006, Abraham Lincoln. Upon conclusion of several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area from 5 to 25 July 2006, Abraham Lincoln headed to Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Abraham Lincoln took part in RIMPAC 2006, a multinational exercise that involved 19,000 service members, 35 ships, six submarines, 160 tactical aircraft and amphibious forces. During part of the exercise, however, activists concerned over the impact of mid-frequency active sonar upon marine life and following the precepts established by the Marine Mammal Protection Act (21 October 1972), pressured a district judge to issue a temporary restraining order on the Navy’s use of the systems. The UAV made four successful maritime surveillance missions from Edwards AFB in California out to Hawaii, which demonstrated its capability of identifying targets in a coastal or littoral environment while also successfully identifying targets in wide area maritime search and tracking. Global Hawk logged about 100 hours during the exercise, and operators transmitted data back to a team from VX-1 and VX-20, and Fleet Composite Squadron (VC)-6, at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, who analyzed the information and forwarded the data to participants. Australian, British, Canadian, Chilean, Japanese, Peruvian and South Korean forces also took part in RIMPAC. Abraham Lincoln areas of operations en route to Hawaii were not reported from 26 to 27 July 2006, yet steaming through the Western Pacific and the Pacific seems reasonable. Abraham Lincoln areas of operations en route to Hawaii were not reported from 26 to 27 July 2006, yet steaming through the Western Pacific and the Pacific seems reasonable. Abraham Lincoln returned to Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 28 July 2006, departing Pearl Harbor on 29 July 2006, after the final weekend of the biennial Rim of the Pacific 2006 (RIMPAC) exercise, visiting on the 28th, for the return trip to NASNI and the homecoming of CVW-2, conducting a "Tiger Cruise" in the Pacific on 29 July 2006. More than 1,000 guests, including Sailors from Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Peru, the Republic of Korea, and the United Kingdom joined U.S. Navy personnel for a final pierside reception aboard the carrier July 28th. Lincoln served as the command and control hub for the multination task force during the exercise. According to Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, the training received on the part of all the participating navies was invaluable. Crew members and guests aboard Abraham Lincoln were treated to a display of the formidable air power of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 during an air power demonstration n 29 July 2006. The air power demonstration showcased the aircraft, pilots and air crews of embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and was for many of the guests and family members, known as "Tigers," the most exciting event of the 2006 Tiger Cruise. Almost every squadron aboard Lincoln was given the opportunity to strut their stuff with a dynamic series of fly-bys, aerobatics, and weapons demonstrations. Abraham Lincoln conducted "Tiger Cruise" in the Pacific from 29 July to 3 August, returning to NASNI on the 4th, remaining until the 5th and then, proceeded to her homeport of Everett, Washington, operating in the Eastern Pacific from 6 to 7 August 2006. As reported on 7 August 2006, the Navy has unveiled a new tool in its effort to educate Sailors on the hazards of drunken driving. A multi-million-dollar drunk-driving simulator, operated by “Save a Life Tour” Kramer International, is teaching Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln and those attached to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 just how dangerous driving under the influence of alcohol is. According to McCawley, the deployment was a successful one.

“From the extremely important mission of projecting U.S. policy abroad to the equally vital mission of presenting an image of America as a global citizen who respects and enjoys the cultures of other nations, the Sailors of Abraham Lincoln have performed in an exemplary fashion,” McCawley said. “Our participation in several exercises, our cooperation with the navies of several of our allies in the Western Pacific region and our ambassadorship in foreign ports was the perfect example of today’s professional Sailors performing their duties to the utmost,” he said. During this Western Pacific deployment, the aviation boatswain’s mates (fuels) of Abraham Lincoln’s air department, V-4 division set a new record, handling 27,559,818 gallons of JP-5 fuel during 13 underway replenishments. The aircraft of CVW-2 flew 7,871 sorties, with a total of 7,578 catapult launches from the flight deck. The ship safely navigated more than 41,000 nautical miles during the deployment. Abraham Lincoln and Shoup returned to a crowd estimated at 7,000.  The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group includes the Abraham Lincoln, Commanding Officer Capt. Patrick Hall, Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, Carrier Air Wing TWO,  Capt. John Aquilino and Commander, Destroyer Squadron NINE, Captain James T. Loeblein directs Squadron Ships for the conduct of sustained naval operations and serves as Sea Combat Commander within its assigned Carrier Strike Group to include: USS Curts (FFG-38), guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Ingraham (FFG-61), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Ford (FFG-54), USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Rodney M. Davis and USS Russell (DDG-59). Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aircraft consist of, Boeing / McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18F Super Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron TWO (VFA-2) “Bounty Hunters, ” F/A-18E Hornets of  Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 “Kestrels," FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 “Vigilantes,” FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34 “Blue Blasters,” EA-6B Prowler of Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE ONE or VAQ-131, “Lancers,” E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SIX or VAW-116 and C-2 Greyhound of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron THREE ZERO Det TWO or VRC-30 DET 2, Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron (HS) 2 “Golden Falcons” and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 “Saberhawks” and the Sailors of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 11, Detachment 9, showcased their special operations abilities, stealthily approaching Lincoln in an SH-60B Seahawk. Ports of call: Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California twice; Hong Kong; Thailand pierside in Laem Chebang Changi; Naval Base in Singapore; Sasebo, Japan; Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii twice. Her 10th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 (27 February to 8 August 2006)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A, 681E, 1161, 1162, 1163; Story Number: NNS060309-03 - Release Date: 3/8/2006 10:00:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060307-11 - Release Date: 3/7/2006 9:00:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060317-06 - Release Date: 3/17/2006 1:30:00 PM - By Photographer’s Mate Airman Tim Roache and Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060320-11 - Release Date: 3/20/2006 3:26:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060322-12 - Release Date: 3/22/2006 12:00:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At sea (NNS) Story Number: NNS060324-11- Release Date: 3/25/2006 8:00:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060327-06 - Release Date: 3/27/2006 3:45:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060406-15 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 2:19:00 PM - From Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060330-17 -Release Date: 3/30/2006 7:33:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060406-17 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 8:00:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class David McKee, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public Affairs - SEOUL (NNS); Story Number: NNS060406-17 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 8:00:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class David McKee, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public Affairs - SEOUL (NNS); By Ensign Grace Rodden, USS Abraham Lincoln public affairs - Posted: 03/27/2006; Story Number: NNS060406-25 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 10:25:00 PM - By Journalist Seaman Mary Guiney, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060407-02 - Release Date: 4/7/2006 9:17:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, HONG KONG (NNS); Story Number: NNS060411-05 - Release Date: 4/11/2006 12:39:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class(SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060411-07 - Release Date: 4/11/2006 12:42:00 PM - By Ensign Matt Johnson, USS Mobile Bay Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060418-07 - Release Date: 4/18/2006 11:51:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class Michael Murdock, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060419-14 - Release Date: 4/19/2006 6:00:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060421-12 - Release Date: 4/21/2006 1:26:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, LAEM CHEBANG, Thailand (NNS); Story Number: NNS060429-10 - Release Date: 4/29/2006 7:42:00 PM -By Photographer's Mate 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, PATTAYA, Thailand (NNS); Story Number: NNS060428-01 - Release Date: 4/28/2006 9:58:00 AM - By Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, PATTAYA, Thailand (NNS); Story Number: NNS060425-09 - Release Date: 4/25/2006 5:40:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060425-02 - Release Date: 4/25/2006 11:00:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060428-02 - Release Date: 4/28/2006 10:00:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SINGAPORE (NNS); Story Number: NNS060429-07 - Release Date: 4/29/2006 7:32:00 PM - By Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, USS SHOUP, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060501-05 - Release Date: 5/1/2006 9:10:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060501-05 - Release Date: 5/1/2006 9:10:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060504-06 - Release Date: 5/4/2006 12:57:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060512-05 - Release Date: 5/12/2006 9:15:00 AM - By Photographer's Mate 3rd Class (AW) Moses Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SINGAPORE (NNS); Story Number: NNS060511-05 - Release Date: 5/11/2006 8:45:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060603-03 - Release Date: 6/3/2006 3:36:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060512-15 - Release Date: 5/12/2006 10:52:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060526-44 - Release Date: 5/26/2006 2:43:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SASEBO, Japan (NNS); Story Number: NNS060604-02 - Release Date: 6/4/2006 10:16:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060606-07 - Release Date: 6/6/2006 4:12:00 PM - By Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SASEBO, Japan (NNS); Story Number: NNS060614-04 - Release Date: 6/14/2006 12:38:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060630-22 - Release Date: 6/30/2006 11:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brandon Wilson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060616-05 - Release Date: 6/16/2006 9:39:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) Marc Rockwell-Pate, USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs - USS RONALD REAGAN, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060619-07 - Release Date: 6/19/2006 9:58:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Justin Blake, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder 060619-N-6074Y-056 (RELEASED - www.pacom.mil); Story Number: NNS060620-15 - Release Date: 6/20/2006 8:30:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW/AW) Shane Tuck, USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs - USS RONALD REAGAN, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060626-02 - Release Date: 6/26/2006 8:38:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tim Roache, USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060627-06 - Release Date: 6/27/2006 1:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, AGANA, Guam (NNS); Story Number: NNS060621-07 - Release Date: 6/21/2006 10:46:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060620-10 - Release Date: 6/20/2006 1:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060623-07 - Release Date: 6/23/2006 10:43:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060624-02 - Release Date: 6/24/2006 4:08:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060628-09 - Release Date: 6/28/2006 2:05:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James McGury and Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060630-11 - Release Date: 6/30/2006 1:33:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060708-08 - Release Date: 7/8/2006 9:23:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060708-08 - Release Date: 7/8/2006 9:23:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060711-12 - Release Date: 7/11/2006 6:56:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. James L. Carlson, USS Shoup Public Affairs, PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (NNS); Story Number: NNS060707-25 - Release Date: 7/8/2006 12:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060716-01 - Release Date: 7/16/2006 9:23:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060715-04 - Release Date: 7/15/2006 7:45:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael K. McNabb, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs , At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060717-19 -Release Date: 7/17/2006 4:36:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060730-01 - Release Date: 7/30/2006 9:56:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS060806-01 - Release Date: 8/6/2006 8:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist James Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, (NNS); Story Number: NNS060807-05 - Release Date: 8/7/2006 11:06:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, (NNS) & Story Number: NNS060305-02 - Release Date: 3/5/2006 9:34:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22608

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22794

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22873

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23032

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23037

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23037

http://www.c7f.navy.mil

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23091

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23599

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23754             

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23598

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23993

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24148

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24203

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24229

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24224

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24340

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24336

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24246

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24315

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24337

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24404

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24449

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24578

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24578

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24620

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24484

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24692

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24691

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24694

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24920

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24995

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24994

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22561

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23598

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23824

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23993

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24148

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24445

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24203

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24229

http://www.pacom.mi
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24224

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24340

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24336

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24246

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24230

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24315

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24337

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24404

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24449

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24578

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24578

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24620

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24484

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24692

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24691

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24694

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24920

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24995

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24994

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22561

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XIX (1 January to 8 August 2006)

Part IV of IV - 8 August 2006

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4