Naval Station, Everett, Washington; quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time; Inspection and Survey (INSURV) at sea period; Naval Station, Everett, Washington and her Eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East, South China Sea and Java Sea, joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian, exercises and operations will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and hosted the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports and participated in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea, a month-long exercise designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations (27 February to 8 August 2006).

1 January to 8 August 2006

Chapter XIX

Part I of IV - 1 January to 31 March 2006

Part II of IV - 1 April to 17 June 2006

Part III of IV - 18 June to 7 August 2006

Part IV of IV - 8 August 2006

 

Abe’s In port and Eighth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XIX, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call.

Chapter XIX, Appendix I

 

 

Aircraft Carriers USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) sail in formation at the start of Exercise Valiant Shield 2006.

 

060618-N-5961C-001 - Philippine Sea (June 18, 2006) - Aircraft Carriers USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sail in formation at the start of Exercise Valiant Shield 2006. Valiant Shield 2006 is the largest joint exercise in recent history. Held in the Guam operating area June 19-23, the exercise includes 28 naval vessels. Nearly 300 aircraft and approximately 22,000 service members from the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard are participating in the exercise. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Photographer's Mate Spike Call (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=35888

 

Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) transits the Philippine Sea to begin Exercise Valiant Shield 2006.

 

060618-N-5961C-003 - Philippine Sea (June 18, 2006) - Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transits the Philippine Sea to begin Exercise Valiant Shield 2006. Valiant Shield focuses on integrated joint training among U.S. military forces, enabling real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces and in detecting, locating, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air, on land and cyberspace in response to a range of mission areas. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Photographer's Mate Spike Call (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=35935

 

An Air Force B-2 bomber along with other aircrafts from the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps fly over the Kitty Hawk, Ronald Reagan and Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike groups.

 

060618-N-8492C-212 - Philippine Sea (June 18, 2006) - An Air Force B-2 bomber along with other aircrafts from the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps fly over the Kitty Hawk, Ronald Reagan and Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike groups during the photo portion of Exercise Valiant Shield 2006. Valiant Shield focuses on integrated joint training among U.S. military forces, enabling real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces and in detecting, locating, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air, on land and cyberspace in response to a range of mission areas. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Photographer's Mate Todd P. Cichonowicz (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=35949

 

“USAF Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirits flying from Whiteman AFB, Missouri, along with 28 vessels from groups built around aircraft carriers Abraham Lincoln, Kitty Hawk, Ronald Reagan, and USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) were Valiant Shield 06 participants beginning the exercise by staging a dramatic photographic event as all three carrier strike groups sailed in a formation that brought leading ships within 500 yards of each other, and as a Spirit led a flight of Hornets and Super Hornets overhead.

 

Operations then began in earnest, as the carrier strike groups began flying three days of sustained air strikes jointly with Air Force aircraft. At the same time, the groups’ helicopter squadrons began anti-submarine warfare exercises, and detachments went ashore to Guam to perform Naval Special Warfare missions with SEAL Team 1 and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060624-02 - Release Date: 6/24/2006 4:08:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24337

 

“Aircraft flying from Abraham Lincoln performed strike group defense, offensive air-to-air, maritime interdiction and antisubmarine missions, and helicopters not only hunted submarines but also accomplished naval special warfare missions with SEAL Team 1 and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5 AFB” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Hosts Foreign Military Observers During Valiant Shield ‘06


Twenty-two foreign military officials and civilians visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 17 to 18 June 2006, commencing Exercise Valiant Shield 2006 in the Pacific Ocean operating off the coast of Guam. Observers from Russia, India and Japan arrived aboard Lincoln on 17 June 2006 via a C-2A Greyhound from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30, flying from Anderson Air Force Base, Guam.

 

The visitors were aboard Lincoln for two days and enjoyed tours of the carrier, as well as observing operations during the exercise. After arriving aboard Lincoln, guests were greeted by Capt. C.A. McCawley, Lincoln’s commanding officer.

“It is an honor and pleasure to host you on board
Abraham Lincoln, and on behalf of the embarked crew, I would like to welcome you,” said McCawley. Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, commented on the unique opportunities presented during the visit and the upcoming exercise.

“We are here to join with the other services and test our command and control capabilities as we bring these three carrier strike groups together,” said Goodwin. “It is a tremendous training activity that we don’t get to take part in very often.”

Valiant Shield is the first time three carrier strike groups have operated together in the Pacific in more than 10 years. During their visit, the guests toured the combat direction center, hangar bays, and bridge, and watched flight operations from the flight deck.

“This was a great opportunity for this firsthand view of the professionalism of the crew of
Lincoln,” said Brig. Gen. Vikra Goswami of India’s Joint Operations and Planning office, one of Lincoln’s guests. While aboard, guests attended a video teleconference (VTC) with key ships of the exercise, including USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19), and Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Adm. Gary Roughead, to discuss the exercise and their visit.

Valiant Shield is a joint exercise designed to reinforce the United States’ commitment to the Pacific Region. Valiant Shield 2006 exercises the U.S. military’s ability to conduct robust, joint command and control operations and rapidly bring together joint forces in response to any regional contingency.

 

Along with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, Kitty Hawk's and Ronald Reagan's strike groups are also participating in the event” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060619-07 - Release Date: 6/19/2006 9:58:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Justin Blake, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24229

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated in the Pacific conducting training from 16 to 18 June 20006, entering the Philippine Sea on the 18th” (Ref. 76).

 

Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006"

 

GUAM (June 19, 2006) -- Sailors from the Navy Special Warfare (NSW) community, Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technicians and Navy SEALs conduct a static-line parachute jump off the coast of Guam from HH-60H helicopters. HS-2, part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was ashore on the island of Guam operating with a detachment of HS-14 “Chargers” in support of Exercise Valiant Shield  2006, the largest Pacific joint exercise in recent history. Held off the coast of Guam, it involves 28 naval vessels including three carrier strike groups. More than 300 aircraft and approximately 20,000 service members from the Navy, Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard are also participating in the exercise” (Ref. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder 060619-N-6074Y-056 (RELEASED - www.pacom.mil)

 

Sailors assigned to Navy Special Warfare (NSW) units fast rope from an HH-60H helicopter assigned Golden Falcons of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Two (HS-2) during simulated Strike Warfare missions.

 

060620-N-6074Y-030 - Guam (June 20, 2006) - Sailors assigned to Navy Special Warfare (NSW) units fast rope from an HH-60H helicopter assigned "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Two (HS-2) during simulated Strike Warfare missions over the island of Guam. HS-2, part of Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2), embarked aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is currently ashore on the island of Guam operating in support of Exercise Valiant Shield 2006. Valiant Shield focuses on integrated joint training among U.S. military forces, enabling real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces and in detecting, locating, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air, on land and cyberspace in response to a range of mission areas. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=36128

 

Valiant Shield Provides Valuable Joint Training Among U.S. Military Forces

 

“As reported on 20 June 2006, Exercise Valiant Shield 2006, taking place now through June 23, 2006 brings together more than 20,000 Sailors, Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. The exercise focuses on real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces and detecting, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air and on land in response to a wide range of missions.

The exercise includes 28 ships from three carrier strike groups, as well as 290 aircraft, in a maritime environment for five days of integrated joint training, and invited 10 countries to observe the exercise near Guam.

Valiant Shield '06 is a unique opportunity for U.S. forces to exercise together, allowing participating units to work through a range of skill sets using a capability-based approach in a complex operational environment. Forces will exercise a wide range of skills, including maritime interdiction; defense counter-air and anti-submarine warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and command and control.

“Joint interoperability is the key to successfully responding to future contingencies in the Pacific,” said Rear Adm. Michael H. Miller, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 7. “Exercises such as Valiant Shield give us an opportunity to ensure joint command, control and communication procedures are seamless.”

CSG 7 and its flagship,
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), is one of the three carrier strike groups participating in the exercise.

According to Miller,
Valiant Shield '06 builds upon the annual Joint Air and Sea Exercise (JASEX), which demonstrated a U.S. commitment in the Western Pacific and has taken place for the past three years. U.S. Pacific Command forces will also take advantage of a series of linked exercises to ensure stability and security throughout the Asia-Pacific Region.

According to Miller, in today’s constantly changing threat environment, it's essential to swiftly bring together integrated, versatile military forces in response to any regional contingency.

“U.S. forces are extremely flexible and can quickly respond anywhere in the world,” said Miller. “
Valiant Shield 2006 is a perfect example of forces rapidly coming together from many different geographic regions to operate together on short notice.”


According to Capt. Terry B. Kraft,
Ronald Reagan’s commanding officer, this year’s exercise includes forces already operating in the Western Pacific. Kraft said U.S. forces are transforming to meet challenges to regional stability in the Asia-Pacific Region.

Valiant Shield, along with exercises like Northern Edge and Terminal Fury, allow naval forces in the Pacific to exercise complete command-and-control scenarios across a wide range of geographic areas and operational situations,” said Kraft. “These linked exercises are a key component to transforming forces for the 21st century.”

According to Kraft,
Valiant Shield '06 is an opportunity to bring together platforms that normally don’t exercise collectively. The Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps operate a variety of combat and combat support aircraft designed to meet joint training objectives for the exercise. Altogether, 50 Air Force, 234 Navy and six Marine Corps aircraft are scheduled to participate. Exercises such as Valiant Shield are only conducted if they’re accomplished in a safe and environmentally responsible manner.

“Safety and the protection of the environment are always top priorities for every U.S. military exercise and operation,” said Kraft. “They were major considerations when planning conferences began for
Valiant Shield early this year.”

Participating units include the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group; USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) Carrier Strike Group; USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group; embarked air wings; elements of the 5
th Air Force; 8th Air Force; 11th Air Force; 1st Marine Air Wing; U.S. Coast Guard assets; military sealift command ships; and supporting headquarters’ staffs.

Valiant Shield '06 is the first of what will become a biennial exercise and has been planned for months. The U.S. routinely deploys forces to the Western Pacific to maintain a stabilizing presence in the region. The exercise allows U.S. forces to exercise joint skills in peacetime to prepare for success during a contingency.

Operating in the
Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, the U.S. 7th Fleet is the largest of the forward-deployed U.S. fleets, with approximately 50 ships, 120 aircraft and 20,000 Sailors and Marines assigned at any given time” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060620-15 - Release Date: 6/20/2006 8:30:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW/AW) Shane Tuck, USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs - USS RONALD REAGAN, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24224

 

Operations Specialist 2nd Class Charles Miranda stands watch in the Combat Information Center (CIC) aboard of the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53).

 

060621-N-7981E-020 - Philippine Sea (June 21, 2006) - Operations Specialist 2nd Class Charles Miranda stands watch in the Combat Information Center (CIC) aboard of the Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53). Mobile Bay is currently underway in the Guam operating area in support of Exercise Valiant Shield 2006. Valiant Shield focuses on integrated joint training among U.S. military forces, enabling real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces and in detecting, locating, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air, on land and cyberspace in response to a range of mission areas. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=36022

 

Lincoln Hosts Foreign Military Observers During Valiant Shield ‘06

 

“USS Shoup (DDG-86) turned 4 years old on 22 June 2006 while participating in Exercise Valiant Shield ’06, a joint exercise designed to reinforce the United States’ commitment to the Pacific Region. Shoup, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, was commissioned in Seattle, Wash. on 22 June 2006. The ship was named after Medal of Honor recipient Gen. David Shoup, a Marine who earned the distinction in the battle of Tarawa during World War II as the commander of all Marine Corps troops in action against Japanese forces on Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll and Gilbert Islands, Nov. 20–22, 1943.

Shoup Command Master Chief CMDCM (SW) Herb Gregory said he has seen many positive influences and growth during his time aboard and reflected on the ship’s namesake. “The Shoup has a great crew, and the chain of command functions very well,” said Gregory. “The crew morale is very high, and I believe we uphold the standards that Gen. Shoup served while on active duty.”

Since
Shoup’s commissioning, many Sailors have checked aboard and transferred, but there are still 21 crew members that have been aboard since Shoup’s commissioning, known as “plankowners.” Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class (SW) Patricia Genes of Long Island, N.Y., is one of these plankowners. From her days as a Seaman Recruit until now, Genes is impressed with Shoup’s capabilities.

“At first, we were all new to the ship and learning new things,” said Genes. “Now, we aim for the stars and we reach them.”
Shoup has a crew of 304, all of whom work and live together in very close quarters. “After four years on this kind of ship, you get to know everybody,” said Genes. “It’s like we’re family.”

Shoup’s crew celebrated the ship’s birthday with a ceremony on the mess decks, followed by a cake cutting and an ice cream social. “We put on a celebration dinner with steak and crab legs,” said Gregory. “This celebration had all the trimmings for the crew.” Shoup is currently deployed as part of Carrier Strike Group 9, and participated in Exercise Valiant Shield in the Guam area of operations.

Valiant Shield 2006 exercised the U.S. military’s ability to conduct robust, joint command and control operations and rapidly being together joint forces in response to any regional contingency. Along with the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), Carrier Strike Group, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Strike Groups also participated in the event” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060626-02 - Release Date: 6/26/2006 8:38:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tim Roache, USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24340

 

A plane captain directs an F/A-18F Super Hornet aircrew as they perform control surface checks prior to takeoff on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

060622-N-7981E-067 - Philippine Sea (June 22, 2006) - A plane captain directs an F/A-18F Super Hornet aircrew as they perform control surface checks prior to takeoff on the flight deck aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during Exercise Valiant Shield 2006. Valiant Shield focuses on integrated joint training among U.S. military forces, enabling real-world proficiency in sustaining joint forces and in detecting, locating, tracking and engaging units at sea, in the air, on land and cyberspace in response to a range of mission areas. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans (RELELASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=36088

 

HS-2 Participates In Naval Special Warfare Training During Valiant Shield ‘06

 

“As part of Exercise Valiant Shield ‘06, a detachment of Sailors from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 “Golden Falcons” flew to the Island of Guam from 18 to 22 June 2006, to conduct strike warfare mission training.

 

The squadron joined their counterparts from the HS-14 “Chargers”, Navy Special Warfare Unit (SEAL Team) Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class (NAC/AW) Kyle Cannon, of HS-14, discovered that working with another HS squadron in addition to SEAL and EOD teams is challenging and rewarding.

“This line of work requires a lot of flexibility,” Cannon said. He said that Sailors from the special operations community are very intent on mission accomplishment, whether the mission involves parachutists dropping out of the helicopter cabin or fast-roping onto rooftops in an urban environment at night.

Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 1st Class (NAC/AW) Cory Merritt, an air cew memeber from HS-2, said that exercises such as
Valiant Shield are valuable to a squadron embarked on a ship because they afford both pilots and air crew the opportunity to maintain and improve proficiency in their aircraft's land-based strike warfare mission. “This week allowed us to work on both aspects of our strike warfare mission, combat search and rescue and NSW (Naval Special Warfare),” said Merritt. Both are missions that HS-2 cannot normally train for while embarked aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) he said.

Both squadrons also flew direct action missions in a low-light environment, deploying special operations troops into a simulated hostile urban setting with the intent of capturing a particular building or personnel within that building. Merritt emphasized the real-world application of such simulations for SEALs, the air crew, and pilots. He said that with HS squadrons deploying to Iraq, such training is invaluable and it increases the operational readiness of HS-2 in the event of such a deployment.

The Sailors from HS-14, which operates out of Yokosuka, Japan, also found the training extremely valuable, especially the opportunity to fly with a squadron based in the United States. Cannon said that working with HS-2, if anything, cleared up any questions or complications. “It shows the capabilities of two separate squadrons, which typically work in different areas of responsibility, and what they can accomplish together,” he said. “We are two squadrons, but we have one goal” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060627-06 - Release Date: 6/27/2006 1:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, AGANA, Guam (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24336

 

ALCSG Pursues Undersea Threats During Valiant Shield ‘06

 

“During Exercise Valiant Shield ’06, the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) took advantage of the opportunity to train in undersea warfare (USW) detection and tracking in the Western Pacific from 19 to 23 June 2006.

While participating in
Valiant Shield, the ALCSG successfully located and tracked numerous submarines in the operating area, using some of the Navy’s most advanced technology, including both active and passive sonar, according to Lt. James Steffen, USW officer of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, embarked on Abraham Lincoln.

"
Valiant Shield 2006 is USW-intensive, with multiple U.S. submarines participating," Steffen said. "Many advanced USW technologies are being used to detect and track the opposing submarines in this exercise by DESRON 9."

DESRON 9 is responsible for the surface combatants and anti-submarine warfare aboard
Lincoln. The DESRON provides a shield of protection in conjunction with the helicopter squadrons of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, which makes approaching or attacking ALCSG a risky proposition for enemy threats.

Aboard USS
Russell (DDG-59), Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Chris Kooken of weapons department said the exercise was beneficial in training and helped him gain an appreciation for the intense evolution.

“Knowing there are numerous submarines in the area provides us an opportunity to conduct training and gain knowledge that is beneficial in becoming more efficient in our jobs,” said Kooken. “This exercise is a great training tool.”

Along with the aircraft carrier, ALCSG is comprised of the destroyers Russell, USS
Shoup (DDG-86) and the cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53).

The USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Strike Groups are also participating in the event.

Valiant Shield is a joint exercise designed to reinforce the United States’ commitment to the Pacific Region. Valiant Shield is the first time three carrier strike groups have operated together in the Pacific in more than ten years” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060621-07 - Release Date: 6/21/2006 10:46:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24246

 

Hornets Bring Multi-Mission Capability to Valiant Shield

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 are participating in Exercise Valiant Shield 06 from 19 to 23 June 2006, with more than 200 U.S. military aircraft in the Western Pacific. Valiant Shield is a joint exercise that will put those aircraft and support crews who maintain them to the test in a dynamic environment. Stepping up to meet that challenge are CVW-2’s F/A-18 Hornets of the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 “Kestrels," VFA-2 “Bounty Hunters”, VFA-34 “Blue Blasters” and VFA-151 “Vigilantes.” “With the ability to engage air threats, attack ground targets and perform aerial refueling, the Hornets have quickly become the Navy’s “go-to” aircraft for almost every mission that can be launched from the deck of a carrier,” said Lt. Cmdr. Greg Newkirk, a pilot assigned to VFA-137.

 

Throughout Valiant Shield, the Hornet Squadrons flying from Abraham Lincoln will be showcasing these abilities. “Our squadron will be doing the whole gamut, which includes strike group defense as well as offensive air-to-air, maritime interdiction, and we’ll also be tanking other aircraft,” said Newkirk. According to Newkirk, tanking missions are one of the most crucial assets of a carrier strike group. Refueling other aircraft in flight allows an air wing to not only fly longer missions, but also to operate in “blue water” areas, without support of land-based facilities and alternate airfields. “We can go in the middle of the ocean and fly with no other landing options within thousands of miles. To do that safely, you need gas airborne.

 

So if a guy’s having trouble getting aboard because of a pitching deck or whatever, he has enough fuel to make multiple attempts,” said Newkirk. For pilots and planners, the most significant training opportunity presented by Valiant Shield is the challenge of having so many planes in the air at once. The Kestrels and the Bounty Hunters will be sharing the skies with many different aircraft. Also participating in the exercise are aircraft from the USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Strike Groups, the Marine Corps and the Air Force, including B-2 stealth bombers from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri. “There are a lot of people in the skies, so de-confliction is a real challenge,” said Newkirk. Navy aircraft from each air wing joined together with Air Force fighter escorts for an extended series of massive simulate air strikes, according to Lt. Eric Peterson of VFA-137 aboard Lincoln.

“It is similar to flying sustained strike missions in the (Persian) Gulf,” said Peterson. He explained that the biggest challenge was control – the aircraft would fall under varying controllers, including U.S. Air Force Airborne Warning And Control Systems (AWACS), Navy ships or E-2C “
Hawkeyes.” Aircraft will also be utilizing both Navy Super Hornets as tankers and Air Force KC-135 aircraft, making the coordination of events complex. Valiant Shield is a joint exercise that demonstrates the U.S. military’s ability to conduct robust, joint command-and-control operations and rapidly bring together joint forces in response to any regional contingency.

 

The exercise also demonstrates the U.S. commitment to the Pacific region. Valiant Shield marks the first time three carrier strike groups have operated jointly in the Pacific in more than a decade” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060620-10 - Release Date: 6/20/2006 1:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24230

 

AICs Control Air Space, CSG Defense During Valiant Shield ‘06

 

“In support of Exercise Valiant Shield, from 19 to 23 June 2006, air-intercept controllers (AIC) stationed aboard USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) and other surface ships in the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG), directed air wing assets to intercept hostile aircraft in defense of the strike group. Valiant Shield is the first time three carrier strike groups have operated together in the Pacific in more than a decade and adds an extra challenge for the AICs of ALCSG. “We have to know where to turn aircraft off [of the contact] so that they do not run into each other,” said Lt. Cmdr. Michael T. Koerner, combat systems officer aboard Mobile Bay. “The situation requires constant monitoring to prevent a contact from slipping between two lines of coverage.”

Once an aircraft being used for strike group defense has departed the ship and checked in with strike operations, the AIC takes over control of that aircraft, coordinating with the pilot to send him toward an air contact that needs investigation. Koerner said that although
Mobile Bay is the AIC for the ALCSG, every ship in the strike group has a watch station with at least four qualified AICs, including a senior controller, responsible for manning it. Additionally, he said that the E-2C Hawkeyes of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116, the “Sun Kings,” also have an AIC station aboard the aircraft for the same purpose. “For an alert launch, we will vector that aircraft. The aircraft will then stay under the control of whoever we (the AIC) designate that control to,” Koerner said. “Normally it is us, but it can be another ship or even an aircraft.”

The control of air space and the protection of the strike group through the management of air assets is more challenging for the AIC during
Exercise Valiant Shield, said Koerner. “With three carrier strike groups, the challenge becomes, ‘How do I work with the other two AICs to make sure that the area that I am covering and the area that they are covering overlap so that there are no gaps?’” said Koerner. Between each strike group’s AICs, he said, “There will be a lot of give and take.” According to Ensign Todd Shaw, AIC officer aboard Mobile Bay, the volume of aircraft involved in Valiant Shield presents a challenge. “It's a very complex exercise,” said Shaw, gesturing toward the radar displays in Mobile Bay’s combat direction center (CDC).

 

“You can look at the screens and see that it looks like army ants - there are aircraft everywhere. These guys (AICs) make sense out of all that.” Shaw said that Mobile Bay was able to seamlessly integrate USS Decatur (DDG-73) and USS McCampbell (DDG-85) into the strike group and work with them “as if they'd been there all along.” This also helps ensure effective control of ALCSG during Valiant Shield. Prior to this exercise, Decatur and McCampbell had not worked with ALCSG.

Valiant Shield 2006 exercised the U.S. military’s ability to conduct robust, joint command and control operations, and rapidly bring together joint forces in response to any regional contingency. The exercise demonstrated the U.S. commitment to the Pacific region. Along with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) strike groups are also participating in the event” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060623-07 - Release Date: 6/23/2006 10:43:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24315

 

ALCSG Wraps Up Exercise Valiant Shield ‘06

 

“The USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) concluded its participation in Exercise Valiant Shield on 23 June 2006, marking the completion of the first such exercise to involve three carrier strike groups in more than 10 years, from 19 to 23 June 2006. Valiant Shield is a joint exercise designed to reinforce the United States’ commitment to the Pacific Region and exercise the U.S. military’s ability to conduct robust, joint command-and-control operations and rapidly bringing together joint forces in response to any regional contingency.

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) Carrier Strike Groups also participated in the exercise, along with U.S. Air Force, U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Marine Corps personnel. “
Exercise Valiant Shield is the most important evolution of our 2006 deployment,” said Lincoln Commanding Officer, Capt. C.A. McCawley. “Our ability to seamlessly integrate with two other carrier strike groups as well as Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard units in order to respond to any situation that could occur in the Pacific region is vital to the transformation of American fighting forces in the Pacific.”

Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander of ALCSG, emphasized the importance of joint operations during the exercise. “
Valiant Shield is a rare opportunity to bring together platforms that normally do not exercise together,” said Goodwin. “Bringing B-2 bombers and carrier strike groups together is unusual, but exercising these capabilities helps ensure an integrated American air, sea and land force capable of an overwhelming and decisive response in any future contingency.”

Prior to the exercise,
Lincoln hosted foreign observers from the nations of India, Japan and Russia, as well as media from the Armed Forces Network, Guam, Japan and National Public Radio. The exercise began with a photo exercise as the three strike groups conducted a passing exercise, sailing in a formation that brought the ships within 500 yards of one another as a flight of F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets, lead by an Air Force B-2 Spirit bomber, flew in formation overhead.

 

Operations then began in earnest, as the carrier strike groups began flying three days of sustained air strikes jointly with Air Force aircraft. At the same time, the groups’ helicopter squadrons began anti-submarine warfare exercises, and detachments went ashore to Guam to perform Naval Special Warfare missions with SEAL Team 1 and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060624-02 - Release Date: 6/24/2006 4:08:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24337

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific from 24 to 26 June 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

ALCSG Enters U.S. 3rd Fleet AOR

 

“USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) entered the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) on 27 June 2006, after spending the majority of a successful 2006 deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet AOR.

While in the 7
th Fleet AOR, ALCSG participated in exercises such as Foal Eagle and Valiant Shield. “So far we’ve participated in Foal Eagle with the [Republic of Korea] and a passing exercise with the Japanese,” said Lt. Cmdr. Wayne Goveia of the embarked staff of Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9. “We did exercises with the Thai and Singaporeans as well.” ALCSG also made port calls in Hong Kong; Laem Chebang, Thailand; Singapore and Sasebo, Japan.

ALCSG is deployed to conduct maritime security operations and to train with its coalition partners to improve its ability to operate with naval forces from many nations. Though exercises had specific operational goals, they also helped build international relationships between the United States and its allies. “Most important is the relationships we build with these countries,” said Goveia, “if we ever have to operate in a real-world situation, knowing those countries’ [navies] will help us out if we ever have to go into anything together.

 

Goveia added that international exercises help build personal relationships between participants and allow the United States and its allies to have a better understanding of how each other work. Exercises weren’t the only way ALCSG helped build international relations. Sailors’ conduct in foreign ports also made a positive impression. “Abe and the strike group did an outstanding job being ambassadors of the United States and displaying good citizenship,” said Lt. Ryan Stormer of Abraham Lincoln's Legal DepartmentAbraham Lincoln deployed Feb. 27 from its homeport of Everett, Wash” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060628-09 - Release Date: 6/28/2006 2:05:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James McGury and Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24404

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) in the Pacific from 27 to 29 June 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln Visits Pearl Harbor, To Commence RIMPAC

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on 30 June 2006, before participating in the biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2006 exercise. The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) will join units from Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Peru, the Republic of Korea, and the United Kingdom as well as other ships from the U.S. Navy for RIMPAC.

RIMPAC is intended to increase the tactical proficiency of participating units in a wide array of combined operations at sea. “By enhancing interoperability, RIMPAC promotes stability in the Pacific Rim region,” said Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander, Carrier Strike Group 9. More than 400 Lincoln Sailors are participating in RIMPAC sporting events throughout the weekend before getting underway for the operational phase.

Lincoln will host more than 1,000 guests aboard for tours of the ship July 2 as part of the weekend celebration. Operationally, embarked Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and helicopters of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 will conduct anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare operations as the fixed-wing aircraft of CVW-2 provide Combat Air Patrol (CAP) support for the exercise's multinational fleet.

According to Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) is the United States’ top war fighting priority for the Pacific region.
RIMPAC is a key part of the Navy’s efforts to focus on ASW and support the proficiency of U.S. Sailors in this challenging skill. The exercise also offers an opportunity to increase cooperation and interoperability amongst nations’ military forces. During the exercise, Lincoln will host more than 100 distinguished visitors aboard while underway, and will host a reception aboard the carrier upon the ship’s return to Pearl Harbor at the conclusion of RIMPAC exercises. ALCSG is on a routine deployment to the Western Pacific” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060630-11 - Release Date: 6/30/2006 1:33:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24449

 

he Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) departs from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii to participate in exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

 

060705-N-8629M-185 - Pearl Harbor (July 5, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departs from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii to participate in exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC). Eight nations are participating in RIMPAC, the world's largest biennial maritime exercise. Conducted in the waters off Hawaii, RIMPAC brings together military forces from Australia, Canada, Chile, Peru, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rebecca J. Moat (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=36517

 

Lincoln Underway For RIMPAC 06

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) got underway from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on 5 July 2006, to participate in several weeks of training and exercises as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area..

RIMPAC brings together maritime forces from Australia, Canada, Chile, Peru, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Lincoln will serve as the flagship for the exercise, as well as providing combat air patrol and anti-surface and submarine warfare assets from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked on board Lincoln.

"As we work with our international partners during
RIMPAC, safety and protecting the environment are top priorities for this exercise," said Capt. Matthew Klunder, commander, CVW 2.

This year's exercise is the twentieth in a series of
RIMPAC exercises conducted biennially since 1971. RIMPAC training operations will include participation by 35 ships, more than 60 aircraft and 18,000 Sailors, Airmen, Marines, Soldiers and Coast Guardsmen.

RIMPAC is intended to increase the tactical proficiency of participating units in a wide array of combined operations at sea. By enhancing interoperability, RIMPAC promotes stability in the Pacific Rim region to the benefit of all participating nations” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060708-08 - Release Date: 7/8/2006 9:23:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln, Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24578

 

RIMPAC is a multinational exercise bringing together maritime forces from Australia, Canada, Chile, Peru, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. Lincoln will serve as the flagship for the exercise, as well as providing combat air patrol and anti-surface and submarine warfare assets from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked on board Lincoln. During the exercise, Lincoln will host more than 100 distinguished visitors aboard while underway, and will host a reception aboard the carrier upon the ship's return to Pearl Harbor at the conclusion of RIMPAC exercises” (Ref. 1161).

 

USS Shoup Holds Change Of Command Ceremony in Pearl Harbor

 

“Cmdr. Mark A. Johnson relieved Cmdr. Christopher H. Halton as commanding officer of the Aegis destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86) during a change of command ceremony on the ship's flight deck on 5 July 2006.

In his remarks to the crew before turning over command, Halton reflected on his tenure as the commanding officer, thanking the crew, the officers and his family for supporting him along the way. He praised the crew for their relentless positive attitude, perseverance and “can do” work ethic. These qualities guided the crew during a strenuous operational tempo as a surge status platform.

Halton assumed command of
Shoup in January 2005. Under his leadership, Shoup immediately provided tsunami relief off the coast of Sumatra as part of Operation Unified Assistance in January 2005.

Furthermore, Halton led
Shoup during work-up exercises in the Pacific area of operations, and two six-month deployments. The latter included four months of operations in the Western Pacific in support of Exercise Foal Eagle 2006, Valiant Shield 2006 and several goodwill diplomatic port visits.

"It is an honor that this great charge has been placed upon me,” Johnson told the crew after assuming command. Johnson is a native of Bethesda, Md., and a 1987 graduate of Miami University, where he earned a Bachelor's degree in history. He was commissioned via ROTC in December of that year.

At sea, Johnson has served aboard USS
Thomas S. Gates (CG-51), USS Ramage (DDG-61), and USS Gettysburg (CG-64). His most recent sea duty assignment was as executive officer of USS Hue City (CG-66) from 2001 to 2003, deploying for Operation Enduring Freedom. This is his first tour as commanding officer.

His personal decorations include the Meritorious Service Medal (three awards), the Navy Commendation Medal (three awards), and the Army Commendation Medal as well as other personal and unit-level awards and citations.
Shoup is a critical member of Carrier Strike Group 9, which includes USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) and USS Russell (DDG-59).

Shoup is currently on a routine Western Pacific Deployment, supporting the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations” (Ref.  Story Number: NNS060711-12 - Release Date: 7/11/2006 6:56:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. James L. Carlson, USS Shoup Public Affairs, PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24620

 

RimPac 2006 proceeded with severe anti-submarine warfare training restrictions by participating commands, although the Navy successfully negotiated with plaintiffs to have the temporary restraining order lifted for the remaining phase on 9 July 2006, which involved a fictitious scenario where coalition ‘blue’ forces worked to enforce United Nations Security Council resolutions to prevent country ‘orange’ from overtaking country ‘green.’ As part of the role playing, marines accomplished non-combatant evacuation operations, as well as an amphibious beach assault, and aircraft flew close air support, surveillance, air strikes, anti-ship and antisubmarine warfare sorties. A delegation of 10 Chinese officers also observed part of the exercise. In addition, Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX)-20, augmented by the Air Force’s 452nd Flight Test Squadron, flew the Northrop Grumman RQ-4A Global Hawk Maritime Demonstration system in RimPac” (Ref. 378A).

 

“The Navy sank several decommissioned ships during RimPac 2006, including amphibious assault ship Belleau Wood (LHA-3; sunk on 10 July), ammunition ship Mauna Kea (AE-22), combat store ship Mars (T-AFS-1) and Yacona, an 80 foot sludge removal barge (sunk on 9 July). In addition to various U.S. ships and aircraft that pummeled the ships, Canadian P-3C Orions, area air defense destroyer HMCS Algonquin (DDG-283) and multi-role patrol frigate HMCS Vancouver (FFH-331), and South Korean aircraft, bombed and shot at the decommissioned ships” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Hosts Australian Parliament Members

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted six members of the Australian Parliament on 9 July 2006 as a part of biennial Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercises in the Hawaiian operating area.

The Distinguished Visitors (DV) saw various parts of the ship, including medical spaces, the mess decks and the flight deck.

“I’ve always had a desire to visit a
Nimitz-class carrier,” said Kim Wilkie, Parliament member for Swan, Western Australia. “These visits are important to enhance the relationship between the U.S. and Australia. Since we’re both involved in RIMPAC, it gives us an opportunity to work with more than our allies; it gives us the opportunity to work with our friends.”

The visitors came aboard as a part of the Australian Defense Force Parliament Program, which allows members of Australia’s Parliament to get a better understanding of how the U.S. Navy operates.

“The program is designed to get the members a better understanding of what life at sea and shore is like,” said Australian navy Lt. Jillian Brownlie. “It’s a great opportunity to learn and appreciate how tough military life really is. They get to interact on a normal basis with service members of all ranks.”

Brownlie said the visit to Abe was to gain a better understanding of how an aircraft carrier fits into an international exercise.

Abraham Lincoln
is currently participating in the month-long RIMPAC exercise. RIMPAC includes ships and personnel from the United States, Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Peru, the Republic of Korea and the United Kingdom. This exercise trains U.S. and allied forces to be interoperable and ready for a wide range of potential combined operations and missions” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060716-01 - Release Date: 7/16/2006 9:23:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24692

 

Abe Hosts 3,000 Visitors During Deployment

 

As reported on 15 July 2006, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted more than 3,000 Distinguished Visitors (DV), public visitors and members of the media during the ship’s Western Pacific deployment in 2006.

Throughout the deployment,
Abe Sailors showed their hospitality through tours, ship visitations, and the overnight program for DVs, which is designed to give guests a taste of Navy life underway.

Lincoln
showed visitors how Sailors from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 join with ship’s company to form a cohesive unit.

During the deployment,
Abe hosted guests from the nations of Korea, China, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Brunei and Australia.

"This was a great opportunity for this firsthand view of the professionalism of the crew of
Lincoln,” said Brig. Gen. Vikra Goswani of India’s Joint Operations and Planning office during his visit aboard Lincoln.

Other visitors brought aboard included 400 DVs and media in Hong Kong; 380 DVs and media from Thailand; 600 DVs and visitors from Singapore; 600 DVs, media and visitors from Japan; 16 DVs from Brunei and 1,000 visitors from Hawaii.

Lincoln hosted these guests during exercises throughout the deployment, including 21 DVs and media during the JMSDF Undersea Warfare Exercise, 48 DVs and media during Foal Eagle, 11 DVs during Valiant Shield and 100 DVs during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).

“The face-to-face interaction helps with the communications barrier,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Mills, from DESRON 9.

Abraham Lincoln is currently participating in RIMPAC 2006. RIMPAC includes ships and personnel from the United States, Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Peru, the Republic of Korea and the United Kingdom. This exercise trains U.S. allied forces to be interoperable and ready for a wide range of potential combined operations and missions” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060715-04 - Release Date: 7/15/2006 7:45:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael K. McNabb, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs , At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24691

 

Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) spell out

 

060725-N-7981E-170 - Pacific Ocean (July 25, 2006) - Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) spell out "RIMPAC 2006" on the flight deck during a photo exercise. To commemorate the last day of RIMPAC, participating country's naval vessels fell into ranks for a photo exercise. RIMPAC trains U.S. allied forces to be interoperable and ready for a wide range of potential combined operations and missions. Eight nations participated in RIMPAC, the world's largest biennial maritime exercise. Conducted in the waters off Hawaii, RIMPAC brings together military forces from Australia, Canada, Chile, Peru, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States. Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is currently underway on a scheduled Western Pacific deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=37454

 

“Upon conclusion of several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area from 5 to 25 July 2006, Abraham Lincoln headed to Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Abraham Lincoln took part in RimPac 2006, a multinational exercise that involved 19,000 servicemembers, 35 ships, six submarines, 160 tactical aircraft and amphibious forces. During part of the exercise, however, activists concerned over the impact of mid-frequency active sonar upon marine life and following the precepts established by the Marine Mammal Protection Act (21 October 1972), pressured a district judge to issue a temporary restraining order on the Navy’s use of the systems. The UAV made four successful maritime surveillance missions from Edwards AFB in California out to Hawaii, which demonstrated its capability of identifying targets in a coastal or littoral environment while also successfully identifying targets in wide area maritime search and tracking. Global Hawk logged about 100 hours during the exercise, and operators transmitted data back to a team from VX-1 and VX-20, and Fleet Composite Squadron (VC)-6, at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, who analyzed the information and forwarded the data to participants. Australian, British, Canadian, Chilean, Japanese, Peruvian and South Korean forces also took part in RimPac” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) areas of operations en route to Hawaii were not reported from 26 to 27 July 2006, yet steaming through the Western Pacific and the Pacific seems reasonable.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 28 July 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln Wraps Up RIMPAC, Heads Home

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 29 July 2006, after the final weekend of the biennial Rim of the Pacific 2006 (RIMPAC) exercise.visiting on the 28th, for the return trip to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California and the homecoming of CVW-2, conducting a "Tiger Cruise" in the Pacific on 29 July 2006. More than 1,000 guests, including Sailors from Australia, Canada, Chile, Japan, Peru, the Republic of Korea, and the United Kingdom joined U.S. Navy personnel for a final pierside reception aboard the carrier July 28th.” (Ref. 76 & 378A).


Lincoln served as the command and control hub for the multination task force during the exercise. According to Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, the training received on the part of all the participating navies was invaluable. “We (the U.S. Navy) take every opportunity to train and hone our warfighting skills,” Goodwin said. “Adding the challenges of interoperability with foreign navies gives us a great opportunity to expand those capabilities and the capabilities of those participating navies. Interoperability is a perishable skill.”

“Exercises such as
RIMPAC help ensure that we will be capable of handling any contingency in the Pacific region in cooperation with the navies of nations throughout the area,” he added. During the exercise, embarked Destroyer Squadron 9 (DESRON) and helicopters of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 47 from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 conducted anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare training as the fixed-wing aircraft of CVW-2 provided Combat Air Patrol (CAP) support for the multinational fleet.

“Anti-submarine warfare (ASW) is the United States Navy’s top warfighting priority for the Pacific region.
RIMPAC is a key part if the Navy’s efforts to focus on ASW and support the proficiency of Sailors in this challenging skill,” said Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, Capt. C.A. McCawley. “Our participation in this exercise provided an opportunity for us not only to practice our ASW skills, but to work in conjunction with the very nations we would assist in alliance with if the worst happened in the Pacific region, and our services as defenders of freedom and open navigation of the seas were threatened,” said Capt. Jeff Harley, commander, DESRON 9.

As
RIMPAC came to a close, Lincoln embarked 750 “Tigers,” friends and family members of the crew, for the return trip to San Diego and the homecoming of CVW-2. Lincoln will then proceed to its homeport of Everett, Wash., to end the ship’s routine deployment to the Western Pacific” (Ref.  Story Number: NNS060730-01 - Release Date: 7/30/2006 9:56:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24920

 

Air Power Demonstration Wows Lincoln Tigers, Crew

 

“Crew members and guests aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) were treated to a display of the formidable air power of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 during an air power demonstration n 29 July 2006.

The air power demonstration showcased the aircraft, pilots and air crews of embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and was for many of the guests and family members, known as "Tigers," the most exciting event of the
2006 Tiger Cruise. Almost every squadron aboard Lincoln was given the opportunity to strut their stuff with a dynamic series of fly-bys, aerobatics, and weapons demonstrations.

"What the air power demo is, is a chance for us to exhibit to other people the culmination of everyone on the ship doing their job the way that they're trained to do," said Lt. Brian McIntosh, a pilot assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34 "Blue Blasters" who also announced the air power demonstration over the flight deck address system.

Lincoln's air power demonstration began with a search and rescue (SAR) demonstration by Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Light (HSL) 47, followed by flybys from Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116 and Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131. Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 2 then kicked things up a notch with a performance showcasing the speed and maneuverability of the F/A-18F Super Hornet.

According to Lt. Cmdr. Vorrice Burks, VFA-2's demo pilot for the show, his
Super Hornet demo started out with a high-speed pass in which the aircraft blasted past the crowd at just under the speed of sound. Burks then put the aircraft, painted in the squadron's signature red white and blue paint scheme, through a series of rolls, climbs, and turns, wowing the audience at altitudes as low as 500 feet and pulling up to 7 Gs.

"It's definitely one of the better hops (missions) we get to do on deployment," Burks said. "It was a pleasure for the Tigers and the crew, and I had a blast doing it," he added. Following Burks' performance, the Kestrels of VFA-137 displayed yet another capability of the
Super Hornet, executing a mid-air refueling with an EA-6B Prowler from VAQ-131.

As the audience turned to watch the two connected aircraft depart, the commanding officer of VFA-34, Cmdr. Greg Prentiss, announced the Blue Blaster's arrival on the scene with a "sneak pass." Catching audience members by surprise, Prentiss roared over the crowd with his F/A-18C
Hornet on full afterburner, much to the delight of the audience.

The Blue Blasters then gave the audience a taste of true firepower, dropping bombs and strafing the ocean with their 20mm Vulcan cannons a mere mile from Lincoln. Before the water could settle from their bombardment, four Super Hornets from VFA-2 and VFA-137 dropped a string of bombs one right after another, creating a "wall of water" and rocking the crowd with the concussion of exploding ordnance.

But the biggest boom was yet to come. Once again, Prentiss pointed his F/A-18C
Hornet toward Lincoln and accelerated, this time breaking the sound barrier and blasting everyone with a sonic boom as he streaked overhead.

"The sonic boom was my favorite part of the show," said Brandon Jumaoas, who, like many young
Tigers, watched the demonstration perched atop his father's shoulders.
Next, Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron (HS) 2 and the Sailors of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 11, Detachment 9, showcased their special operations abilities, stealthily approaching
Lincoln in an SH-60B Seahawk and deploying fully armed EOD members via fast rope onto the flight deck.

The air power demonstration ended with a formation flyover by all of the participants' aircraft, which for many visiting
Tigers, was as emotional as it was breathtaking.

"Naval aviation has always been such a big part of my family, growing up and now," said Patty Cohick, whose son, Lt. Scott Cohick, is a helicopter pilot attached to HS-2. "Every time I see the formation of all the planes flying together, I never cease to get butterflies in my stomach and tears in my eyes."

Abraham Lincoln is en route to Naval Air Station North Island to disembark the squadrons of CVW-2 before the final leg of its 2006 deployment, the return to its homeport of Everett, Wash” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060806-01 - Release Date: 8/6/2006 8:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist James Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24995

 

Aircraft from embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) fly in formation over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) during an air power demonstration for Lincoln's Tigers.

 

060730-N-7981E-143 - Pacific Ocean (July 30, 2006) - Aircraft from embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) fly in formation over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during an air power demonstration for Lincoln's Tigers. Lincoln and CVW-2 are currently underway on a Tiger cruise, during which families and friends of the crew are given the opportunity to experience life at sea by embarking aboard the ship for a week. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James R. Evans (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=37631

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted "Tiger Cruise" in the Pacific from 29 July to 3 August, returning to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on the 4th, remaining until the 5th and then, proceeded to her homeport of Everett, Washington” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated in the Eastern Pacific from 6 to 7 August 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

‘Save A Life Tour’ Visits Lincoln Mess Decks

 

As reported on 7 August 2006, “the Navy has unveiled a new tool in its effort to educate Sailors on the hazards of drunken driving.

A multi-million-dollar drunk-driving simulator, operated by “Save a Life Tour” Kramer International, is teaching Sailors aboard
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and those attached to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 just how dangerous driving under the influence of alcohol is.

According to Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) Guy Dicks,
Lincoln’s assistant command Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Awareness (DAPA) coordinator, the purpose of the simulator and classroom training is to familiarize people with the effect an individual’s blood alcohol content (BAC) has on their motor responses. “Depending on their BAC level,” Dicks said, “there is a real delay factor involved in the individual’s response time. People see [by using the simulator] that they cannot drink and drive - not without consequences,” Dicks said.

“The major thing is that it convinces people that they have to focus so much on controlling their own vehicle on the road and staying within the lanes without swerving so that they don’t get caught, that they miss every other potential hazard,” he added.

Intelligence Specialist Seaman Apprentice Shela Constantineau, from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151, said that the simulator was, for her, very convincing. “It gives you a real-life example (of driving drunk), an idea of how you might really feel and the lack of control that you have,” Constantineau said. “It will definitely make me think twice about getting behind the wheel of a car after having a couple of drinks."

Brian Beldyga, the founder of the “Save a Life Tour,” said that his goal is to reach one person every day. “If I can get to them, they might go to the bar and, when they see their friends drink, at least say to them, ‘hey, don’t drive’,” said Beldyga. As the ship prepares to return from deployment, Dicks said that it is especially important to make a push to educate people on the hazards created by mixing alcohol and vehicles.

“We are doing our best to leave people with no excuse for drinking and driving,” Dicks said. “The simulator presents the consequences side. You prove to yourself that you cannot do it (drive under the influence), and you see the consequences if you try."

Dicks said that while there are many avenues by which the U.S. Navy and Lincoln are attacking the drinking and driving issue, the simulator and classroom discussions are an important part of that overall education effort” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060807-05 - Release Date: 8/7/2006 11:06:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24994

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XIX (1 January to 8 August 2006)

Part III of IV - 18 June to 7 August 2006

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4