Naval Station, Everett, Washington; quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time; Inspection and Survey (INSURV) at sea period; Naval Station, Everett, Washington and her Eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East, South China Sea and Java Sea, joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian, exercises and operations will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and hosted the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports and participated in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea, a month-long exercise designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations (27 February to 8 August 2006).

1 January to 8 August 2006

Chapter XIX

Part I of IV - 1 January to 31 March 2006

Part II of IV - 1 April to 17 June 2006

Part III of IV - 18 June to 7 August 2006

Part IV of IV - 8 August 2006

 

Abe’s In port and Eighth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XIX, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call.

Chapter XIX, Appendix I

 

 

Abraham Lincoln Strike Group participates in Foal Eagle 06

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific from 26 March to 1 April 2006, participating in Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06) from 26 to 31 March 2006, is designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness. “Foal Eagle provides the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group the opportunity to continue developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s commanding officer. Cmdr. Glen Leverette of Commander Task Force 70 (CTF 70) based in Yokosuka, Japan, described Lincoln’s role in RSOI/FE 06 as a vital one. “Lincoln is here to support theater security, cooperation and engagement with the ROK and to reinforce the alliance we have,” he said. “Our presence during the exercise is a visible, tangible expression of our nation’s commitment to their [ROK’s] defense.” According to Leverette, the war-fighting skill sets Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing 2 will rehearse include close-air support for ground units, air-to-air defense exercises, maritime interoperability training and expeditionary operations. “An exercise like this crystallizes Lincoln’s role as a command-and-control node,” said Leverette. “Without Lincoln’s communications suite and connectivity, this exercise would be nearly impossible to conduct.” Leverette stated that Foal Eagle is the largest concentration of surface and air forces that participate in field training exercises on the Korean Peninsula. “It involves more than 70 ships, 70 to 80 aircraft, and all four services of both the U.S. and ROK armed forces. Everyone is involved,” he added. The ROK and U.S. navies will conduct an officer exchange program during the exercise. Five ROK naval officers will embark Abraham Lincoln to train with the ships’ crew. Gen. B. B. Bell, Commander, U.S. Forces Korea, said Foal Eagle presents a great training opportunity, but urged leaders to be familiar with the risks involved. “The success of this exercise will be measured, among other things, by how safely we conduct the operation,” said Bell” (Ref. By Ensign Grace Rodden, USS Abraham Lincoln public affairs - Posted: 03/27/2006). http://www.c7f.navy.mil

 

“More than 70 ships and submarines, participated in RSOI/Foal Eagle 06, an exercise to demonstrate United States resolve to support the South Koreans from 27 March to 1 April 2006. U.S. 7th Fleet assets included the Commander, Amphibious Squadron (COMPHIBRON) 11 staff embarked on amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD-2), amphibious transport dock ship USS Juneau (LPD-10), dock landing ship USS Harper’s Ferry (LSD-49), attack submarine USS Houston (SSN-713), mine countermeasures ships USS Guardian (MCM-5) and USS Patriot (MCM-7), guided missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), salvage ship USS Safeguard (ARS-50), as well as the DESRON 15 staff embarked on guided missile destroyer USS Curtis Wilbur (DDG-54), and guided missile frigate USS Vandegrift (FFG-48), guided missile frigate USS Stethem (DDG-63), guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62), guided missile frigates USS Gary (FFG-51) and USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) together, with 70 to 80 aircraft, took part in the training, which included deploying some forces ashore at stations within the Republic of Korea. Abraham Lincoln hosted an entourage of high-ranking South Korean officials (29 March). Meanwhile, Safeguard and South Korean auxiliary Pyong Taek (ATS-27) also salvaged a USAF F-16C Fighting Falcon that had crashed off the South Korean coast on 14 March. Abraham Lincoln also took part in reception, staging, onward movement and integration exercises. In addition, Supply Department sailors deployed ashore to Pusan AFB, South Korea, to facilitate the extended logistics flow through Japanese and South Korean routes” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060406-17 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 8:00:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class David McKee, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public Affairs - SEOUL (NNS) & 378A). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23037

 

Republic of Korea (ROK) Marines depart the amphibious dock landing ship USS Juneau (LPD 10) in Pohang.

 

060402-N-4124C-063 - Pohang, Republic of Korea (April 2, 2006) - Republic of Korea (ROK) Marines depart the amphibious dock landing ship USS Juneau (LPD-10) in Pohang. Juneau and the rest of the forward-deployed Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) arrived in Pohang to backload personnel and equipment assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) after the completion of Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration (RSIO) and Foal Eagle 2006. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 3rd Class Adam R. Cole (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33306

 

An Enlisted Landing Signalman gives the hover signal to the pilot.

 

060403-N-0499M-093 - Pacific Ocean (April 3, 2006) - An Enlisted Landing Signalman gives the hover signal to the pilot of an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter assigned to the "Island Knights" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron Two Five (HSC-25) during a vertical replenishment aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway in the Western Pacific area of operations. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class James R. McGury (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33309

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Sea of Japan from 26 March to 3 April 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

 “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the East China Sea on 4 April 2006 and in the South China Sea on 5 April 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

Sailors assigned aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) man the rails while pulling into Hong Kong.

 

060406-N-5384B-086 - Pacific Ocean (April 6, 2006) - Sailors assigned aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) man the rails while pulling into Hong Kong. Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing TWO (CVW-2) are currently deployed in the Western Pacific for a scheduled six-month deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Justin R. Blake (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33379

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Visits Hong Kong

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Hong Kong on 6 April 2006, following five weeks of exercises in the Western Pacific.

The 5,500 Sailors of the ship’s crew and embarked air wing will have the opportunity to enjoy the renowned hospitality of the city for an extended weekend before heading back to sea to continue their scheduled
Western Pacific deployment.

“Hong Kong has been a favorite port of call for our Sailors for several years,” said Capt. Andrew McCawley,
Lincoln’s commanding officer. “We expect it will remain so for several years to come.”

While in port, the crew of
Abraham Lincoln as well as Carrier Strike Group 9 will take part in several community service efforts throughout the city.

“The community relations projects are a great way for Sailors to help out Hong Kong on a personal level and act as excellent ambassadors of the United States,” said McCawley.

The 1,092-foot-long aircraft carrier’s last deployment was marked by its speedy response and humanitarian assistance following the devastating tsunami in Southeast Asia, Dec. 26, 2004” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060407-02 - Release Date: 4/7/2006 9:17:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, HONG KONG (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23053

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN 72) 1st Class Association takes part in a Community Relations (COMREL) project at the Bayanihan Trust.

 

060408-N-5384B-037 - Pacific Ocean (April 8, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1st Class Association takes part in a Community Relations (COMREL) project at the Bayanihan Trust during a recent port visit to Hong Kong. Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway in the Western Pacific Ocean for a scheduled six-month deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Justin R. Blake (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33441

 

Abraham Lincoln Wraps Up Hong Kong Port Call

 

“The men and women of the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) wrapped up a port call in Hong Kong on 10 April 2006 after four days of liberty, visiting Hong Kong, China from 6 to 10 April 2006. The ship pulled into Hong Kong April 6, after successfully completing the Reception, Staging, Onward-movement & Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE-06) exercises off the coast of South Korea, March 31st.

During their four days in port, ALCSG Sailors toured the Hong Kong area, played soccer and rugby, lent a helping hand in community service projects and even found time to squeeze in a run with a local chapter of the Hash House Harriers.
Lincoln’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office sold tickets for more than 1,230 tours of the area. Additionally, more than 350 Sailors took advantage of the opportunity to stay in hotel rooms in Hong Kong and Kowloon.

While Sailors explored places such as Lantau Island and the New Territories,
Lincoln’s soccer and rugby teams played local clubs, getting a taste of international competition. A few other Sailors spent time either playing basketball - both men's and women's teams - or golfing. ALCSG Sailors participated in six community service projects, including work for the Salvation Army, the Banayihan Trust and other local charities. They assisted in preservation, moved supplies and contributed to other projects to extend good will.

According to Personnel Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Jon Westrum, these projects are “a great chance to give back to the community [and] spend time with friends.”Westrum is a member of
Lincoln’s First Class Petty Officer’s Association (FCA). The FCA volunteered to repaint a classroom at the Banayihan Trust, a Hong Kong charity.

“We’re part of a military organization, and with our primary job being what it is, it’s nice to do something a little bit different, something where we’re giving back in a positive light and showing good citizenship,” he said. Many Sailors also took advantage of offers of in-home meals with local residents. In all, amidst the shopping, tours, food and local nightlife, ALCSG Sailors had the opportunity to enjoy the sights, sounds and tastes of Hong Kong before returning to sea.

Abraham Lincoln is currently on a Western Pacific deployment. Hong Kong was the ship’s first port call in a foreign port during its deployment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060411-05 - Release Date: 4/11/2006 12:39:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class(SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23091

 

“Upon leaving Hong Kong, Abraham Lincoln participated in a Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and hosted the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits” (Ref. 378A).

 

Mobile Bay Strengthens Interoperability With Hong Kong

 

“Guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) participated in flight operations with the Hong Kong Governmental Flight Service (HKGFS) on 10 April 2006 in the Western Pacific Ocean.

The HKGFS consists of helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, and its primary mission is to provide emergency airlift and search and rescue in local and coastal waters of Hong Kong.

Three aircraft participated in the event. A fixed-wing control craft acted as a communications relay and provided air control for the search and rescue exercises, a helicopter practiced approaches, Deck Landing Qualifications (DLQ) and refueling and a second helicopter photographed the operations.

“This invaluable training was to practice interoperability between the U.S. Navy and the HKGFS, and allow for their helicopter to practice landing and refueling at sea,” said Capt. Thomas Carney,
Mobile Bay’s commanding officer. He added that the refueling at sea increases the aircraft's range and provides for greater on-station time during extended operations.

The primary HKGFS helicopter made multiple landings and relaunches and took on fuel - a first for a U.S. Naval vessel.

“The Hong Kong Government Flight Service pilots were very professional and appreciative of the opportunity to practice on
Mobile Bay's flight deck,” said Carney.

Mobile Bay is deployed with the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group, currently conducting operations with coalition partners and allies in the Western Pacific during a routine scheduled deployment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060411-07 - Release Date: 4/11/2006 12:42:00 PM - By Ensign Matt Johnson, USS Mobile Bay Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23095

 

HSL-47, USS Russell Assist Vessel in Distress

 

“A crew from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 assisted a vessel in distress in the South China Sea on 15 April 2006. The squadron, known as the “Saberhawks,” were conducting routine flight operations at the time. “We were flying around checking out all the surface contacts near the battle group,” said Lt. j.g. James Bowen, one of the two pilots aboard the SH-60B Seahawk helicopter when the vessel was spotted.

 

“We were flying past and it just looked like an old fishing vessel.” However, the crew noticed the fishermen on deck were trying to signal them, so the crew decided to turn around and make another pass to check it out. “This time there were more people on deck, and they were signaling us to come closer,” said Bowen.

“There were at least 10 people on deck waving both their arms,” said Aviation Warfare Specialist 2nd Class (AW) Zachary J. Dotson, a sensor operator aboard the helicopter. “The vessel was dead in the water with a smaller boat tethered to it with a 50-yard line. I held up a bottle of water, and we got a noticeable reaction.” The crew then hovered the helicopter near the 100-foot-long vessel, which was of unknown nationality, and threw out a bottle of water.

 

“About five fishermen jumped into the water to get it, and we knew there was a problem on board,” said Dotson. The fishing vessel appeared to be very primitive, and the helicopter crew doubted they would have radio equipment aboard, but they attempted to raise them anyway. “We didn’t get any response whatsoever,” said Bowen. “At this point we called USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to coordinate efforts and request support.” The crew arranged to fly to USS Russell (DDG 59), which was nearby, and pick up some supplies they could deliver to the vessel.

 

“We flew back and dropped the food and water to them,” said Bowen. “We stayed in a hover and watched as they opened the package, and they seemed very ecstatic.” The HSL-47 crew tried to contact other vessels in the area that might have been able to assist, but could not get any response. As a result, Russell moved into the area to monitor the vessel and further support the humanitarian effort if necessary.

 

“This kind of event shows the versatility we have - to shift from a military to a humanitarian mission at a moment’s notice,” said Cmdr. Shawn P. Malone, HSL-47’s executive officer, and the other pilot aboard the helicopter. “It also shows the kind of cooperation we bring to the region. We are more than a show of military power…we are here to assist when needed.” Versatility and cooperation was also demonstrated by helicopter crew itself, as it included a member from Helicopter Anti Submarine Squadron (HSL) 2, the “Golden Falcons.”

 

“I flew with them as a [search-and-rescue] swimmer,” said Aviation Warfare Specialist 2nd Class (AW) Zack D. Webb. “If [the vessel] was going down, I would have went in and performed rescues. If [anyone] was hurt, I would have went down, assessed the situation and got them into the bird.” Both crewmen aboard the helicopter had participated in the tsunami relief and Hurricane Katrina relief efforts in 2005, and their experience was critical to the success of this mission.

 

“They were guiding the helicopter into position so we could drop the food and water, and communicating with the vessel’s crew members to see what they needed,” said Malone. “They performed very well” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060418-07 - Release Date: 4/18/2006 11:51:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class Michael Murdock, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23189

 

USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), USS Russell (DDG 59), and USS Shoup (DDG 86) perform a pass and review with the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

060416-N-5837R-058 - South China Sea (April 16, 2006) - USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Russell (DDG-59), and USS Shoup (DDG-86) perform a pass-in-review with the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway to the Western Pacific for a scheduled deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy C. Roache Jr. (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33641

 

ALCSG Conducts Pass-In-Review In South China Sea

 

“USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) participated in the time-honored naval tradition of a pass-in-review ceremony on 16 April 2006, while underway in the South China Sea.

The ceremony was led by
Abraham Lincoln, command ship of Rear Adm. J.W. Goodwin, commander, Carrier Strike Group 9. The remaining three ships of the ALCSG, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), passed Lincoln on the port side, one-by-one, dipping their National Ensign and rendering honors.

Lincoln Sailors were invited by Goodwin via the ship’s 1-MC to participate in the event and made their way to the flight deck to take pictures. Sailors from the other ships in the strike group were also out on their weather decks to participate in the ceremony.

Sailors of
Russell brought some humor to the pass-in-review by taking turns hitting golf balls off of their ship’s fantail and broadcasting music over their 1-MC.

According to Lt. Cmdr Jennifer Mills of Destroyer Squadron 9, the surface arm of ALCSG, the pass-in-review was “an outstanding display of professional seamanship.

“A pass-in-review gives us the opportunity to display the surface power inherent in a carrier strike group,” she said.

With the bright sun and hot temperatures, ALCSG Sailors welcomed the brief break from their normally hectic schedule. The pass-in-review was conducted during Easter Sunday, which was a scheduled “no-fly” day on the carrier and allowed the maximum number of Sailors to enjoy the ceremony from the weather decks.

The ALCSG is currently underway on a scheduled six-month deployment to the
Western Pacific” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060419-14 - Release Date: 4/19/2006 6:00:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23218

 

Guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) sails through the South China Sea in support of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

060417-N-5384B-051 - South China Sea (April 17, 2006) - Guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86) sails through the South China Sea in support of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway to the Western Pacific for a scheduled deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Justin R. Blake (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33664

 

Guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) sails through the South China Sea in support of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

060417-N-5384B-051 - South China Sea (April 17, 2006) - Guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86) sails through the South China Sea in support of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway to the Western Pacific for a scheduled deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Justin R. Blake (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33664

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea from 10 to 17 April 2006” (Ref. 76).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Gulf of Thailand from 18 to 19 April 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) pulls into Laem Chebang, Thailand for a brief port visit. Lincoln made U.S. Naval history Thursday, being the first U.S. aircraft carrier to moor pier side in Thailand.

 

060420-N-6074Y-155 - Laem Chebang, Thailand (April 20, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulls into Laem Chebang, Thailand for a brief port visit. Lincoln made U.S. Naval history Thursday, being the first U.S. aircraft carrier to moor pier side in Thailand. Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently on a scheduled six-month deployment to the Western Pacific. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class James R. McGury (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33802

 

Lincoln Makes History Pierside In Laem Chebang

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made history on 20 April 2006, mooring in Laem Chebang, Thailand, the first time a U.S. aircraft carrier has done so.

Previously, carriers visiting Thailand anchored off the coast and used liberty launches; a lengthy and dangerous way for Sailors to go ashore in Laem Chebang, said Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate (SW) Robert W. Dean.

According to Dean, a Navy harbor pilot from Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka, being pierside is a much better alternative.

“You’re giving Sailors a safer atmosphere for getting ashore,” said Dean, who was specifically sent to
Lincoln to assist the ship in getting into and out of Laem Chebang safely.

In the past, the liberty launch system presented a much more dangerous shore-to-ship evolution, as the prevailing winds off the coast of the Pattaya Beach area tend to pick up in the evenings, said Dean.

“You had to wade in to shore [from the liberty boats] in the past,” he added.

Abraham Lincoln is visiting Thailand as part of a scheduled Western Pacific deployment. Sailors plan to enjoy liberty, participate in community service projects and take advantage of tours offered by Lincoln’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation Division during the port visit” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060421-12 - Release Date: 4/21/2006 1:26:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, LAEM CHEBANG, Thailand (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23262

 

Lincoln Strike Group Departs Thailand

 

“Ships of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) got under way on 24 April 2006, after a four-day port visit to Thailand, pierside in Laem Chebang from 20 to 24 April 2006. Sailors were bused from the busy commercial port to Pattaya in order to take advantage of liberty. Previously, carriers visiting Thailand anchored off the coast and used liberty launches; a lengthy and dangerous way for Sailors to go ashore in Laem Chebang. The ship avoided running liberty boats for sailors going ashore, a sometimes dangerous proposition in rough weather, by berthing pierside at the exotic port. In addition, as Abraham Lincoln sailed from the area, she will commence a passing exercise with Thai vessels, and officers from both nations participating in brief officer exchanges. During the visit, Sailors were able to shop, take tours and participate in community service projects with a local orphanage and two local schools. According to Lt. Cmdr Steven Orren, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 chaplain, more than 200 Sailors participated in the community service projects.

The visit made history as
Lincoln moored at Laemb Chebang, the first time any large-deck Navy ship has been able to moor in Thailand. Sailors were bused from the busy commercial port to Pattaya in order to take advantage of liberty. During the visit, Sailors were able to shop, take tours and participate in community service projects with a local orphanage and two local schools. According to Lt. Cmdr Steven Orren, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 chaplain, more than 200 Sailors participated in the community service projects. “We moved furniture from an old building that was being readied [for reconstruction], to a new building that looked like it was just completed,” said Orren, describing the work done at Pattaya orphanage. The time doing community service was not all work and no play, though. “We hung out with the babies, held and fed them, and played soccer and basketball with the kids,” he said. Sailors had the opportunity to host 38 children from the Pattaya orphanage aboard the ship April 22nd.

 

The children had ice cream in the first class petty officer’s mess and were led on a tour of the ship. “They were pretty ecstatic about it,” said Lt. Todd Friedman, Lincoln’s supply department services officer. “They were a nice group of kids that had a great time having ice cream with their tour guides. The [executive officer] even sat down and had a cup with them.” Lincoln hosted more than 500 guests aboard for tours of the ship, including members of the Chinese and Russian embassies to Thailand. Sailors also took advantage of tours, traveling to Bangkok to visit places such as the Royal Grand Palace and the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, and Wat Pho, the temple of the Reclining Buddha. There were activities such as snorkeling, elephant rides and plenty of shopping in Pattaya, as well. Abraham Lincoln and the ALCSG are currently under way as part of a scheduled Western Pacific deployment” (Ref. 1161 & Story Number: NNS060425-09 - Release Date: 4/25/2006 5:40:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23313

 

Lincoln CSG Participates In PASSEX With Royal Thai Navy

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), flagship of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, teamed up with the Royal Thai navy 24 April 2006 to conduct a passing exercise (PASSEX) in the Gulf of Thailand. During the exercise, officers from both nations participated in an officer exchange program between ships, in order to get a better understanding of how each navy operates.

“When we first came aboard
Abraham Lincoln, we were very impressed,” said Lt. Banjird Tongchiw of the Royal Thai navy. “The crew has a very high commitment to their duties.” Tongchiw, an eight-year veteran of the Royal Thai navy, said that the exchange program not only helps the Sailors involved, but it also benefits both countries’ readiness for future operations.

“In the case of emergency, or in the need of cooperation, we can have the capability of working jointly,” Tongchiw said. “The exchange is also for making friends and seeing the differences between the U.S. Navy and our navy so we can work together if we need to in the future.”

Cooperation between the U.S. Navy and the navies of allied countries is very important in today’s ever-changing political climate. “We need to form a worldwide force, and doing exercises like this helps us understand each other’s capabilities,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Mills from Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, embarked aboard
Lincoln. “This helps us become stronger against any opposing forces.”

While this
PASSEX helped build relations between the United States and Thailand, future exercises will help build stronger ties with other allied nations, allowing the formation of strong coalition strike groups. “Every time we do [PASSEX],” said Mills, “it helps us understand how our allies do business. [Exercises] help build our friendship and communications. They are an excellent way for us to learn more and more from friends and allies.”

Along with
Lincoln, CSG 9 includes Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, DESRON 9, the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86).

The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to conduct maritime security operations and to train with coalition partners to improve the ability to operate with naval forces from many nations” (Ref.
1161 & Story Number: NNS060425-02 - Release Date: 4/25/2006 11:00:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23312

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Gulf of Thailand from 24 to 26 April 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln Returns To Singapore For Port Visit

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Singapore on 27 April 2006, after a brief at-sea period following a port call in Thailand.

Lincoln last visited Singapore in February 2005 after spending a month off the coast of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, as part of Operation Unified Assistance following the December 2004 tsunami disaster.

While in port, Sailors plan to perform community service projects including visiting children with special needs, several schools and children’s residential homes.

Sailors will also take in tours of the area, including nighttime dinner cruises, shopping in Singapore’s Chinatown, viewing the world-famous zoo and much more.

“Singapore is a great liberty port,” said Capt. Dave Lausman,
Lincoln’s executive officer. “It’s a wonderful culture and a beautiful city. I’ve always enjoyed myself the many times I have been here throughout my career,” he added.

The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group includes Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, USS
Shoup (DDG-86), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Mobile Bay (CG-53). The strike group is underway on a scheduled Western Pacific deployment. During the deployment, the ship has participated in military exercises, strengthening bonds with allied countries while reinforcing U.S. policy and keeping sea lanes open” (Ref. 1161 & Story Number: NNS060428-02 - Release Date: 4/28/2006 10:00:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SINGAPORE (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23391

 

Shoup Sailors Excel At VBSS Mission

 

As reported on 29 April 2006, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG), conducted missions in the Western Pacific in April, completed drills designed to keep the high seas safe. A Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) exercise was conducted by a select group of Sailors from the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86).

 

“Our mission is to board and search vessels suspected of transporting drugs and contraband, trafficking in persons, or harboring suspected terrorists,” said Personnel Specialist 2nd Class Richard Isotalo, a member of the VBSS team. Before becoming a part of Shoup’s VBSS team, prospective members attend the three-week Noncompliant VBSS course at the Fleet Training Center in San Diego, in addition to completing both the basic and advanced Security Reaction Force courses.

“At the
VBSS Course in San Diego, we learned a lot of more advanced hand-to-hand combat techniques, defensive tactics, team movement, ladder climbing and rappelling, as well as live fire with the Mk-18 assault rifle and M9 pistol,” said Engineman Fireman Christopher Cavnar.

 

“The Navy SEALs (Sea, Air, Land) who taught there showed us some pretty brutal ways to put the ‘hurt’ on people,” said Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Joshua Gonzales, a former Olympic wrestler who serves as the team’s primary engineer and close-quarters combat instructor.

“We’re all pretty proud to have completed it, because it’s a tough school with a pretty high dropout rate,” Gonzales said. According to Gonzales,
Shoup is the only ship in the ALCSG currently qualified to conduct a “noncompliant” boarding. With this distinction comes a lot of pride both in the team itself and the equipment they carry.

 

Members are especially pleased with their new weapons and holsters. “The coolest weapon we have is the Mk-18, which is basically a short barreled version of the M-16 with a folding stock. It’s designed for fighting in [close quarters] such as inside the skin of a ship. It’s very accurate, and the guys love it,” said Gonzales.

 

Additionally, the VBSS team is equipped with quick-draw “Serpa” holsters for their M9 pistols. These holsters allow a trained carrier to draw their pistol almost reflexively in any situation, but make it extremely difficult for someone who is not familiar with the holster to take a team member’s gun. The most deadly weapon, which can work for or against a unit, is communication. Shoup’s team uses hands-free headsets for their radio communication during boardings and an elaborate system of code words to represent mission objectives.

 

“Communication is a really big factor. It can save or kill a team,” said Isotalo. In addition to Shoup, the ALCSG is comprised of Abraham Lincoln, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and USS Russell (DDG-59) and is led by Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin. The ALCSG is on a routine deployment to the Western Pacific” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060429-07 - Release Date: 4/29/2006 7:32:00 PM - By Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, USS SHOUP, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23388

 

Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit (EOD) Sailors dive in the Singapore Naval Diving Unit pool.

 

060501-N-6074Y-171 - Singapore (May 1, 2006) - Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit (EOD) Sailors dive in the Singapore Naval Diving Unit pool as part of their re-qualification dive. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit One One (EODMU-11), currently embarked aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are conducting joint training exercises with the Singapore Naval Diving Unit. Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently operating in the Western Pacific Ocean in support of a routine deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=34128

 

Lincoln Departs Singapore After Successful Port Visit

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) got underway from Changi Naval Base in Singapore on 1 May 2006, after a successful four-day port call to "The Lion City.", visiting from 27 to 1 May 2006. As part of the port visit, Lincoln hosted a reception April 27th, welcoming the Honorable Patricia Herbold, U.S. ambassador to Singapore, Rear Adm. Ronnie Tay, chief of the Singapore navy, and ambassadors of several other nations to Singapore aboard the ship.

Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) Sailors also offered their time during the port visit in six different community service (COMSERV) projects, including taking children from a local orphanage swimming and helping disabled children who are undergoing water therapy.

“The community service projects here were more about people,” said Chief Religious Program Specialist (SW) Ronald Roberts of
Lincoln’s religious ministries department.
“It was a positive experience both for the recipients and the people who volunteered,” he said.

More than 200 Sailors participated in the COMSERV projects in Singapore, which, Roberts explained, were aimed more toward interaction with local people. “The COMSERVs in Thailand and Hong Kong were more about fixing things, like painting in an orphanage or moving furniture,” he said. “Here, it was more about relating with the people.”

In addition to promoting goodwill through COMSERV projects, ALCSG Sailors toured Singapore and the surrounding islands through the ship’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation program, enjoying the world-famous Singapore Zoo, tours to Sentosa Island and more.

Lincoln also hosted tours to more than 400 guests while in port in Singapore, showing them the flight deck, hangar bays, bridge and the Abraham Lincoln Room, which houses artifacts from President Lincoln’s era and information about the ship’s namesake.

Abraham Lincoln, the embarked Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, and Destroyer Squadron 9, are underway on a scheduled Western Pacific deployment. The strike group has visited the ports of Hong Kong and Laemb Chabang, Thailand, in addition to Singapore” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060501-05 - Release Date: 5/1/2006 9:10:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23425

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) got underway for the South China Sea on 1 May 2006 making a short transit of the eastern portion of the Strait of Malacca” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted freedom of navigation exercises and a PASSEX in the Java Sea once the carrier cleared the South China Sea, most likely on the 2nd, during which time the U.S. ambassador to Indonesia and several Indonesian officials flew out to the ship to once again thank the crew for their efforts to provide humanitarian assistance during Operation Unified Assistance (OUA) in the aftermath of the December 26, 2004, tsunami disaster” (Ref. 378A).

 

U.S. Ambassador, Indonesian Officials Visit Lincoln

 

B. Lynn Pascoe, U.S. ambassador to Indonesia and several officials from the Indonesian government and military flew aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 3 May 2006 for a brief visit. Fifteen months earlier, Pascoe had been aboard Lincoln with a delegation of Indonesian officials to say “thank you” to the crew for their efforts during Operation Unified Assistance (OUA). The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) responded to the Dec. 26, 2004, tsunami disaster, getting underway from Hong Kong and heading immediately to the coast of Aceh, Indonesia, one of the areas hardest hit by the catastrophe.

 

The carrier and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 provided relief in the form of supply drops, water and medevac flights utilizing the helicopters of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 throughout the month of January 2005, turning over relief efforts to USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) in February 2005. Pascoe was joined by the Honorable Agung Laksono, speaker of the Indonesian House of Representatives, Lt. Gen. Sjafrie Sjamsoeddin, secretary-general of Indonesia’s department of defense, and several other high-ranking government and military officials.

While aboard, guests enjoyed a brief luncheon with
Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, Capt. C. A. McCawley, were greeted by Commander, ALCSG, Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, and had a brief tour of the ship. The guests viewed flight operations from the flight deck and viewed an air power demonstration from the ship’s signal bridge.

 

The culmination of their tour, however, was a "meet and greet" in the hangar bay, where officials shook hands with Sailors who were aboard and had gone ashore to lend assistance in Aceh during the tsunami relief efforts. In the shadow of one of HS-2’s SH-60F Seahawk helicopters, one of the aircraft used during OUA relief efforts, Pascoe took a few moments to thank Sailors and talk about the awesome work ALCSG performed during OUA. “It was a tremendously huge contribution that was made by the people on this ship, and everybody in Indonesia knows that,” said Pascoe.

 

“It was everybody being involved, from people flying the helicopters to people filling water bottles to people on shore carrying sacks of rice. I remember that the guys were hauling people in on stretchers that the helicopters had rescued...it was just an incredible operation from the very first,” he said. “The people of Aceh, to this day, are incredibly grateful. They all remember this ship, the efforts the people made and the generosity of the American military,” he added.

 

“I think that everybody on this ship can be extremely proud of what they did in the recovery and the fact that we are all carrying through to make it work in the end,” Pascoe concluded. “I thought it was really nice that they came on board to thank us again for helping them out,” said Chief Hull Technician (SW/AW) Carmen Viduya, Lincoln’s command equal opportunity advisor and one of the Sailors who volunteered in Aceh during OUA.

 

“I was honored to meet them." As Pascoe’s group left the ship, another group of Indonesian visitors, led by Commander in Chief of the Indonesian Military Air Chief Marshal Djoko Suyarto, began a brief tour. The group toured the ship, witnessed flight operations from the flight deck, and spoke with the pilots and crew of HS-2 before departing (Ref. Story Number: NNS060504-06 - Release Date: 5/4/2006 12:57:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23486

 

EODMU 11 Trains With Singapore Navy EOD

 

“Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 11, Detachment 9 spent time diving and training with their Singaporean counterparts from 1 to 4 May 2006. EODMU 11, based out of Whidbey Island, Wash., remained in Singapore following the departure of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 4 May 2006, training with the Republic of Singapore Naval Diving Unit (NDU), a unique experience for both the U.S. Navy EOD team and the Singaporean sailors who participated in the exercise.

According to Senior Chief Engineman (EOD/PJ/SW) Andy Rodolph, EODMU 11 Det. 9’s leading chief petty officer, the primary focus of their visit was to build relationships between the EOD communities of each country and to facilitate possible future training exercises. Though the primary focus of the four-day exercise was relationship building, Chief Engineman (EOD/PJ) J. Chris Lisenby pointed out that the exchange of ideas and tactics was extremely valuable.

The discussion spanned a number of topics, said Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class (EOD) Ryan Swanson, but it centered on floating naval mine countermeasure procedures, including their neutralization, recovery, and exploitation, particularly neutralization. “Most of the interaction time was spent in the classroom comparing notes regarding methods used in a variety of real-world scenarios,” said Lisenby. He added that he was impressed by the Republic of Singapore navy’s level of proficiency with respect to their craft.

While Mobile Unit 11 has worked with EOD teams from a number of countries on this deployment, Lisenby said the experience has, by far, been the most productive and informative exercise they have had to date. EODMU 11 is embarked aboard
Lincoln on a scheduled Western Pacific deployment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060512-05 - Release Date: 5/12/2006 9:15:00 AM - By Photographer's Mate 3rd Class (AW) Moses Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SINGAPORE (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23564

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and aircraft assigned to Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) perform an aerial demonstration in the South China Sea.

 

060508-N-4166B-030 - South China Sea (May 8, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and aircraft assigned to Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) perform an aerial demonstration in the South China Sea. Lincoln and embarked CVW-2 are currently underway to the Western Pacific for a scheduled deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Jordon R. Beesley (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=34319

 

His Royal Highness, Prince Mohamed, Foreign Minister of Brunei, receives the title of Honorary Naval Aviator.

 

060509-N-9898L-049 - Pacific Ocean (May 9, 2006) - His Royal Highness, Prince Mohamed, Foreign Minister of Brunei, receives the title of Honorary Naval Aviator from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Commanding Officer, Capt. C. Andrew McCawley after landing aboard the ship for a tour. Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway in the Western Pacific for a scheduled six-month deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Geoffrey Lewis (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=34371

 

Lincoln Hosts Prince of Brunei

 

Prince Mohamed, along with several government officials, the heads of Brunei’s armed forces and Charge d’affaires of the U.S. Embassy to Brunei Jeff Hawkins, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 9 May 2006, while the ship was off the northwest coast of the island of Borneo.

During the officials' visit, Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, and commanding officer, Capt. C. A. McCawley, hosted the group.

The group was treated to an up-close view of flight operations, observing aircraft launches from the flight deck before climbing to the ship’s signal bridge to observe an air power demonstration by the embarked aircraft of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2.

After the air show, the group visited with several pilots and air crew from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47, who showed them an SH-60B “
Seahawk” used in Operation Unified Assistance in Indonesia during the aftermath of the Dec. 26, 2004, tsunami.

Mohamad and several of the military officials accompanying him thanked air crew members from HSL-47 for their efforts in Aceh.

“Just being in Indonesia and helping was, in itself, a reward,” said Aviation Warfare Systems Operator 2nd Class (NAC/AW) Zachary Dotson. “To meet people who were affected by it and hear them say ‘thank you,’ it’s humbling to accept that thanks.”

The group came aboard
Lincoln as part of the Navy’s distinguished visitors program, which brings both American and foreign businessmen, dignitaries and military officials to the ship to observe the strength and dedication of American Sailors as they perform their mission.

Guests were interested in the operations of the ship, how many Sailors are aboard, and what their workday is like. “What you have seen today is the best example of the U.S. Navy,” said Goodwin. “We’re very proud of our friendship with Brunei, and we hope to come back and visit some day soon.”

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is currently deployed to the Western Pacific to conduct maritime security operations and to train with its many partners in the region” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060512-15 - Release Date: 5/12/2006 10:52:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23598

 

“As USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sailed northward toward Japanese waters, Tropical Storm Chanchu (“Pearl”) swept across the Philippines and killed 32 people in mid-May 2006. The storm continued on a westerly track into the South China Sea, where forecasters upgraded Chanchu to a typhoon, which turned northward and wreaked havoc with hundreds of Vietnamese fishermen caught in the tempest’s path. Chanchu increased to such fury that forecasters again upgraded the storm, to a super typhoon–an extreme rarity. The super typhoon barreled northeastward and slammed into the Chinese coastline, where it killed at least another 25 people before the super typhoon finally spent its ferocity. Chanchu forced Abraham Lincoln to change course by a circuitous route to avoid the super typhoon’s powerful winds and heavy seas. The ship passed through Philippine waters via the Balabac Strait, between the Philippine island of Palawan and Sabah, Borneo, crossed the Sulu Sea and transited the Surigao Strait between the islands of Mindanao and Samar” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea from 1 to 18 May 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Philippine Sea on 19 May 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7), center, is met by the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG 85) for a fueling at sea (FAS) evolution.

 

060520-N-7130B-181 - Persian Gulf (May 20, 2006) - In an early morning rendezvous, Military Sealift Command (MSC) fast combat support ship USNS Rainier (T-AOE-7), center, is met by the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS McCampbell (DDG-85) for a fueling at sea (FAS) evolution. All three ships are part of the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group, which is currently deployed as part of a routine rotation of U.S. maritime forces in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, as well as conducting Maritime Security Operations (MSO) in the region. MSO set the conditions for security and stability in the maritime environment as well as complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts in regional nations. MSO deny international terrorists use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons, or other material. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Aaron Burden (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=34708

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific on 22 May 2006” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific from 22 to 24 May 2006; sailing north to participate in PASSEX and training exercises with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) before conducting a port call in Sasebo, Japan” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Sasebo, Japan on 25 May 2006” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Enters Port Of Sasebo

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived in Sasebo, Japan on 25 May 2006 for a scheduled port visit.

While in port, the ship’s crew members will have a chance to participate in friendship-building and goodwill-generating activities and cultural exchanges.

“This visit is an outward demonstration of U.S. commitment to Japan and the entire East Asia region,” said Rear Adm. J.W. Goodwin, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9.

Goodwin and his staff are embarked on the carrier, homeported in Everett, Wash. Other commands embarked on
Abraham Lincoln are Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and Destroyer Squadron 9. Ships in the strike group are USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Mobile Bay (CG-53).

“The crew always enjoys opportunities to visit cities in Japan and experience different parts of this fascinating country,” said Capt. Andrew McCawley, commanding officer of
Abraham Lincoln” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060526-44 - Release Date: 5/26/2006 2:43:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SASEBO, Japan (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23824

 

Lincoln Sailors Say “So Long” to Sasebo Following Port Call

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Base Sasebo, Japan on 29 May 2006 after spending four days in port.

While in Sasebo, Sailors from
Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 had the opportunity to learn about Japanese culture through various command-sponsored tours and sporting events. One Sailor, Airman Christopher Devilbliss, from Supply Department’s S-7 Division, attended two such tours. “We got to see and stand in the spot where the [atomic] bomb was dropped,” said Devilbliss. “The museum we went to was informative as well. It was definitely worth seeing.”

Devilbliss also enjoyed a baseball game while he was in Sasebo. “The baseball game was a blast,” he added. “They play the game the same way we do, but the atmosphere in Japan is different. The games are more like college games. There’s a band playing, cheerleaders, and during the 7th inning stretch everyone inflates balloons and after singing what would be the equivalent to “Take me out to the old ballgame,” everyone lets the balloons fly through the air.

“Overall, I had a blast in Sasebo,” Devilbliss said. “I would definitely like to come back again.” Although there were many tours Sailors could have signed up for through
Abe’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation Division, some decided to spend their free time playing sports against local teams. “We played against a local Sasebo rugby team,” said Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class (AW) Justin Oman from Abe’s Training Department. “It was a real good time; the people we played against were very nice. Afterwards, we had a barbecue and an awards ceremony.”

May 29 wasn’t just a day that
Lincoln pulled out of a foreign port; it was also Memorial Day and was observed on board at 3 p.m. local time with 30 seconds of silence. “On Memorial Day, a grateful nation undertakes its solemn duty to honor proud patriots who sacrificed their lives for our great nation,” said Abe’s Commanding Officer Capt. C.A. McCawley in an address to the crew. “Your vital work is spreading the realm of freedom and furthering the cause of liberty.

While in port,
Lincoln also hosted 650 guests to tour the ship so they could get a better understanding of how an aircraft carrier actually works. Lincoln also hosted a reception with more than 200 foreign guests. Abraham Lincoln, embarked Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9, CVW-2 and Destroyer Squadron 9 are on a scheduled Western Pacific deployment. The strike group has visited the ports of Hong Kong; Laemb Chabang, Thailand; and Singapore, in addition to Sasebo” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060604-02 - Release Date: 6/4/2006 10:16:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23983

 

EODMU11 Det. 9 Sailors Train With JMSDF EOD

 

“Members of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 11, Detachment 9, from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash., participated in joint training operations with members of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Explosive Ordnance Disposal team on 29 May 2006 in Sasebo, Japan.

Lt. John Laney, EODMU 11, Det. 9’s officer in charge, said that every opportunity that his EOD unit has to work with
JMSDF is a chance to strengthen the bond between the United States and Japan. “While I cannot do that single-handedly,” he said, “I can focus on my specialty (EOD), and improving relationships between American EOD and our Japanese counterparts.”

While fostering relationships, the joint training allowed EODMU 11 Det. 9 Sailors to share information on how they address some of the problems that joint U.S. forces have been facing in Iraq with respect to improvised explosive devices.

Laney said that the
JMSDF EOD team is incredibly proficient at their job, but their training is limited to surface and sub-surface explosive devices within the marine environment. As a result, the training that Det. 9 provided was both new and insightful.

As part of the training, Det. 9 Sailors demonstrated X-ray techniques with their portable X-ray machine, which is used to identify the type of IED in question and discern the makeup and location of the component parts within the device. According to Laney, these components can vary greatly from device to device.

Laney said that while the specific techniques used in the X-ray process were not familiar to his Japanese counterparts, they were accustomed to using larger X-ray devices for identification purposes in mine countermeasure (MCM) work.

Chief Explosive Ordnance Disposalman (EWS) C.J. Cowlin, the EOD chief from EODMU 5, Detachment 51 located in Sasebo, said that the topics covered in the training are of secondary importance. “It is important to always try to coordinate training [with the Japanese], to interface, to increase exposure, and to share capabilities,” Cowlin said. “It helps in the global war on terror to have a strong front, and it takes sharing knowledge to get there. “In the Pacific theatre, Japan is our (the United States’) primary ally,” he said.

For this reason, Cowlin said, it is difficult to overstate the value of having operational relationships in as many areas of the world as possible” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060606-07 - Release Date: 6/6/2006 4:12:00 PM - By Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SASEBO, Japan (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23993

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in PASSEX and training exercises with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific from 29 May to 9 June 2006, performing burials at sea for 10 veterans on 9 June 2006” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

ALCSG Participates in PASSEX with JMSDF

 

“The USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group (ALCSG) participated in a Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Western Pacific from 10 to 14 June 2006, preceded by ASW operations in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific from 29 May to 9 June 2006. This PASSEX was focused on anti-submarine warfare (ASW)” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

This
PASSEX was focused on anti-submarine warfare (ASW). “During an ASW exercise, helicopters go out and play their roles, like dropping sonobuoys,” said Lt. Jim Steffen, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9’s submarine liaison officer. “It’s DESRON’s job to take all the information in and make the big picture. When it’s all U.S. forces, it’s easy; there’s no language or equipment barrier.” To overcome such communication and equipment barriers between U.S. forces and Japanese during this exercise, the strike group participated in an officer exchange program, said Steffen.

“We have liaisons from the Japanese,” he said. “We also sent [U.S. Navy] representatives over [to their ships]. It’s good to have bilingual individuals to help us iron out some of the communication issues.” Steffen said it is important to include U.S. allies in exercises like these. “Japan is a major ally in the Eastern hemisphere,” he said. “It is important for us to maintain our proficiency with them. Coalition forces aren’t [just] the future, they are now. We don’t do anything by ourselves any more. Bilateral or multinational forces are the present.” Steffen said exercises like these help promote international relationships between the United States and its allies.

As part of the exercise, Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, commander of ALCSG, visited the
JMSDF ship JDS Chokai (DDF-176) to observe operations. “It is important to train with our Japanese allies,” said Goodwin. “Not only does it reinforce our commitment to support the people of Japan, it increases both militaries’ abilities to cooperate with one another in realistic scenarios.” ALCSG is on a routine deployment to train with coalition partners to improve the ability to operate with naval forces from many nations” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060614-04 - Release Date: 6/14/2006 12:38:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24148

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific on 15 June 2006, crossing the equator in June 2006” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

Lincoln Pumps 25 Million Gallons Of Fuel, Celebrates Landmark

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Air Department’s V-4 division set a milestone on 15 June 2006 as the ship reached the 25-million gallon mark of fuel pumped aboard during the ship's Western Pacific deployment. The ship pumped fuel aboard during 10 underway replenishments (UNREP), an operation in which fuel lines are sent from a USNS oil tanker to a ship while underway, supplying the fuel needed for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aircraft. According to Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) (SW) William Langdon, “25 million gallons of JP-5 is more fuel than three-and-a-half [oil] tankers full.”

“It’s quite an accomplishment, especially on this type of deployment,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) 3rd Class Sam Gregg. “We came out here not expecting to fly this hard. We came up with 25 million, and we did it without any big mishaps.”
Lincoln and CVW-2 used approximately 16 million gallons of fuel during Surge Deployment ‘04-05, much less than during the current deployment. According to V-4 Fuels Boatswain Lt. Michael Chanley, USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) held the previous record, pumping 23.5 million gallons of fuel during its maiden deployment.

“We’re on track to handle 27 million gallons this cruise,” said Chanley. He added that the ship expected to perform a total of 12 refueling
UNREPs. The JP-5 fuel V-4 manages is pumped from stowage tanks below decks and stripped of any water within the tanks. It is then sent through transfer pumps into purifiers. After being cleaned, the JP-5 becomes service fuel ready to be sent to the service tanks and from there to the flight deck. The more jets that are in the air, the more fuel is demanded.

“It’s a huge number [of gallons] for the four month period we’ve been underway compared to other deployments that we’ve had,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) 1st Class (AW) Douglas Mohr. From below decks, where the
V-4 "purple shirts" provide serviceable fuel, to the flight deck, where they directly fuel the aircraft, V-4 pumps roughly 150,000 to 200,000 gallons of JP-5 per day to the aircraft on the flight deck. V-4 celebrated by having a cake-cutting ceremony in the First Class Petty Officers Mess June 18 with Commander, Carrier Strike Group 9 Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin congratulating them on the achievement.

"It is an honor to celebrate the dedication and professionalism of the hard-working Sailors of
V-4 division,” said Goodwin. “Their dedication to safely performing this vital job is exemplary of the overall outstanding performance of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group team” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060630-22 - Release Date: 6/30/2006 11:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brandon Wilson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24445

 

Destroyer Squadron 7 Prepares for Valiant Shield Exercise

 

As reported on 16 June 2006, “Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7, along with other ships and military personnel from around the U.S. Pacific Fleet, is making preparations for Valiant Shield 2006, one of the largest joint military exercises in this region in more than a decade.

 

Two ships from DESRON 7, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS McCampbell (DDG-85) and USS Decatur (DDG-73), will be operating off the coast of Guam from 19 to 23 June 2006.

 

The exercise will involve more than 20,000 Sailors, Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. Valiant Shield 2006 will also see more than 300 aircraft and 28 ships from the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Groups, as well as the Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard. McCampbell and Decatur are part of the Reagan Strike Group.

According to Lt. Cmdr. Andy Liggett, DESRON 7’s plans officer, the squadron will be supporting the exercise in many ways. “DESRON 7’s mission is to support [the] Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group’s undersea warfare and surface warfare commander, while simultaneously coordinating with the
Lincoln and Kitty Hawk Strike Groups,” said Liggett. Liggett, a San Diego native, added that this exercise would give DESRON 7 a chance to develop new skills in a different environment.

“This is a great opportunity for DESRON 7,” said Liggett. “Operating in the
Pacific is much different than the Middle East, and it should give us the chance to refocus our skills toward those necessary for operating in the blue water environment of the Pacific.”

Liggett added that, along with performing anti-submarine warfare patrols, DESRON 7 will be participating in a photo exercise with other ships and units involved in Valiant Shield 2006. Liggett added that
Valiant Shield 2006’s overall goal is to enhance the operational capabilities of multiple military services and their abilities to respond to different contingencies in the Pacific Theater in a short amount of time.

To learn more about Valiant Shield, visit the Web site
http://www.pacom.mil” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060616-05 - Release Date: 6/16/2006 9:39:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) Marc Rockwell-Pate, USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs - USS RONALD REAGAN, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24203

 

Twenty-two foreign military officials and civilians visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Observers from Russia, India and Japan arrived aboard Lincoln on 17 June 2006 via a C-2A Greyhound from Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30, flying from Anderson Air Force Base, Guam” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060619-07 - Release Date: 6/19/2006 9:58:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Justin Blake, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24229

 

 

Chapter XIX (1 January to 8 August 2006)

Part II of IV - 1 April to 17 June 2006

 

 

 

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4