Naval Station, Everett, Washington; quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time; Inspection and Survey (INSURV) at sea period; Naval Station, Everett, Washington and her Eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East, South China Sea and Java Sea, joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian, exercises and operations will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and hosted the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports and participated in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea, a month-long exercise designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations (27 February to 8 August 2006).

1 January to 8 August 2006

Chapter XIX

Part I of IV - 1 January to 31 March 2006

Part II of IV - 1 April to 17 June 2006

Part III of IV - 18 June to 7 August 2006

Part IV of IV - 8 August 2006

 

Abe’s In port and Eighth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XIX, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call.

Chapter XIX, Appendix I

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2006 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

“The Navy announced that it would reassign Abraham Lincoln Security Division from the Weapons Department to the Operations Department prior to October 2005. The ship proactively accomplished this move by August 2005, which thrust the division into a new environment. Abraham Lincoln rendesignated her Ship Self Defense Force the Naval Security Force, and utilized ship’s company to augment the force. She thus established the Integrated Security Force; each department on board supported a team of 102 sailors who melded into the Security Division to protect the ship while she visited ports. This involved extensive training regimens for crewmembers that included tactical team movements and basic law enforcement procedures” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 16 November 2005 to 4 January 2006” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Ready for Anything During Surge Sustainment Training

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 5 January 2006, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, for quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time. This is Lincoln's final training cycle before departing on a scheduled six-month deployment later this year. Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) will commence once at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to embark Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2. Abe returns to the Pacific Ocean for quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of the Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP). Under the FRP, deployable Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time. This will be Lincoln's final training cycle before departing on a scheduled six-month deployment later this year. The culmination of training over the past year will also be put to the test when members of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) embark Lincoln to thoroughly inspect the ship. In a recent address to the crew, Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abe's commanding officer, said he is confident that Abe Sailors and their ship are up to the task. “The INSURV underway material assessment will be verifying and inspecting Abraham Lincoln's material condition and the operational status of the ship and its systems,” McCawley said. INSURV will validate and verify our readiness for deployment in 2006. “All hands work will be required as we continue to prepare for and execute the inspection.” Although the INSURV inspection may only be a single portion of Lincoln's overall training process, McCawley emphasized the importance of the meticulous inspection. "The cleanliness of the ship, its electrical and damage control equipment will all be very closely assessed,” said McCawley. “Abraham Lincoln is the first of three carriers that will undergo INSURV early in 2006, and I expect that we will set the standard.” Following the INSURV inspection, the professionals from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 are scheduled to board Lincoln to commence their Carrier Qualifications” (Ref. 76, 1161 & Story Number: NNS060109-06 - Release Date: 1/9/2006 3:28:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=21603

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 5 to 8 January 2006” (Ref. 76 & 1161).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port visit at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 9 January 2006, to embark Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) members (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 11 January 2006, with members of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) embarked, in port from 9 to 10 January 2006” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 12 January 2006, to disembark members of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), underway in the Eastern Pacific on 11 January 2006” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

The port side anchor chains is released into the Pacific Ocean from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) during a Precision Sea and Anchor detail off the coast of San Diego.

 

060112-N-4166B-056 – Pacific Ocean (Jan. 12, 2006) - The port side anchor chains is released into the Pacific Ocean from the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during a Precision Sea and Anchor detail off the coast of San Diego. Lincoln is underway off the coast of Southern California for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) inspection and the final Fleet Response Plan (FRP) readiness training. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Jordon R. Beesley (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=31190

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 14 January 2006, for additional sustainment training in southern Californian waters for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 Carrier Qualifications, disembarking members of the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), in port from 12 to 13 January 2006” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Kestrels of Strike Fighter Squadron One Three Seven (VFA-137) is raised to the flight deck by elevator from the hangar bay.

 

060120-N-7842G-234 - Pacific Ocean (Jan. 20, 2006) - An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the “Kestrels" of Strike Fighter Squadron One Three Seven (VFA-137) is raised to the flight deck by elevator from the hangar bay aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are underway off the coast of Southern California conducting flight operations in preparation for an upcoming deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Mary E. Guiney (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=31448

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) makes a high speed turn during the ship handling drills.

 

060111-N-1229B-002 - Pacific Ocean (Jan. 11, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) makes a high speed turn during the ship handling drills as part of the ship's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) inspection. All naval vessels are inspected by INSURV to check their material condition and battle readiness. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Patrick M. Bonafede (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=31257

 

An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the Kestrels of Strike Fighter Squadron One Three Seven (VFA-137) is raised to the flight deck by elevator from the hangar bay.

 

060120-N-7842G-234 - Pacific Ocean (Jan. 20, 2006) - An F/A-18E Super Hornet assigned to the “Kestrels" of Strike Fighter Squadron One Three Seven (VFA-137) is raised to the flight deck by elevator from the hangar bay aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are underway off the coast of Southern California conducting flight operations in preparation for an upcoming deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Mary E. Guiney (RELEASED)http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=31448

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) completed additional sustainment training in southern Californian waters for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 Carrier Qualifications from 14 to 25 January 2006 and headed to her home port” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 26 January 2006, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, conducting quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and Carrier Qualifications for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2.. Under the FRP, deployable U.S. Navy forces must maintain a heightened state of readiness to be able to deploy in a short amount of time. This is Lincoln's final training cycle before departing on a scheduled six-month deployment later this year. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 5 to 8 January 2006, returning to the Pacific Ocean for quarterly sustainment training in support of the Navy's FRP. pulling in for a port visit at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 9 January 2006, to embark INSURV members, departing NASNI on 11 January 2006, with INSURV members embarked, in port from 9 to 10 January 2006, thereby the culmination of training over the past year was put to the test when members of INSURV embarked aboard Lincoln to thoroughly inspect the ship. Abraham Lincoln pulled into NASNI on 12 January 2006, to disembark members of INSURV, underway in the Eastern Pacific on 11 January 2006. Abraham Lincoln departed NASNI on 14 January 2006, for additional sustainment training in southern Californian waters, disembarking members of the INSURV, in port from 12 to 13 January 2006. Following the INSURV inspection, the professionals from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 commenced Carrier Qualifications, conducting additional sustainment training in southern Californian waters from 14 to 25 January 2006 and headed to her home port, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 26 to 27 January 2006 (14 to 26 January 2006)” (Ref. 76, 1161 & Story Number: NNS060109-06 - Release Date: 1/9/2006 3:28:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=21603

 

Lincoln SOYs Battle at RTC’s ‘Battle Stations’

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2005 Sailors of the Year (SOY), along with almost three dozen other Sailors of the Year from around the fleet, traveled to Recruit Training Command (RTC), Great Lakes, Ill., to join a recruit division for their running of “Battle Stations,” the “final exam” for recruit training on 7 February 2006, as part of a pilot leadership program.

Escorted by Chief Torpedoman's Mate (SW) Regina Halley, a new Lincoln chief who recently transferred from Recruit Division Commander (RDC) duty, Air Traffic Controller 1st Class (AW/SW/FMF) Kyle Hempel, Storekeeper 2nd Class (SW/AW) Dametries Holmes, and Aviation Support Equipment Technician Airman Christopher Dionisio, Abe’s Senior Sailor, Junior Sailor, and Blue Jacket of the Year respectively, quickly immersed themselves within Division 081 at RTC’s “USS
Arizona” Hall. A native of Chicago, who went through RTC approximately five years ago, Holmes said the memories and adrenaline came back to him quickly.

“I’m absolutely pumped,” he said as the evolution approached. Although the temperature hovered around 25 degrees, Holmes said he was warm and ready.

Though too busy with the mission at hand to allow personal interaction at first, the recruits quickly took to the
Lincoln Sailors, appreciating their dedication in coming back to RTC to run “Battle Stations” with them. Traditionally, the night of “Battle Stations” is fueled by the motivation of the group. They focused that motivation, yelling “Abraham Lincoln” in unison before each event throughout the night.

“Battle Stations” is a night veiled in secrecy in order to keep recruits on their toes, but not to serve as a surprise because it’s a culmination of everything the recruit has learned over his eight weeks at RTC. Holmes didn’t speak about the details of what he observed, but did say he was impressed by how realistic “Battle Stations” had become since he ran it as a recruit in 2001.

“The technology they have is absolutely amazing and will help these guys be better prepared when they get to the fleet and experience the ‘real deal,” he said.

The
Lincoln SOYs helped motivate their future shipmates of Division 081 before and during the training evolutions. During a brief lull in the action, “Battle Stations” facilitators allowed the guests to talk to the recruits about their futures as Sailors, and allowed the division to ask questions of the fleet Sailors.

Hempel,
Abe’s Senior Sailor of the Year, took the lead while talking with the recruits. He told them about life on an aircraft carrier, but also stressed the importance of loving your job and doing it well, wherever you receive orders to.

“Every ship is different, but they’re all good,” Hempel said. “Wherever you go, be sure to take care of your shipmates because, just like ‘Battle Stations’ tonight. No one can ‘do it’ alone.”

Hospital Corpsman 1st Class (SW/AW/FMF) Michael Matthews, a prior RDC and one of the night’s “Battle Stations” facilitators, said having fleet SOYs participate during the recruits’ final night as recruits was worthwhile.

“These guys seem pretty squared away and motivated,” Matthews said. “Giving the Sailors an opportunity to talk with the recruits, I have to think there is value there.”

Because the instructor/recruit relationship is such a critical one, Matthews admitted he was hesitant to have them along at first, but particularly credited Lincoln Sailors for the impression they left on his recruits.

“These guys seem to be concerned with ‘us’ as a Navy, rather than just their own personal careers,” Matthews said.

He also said having quality SOYs like the ones from
Lincoln could help in the bigger picure of naval leadership.

“As petty officers, I think it’s truly up to us to bring the Navy back to a culture of policing and taking care of our own,” said Matthews. “Having these guys out here is a good start” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060214-11- Release Date: 2/14/2006 1:48:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class David Poe, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, GREAT LAKES, Ill. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22296

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 January 2006 to 27 February 2006” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Strike Group Underway

 

“During a cool day beneath gray and leaden skies, Rear Adm. John W. Goodwin, Commander Carrier Strike Group 9, broke his flag in USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed from Naval Station, Everett, Washington 27 February 2006, embarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California, with Captain. C. Andrew McCawley, as Commanding Officer, on her eighth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, extending operations into the Sea of Japan, Gulf of Thailand, East, South China Sea and Java Sea, joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian waters from 25 to 27 March 2006, with the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), joined (at various times) attack submarines Cheyenne, Greeneville (SSN-772), Pasadena, Seawolf (SSN-21) and Tucson (SSN-770). Additional exercises and operations during this deployment will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and will host the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports. and participating in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea. The month-long exercise was designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations. This deployment will be the first WestPac since Lincoln's historic cruise in 2004, when Lincoln and CVW-2 Sailors responded to the Southeast Asian tsunami disaster that occurred Dec. 26, 2004. After Operation Unified Assistance (OUA), Lincoln returned and has since been conducting readiness training in accordance to the Fleet Response Plan (FRP)., Lincoln’s crew of approximately 3,300 Sailors will apply the lessons learned in the past to missions of the future. Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, Capt. C.A. McCawley, urged Lincoln Sailors to use the training they’ve acquired and apply it in the forthcoming months. “As we depart Everett, it is imperative that USS Abraham Lincoln look toward excelling at whatever lies ahead, wherever we may go,” said McCawley as he addressed the crew Monday morning. “From the reactor spaces to the signal bridge, I am confident that the hard-working professionals aboard Abraham Lincoln will exceed expectations, just as you have in the past.” After transiting South, Lincoln is expected to pick up the 2,000-plus personnel of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, along with various aircraft and equipment before steaming West. McCawley reminded Abe’s crew that the relationship and coordination between the ship and CVW-2 are what makes the two units such a cohesive team. “The air wing is the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group’s main power of projection,” McCawley said. “Together, we will continue to focus and be deliberate in our actions.” This deployment will be the first “WestPac” since Lincoln’s historic cruise in 2004, when Lincoln and CVW-2 Sailors responded to the Southeast Asian tsunami disaster that occurred Dec. 26, 2004. After Operation Unified Assistance, Lincoln returned and has since been conducting readiness training in accordance to the Fleet Response Plan. Abraham Lincoln is home to the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Commander, Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, who said the 2006 deployment affords the strike group the opportunity to work with many coalition partners. “The strike group will be training with coalition partners to improve our ability to operate with naval forces from many nations,” Goodwin said. “The United States is committed to its alliances and will be working to develop partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security.” The ships wll pass through Philippine waters via the Balabac Strait, between the Philippine island of Palawan and Sabah, Borneo, crossed the Sulu Sea and transited the Surigao Strait between the islands of Mindanao and Samar. What the future holds for this deployment remains unknown, but the Sailors that comprise the Abe/CVW-2 team will rely on the knowledge gained while performing at sea. She will under go her 10th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & Story Number: NNS060305-02 - Release Date: 3/5/2006 9:34:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22561

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 (NE)

(27 February to 8 August 2006)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet & 7th (Guam operating area)

8th WestPac

RSOI/FE 06

Sea of Japan

PASSEX

Gulf of Thailand

CVW-2

NE

27 Feb 2006

8 Aug 2006

Western Pacific

10th FWFD

163-days

Joining Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian waters from 25 to 27 March 2006, with the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), joined (at various times) attack submarines Cheyenne, Greeneville (SSN-772), Pasadena, Seawolf (SSN-21) and Tucson (SSN-770). Additional exercises and operations during this deployment will include Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness, developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley, Abraham Lincoln’s Commanding Officer, followed by Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Thai Navy and will host the U.S. ambassador to Thailand, as well as many Thai distinguished visitors aboard during the brief underway period between the Hong Kong and Thailand port visits, followed by PASSEX and training exercises with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force in the Sea of Japan and Western Pacific.  Exercise "Valiant Shield 2006," formerly known as JASEX followed and is one of the largest annual exercises in the Western Pacific, involving about 30 ships, 280 aircraft, and 22,000 airmen, sailors, soldiers and marines working together to enhance joint combat skills and interoperability, while the air component of the exercise was orchestrated from Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as TSgt Chris Vadnais reports. and participating in several weeks of training and exercises as part of RIMPAC 2006 in the Hawaiian Operating Area, a multinational exercise including the navies of Chile, Peru, Great Britain, Australia, Japan and South Korea. The month-long exercise was designed to continue the close relationships between U.S. forces and those of the participating nations.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-2

Bounty Hunters -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter - Trainer

NE100

FA-18F

VFA-137

Kestrels -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE200

FA-18E

VFA-151

Vigilantes -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE300

 

FA-18C (N)

VFA-34

Blue Blasters -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE400

 

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-131

Lancers -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NE500

EA-6B

VAW-116

Sun Kings -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-2

Golden Falcons - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -      Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

HSL-47 Det.

Saberhawks - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light)

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine

700

SH-60B

VRC-30 Det. 2

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

 

Grumman - Greyhound

20, 35

C-2A

Will support approximately 80 aircraft, including the F/A-18 Hornet and F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet strike fighters, the E-2C Hawkeye  airborne early warning aircraft, the C-2 Greyhound logistics aircraft, the S-3B Viking anti-submarine aircraft, the EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft, and the multi-role SH-60F and MH-60 R/ S helicopters.

 

“Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aircraft consist of, Boeing / McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18F Super Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron TWO (VFA-2) “Bounty Hunters, ” F/A-18E Hornets of  Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 “Kestrels," FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 “Vigilantes,” FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34 “Blue Blasters,” EA-6B Prowler of Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE ONE or VAQ-131, “Lancers,” E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SIX or VAW-116, the “Sun Kings,” Commander and C-2 Greyhound of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron THREE ZERO Det. TWO or VRC-30 Det. 2, Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron (HS) 2 “Golden Falcons” and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 “Saberhawks” and the Sailors of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 11, Detachment 9, showcased their special operations abilities, stealthily approaching Lincoln in an SH-60B Seahawk” (Ref. 76).

 

“The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group includes the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), Rear Admiral J. W. Goodwin, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Nine, Carrier Air Wing TWO and Commander, Destroyer Squadron NINE, which directs Squadron Ships for the conduct of sustained naval operations and serves as Sea Combat Commander within its assigned Carrier Strike Group to include the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86). Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and helicopters of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 2 and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron (HS) 2 and the Sailors of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 11, Detachment 9, showcased their special operations abilities, stealthily approaching Lincoln in an SH-60B Seahawk)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060327-06 - Release Date: 3/27/2006 3:45:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22873

 

Will support approximately 80 aircraft, including the F/A-18 Hornet and F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet strike fighters, the E-2C Hawkeye  airborne early warning aircraft, the C-2 Greyhound logistics aircraft, the S-3B Viking anti-submarine aircraft, the EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft, and the multi-role SH-60F and MH-60 R/ S helicopters.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 27 to 28 February 2006 en route to southern Californian waters to rendezvous with the remainder of the group and to embark CVW-2” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 2 March 2006, visiting from 1 to 2 March 2006, embarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California. The S-6 Aviation Support Division of the Supply Department loaded two SH-60B Seahawk aviation repairable pack-up kits, including four aviation consumable Vidmar cabinets, from NAS North Island. The ship required this equipment to support the second iteration on board Abraham Lincoln of the SH-60B-To-Carrier Pilot, a unique program that assigned the carrier to directly support HSL-47, a full squadron of helicopters embarked (dispersed) throughout the carrier strike group” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

The guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) departs Pearl Harbor for a scheduled six-month deployment.

 

060309-N-9643K-001 - Pearl Harbor (March 9, 2006) - The guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG-59) departs Pearl Harbor for a scheduled six-month deployment. Russell joins the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike group on deployment in the support of maritime security operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Journalist Joe Kane (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32789

 

Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Conducts Undersea Warfare Training

 

As reported on 17 March 2006, “at the kickoff of its latest Western Pacific deployment, the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group gathered in Hawaiian waters in mid-March to hone its ability to detect, track and counter a threat from beneath the sea.

This strike group, centered around
Abraham Lincoln, from Everett, Washington, is the third to conduct an undersea warfare exercise near Hawaii this year, illustrating Pacific Fleet Commander Adm. Gary Roughead’s focus on making anti-submarine warfare his top war-fighting priority. “This is a core competency for naval forces in a joint war-fighting environment, and an area where we are constantly looking for ways to improve,” said Roughead, whose area of responsibility stretches from the west coast of North America to the east coast of Africa.

The other ships in the strike group are the guided-missile cruiser USS
Mobile Bay (CG-53) from San Diego, and the guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) from Pearl Harbor and USS Shoup (DDG-86), from Everett, Wash.

“Individually, everyone is up to speed on training,” Senior Chief Aviation Warfare Systems Operator (NAC) Jesse Cash said of the units involved in the exercise. “It’s time to work as a team now.” As with all naval exercises, there was detailed consideration toward environmental protection and the safeguarding of marine mammals, both fundamental factors in planning an exercise. Every precaution was taken to minimize the potential for negative impacts on the environment.

“Sea life such as whales, dolphins and sea turtles are one of our biggest concerns,” Cash said. “We take precautions on an hourly basis. We look historically to see what kind of sea life has been in the area. Before we conduct operations, we do a really good survey of the environment, both visually and with our equipment.”

Lookouts are posted in helicopters and on the weather decks of every ship, and numerous sonar technicians all closely listen for marine mammals” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060317-06 - Release Date: 3/17/2006 1:30:00 PM - By Photographer’s Mate Airman Tim Roache and Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) & 1161).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22758

 

Carrier Strike Group 9 Enters 7th Fleet AOR

 

As reported on 20 March 2006, “Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, led by Rear Adm. J. W. Goodwin embarked on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), arrived in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in late March as part of a routine scheduled deployment.

CSG 9 includes Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Destroyer Squadron 9,
Abraham Lincoln, the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86).

While in the region, CSG 9 will be training with coalition partners to improve its ability to operate with naval forces from many nations. The efforts are intended to develop partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security.

“The U.S. Navy has maintained a presence in the
West Pacific for a century and a half to promote peace, regional cooperation, and stability,” said Goodwin.

The strike group will work to help preserve the free and secure use of the world’s oceans by legitimate mariners and prevent terrorists from attempting to use the maritime environment as a venue for attack or as a medium to transport personnel, weapons or other material that could support their efforts.

CSG 9 recently completed an undersea warfare exercise off the coast of Hawaii and is gearing up to participate in joint exercises with the
Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060320-11 - Release Date: 3/20/2006 3:26:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At sea (NNS) & 1161).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22794

 

 Commander Destroyer Squadron Nine (CDS-9) Capt. Jeffrey Harley, bids farewell to Cruiser Destroyer Squadron Six One (CDS-61) Capt. Katsuaki Amakawa, aboard JDS Kirishma (DDG 174).

 

060322-N-5837R-022 - Pacific Ocean (March 22, 2006) - Commander Destroyer Squadron Nine (CDS-9) Capt. Jeffrey Harley, bids farewell to Cruiser Destroyer Squadron Six One (CDS-61) Capt. Katsuaki Amakawa, aboard JDS Kirishma (DDG-174) before returning to At the kickoff of its latest Western Pacific deployment, the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln Carrier Strike and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force are currently conducting an officer exchange program as part of a Passing Exercise in the Western Pacific area of operations. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy C. Roache Jr. (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32984

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), and ships of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) conduct a PASSEX in the Western Pacific.

 

060323-N-6074Y-177 - Pacific Ocean (March 23, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and ships of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) conduct a PASSEX in the Western Pacific. Lincoln spent three days conducting exercises with JMDSF and took part in an officer exchange program as part of a passing exercise. Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently on a scheduled deployment to the Western Pacific. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32985

 

CSG 9 Participates in Exercise with JMSDF

 

“Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Western Pacific area of operations from 22 to 23 March 2006.

The purpose of the
PASSEX is to exercise basic seamanship and conduct coordinated operations between CSG-9 and the JMSDF.

“It’s always an honor and privilege to work with Japanese forces,” said Capt. Jeff Harley, commodore of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9. “This exercise strengthens our Navy’s ability to continue working with our alliances so we can continue to develop partnerships in the
Western Pacific.”

The Japanese ships participating in the
PASSEX are JDS Kirishima, JDS Harusame and JDS Hatakaze. During the PASSEX, CSG-9, and the Japanese navy conducted an officer exchange program to allow Japanese Sailors to experience life aboard an American ship and vice-versa” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060322-12 - Release Date: 3/22/2006 12:00:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22822

 

“Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 led by USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steaming  toward the Seventh Fleet, participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with Japanese guided missile destroyers Harusame (DD-102), Hatakaze (DD-171) and Kirishima (DDG-174) operating under the direction of the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Western Pacific area of operations from 22 to 23 March 2006. The purpose of the PASSEX was to exercise basic seamanship and conduct coordinated operations between CSG 9 and the JMSDF. During the PASSEX, CSG 9 and the Japanese navy conducted an officer exchange program to allow Japanese Sailors to experience life aboard an American ship and vice-versa” (Ref. 378A & 1161).

 

PASSEX Builds American, Japanese Teamwork

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) flagship for Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, teamed up with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force on 23 March 2006 to conduct a passing exercise (PASSEX) in the Western Pacific. During the exercise, officers from both sides participated in an officer exchange program between ships in order to get a better understanding of how each navy operates. “The face-to-face interaction helps with the communication barrier,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Mills, from Destroyer Group (DESRON) 9. “It allows us to be on the same page with the goals of this exercise.”

Mills, who was stationed in Japan for two years, was honored to be able to go aboard JDS
Kirishima (DD-174), a Kongo-class destroyer similar to U.S. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. “I’ve always been extremely interested in how different navies are put together and operate,” said Mills. “They (the Japanese) have managed to come up with ways to operate similar to ours, based from a different way of thinking.”

Not only did she see a ship from a different country, she also witnessed how the Japanese conduct themselves on a regular basis. “The Japanese are extremely efficient and outstanding mariners,” Mills said. “They run their ship with constant professionalism in everything they do.” While Mills and four other members of
Abraham Lincoln’s crew were touring Japanese ships, Lincoln hosted four distinguished visitors from different Japanese ships for the three-day exchange.

 

One visitor to Abraham Lincoln said this exchange, like the exercise, allows the two nations to demonstrate their ability to work together in a variety of missions. “This operation helps build the United States and Japanese friendship,” said Lt. Cmdr. Tadahiro Fujiyama, from JDS Takanami (DD-110). “It also helps us understand each other better.” Cooperation between the U.S. Navy and the navies of allied countries is very important in today’s ever-changing political climate. “The Japanese are a major ally,” said Mills. “We need to form a world wide force, and doing exercises like this helps us understand each other's capabilities.

 

This helps us become stronger against any opposing forces.” While this PASSEX helped build American and Japanese relations, future exercises will help build stronger ties with other allied nations, allowing the formation of strong coalition strike groups. “Every time we do [PASSEX],” said Mills, “it helps us understand how our allies do business. [Exercises] help build our friendship and communications. They are an excellent way for us to learn more and more from friends and allies”” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060324-11- Release Date: 3/25/2006 8:00:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22851

 

“The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group includes the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), Rear Admiral John W. Goodwin, Commander Carrier Strike Group 9, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, and Commander, Destroyer Squadron 9, (CSG 9), which directs Squadron Ships for the conduct of sustained naval operations and serves as Sea Combat Commander within its assigned Carrier Strike Group to include the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060327-06 - Release Date: 3/27/2006 3:45:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22873

 

“Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 aircraft consist of, Boeing / McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18F Super Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron TWO (VFA-2) “Bounty Hunters, ” F/A-18E Hornets of  Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137 “Kestrels," FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 151 “Vigilantes,” FA-18C (N) Hornet of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34 “Blue Blasters,” EA-6B Prowler of Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE ONE or VAQ-131, “Lancers,” E-2C Hawkeye 2000 NP of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SIX or VAW-116 and C-2 Greyhound of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron THREE ZERO Det. TWO or VRC-30 Det. 2, Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron (HS) 2 “Golden Falcons” and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light) (HSL) 47 “Saberhawks” and the Sailors of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit 11, Detachment 9, showcased their special operations abilities, stealthily approaching Lincoln in an SH-60B Seahawk.” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 27 to 28 February 2006 en route to southern Californian waters to rendezvous with the remainder of the group and to embark CVW-2” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 2 March 2006, visiting from 1 to 2 March 2006, embarking CVW-2 at San Diego, California. The S-6 Aviation Support Division of the Supply Department loaded two SH-60B Seahawk aviation repairable pack-up kits, including four aviation consumable Vidmar cabinets, from NAS North Island. The ship required this equipment to support the second iteration on board Abraham Lincoln of the SH-60B-To-Carrier Pilot, a unique program that assigned the carrier to directly support HSL-47, a full squadron of helicopters embarked (dispersed) throughout the carrier strike group” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

The guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) departs Pearl Harbor for a scheduled six-month deployment.

 

060309-N-9643K-001 - Pearl Harbor (March 9, 2006) - The guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG-59) departs Pearl Harbor for a scheduled six-month deployment. Russell joins the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike group on deployment in the support of maritime security operations (MSO) and the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Journalist Joe Kane (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32789

 

Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Conducts Undersea Warfare Training

 

As reported on 17 March 2006, “at the kickoff of its latest Western Pacific deployment, the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group gathered in Hawaiian waters in mid-March to hone its ability to detect, track and counter a threat from beneath the sea.

This strike group, centered around
Abraham Lincoln, from Everett, Washington, is the third to conduct an undersea warfare exercise near Hawaii this year, illustrating Pacific Fleet Commander Adm. Gary Roughead’s focus on making anti-submarine warfare his top war-fighting priority. “This is a core competency for naval forces in a joint war-fighting environment, and an area where we are constantly looking for ways to improve,” said Roughead, whose area of responsibility stretches from the west coast of North America to the east coast of Africa.

The other ships in the strike group are the guided-missile cruiser USS
Mobile Bay (CG-53) from San Diego, and the guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) from Pearl Harbor and USS Shoup (DDG-86), from Everett, Wash.

“Individually, everyone is up to speed on training,” Senior Chief Aviation Warfare Systems Operator (NAC) Jesse Cash said of the units involved in the exercise. “It’s time to work as a team now.” As with all naval exercises, there was detailed consideration toward environmental protection and the safeguarding of marine mammals, both fundamental factors in planning an exercise. Every precaution was taken to minimize the potential for negative impacts on the environment.

“Sea life such as whales, dolphins and sea turtles are one of our biggest concerns,” Cash said. “We take precautions on an hourly basis. We look historically to see what kind of sea life has been in the area. Before we conduct operations, we do a really good survey of the environment, both visually and with our equipment.”

Lookouts are posted in helicopters and on the weather decks of every ship, and numerous sonar technicians all closely listen for marine mammals” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS060317-06 - Release Date: 3/17/2006 1:30:00 PM - By Photographer’s Mate Airman Tim Roache and Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) & 1161).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22758

 

Carrier Strike Group 9 Enters 7th Fleet AOR

 

As reported on 20 March 2006, “Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, led by Rear Adm. J. W. Goodwin embarked on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), arrived in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility in late March as part of a routine scheduled deployment.

CSG 9 includes Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Destroyer Squadron 9,
Abraham Lincoln, the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86).

While in the region, CSG 9 will be training with coalition partners to improve its ability to operate with naval forces from many nations. The efforts are intended to develop partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security.

“The U.S. Navy has maintained a presence in the
West Pacific for a century and a half to promote peace, regional cooperation, and stability,” said Goodwin.

The strike group will work to help preserve the free and secure use of the world’s oceans by legitimate mariners and prevent terrorists from attempting to use the maritime environment as a venue for attack or as a medium to transport personnel, weapons or other material that could support their efforts.

CSG 9 recently completed an undersea warfare exercise off the coast of Hawaii and is gearing up to participate in joint exercises with the
Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060320-11 - Release Date: 3/20/2006 3:26:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At sea (NNS) & 1161).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22794

 

 Commander Destroyer Squadron Nine (CDS-9) Capt. Jeffrey Harley, bids farewell to Cruiser Destroyer Squadron Six One (CDS-61) Capt. Katsuaki Amakawa, aboard JDS Kirishma (DDG 174).

 

060322-N-5837R-022 - Pacific Ocean (March 22, 2006) - Commander Destroyer Squadron Nine (CDS-9) Capt. Jeffrey Harley, bids farewell to Cruiser Destroyer Squadron Six One (CDS-61) Capt. Katsuaki Amakawa, aboard JDS Kirishma (DDG-174) before returning to At the kickoff of its latest Western Pacific deployment, the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Lincoln Carrier Strike and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force are currently conducting an officer exchange program as part of a Passing Exercise in the Western Pacific area of operations. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy C. Roache Jr. (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32984

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), and ships of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) conduct a PASSEX in the Western Pacific.

 

060323-N-6074Y-177 - Pacific Ocean (March 23, 2006) - The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and ships of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) conduct a PASSEX in the Western Pacific. Lincoln spent three days conducting exercises with JMDSF and took part in an officer exchange program as part of a passing exercise. Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently on a scheduled deployment to the Western Pacific. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class M. Jeremie Yoder (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=32985

 

CSG 9 Participates in Exercise with JMSDF

 

“Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Western Pacific area of operations from 22 to 23 March 2006.

The purpose of the
PASSEX is to exercise basic seamanship and conduct coordinated operations between CSG-9 and the JMSDF.

“It’s always an honor and privilege to work with Japanese forces,” said Capt. Jeff Harley, commodore of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9. “This exercise strengthens our Navy’s ability to continue working with our alliances so we can continue to develop partnerships in the
Western Pacific.”

The Japanese ships participating in the
PASSEX are JDS Kirishima, JDS Harusame and JDS Hatakaze. During the PASSEX, CSG-9, and the Japanese navy conducted an officer exchange program to allow Japanese Sailors to experience life aboard an American ship and vice-versa” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060322-12 - Release Date: 3/22/2006 12:00:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22822

 

“Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 led by USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steaming  toward the Seventh Fleet, participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with Japanese guided missile destroyers Harusame (DD-102), Hatakaze (DD-171) and Kirishima (DDG-174) operating under the direction of the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Western Pacific area of operations from 22 to 23 March 2006. The purpose of the PASSEX was to exercise basic seamanship and conduct coordinated operations between CSG 9 and the JMSDF. During the PASSEX, CSG 9 and the Japanese navy conducted an officer exchange program to allow Japanese Sailors to experience life aboard an American ship and vice-versa” (Ref. 378A & 1161).

 

PASSEX Builds American, Japanese Teamwork

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) flagship for Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, teamed up with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force on 23 March 2006 to conduct a passing exercise (PASSEX) in the Western Pacific. During the exercise, officers from both sides participated in an officer exchange program between ships in order to get a better understanding of how each navy operates. “The face-to-face interaction helps with the communication barrier,” said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Mills, from Destroyer Group (DESRON) 9. “It allows us to be on the same page with the goals of this exercise.”

Mills, who was stationed in Japan for two years, was honored to be able to go aboard JDS
Kirishima (DD-174), a Kongo-class destroyer similar to U.S. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. “I’ve always been extremely interested in how different navies are put together and operate,” said Mills. “They (the Japanese) have managed to come up with ways to operate similar to ours, based from a different way of thinking.”

Not only did she see a ship from a different country, she also witnessed how the Japanese conduct themselves on a regular basis. “The Japanese are extremely efficient and outstanding mariners,” Mills said. “They run their ship with constant professionalism in everything they do.” While Mills and four other members of
Abraham Lincoln’s crew were touring Japanese ships, Lincoln hosted four distinguished visitors from different Japanese ships for the three-day exchange.

 

One visitor to Abraham Lincoln said this exchange, like the exercise, allows the two nations to demonstrate their ability to work together in a variety of missions. “This operation helps build the United States and Japanese friendship,” said Lt. Cmdr. Tadahiro Fujiyama, from JDS Takanami (DD-110). “It also helps us understand each other better.” Cooperation between the U.S. Navy and the navies of allied countries is very important in today’s ever-changing political climate. “The Japanese are a major ally,” said Mills. “We need to form a world wide force, and doing exercises like this helps us understand each other's capabilities.

 

This helps us become stronger against any opposing forces.” While this PASSEX helped build American and Japanese relations, future exercises will help build stronger ties with other allied nations, allowing the formation of strong coalition strike groups. “Every time we do [PASSEX],” said Mills, “it helps us understand how our allies do business. [Exercises] help build our friendship and communications. They are an excellent way for us to learn more and more from friends and allies”” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060324-11- Release Date: 3/25/2006 8:00:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22851

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 3 to 25 March 2006” (Ref. 76).

Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06)

 

“Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, led by Rear Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, embarked on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), participated in Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06), which began on 26 March 2006 and would run through the end of the month. Marines and sailors with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) embarked aboard the Sasebo Forward Deployed Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) arrived on 25 March 2006 to take part in Exercise Foal Eagle 2006, as well.

The war-fighting skill sets Lincoln and CVW-2 rehearsed included close-air support for ground units, air-to-air defense exercises, maritime interoperability training and expeditionary operations. This exercise crystallized Lincoln's role as a command-and-control node. During Foal Eagle 2006, Marines and sailors with the MEU participated in a variety of exercises, including assault climbing, live-fire ranges, urban combat training, community outreach efforts and a combined amphibious landing. In addition to the MEU/ARG arrival, elements of Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment and MEU Service Support Group 31 debarked from the USS Essex (LHD-2), USS Harpers Ferry (LSD-49) and USS Juneau (LPD-10). As the Marines and sailors disembarked, a contingent of over 300 ROK Marines and sailors of the 1st ROK Marine Division's 3rd Regimental Landing Team came aboard the ARG for further combined planning and training in with the Navy-Marine Corp team in amphibious doctrine. Marines from Headquarters and Services Company, Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, the ground combat element of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, exercised techniques for military operations in urban terrain at a Korean Marine Corps MOUT training facility. Approximately 25 Marines spent the day practicing the basic principles of vehicle checkpoint procedures and room clearing techniques. Marines were taught the proper escalation of force, the different zones used for conducting VPC's and the different things to look for, such as contraband and warning signs of an attack.  Foal Eagle was the largest concentration of surface and air forces to participate in field training exercises on the Korean Peninsula. It 2006, it involved more than 70 ships, 70 to 80 aircraft, and all four services of both the U.S. and ROK armed forces. The ROK and U.S. navies conducted an officer exchange program during the exercise. Five ROK naval officers embarked Abraham Lincoln to train with the ships' crew” (Ref. 1161 & 1162).

 

Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE 06) exercise was designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness. “The ROK and U.S. navies conducted an officer exchange program during the exercise. Five ROK naval officers embarked Abraham Lincoln to train with the ships' crew” (Ref. 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), and the guide-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86), joined (at various times) attack submarines Cheyenne, Greeneville (SSN-772), Pasadena, Seawolf (SSN-21) and Tucson (SSN-770), and Orions from Command Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, VP-4, VP-9 and VP-47, for USWEX 08-3, an antisubmarine exercise in Hawaiian waters from 25 to 27 March 2006” (Ref. 378A).

 

CSG 9 Participates in Foal Eagle 06

 

“Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, led by Rear Adm. J. W. Goodwin, embarked on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is currently participating in Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE-06), which began on 26 March 2006 and runs through the end of the month. The exercise is designed to demonstrate U.S. resolve to support the Republic of Korea (ROK) while improving overall readiness. “The exercise will also help teach, coach, and mentor junior military personnel while exercising senior leaders’ decision-making capabilities,” said Goodwin.

“Foal Eagle provides the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group the opportunity to continue developing its partnerships with nations in the region to enhance security,” said Capt. C. A. McCawley,
Abraham Lincoln’s commanding officer. Cmdr. Glen Leverette of Commander, Task Force 70 (CTF-70) based in Yokosuka, Japan, described Lincoln’s role in RSOI/FE-06 as a vital one. “Lincoln is here to support theater security, cooperation and engagement with the ROK and to reinforce the alliance we have,” Leverette said. “Our presence during the exercise is a visible, tangible expression of our nation’s commitment to their [ROK’s] defense.”

According to Leverette, the war-fighting skill sets
Lincoln and CVW-2 will rehearse include close-air support for ground units, air-to-air defense exercises, maritime interoperability training and expeditionary operations. “An exercise like this crystallizes Lincoln’s role as a command-and-control node,” said Leverette. “Without Lincoln’s communications suite and connectivity, this exercise would be nearly impossible to conduct.” Leverette stated that Foal Eagle is the largest concentration of surface and air forces that participate in field training exercises on the Korean Peninsula. “It involves more than 70 ships, 70 to 80 aircraft, and all four services of both the U.S. and ROK armed forces. Everyone is involved,” Leverette added.


The ROK and U.S. navies will conduct an officer exchange program during the exercise. Five ROK naval officers will embark
Abraham Lincoln to train with the ships’ crew. Gen. B. B. Bell, commander, U.S. Forces Korea, said Foal Eagle presents a great training opportunity, but urged leaders to be familiar with the risks involved. “The success of this exercise will be measured, among other things, by how safely we conduct the operation,” said Bell” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060327-06 - Release Date: 3/27/2006 3:45:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22873

 

Lincoln Wraps Up Successful Exercise, Heads for Port

 

“Following the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group’s participation in bilateral Reception, Staging, Onward-movement & Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/FE-06) exercises with the Republic of Korea (ROK) on 26 March 2006 through April 1st, Abraham Lincoln continued on her deployment in the Western Pacific. Foal Eagle is an annual combined training exercise including combined/joint U.S. military forces and ROK military forces. It is designed to increase the combat readiness and interoperability of Republic of Korean and U.S. forces while also demonstrating a United States’ willingness to aid the ROK against foreign enemy forces. This year, Abraham Lincoln participated in the exercise because her operational schedule facilitated such involvement, but Lincoln’s Assistant Navigatior Lt. Cmdr. Joe V. Martinez, suggested that, based on the focus of this year’s exercise, which was the use of aircraft, the majority of the ship’s involvement took place via the ship’s four embarked F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter squadrons (VFA). Lincoln’s four such squadrons, VFA-2 “Bounty Hunters,” VFA-34 “Blue Blasters,” VFA-137 “Kestrels” and VFA-151 “Fighting Vigilantes,” along with a large contingent of U.S. Air Force aircraft based in Kadena, Japan, flew combat air patrols and coordinated bombing runs via a Combined Air Operations Center (CAOC). This CAOC, Martinez said, was formed specifically for this combined/joint military operation and was equally comprised of both U.S. and ROK leadership. He said that while the exact details of the operation vary from year to year, the primary focus of the exercise remains consistent — increased fluidity in the working military relationship of United States and ROK forces. According to Lt. Cmdr. Kim Ki-ho, of the ROK navy, the importance of the allied relationship between the United States and the ROK are vital. “I believe that we are who we are as a country...partially because of the Americans and some of the sacrifices that they had made,” said Ki-ho. He said that he felt it essential to stress the importance of the allied relationship between the two nations. While some of the training missions were conducted in a marine environment, Martinez said that some of the squadrons involved utilized the access granted to them to unrestricted airspace over ROK in order to achieve their own land-driven training requirements, as well as the exercise objectives. In the end, however, the training objective of each command or unit, regardless of branch or country of origin, was far less focused on maintaining a prescribed proficiency, said Martinez, than it was on maintaining and demonstrating cooperation between countries. “This operation,” he said, “proves that we (the United States) can bring an air wing to the coast of any cooperative country and integrate successfully with their forces” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060406-15 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 2:19:00 PM - From Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class (AW) M. Jeremie Yoder, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23032

 

Commander United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/ United States Forces Korea, Gen. B.B. Bell, discusses the capabilities of the F/A-18E Super Hornet with Lt. Mitchell Koch.

 

060329-N-7981E-016 - Pacific Ocean (March 29, 2006) - Commander United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/ United States Forces Korea, Gen. B.B. Bell, discusses the capabilities of the F/A-18E Super Hornet with Lt. Mitchell Koch assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron Three Four (VFA-34) during a visit to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Bell and a delegation of Republic Of Korea Defense officials toured the Lincoln as part of the 2006 Reception, Staging, Onward-Movement and Integration (RSOI) and Foal Eagle exercises. Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently underway in the Western Pacific area of operations. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman James R. Evans (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=33159

 

Abraham Lincoln Strike Group Partners with Republic of Korea

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted several Republic of Korea (ROK) military officials during Foal Eagle 2006 in the East Sea on 29 March 2006.

General B. B. Bell, commander, U.S. Forces Korea, along with Deputy Commander Combined Forces, Gen. Hee Won-lee and other senior members of the ROK military, flew aboard the aircraft carrier to witness an array of power projection from the sea.

Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Commander, Rear Adm. J. W. Goodwin, and
Abraham Lincoln’s commanding officer, Capt. C. A. McCawley, welcomed the group along with Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Capt. Matthew Klunder, on the flight deck before touring the ship. The group witnessed air operations from the flight deck and interacted with Sailors during the visit. The delegation also had a chance to view a vast display of weapons in the ship’s cavernous hangar bay.

“The ROK continues to be a valuable ally and partner in the region and around the globe for regional peace and security,” said Goodwin.

He added that “the U.S. appreciates how the ROK military has enhanced their modern navy and her capabilities into the 21st century, and appreciates the opportunity to bring a carrier to Korea."

Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is currently on a scheduled
Western Pacific deployment to conduct exercises and strengthen relations with allied nations. The aircraft carrier is based in Everett, Wash” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060330-17 -Release Date: 3/30/2006 7:33:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=22914

 

U.S., ROK Navies Perfect Warfighting Skills in Foal Eagle 06

 

Personnel and units of the U.S. military and Republic of Korea (ROK) Combined Forces Command (CFC) conducted their annual combined and joint exercise, Reception, Staging, Onward-movement, & Integration and Foal Eagle 2006 (RSOI/Foal Eagle 06) from 26 to 31 March 2006. RSOI and Foal Eagle are Korean-theaterwide computer-simulated and field exercises designed to evaluate and improve the U.S. and ROK forces' ability to coordinate the procedures, plans and systems necessary to defend the ROK in a contingency. It focuses on ground maneuver, air, naval, expeditionary, and special operations, as well as command and control training. Foal Eagle involved more than 70 U.S. and ROK Navy ships and more than 100 aircraft from all services of both the U.S. and ROK armed forces. “The participation of both nations’ navies demonstrates the solid commitment to the ROK/U.S. alliance and strengthens the combat readiness of ROK and U.S. supporting forces through combined and joint training,” said Rear Adm. James P. Wisecup, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea (CNFK).

 

“This yearly exercise is all about working closely with our Republic of Korea counterparts,” said Capt. Robert Girrier, commodore of Destroyer Squadron 15. "The training is comprehensive and robust, and provides Sailors the opportunity to hone our skills." The ships perfected their warfighting skills for working together in a complex multi-threat environment that included close-air-support for ground, air-to-air defense exercises, maritime interoperability training, expeditionary operations and counter-special operations.

 

Foal Eagle is one of the few opportunities to do multi-warfare training with both U.S. and ROK units on a large scale across all of our warfare areas to include anti-submarine, anti-air and anti-surface warfare. It flexed our joint and combined capabilities while stressing the importance of the ROK/U.S. alliance,” said Capt. Gary Waring, assistant chief of staff for operations for CNFK.

 

Both navies showed how closely they work in both exercises and operations and the joint commitment to security in the Korean Theater of Operations. In addition to the rehearsed scenarios throughout the exercise, Safeguard and ROK navy ship ROKS Pyong Taek (ATS 27) conducted a real-world salvage operation for a U.S. Air Force F-16C fighter aircraft that crashed off South Korea’s coast on 14 March 2006.

 

Both ships were taking part in the 21st combined diving and salvage exercise (SALVEX 06). “There is no better training for the dynamic and challenging circumstances of actual salvage operations than to participate in such an operation together with a highly capable ally,” said Lt. Cmdr. Doyle Hodges, Safeguard’s commanding officer. Crew members from Safeguard took part in the recovery with help from scuba divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 1.

 

Foal Eagle was more than exercises involving the coordination of ships and aircraft. Many of the ships embarked and hosted their counterparts as part of the Navy’s liaison naval exchange program. They assisted the ships with communications and provided support throughout all the different events, while at the same time conveying interesting ROKN perspectives. Moreover, the exercise was a chance for Sailors to meet the citizens of Korea and experience the culture, local cuisine, shopping, and take part in community relations projects and sightseeing in the ports of Donghae, Pyongtaek, Pohang, Chinhae and Busan.

 

CNFK is the regional commander for the U.S. Navy in the Republic of Korea and provides leadership and expertise in naval matters to area military commanders, including the Commander for the United Nations Command, the Republic of Korea and U.S. Combined Forces Command, and Commander, U.S. Forces Korea. CNFK also serves as liaison to the Republic of Korea Navy, the Combined Forces Commander staff in armistice and in wartime and to the Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet, based in Yokosuka.

 

The participating U.S. naval units included USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 with embarked aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, as well as Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 ships USS Mobile Bay (CG- 53), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS060406-17 - Release Date: 4/6/2006 8:00:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class David McKee, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public Affairs - SEOUL (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=23037

 

 

Chapter XIX (1 January to 8 August 2006)

Part I of IV - 1 January to 31 March 2006

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4