Pierside maintenance availability at Naval Station, Everett, Washington;

5 March 2005; Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California and in the northern Pacific waters for readiness training in support of FRP; in port activities;  conducting her quarterly integrated Strike Group Sustainment Training, which Abraham Lincoln referred to as “sustainment operations,” for quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2; in port activities; quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) conducting Carrier Qualifications for west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 squadrons once embarked at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) JTFEx 05 off the coast of Southern California; Holidays Season and Christmas Stand Down.

5 March to 31 December 2005

Chapter XVIII

 

Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 June to 8 September 2005.

Chapter XVIII, Appendix I

 

Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 September to 18 October 2005.

Chapter XVIII, Appendix II

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2005 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XVIII, Appendix III

 

Chapter XVIII, Appendix I to III

 

Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 June to 8 September 2005.

Chapter XVIII

Appendix I

 

 

Quartermaster 2nd Class Patricia Garcia, center, and her Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) shipmates, stroll the decks of the Mexican barque Cuauhtemoc.

 

050630-N-5362F-001 - Tacoma, Wash. (June 30, 2005) - Quartermaster 2nd Class Patricia Garcia, center, and her Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) shipmates, stroll the decks of the Mexican barque Cuauhtemoc. The Mexican ship was one of about 30 sailing ships, which moored on Tacoma's Thea Foss Waterway for the Tacoma Tall Ships 2005 festival. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Bernardo Fuller (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=26164

 

Lincoln, Cuauhtemoc Sailors Connect in Name of Seafaring

 

“More than 44 USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors volunteered to represent the Navy here at Tacoma's Tall Ships festival 30 June 2005.

The
Abraham Lincoln crew rolled up their sleeves, manned line handling positions on the floating pier and helped moor the Mexican Barque Cuauhtemoc, one of the two largest sailing ships that made Tacoma its latest port of call.

“We volunteered to moor the Cuauhtemoc, which is the Mexican Navy’s sail training ship," said Senior Chief Quartermaster (SW/AW/CM) John Trail, “I canvassed the ship (Lincoln) and got a big response with over 40 volunteers.”

The veteran quartermaster, who had served as harbormaster at both Naval Station Everett, Wash., and Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, provided the City of Tacoma invaluable insight on how to get the vessels moored without incident. That was where the rest of the Lincoln Sailors became involved.

Upon the ship's arrival, thousands of spectators looked on while Cuauhtemoc stood in. Mexican Sailors manned the yards, standing in formation high above the ship's deck on the yard arms, and Lincoln Sailors manned the pier's rail at parade rest.

“The captain of the Cuauhtemoc and his men were very happy,” said Trail. “Our guys did a great job.”

Once safely moored, and before the ship was open to the general public, the Mexican Sailors beckoned
Lincoln Sailors aboard. They exchanged cordial gifts and with the help of some bilingual Abe Sailors in attendance, they received a detailed tour of the ship they had helped bring in safely.

“It was an experience I’ll never forget, because I got to meet Mexican sailors, learn more about them and their navy,” said Quartermaster 2nd Class Patricia Garcia. "The whole day was very rewarding for me.”

“I think people who haven’t been out here to experience it don’t realize that sailors from all around the world are our brothers,” said Trail. “I want them to realize they are sailors and an elite group of people” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050720-05 -Release Date: 7/20/2005 10:45:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class David Poe, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, TACOMA Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19147

 

A child aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) gets a lesson in firefighting equipment from Damage Controlman 3rd class Anthony Munson.

 

050704-N-8539M-015 - Everett, Wash. (July 4, 2005) - A child aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) gets a lesson in firefighting equipment from Damage Controlman 3rd class Anthony Munson. Lincoln hosted an open house as a part of the "Family Fun 4th of July Celebration" at Naval Station Everett. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Nicholas B. Morton (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=25890

 

NAVSTA Everett’s Family Freedom Festival.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), in conjunction with Naval Station (NAVSTA) Everett, Wash., opened its doors to the public on 4 July 2005, in celebration of Independence Day as part of NAVSTA Everett’s Family Freedom Festival.

Nearly 6,000 people crossed
Abe’s Quarterdeck in just four hours, proving that the public was eager to see the ship and have the opportunity to thank Sailors for their hard work and dedication. Laurie Metcalf, a resident of Tacoma, Wash., brought her three children to see firsthand the ship that they’ve heard about in the news, and meet the Sailors who help to defend her family’s freedom.

“We’re just thrilled to be here,” Metcalf said. “This is a once in a lifetime opportunity, and there’s no other place we’d rather be on the Fourth of July than right here with these heroes.”

 

Those who toured the ship waited in long lines in downtown Everett to board busses that would bring them through the front gates, and after numerous security checkpoints deliver them to the pier. Once in the ship’s hangar bays, the guests were able to purchase souvenirs and participate in various interactive displays. Kyle Munchin, a five-year-old from Arlington, Wash., donned a full Fire Fighter Ensemble (FFE) complete with an oversized helmet and boots, and had the chance to see what Lincoln Sailors wear during a fire.

“It’s really heavy,” he said. “Firefighters have to be strong to wear it.” Guests also had the chance to view some of the ship’s weapons while in the hangar bays and even pose for some interesting pictures while holding an M-240 machine gun, standing next to a few bombs, or posing next to a stationary jet engine.

 

After a quick safety brief, guests were allowed the rare chance to take a ride on aircraft elevator number four, and were greeted by more Abe Sailors on the flight deck. Usually reserved for earsplitting fighter jets, the visitors were able to walk the entire four-and-a-half acre flight deck on their own and see firsthand what a Sailor working on the deck would see.

 

Sailors were there, as well, answering questions and eagerly chatting about everything from their job aboard the carrier to how the catapults and arresting gear work. Near the aircraft carrier’s island, members of Lincoln’s Crash and Salvage team provided demonstrations on how they go about rescuing a downed pilot from a burning F/A-18 Hornet, and were able to show the skills they’ve honed while in the Navy.

 

“It was great meeting these (Sailors),” said Robert Fletcher of Bend, Ore. A Navy veteran himself, Fletcher was honored to be given the chance to board the ship, something he never had the chance to do while serving. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be up here and meet with these wonderful men and women," he said. "Just to shake their hands and share some stories on this Independence Day is more than enough.”

 

On base, guests enjoyed numerous food booths, a rock-climbing wall, miniature golf, go-kart racing, a beer garden and products from a variety of vendors from the local community. “Something like this celebration absolutely brings our communities together,” said Frank Stilwagner, director of marketing for the Village Theater at the Everett Performing Arts Center. “It’s wonderful.”

Heather Staller of Surrey, British Columbia echoed Stilwagner’s enthusiasm about being on base. “Being Canadian, it’s nice to be able to come down and see how Americans celebrate July 4th,” she said, “and being able to come to Naval Station Everett and tour the
Lincoln makes it that much more exciting.” As the Pacific Fleet’s surge carrier, it’s unknown where Lincoln and its crew of 3,100 Sailors will be this time next year, but Sailors were more than happy to volunteer their time should the doors open again to the community.

“This went off really well,” said Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Andre Bradley, temporarily assigned to the ship’s security force from A Division. “We had a lot of people from Security who came in and volunteered on their day off, and the people helped out a lot as they passed through our checkpoints. I would volunteer to help out again if we did this next year. It was fun”” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050712-04 - Release Date: 7/12/2005 8:55:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19145

 

Abe Says Goodbye to its Top Enlisted Man

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) said farewell to Command Master Chief (SW/AW) John O’Banion, Abe’s senior enlisted leader for three years, in a ceremony in Hangar Bay Two on 8 July 2005.

Capt. Andrew McCawley,
Abe’s commanding officer, showed his appreciation for O’Banion’s service to Lincoln. “Master Chief O’Banion has been my most trusted and indispensable counsel and mentor,” said the captain. “The officers, the chief petty officers, and most importantly, the Sailors of this ship have benefited from the last three years of Master Chief O’Banion’s leadership, experience, mature wisdom and judgment, and most of all, his unfailing advocacy of Sailors of Abraham Lincoln.”

McCawley talked to the audience about O’Banion’s journey of active-duty service and closed by presenting O’Banion with the Joint Service Commendation Medal in honor of his leadership during
Operation Unified Assistance earlier this year. McCawley also presented O’Banion a Meritorious Service Medal for his previous work on Lincoln. O’Banion was visibly appreciative of those in attendance, both on the stage and the hundreds more that flooded Hangar Bay 2.

“First off, to all you seamen, airmen, firemen, third class, second class, and first class petty officers, thank you,” O’Banion said warmly. “You are the heart and soul of this command. You have supported me for the past three years and I thank you for that.” O'Banion then addressed a group he worked more closely with during his time aboard Abe - the ship’s leading chief petty officers.

“There has never, ever been one thing in which you guys have failed at,” said O’Banion. “You not only accomplished everything, you excelled at it and set the standard. You made it happen and without you, this would be just another command. You’ve made it special for me and made it worth 30 years of service. I owe you all a debt of gratitude.”

He also passed along thanks to all of
Lincoln’s chief petty officers and stressed the importance of giving the same effort they gave him to Abe’s new command master chief, Master Chief Michael Anjola.

“Keep plugging; keep the traditions going,” said O’Banion. “Embrace the change [the Navy is going through.] Stand up to it, but embrace it and make things happen” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050719-01 - Release Date: 7/19/2005 8:06:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class David Poe, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERET Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19244

 

Lincoln Deck Department Sailors Bridge Gap Between Past and Present

 

As reported on 13 July 2005, “Members of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1st Division recently visited World War II veterans at the Richmond Beach Rehabilitation Center in Shoreline, Wash. In addition to an outdoor barbecue and cake decorated with an American flag made of berries, “sea stories” were the topic of the day. Allison Bunton, speech language pathologist for the center and wife of Lt.j.g. Charles Bunton, 1st Lt. Division officer, thought the meet and greet would be an excellent way for residents of the home to share some of their own experiences. “The idea started with one of my patients, Bud,” said Bunton.

 

“The first time I met him, he just grilled me, asking me why I was here, why I had moved here. Every day I’d see him, he’d ask me more and more questions about (my husband’s service), so, talking to my husband about it, we decided it might be a good idea to have the Sailors come and meet some of the veterans. “A lot of them (veterans) don’t have an outlet to tell their war stories,” she added.

 

“Their children have heard them; their families have heard them, and it’s good for them to be able to talk about it with someone who can understand – especially the Navy veterans here. These Sailors really can understand what they did and appreciate the ships that they were on. They can talk technically about ‘ship stuff’ with them." Service and the honor it entails was at the forefront of Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class (SW) Stanley Ochonogor’s thoughts during the visit. A native of Nigeria, Ochonogor immigrated to New York City before joining the Navy. “The veteran is part of the military family,” said Ochonogor.

 

“They have contributed immensely to the great work of this country. They served well, they served with all their energy, they served with all their resources. They gave so much of their time to this great nation. “If anybody out there is going to really appreciate the effort they put in to this nation, I think it is we right now in the military, because of what they left behind for us,” he added.

 

The day entailed meet-and-greet time, a barbecue and then a little more time spent visiting with veterans before Lincoln Sailors loaded back onto a bus and returned to the ship. Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class (SW) Amber Brown is a third generation service member. She said she was a little nervous about making the visit, but liked to hear the stories. “I like to see the pictures that they have, and to hear the stories they tell,” she said. “To listen to these people tell (us) ‘I appreciate what you’ve done, I’ve been there myself, keep your head up,’ and stuff like that gives (us) a little grounding, to know where we’re at,” she said.

 

She also said that visiting, in uniform, makes her feel proud to serve. “I don’t get to do things like this a lot. It makes me feel proud. I enjoy having people ask questions, to hear their story and have them hear mine.” In all, the day was a success, according to Allison Bunton. Anticipation of the visit amongst the veterans was high, and the day’s events certainly did not disappoint. “I see a lot of good interaction between the Sailors and the veterans,” said Lt.j.g. Bunton.

 

“I think it provides some more focus for our Sailors; it gives them a better idea of what we’re actually doing out there. “Visiting these people helps them (Sailors) realize that their service does count, as did all these peoples’ service,” he added” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050713-07  Release Date: 7/13/2005 11:29:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class(SW) Joaquin Juatai, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19146

 

“The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Ill., and the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission in Washington, D.C., donated dozens of visual memorabilia items to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Lincoln Room and several other locations around the carrier, including Wardroom No. 3 (15 July). One of the last-known photographs of the President, which Alexander Gardner snapped in 1865, took pride of place within the collection: an image that captured the worn and troubled brow of the man who had led the nation through the Civil War, scant days before his assassination” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Memorabilia Finds Home Aboard Abe

 

“Abraham Lincoln will be more than just a spirit and a namesake for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) thanks to the donations of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum (ALPLM) in Springfield, Ill., and Washington D.C.'s Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission (ALBC) on 15 July 2005. The Everett, Wash.-based aircraft carrier received dozens of visual memorabilia items from both institutions, documenting the life of one of America's most beloved presidents. “I reported to the ship during DPIA (Dry Docked Planned Incremental Availability), and nothing on the ship seemed to honor Lincoln, aside from the Lincoln Room,” said Cmdr. Jim Johnson, Abe's assistant supply officer, referring to a “mini-museum” on the ship detailing Lincoln’s life.

Johnson contacted both organizations requesting support and was overwhelmed by the response. “I thought it was important for both the crew and DVs [distingushed visitors] to see photos from Lincoln’s life and his family,” he said. “The photos show how proud we are of the ship’s heritage.” Thomas Schwartz, an Illinois state historian and director of collections and research for the ALPLM, sent along several reproduced photos to decorate the DV staterooms. Ironically, Schwartz was aboard
Lincoln for its commissioning ceremony in 1989, and was asked to help design the Lincoln Room. More than 15 years later, he felt it was important to help continue with the Lincoln tradition.

“I was involved many years ago with the development of the museum room on the ship,” said Schwartz. “I feel honored to be part of the continuing history of the ship’s wonderful namesake. The carrier is amazing, and it just made sense to have a location where people could learn about Lincoln’s life and the role of the U.S. Navy during the Civil War. I hope these pictures help to do that.” The ALBC, based out of Washington, D.C., also provided contributions to the ship. A special part of their donation is one of the last known pictures taken before Lincoln’s assassination. Photographer Alexander Gardner captured the portrait of Lincoln in 1865, which shows a rigid man with a face looking well past his actual age.

Johnson chose to hang the photo in
Abe’s Wardroom 3 lounge, a place where DVs and crew alike gather for meetings and briefings. The lounge also holds a lithograph copy of Lincoln’s famous Emancipation Proclamation. Michael Bishop, executive director of the ALBC, sent along his gratitude and thanks to the Sailors aboard the carrier. “It’s truly an honor for myself and all of us here to share the legacy of Lincoln and his achievements with the men and women of the ship,” said Bishop. “It’s an important mission, and we’re glad that we could help in any way” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050725-05 - Release Date: 7/25/2005 9:51:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19283

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Assistant Supply Officer Cmdr. Jim Johnson, displays one of many pieces of memorabilia sent from Lincoln historical organizations in Illinois and Washington, D.C.

 

050719-N-5837R-001 - Everett, Wash. (July 19, 2005) - USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Assistant Supply Officer Cmdr. Jim Johnson, displays one of many pieces of memorabilia sent from Lincoln historical organizations in Illinois and Washington, D.C. The posters will be displayed throughout the ship in an effort to educate Sailors and distinguished visitors about the life and achievements of President Lincoln, their ship's namesake. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy Roache (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=26446

 

Lincoln Beach Detachment Sailors Stay Busy When Ship is at Sea

 

As reported on 20 July 2005, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Beach Detachment, made up of Lincoln Sailors who are not able to get underway with the ship, stays busy taking care of other crew members and ensuring Lincoln's name stays ringing throughout the community. While the ship was underway in June, more than 90 Sailors arrived at Naval Station Everett, Wash., to report for duty.

 

The Beach Detachment was responsible for taking care of those Sailors and making sure they were prepared to get underway. “We ensure new Sailors, E-4 and below, who check on board get started with indoc, and all E-5 and above make sure their pre-deployment check off list is signed off so they are ready to go to sea,” said Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment)(AW) James Peterson, Beach Detachment’s officer in charge.

 

“We also make sure everyone who is left behind for medical reasons gets to their appointments.” Along with ensuring the needs of Sailors back in homeport are taken care of, Beach Detachment also makes sure these Sailors stay productive. “We have to keep everyone employed so they earn their paycheck,” said Peterson. Keeping them employed means assigning them to a variety of work centers around the base.

 

During Lincoln’s recent underway period, they assisted Naval Station Everett’s work force by providing more than 2,800 man-hours worth of labor around the base. Some Sailors even worked for commands outside the Everett area, such as Naval Hospital Bremerton and Transient Personnel Unit Bangor. Another way to keep beach detachment Sailors productive is to ask them to do volunteer work in the surrounding community. “We do volunteer work to get Lincoln’s name out there and show we are involved in the community,” said Peterson.

 

The Sailors provided more than 900 hours of community service time for the Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, PAWS and the Imagine Children’s Museum. Of all the jobs Beach Detachment Sailors did during the three weeks Lincoln was underway, the biggest was at the Navy’s Jim Creek Recreation area near Arlington. “At first, [the Sailors] were hesitant about going. But once they got out there, they just loved it,” said Damage Controlman 2nd Class Mildred Spensor, a teaching assistant with Lincoln Beach Detachment. “They asked to go again and again.

 

They actually liked the work. While the Sailors were enjoying the work, the staff at Jim Creek was happy to have them there to help. “They did anything we asked them to do,” said Mike Petrowski, a Jim Creek recreation specialist. “One day they came out and cleared sections of the Twin Lakes Trail; it’s about four miles long. Another group worked on a new trail that was just flagged, removing small trees and debris."

 

In all, the Sailors volunteered more than 600 man-hours to help beautify trails and facilities at Jim Creek prior to the summer recreation season. The work performed by the Lincoln Sailors was important to the staff at Jim Creek. “We wanted to get things open by Memorial Day. It was out main priority,” said Petrowski, who appreciated the help the Sailors provided. “The leadership and the guys in general were great to work with” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050720-11 -Release Date: 7/20/2005 1:15:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Michael Murdock, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19148

 

Abe Welcomes New CMC into Fold

 

“With the retirement of Command Master Chief CMDCM (SW/AW) John O'Banion, CMDCM (AW/SW/NAC) Michael Anjola, a career aviation Sailor, took the helm as USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) new command master chief (CMC) on 20 July 2005. Anjola is already working to get the word out about what he expects from the ship’s crew. “I think the main thing I’m working on is just trying to get everybody back to basics,” said Anjola. “[I want to get] the crew involved in taking care of the Lincoln. This is a great ship. I would like every Sailor to reenergize themselves, starting with basic things, like saying 'Good morning,' 'Good afternoon,' 'How are you doing, Chief,' 'How are you doing, petty officer.' I’d like to see our Sailors take pride in themselves when they leave on liberty call," he said.

"I’d also like to see the Sailors reevaluate their outlook towards fun, and start looking for other outlets besides alcohol. There are a zillion things that MWR (morale, welfare and recreation) offers both on and off the ship if Sailors will just take a moment to step back and look for those opportunities.” Anjola also knows Sailors need to make time for their families. “[I want] everybody to realize that taking care of themselves and their families is important,” he said. Another area Anjola wants to see improvement in is the continuing need to keep Sailors informed about more than just the ship’s schedule and day-to-day expectations. “It’s not whether everyone knows we are going to get underway on a particular day, it’s whether they understand how important their job is,” said Anjola.

 

“I don’t think we do a very good job, sometimes, explaining that to some people.” While Anjola lists a lot of things Lincoln Sailors can do to improve life aboard as well as in public, the one thing he is most adamant about is education. “Education is important for themselves and their Sailors,” said Anjola. He pointed out the importance of pursuing qualifications, taking college courses and simply making the most of a tour aboard Lincoln rather then spending free time playing cards or video games. “That’s what I’d like to see them do in the next few years...realize their potential for the future, whether that’s in the Navy or outside the Navy,” said Anjola. “A lot of that starts with the basic building blocks of education.”

 

Anjola’s support of education doesn’t stop with simply getting Sailors started on the path to higher education. He’d also like to see those who have already earned degrees continue down the path of higher learning. “I would like to see everybody on board the ship, whether they already have an associate’s, a bachelor’s or master’s degree, do some sort of continuing education, or something that will help them further their education for the future. It’s not all about the Navy today, it’s about the future beyond the Navy, and education is the cornerstone of that process.” Anjola is just getting started as Lincoln’s newest top enlisted man, and for him, that means immersing himself completely in the job.

 

For now, he is not concerned about what the future holds beyond this tour. “I think what a lot of people seem to forget is that we should give 100 percent of ourselves to our current situation,” said Anjola. “I’m not saying you don’t need to be mindful of the future, but one needs to concentrate 100 percent on your current job. The Lincoln has my undivided attention until 2007. What ever happens after that, who knows? The sky is still the limit” (Ref.  Story Number: NNS050803-08 -Release Date: 8/3/2005 10:41:00 AM - By Journalist 1st Class Michael Murdock, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19452

 

Lincoln Sailors Donate Blood for Fellow Service Members Worldwide

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) lined up to donate to a blood drive held by the Armed Services Blood Bank Center, Madigan Army Medical Center (ASBBC MAMC) on 15 August 2005.

The military supplies blood to its members exclusively through internal donations. That means the blood given today could be the blood received by fellow service members when they need it tomorrow. It also means when supplies run short, the military turns to its members to fill critical needs down-range.

“Right now, we’re having a real shortage for troops in need of blood transfusions,” said Army Staff Sgt. Kim Schrimshaw, a laboratory technician with ASBBC MAMC. “When things get really tight, we have to buy blood from the Red Cross. So when Sailors come out to donate, they’re saving the government money and saving lives.”

Schrimshaw noted that the turnout on
Lincoln was the best they’ve had this year.

“It’s really been an incredible day. We know that a lot of Sailors had to wait a really long time in lines, but that little sacrifice will go a long way in helping the blood program meet its needs,” Schrimshaw said.

Lincoln Sailors were enticed by the offer of liberty after donating. Sailors’ determination to donate was tested as lines to donate got longer and the hours passed, but enthusiasm for the purpose of the drive remained high.

“I think it’s really important for all Sailors to give, because we’re here in this safer environment but other people are in Iraq and Afghanistan, they need our blood and our help a lot,” said Machinist’s Mate Fireman Stephen Stacey, of reactor department’s M-1 division.

“I think it’s good that the command puts an incentive on giving blood, but I don’t think that any of us would be doing this just to get off of work early. For me, it doesn’t hurt that badly and it’s for a good cause. That’s reason enough for me,” Stacey said.

Certain restrictions for donating blood disqualified numerous Lincoln Sailors, but despite that, the day turned out to be an astounding success.

“Even though I can’t speak for the thousands of men and women overseas right now, I think they’d thank you for giving a few hours of your day and deciding to donate,” Schrimshaw said. "Thank you"” (Ref.  Story Number:
NNS050826-03 -Release Date: 8/26/2005 8:34:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Maxwell Olson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19778

 

Lincoln Sailors Take in Classic Rock Fest

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors attended a classic rock festival at the Darrington Rodeo grounds in Darrington, Wash. from 5 to 7 August 2005.

Bands like The Fixx, Night Rider and Ted Nugent played for the classic rock enthusiasts in the crowd.

“The concert was great,” said Airman Chris Devilbliss. “My favorite part was watching ‘Starship’ Saturday night,” Devilbliss added. “We also got to go up on stage Friday night. The lead singer of Shades of Purple, a Deep Purple tribute band, introduced us to the crowd. We also got to talk to Randy Hansen who did a [Jimi] Hendrix tribute. He’s a cool guy.”

The three-day rock fest ended Sunday night with classic rock legend Ted Nugent blaring out some classic tunes.

“Before Nugent started playing he said, ‘thanks to the military. They make it possible to be here,’” Devilbliss said. “That was pretty cool.”

One of Devilbliss’ co-workers agreed, Nugent was the best part of the concert.

“Ted Nugent was pretty good live,” said Airman Hector Casillas, who was also there for the full three days. “I really like classic rock, and the concert gave me an opportunity to enjoy the music live.”

Those who missed this concert may have another chance to return next year.

“If the concert is an annual thing and were here next year, we’ll do it again,” said Chief Damage Controlman (SW) Jody Dellinger, MWR’s leading chief petty officer. “It’s a great opportunity for camping.”

Araham Lincoln's MWR has a history of getting tickets to some of the best concerts that come through the Northwest region.

“We’ve had suites for Hoobastank, Killswitch Engage, Velvet Revolver, Metallica, Kid Rock,” said Dellinger. “We will have tickets for Brooks and Dunn with Big-n-Rich in October” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050826-05 - Release Date: 8/26/2005 12:32:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, DARRINGTON, Wash. (NNS))

 

“While pierside at Naval Station Everett, Washington, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced a maintenance availability period upgrading and sustaining ship systems to better serve the Navy as the Pacific Fleet's "surge carrier" on 28 June to 26 August 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), along with its Sailors, upgraded in significant ways their abilities to serve. In addition to new equipment in many of AIMD's divisions, Sailors received in-depth training from technical representatives. They gained proficiency in multiple Consolidated Automated Support Systems (CASS). They also were trained on Radar Communication (RADCOM) and Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF), test stations and had all of the workbenches recalibrated in anticipation of the next underway period” (Ref. 1161).

 

“The Navy announced that it would reassign USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Security Division from the Weapons Department to the Operations Department prior to October 2005. The ship proactively accomplished this move by August 2005, which thrust the division into a new environment. Abraham Lincoln rendesignated her Ship Self Defense Force the Naval Security Force, and utilized ship’s company to augment the force. She thus established the Integrated Security Force; each department on board supported a team of 102 sailors who melded into the Security Division to protect the ship while she visited ports. This involved extensive training regimens for crewmembers that included tactical team movements and basic law enforcement procedures” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) established her Media Department, under the leadership of the Public Affair’s Officer and Photo Officer on 1 September 2005. The department combined the photo lab, print shop and public affairs department. Sailors from the Draftsman (DM), Journalist (JO), Lithographer (LI) and Photographer’s Mate (PH) ratings comprised the Media Department, and during the subsequent year the Navy would merge their duties into the Mass Communications Specialist (MC) rating (July 2006)” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln to Start Recycling Inport and Underway

 

As reported on 14 September 2005, “starting in September, Naval Station, Everett, Washington and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (Abe) are teaming up to send the ship's trash to recycling centers instead of landfills while the ship is in port.

"There are going to be recycling containers in Hangar Bays 1 and 3," said Lt. Cmdr. Eric Morgan,
Abe's readiness officer. "We'll also have containers in every workspace, and the trash will be segregated [like it is while the ship is underway]. The central drop location for the workspaces will be in the hangar bay, and the containers will be off-loaded daily."

It won't be long before Sailors notice the collection bins in the hangar bays. If everything goes well, Sailors may see the change before the end of September.

"We are supposed to start recycling when we return from this upcoming underway," said Lt. Sam Riser,
Abe's material officer. "There will be e-mails sent out to all hands, Plan of the Day notes, and announcements to let folks know that this is what they can use."

The program was designed to be easy for Abe's crew to participate in.

"We wanted to roll out a program with very little impact to the ship," said Morgan. "The only difference is the trash will be segregated in port like it is underway and the materials will be taken to the hangar bay."

Though it will be a new process for disposing of trash while in port, it will be more convenient for Sailors using the recycling bins.

"Now, Sailors bag the trash and take it to the pier," said Riser. "When we start this recycling program, all they'll have to do is take it to the collection bins in Hangar Bays 1 and 3. The bins will accept the recycling cornerstones - metals, plastics and paper."

By helping out the environment, Abe has managed to save a little money as well.

"We won't have to use as many 30-gallon paper bags for trash, now," said Riser. "That's going to mean less paper going to the trash and going to the landfills, plus it saves the ship money by not having to constantly order those paper bags” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050914-26 - Release Date: 9/14/2005 12:04:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Hart, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20006

 

Rear Adm. Goodwin Assumes Command of CCSG 9

 

“Rear Adm. J.W. (Bill) Goodwin assumed command of Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9, on 7 September 2005. Goodwin relieved Rear Adm. Doug Crowder, who has commanded CCSG 9 since August 2004.

Goodwin graduated from the University of South Carolina in 1975 and was designated a naval aviator two years later. The Dublin, Ga., native served in a number of sea billets, including executive officer of
USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), and commanding officer of USS Rainier (AOE-7) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76).

Goodwin was promoted to flag rank and assumed the duty of deputy director, Strategy, Plans and Policy at U.S. European Command, Stuttgart, Germany, in September 2003.

His current position as commander of Carrier Strike Group 9 has him and his staff embarked aboard
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).

Carrier Strike Group 9 is comprised of many different ships and organizations, including
Lincoln, Destroyer Squadron 9, Carrier Air Wing 2, USS Shiloh (CG-67), USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86).

According to the former pilot and surface Navy veteran, being back on
Lincoln, a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, homeported in Everett, Wash., is a homecoming of sorts.

"I'm extremely proud to be the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Commander,” Goodwin said. “Last time I embarked on board the
Abraham Lincoln, I was the commanding officer of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 94, and my stateroom was about 100 feet away.” Ironically, Goodwin was commanding officer of VFA-94 while embarked on Lincoln’s first deployment to the Persian Gulf region.

Goodwin also said his enjoyment of being back aboard
Abe and relocating to the Pacific Northwest is not only his own. “My family really loves the area,” Goodwin said. “It's great to be back in the beautiful Pacific Northwest” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051006-13 - Release Date: 10/6/2005 4:47:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20301

 

 

Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 September to 18 October 2005.

Chapter XVIII

Appendix II

 

 

Abe Photo Mate Takes Home Coveted Media Award

 

“A USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailor was chosen as the 2005 Walter L. Richardson Pacific Fleet Photographer of the Year on 12 October 2005. A panel of seasoned civilian photographers chose Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Patrick Bonafede from among entrants stationed throughout the Pacific Fleet.

“I really was in shock,” said Bonafede. “I couldn’t believe that he (Bonafede’s division officer) said my name.” The Walter L. Richardson Award is an annual photography competition named after one of the fathers of naval photography. Richardson worked at the Bureau of Navigation in Washington, D.C., after World War I.

During the time he worked there, the field of naval photography was drawn down to a total of 12 enlisted Sailors. Richardson drafted a plan to increase the role of naval photography, and was a trendsetter in giving it new life. Bonafede, a 24-year-old Fairfax, Va., native, was recently promoted through the Command Advancement Program (CAP). He has been in the Navy for almost three years, and has been aboard Abe since July 2004.

“I had a good time in ‘A’ School. Since I was never really into photography before I joined the Navy, I felt like I had to work harder to understand all the concepts,” Bonafede said. During his time aboard, Bonafede has amassed a collection of more than 1,000 original photographs. His portfolio for submission included five photos and one photo layout.

“I’ve taken so many photos that it was pretty difficult trying to select which ones I wanted to send,” he said. “I spent a lot of time working on my submission for one of the categories, but I ended up winning the whole thing.” Bonafede attributes his success and the success of his of co-workers to the competitive atmosphere in Abe’s photo lab.

“We’re always trying to get better photographs than the other guy,” said Bonafede. “But, when we get back to the shop and critique each other’s work, it’s not in a derogatory way. We sincerely are trying to help and challenge each other to become the best photographers that we can be” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS051021-04 -Release Date: 10/21/2005 10:27:00 AM  - By Journalist 3rd Class Maxwell Olson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20698

 

Lincoln Closes Hispanic Heritage Month in Fine Fashion

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) celebrated the role of Hispanic-Americans in the Navy and in America on Abe’s forward mess decks on 12 October 2005. The ceremony, sponsored by the Lincoln Heritage Council (LHC), honored Hispanic Heritage Month, and followed the theme of “Strong and Colorful Threads in the American Fabric.” Guest speakers said that Hispanic-Americans play a huge role in the U.S. Navy, and serve honorably aboard Lincoln.

 

Chief Hull Technician (SW/AW) Carmen Viduya, LHC’s chairperson and master of ceremonies of the event, is a first-generation Mexican-American, and provided facts and figures relating to the monthlong observance. “September is the anniversary of independence for five Latin countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua,” she said. “In addition, Mexico achieved independence Sept. 16, Chile Sept. 18 and Belize Sept. 21.”

 

Chief Electrician’s Mate (SW) Matthew Acevedo of Abe’s Reactor Department is a second-generation Mexican-American and was the first guest speaker. He spoke of his family heritage in both the Mexican and U.S. militaries. “My roots actually come from Poncho Villa and the Federales,” he said. Acevedo said his great-grandfathers fought against each other during the Mexican Revolution, and later united. Acevedo also spoke of growing up in an area where joining a gang was expected of young Hispanic children.

 

“It’s really easy for many people to get caught up in a gang atmosphere,” he said, “and it’s not necessarily because that’s what people are looking for; sometimes you’re just pressured into it.” He recalled being pressured by a gang member at the age of 10 to join the gang, or else he would have been killed. After he refused, the gang member put a knife to Acevedo’s neck, and asked him one last time if he would join. Acevedo remained resolute and refused to join the gang.

 

The final guest speaker for the ceremony was Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) (AW/SW) Alexy Diaz, from Abe’s Air Department. A native of Havana, Cuba, Diaz fled the island to find freedom in the U.S. along with his sister and six other refugees in three small inner tubes.  “It’s a privilege to be here today because I’m alive,” Diaz said.

 

“How many people can say they got in an inner tube, survived four days at sea, got into the States and became a chief petty officer? That’s my pride." Diaz went on to tell the story of surviving four days at sea until finally being rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard. Thankful just to be alive, Diaz expected the ship to bring him to Florida, when in fact it took him to U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Diaz was held on the base in a refugee camp for eight months before being granted political asylum in the U.S.

 

“Imagine being 18 years old in Miami, a big city, no mom, no dad to keep you on your toes,” Diaz said. “I definitely wasn’t the best kid to be down there on my own. So I went to the recruiter and joined the Navy. I’ve worked for the best people in the world, and I always have had the best people work with me and for me. That’s what we’ve got here on this ship, the best” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051024-16 -Release Date: 10/24/2005 7:03:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20701

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 September to 18 October 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Storekeepers Start Pilot Program to Improve Supply Process

 

As reported on 24 October 2005, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Supply Department’s S-8 Division Sailors have developed a prototype inventory and supply management system designed to streamline efficiency, productivity and time. Once the new system is implemented, the storekeepers will keep inventory for many divisions, including Abe’s Food Service Division (S-2). “We recently took over 10 storerooms from S-2,” said Storekeeper 1st Class (SW) Brian Button, S-8’s readiness leading petty officer. “Right now, it’s just the frozen and dry goods. Eventually, we plan to take on more.” Ensign Diana Dalphose, Lincoln’s Food Services Officer, said she feels very positive about the new inventory system.

“Everybody is very excited,” she said. “We are the only ship that is implementing the system. It will completely revamp the current program and will help maintain better accuracy of our many inventory levels.” According
to S-8, better time management for personnel and resources will be the prime advantages gained by handling inventory in this new fashion. With personnel freed up from inventory documentation, there will be a gain in rating-specific man hours. “In recent months, we’ve taken back stores for medical and dental that were typically run by corpsmen,” Button said. “Since then, medical’s manning readiness has increased considerably.

 

While we take care of the inventory, these corpsmen are able to focus on their everyday jobs.” Although the Food Service stores will be inventoried and maintained by storekeepers, the culinary specialists (CS) will still have access to the inventory. “The system is going to be universal. It will be utilized not only for us, but also by the CSs as well,” Button said. From June 2005 through January 2006, the S-8 division will have taken on inventory responsibilities in many other shipboard areas. “The divisions will place an order with us, like anyone else, and we’ll issue their goods to them,” Button explained.

 

Some of the other items range from hazardous materials and reactor materials to candy bars and soda. “If successful, other commands are expected to model their supply inventory systems on Lincoln’s,” Button said. “It’s a lot of work to get everything on line. Once we get to that point, everything’s going to be great. It’s going to pay off dividends in the long run. We’re setting standards for the Navy” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051024-17 - Release Date: 10/24/2005 7:10:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Ty Bjornson, Naval Reserve Center, Everett, Wash (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20710

 

Senior Chief Navy Counselor David Paradise, assigned to Commander Naval Recruiting Command, receives his annual Influenza vaccine in the form of a nasal mist.

 

051028-N-9769P-002 - Millington, Tenn. (Oct. 28, 2005) - Senior Chief Navy Counselor David Paradise, assigned to Commander Naval Recruiting Command, receives his annual Influenza vaccine in the form of a nasal mist. The painless vaccine, called FLUMIST, is sprayed into a person’s nostrils rather than injected by needle. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Jayme Pastoric (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=29458

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 29 October 2005, embarking CVW-2, conducting Carrier Qualifications for west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons as part of quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific from 19 to 29 October 2005” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

Abe, CVW-2 Stay "Ready" With Quarterly Surge Training

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) rejoined Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel for quarterly sustainment training in support of the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan on 30 October 2005. While Abe and attached personnel may only be out to sea for a few weeks, a lot is being done to make sure everyone is up to speed and fit to fight at any time. “Right now we are in a surge mode,” said Lt. Clint Cody of Abe’s operations department. “We have to maintain a certain amount of mission readiness at all times. Right now, we’re required to be at the most forward-leaning posture, in order to be ready to be called upon if something happens that would require us to go out to sea.”

While underway this quarter,
Lincoln will host Fleet Readiness Squadron (FRS) training pilots, who will be landing on the four-and-a-half acre flight deck for their Carrier Qualifications (CQ). “We’re going to do approximately four days of FRS CQs,” Cody said. “We’ll have new pilots from various platforms learn how to land on a flight deck. They’ve had one opportunity prior to this to actually land on a carrier, but this will be the first time that they’ll be doing both day and night CQs.” After completing training with the FRS pilots, Lincoln will join up with the crew of CVW-2. “CVW-2 will be doing a few days of CQs, while both the Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) will be doing dual scenarios,” Cody said.

 

Even though this is a training situation, the dual battle group scenario is something that could become real in the future. “They (Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet) want us to do coordinated efforts and actually get out there and practice working two carriers together in a small area,” Cody said. “It requires a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air, so they want us to practice it before we find ourselves doing it for real if the situation arises.” Ultimately, maintaining readiness is the name of the game for the ALCSG, and completing training now allows the crew to enjoy a holiday season with families, which is something they weren’t able to do while deployed last year.

 

“If you look at the schedule, we’re actually completing this training early,” he said. “One of the reasons we came out early is that this will get us through the holiday period, allow for some time off, and get us ready for INSURV (Board of Inspection and Survey) in the early part of next year.” Although Abraham Lincoln and CVW-2 Sailors may only be out to sea for a relatively short amount of time in the sense of a conventional deployment, the training and professional knowledge gained will probably prove to be long lasting in order to keep the ALCSG at the Navy’s warfighting tip of the spear” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051102-02 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 12:48:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20841

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel and Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 embarked, departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 30 October 2005, for quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), conducting Carrier Qualifications for CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

A plane captain ignals to the crew in one of his squadron’s F/A-18F Super Hornets during starting procedures aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

051102-N-5384B-065 - Pacific Ocean (Nov. 2, 2005) - A plane captain assigned to the “Bounty Hunters” of Strike Fighter Squadron Two (VFA-2), signals to the crew in one of his squadron’s F/A-18F Super Hornets during starting procedures aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently conducting Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Justin R. Blake (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=29523

 

CCSG 9 Sets Sail for JTFEX

 

As reported on 2 November 2005, “the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group, led by Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, is participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California through the beginning of November.

The exercise is the final step in preparing the Strike Group for deployment and is designed to test its ability to operate in a complex, hostile environment with other U.S. and coalition forces.

“This is a unique opportunity to improve upon our combat readiness. Now and in the future, the Navy will continue to be a key component of Joint Task Forces,” said Goodwin.

During this “graduate-level” exercise, more than 6,500 Sailors and Marines are working together to hone their operational skills in preparation for their upcoming deployment.

“The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group serves our nation well as we deliver robust and flexible sea power to meet the challenges of the new security environment with our friends, partner, and Allies,” Goodwin said.

Carrier Strike Group 9 is comprised of many different ships and organizations, including
Abraham Lincoln, Carrier Air Wing 2, Destroyer Squadron 9, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051102-04 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 11:01:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20869

 

Lincoln Preparing for Critical January Inspection

 

As reported on 7 November 2005, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors are getting a head start on the upcoming Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) scheduled for early January. While Sailors are getting ready for the inspection, the 100-person INSURV team, along with Lincoln’s senior leadership, helped to prepare Abe Sailors for what they can expect. Through a series of zone inspections, Abe’s leadership is providing guidance and helping to point out areas of concern that may need extra attention before the INSURV team arrives. By completing zone inspections for every department and division on the ship, Sailors aboard Lincoln are optimistic about their success when the actual inspection team arrives.

Capt. Dave Lausman,
Abe’s executive officer, recently released an XO Gram (16-05), which outlines some of the rules necessary for maintaining standards throughout berthing spaces. The XO Gram is available for review on Abenet, the ship’s intranet site, and includes details about the berthing policies. Chief Operations Specialist (SW/AW) Nicholas Desoto, of Abe’s operations department, is helping to ensure the berthing policies are strictly enforced for the assessment. Serving as the habitability coordinator, Desoto is in charge of making sure the berthing spaces are presentable for the INSURV team.

“With the XO Gram installed, we need to concentrate on effectively following it and making sure every rack is the same,” Desoto said. “It’s a uniformity issue and a cleanliness issue.” One of the main issues of concern for the ship’s equipment is securing for sea. “We’re going to be steaming at an excess of 30 knots while doing 18-degree turns,” Desoto said, “so you’re going to see a lot of movement throughout the ship. One of the things the inspection team will look for is to see if we’re secure for sea.”

During a recent captain’s call, Capt. C. A. McCawley,
Abe’s commanding officer, stated the importance of the upcoming inspection and asked for total cooperation throughout the chain of command, comparing INSURV to an open-book test. “We already know what they’re going to be looking for once they get here,” McCawley said. “It’s the job of every person on this ship to make sure that every space is ready for inspection.”

Although
Abe Sailors may believe their ship is the finest in the fleet, it’s up to every individual to prepare their spaces and prove to the INSURV team that Lincoln is “fit to fight” at any time” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051107-06 - Release Date: 11/7/2005 11:33:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20908

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Carrier Qualifications for and CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California from 30 October to 11 November 2005, returning to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 11 November 2005, to disembark CVW-2 before heading to her home port via a port visit to San Francisco, California. A key element of this training included JTFEx 05 with CVW-2 and Commander Destroyer Squadron 9 embarked, and with Mobile Bay and guided missile destroyers Russell (DDG-59) and Shoup, together with Ronald Reagan and ships of her group (4-8 November). Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) practiced doing dual scenarios in preparation for a possible real life situation. The Commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet ordered the strike groups to conduct coordinated efforts and practice working two carriers together in a small area. It required a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into San Francisco, California for a weekend of liberty and Veterans Day celebrations on 11 November 2005. The Deck Department rigged the aft brow to a barge on the stern dock to receive ferry passengers” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed San Francisco, California on 14 November 2005, after a weekend of liberty and Veterans Day celebrations from 11 to 14 November 2005” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 14 to 15 November 2005” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel and Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 16 November 2005, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, conducting quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ’s) for west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons in the Eastern Pacific from 19 to 29 October 2005, pulling into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, on 29 October 2005. Supply Department’s S-8 Division Sailors have developed a prototype inventory and supply management system designed to streamline efficiency, productivity and time. Once the new system is implemented, the storekeepers will keep inventory for many divisions, including Abe’s Food Service Division (S-2). “We recently took over 10 storerooms from S-2,” said Storekeeper 1st Class (SW) Brian Button, S-8’s readiness leading petty officer. “Right now, it’s just the frozen and dry goods. Eventually, we plan to take on more.” Ensign Diana Dalphose, Lincoln’s Food Services Officer, said she feels very positive about the new inventory system. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel embarked for quarterly sustainment training in support of the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan on 30 October 2005, to conduct CQ’s for CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California upon departure from 30 October to 11 November 2005. “Right now we are in a surge mode,” said Lt. Clint Cody of Abe’s operations department. Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) practiced doing dual scenarios in preparation for a possible real life situation. The Commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet ordered the strike groups to conduct coordinated efforts and practice working two carriers together in a small area. It required a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air. As reported on 2 November 2005, the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, led by Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, began participation in a JTFEX off the coast of Southern California through the beginning of November. The exercise is the final step in preparing the Strike Group for deployment and is designed to test its ability to operate in a complex, hostile environment with other U.S. and coalition forces. “This is a unique opportunity to improve upon our combat readiness. Now and in the future, the Navy will continue to be a key component of Joint Task Forces,” said Goodwin. During this “graduate-level” exercise, more than 6,500 Sailors and Marines are working together to hone their operational skills in preparation for their upcoming deployment. “The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group serves our nation well as we deliver robust and flexible sea power to meet the challenges of the new security environment with our friends, partner, and Allies,” Goodwin said. Carrier Strike Group 9 is comprised of many different ships and organizations, including Abraham Lincoln, Carrier Air Wing 2, Destroyer Squadron 9, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86). As reported on 7 November 2005, Abraham Lincoln Sailors got a head start on the upcoming Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) scheduled for early January. While Sailors were getting ready for the inspection, the 100-person INSURV team, along with Lincoln’s senior leadership, helped to prepare Abe Sailors for what they can expect. Abraham Lincoln conducted CQs for CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX off the coast of Southern California from 30 October to 11 November 2005, returning to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), on 11 November 2005, to disembark CVW-2 before heading to her home port via a port visit to San Francisco, California. A key element of this training included JTFEx 05 with CVW-2 and Commander Destroyer Squadron 9 embarked, and with Mobile Bay and guided missile destroyers Russell (DDG-59) and Shoup, together with Ronald Reagan and ships of her group (4-8 November). Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) practiced doing dual scenarios in preparation for a possible real life situation. The Commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet ordered the strike groups to conduct coordinated efforts and practice working two carriers together in a small area. It required a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air. Abraham Lincoln returned to NASNI, disembarking CVW-2 before heading to her home port via a port visit to San Francisco, California from 11 to 14 November 2005. The Deck Department rigged the aft brow to a barge on the stern dock to receive ferry passengers. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 14 to 15 November 2005 (19 October to 16 November 2005)” (Ref. 76, 378A, 1161, Story Number: NNS051024-17 - Release Date: 10/24/2005 7:10:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Ty Bjornson, Naval Reserve Center, Everett, Wash (NNS); Story Number: NNS051102-02 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 12:48:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS051102-04 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 11:01:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) & Story Number: NNS051107-06 - Release Date: 11/7/2005 11:33:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20710

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20841

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20869

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20908

 

Lincoln Sailors Pitch In on Mississippi Gulf Coast

 

“A team of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors used their Thanksgiving leave, usually spent with family and friends, to assist in the daunting task of cleaning up the Mississippi Gulf Coast from 21 to 28 November 2005 in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The Sailors flew from Seattle to Jackson, Miss., then traveled approximately 120 miles to the coast. As they traveled south, Yeoman 3rd Class Benjamin Clay said Katrina became more and more real the farther they went.

"Things looked pretty much untouched in Jackson," Clay said. "Though as we rode south, Katrina's aftermath became more and more obvious. It started with just debris on the side of the road, but by the time we passed Hattiesburg you saw plenty of caved-in roofs and toppled trees, and when we got to the coast, it looked like a war zone. Reality set in very quickly." While in Mississippi, the group was hosted by the Gulf Coast Worship Center (GCWC), a Long Beach, Miss., church. They joined church volunteers who came from across the country, and as far away as Hawaii.

 

The team helped with what the GCWC called "The Feast for 5,000," a Thanksgiving Day meal held in the name of kindness for the storm-ravaged community. The Sailors joined forces with Relief Spark (www.reliefspark.org), a nonprofit organization from Van Nuys, Calif. Led by Lisa Campbell, a Relief Spark volunteer coordinator, the group took to the streets as well. Packed into a 10-foot box truck, they helped Campbell deliver frozen turkeys, purchased locally by her organization, to residents in what's left of Biloxi, Miss.

They also transported almost 100 Christmas trees to the small coastal community of Gaultier, Miss.,in hopes of bringing some holiday cheer to those who may currently have little else. The biggest project of their holiday week was the excavation of one of hundreds of demolished beachfront homes in Long Beach. The Sailors wore respirators and other protective gear as they and the Relief Spark team gutted a home that was devastated by wind and water damage.

One of the biggest dangers in their work, even three months after Katrina made landfall, was the rampant Stachybotrys Chartarum (better known as Black Mold) spores commonly found in hurricane-damaged homes. Black mold has been known to cause long-lasting asthma-related illnesses in its victims. The team exercised their Navy-taught operational risk management (ORM) skills and wore the proper personal protective gear for the work environment.

 

Aviation Support Equipment Technician Christopher Dionisio was also confident in their assessment of the ORM question, "does the benefit outweigh the risk?" Dionisio was 11 and living in the Philippines when Mount Pinatubo erupted in the early 90s and lava swept his and other island communities away.

 

Too young to lend a hand in his homeland's recovery, Dionisio said the benefits outweighed the risks in Mississippi tenfold, and a big part of what he did to help there was in the name of the Pinatubo disaster. "When Pinatubo erupted, there was a huge hand extended to us. Some people may not know that the Lincoln actually showed up and evacuated thousands," Dionisio said.

 

"There wasn't much I could do then, so I wanted to give back in thanks for those who helped me and my family." Though the group didn't go to Mississippi as part of an official Navy project, they had plenty of Sailors behind them and their effort. On short notice, Lincoln's First Class Petty Officer Association (FCPOA) provided funds to help offset airfare costs during the pricey Thanksgiving travel season.

 

Their group donation, in addition to individual contributions from countless Sailors throughout, was crucial in not only getting the Lincoln team to the disaster area, but also played a big part in making sure their shipmates stayed well and had the best protective gear available in the still-hazardous and unstable environment. "Though we had planned this trip for a few months, circumstances only gave us two weeks of actual preparation," said Journalist 2nd Class David Poe.

 

"Whether it was those who found the time and resources to volunteer on such short notice, or those who couldn't join us but said "what can I do to help you?" the way this crew pulled together was truly touching." Poe also said the support the team got from Lincoln Sailors did much to encourage the belief in taking care of one another - whether on the ship taking care of a shipmate who needs help or volunteering one's time to help those less fortunate.

"Once the word got out, people who I have never met before showed up at my office door with funds in hand," Poe said. "I didn't know if they expected a tax receipt or something, but they trusted we would use their generosity for a greater good and only said they were proud of us and wished they could join us.

"Having a crew of more than 2,000 come to our aid like they did made us work that much harder because it was in their names as well as our own” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS051214-12 - Release Date: 12/14/2005 9:49:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Media Department, LONG BEACH, Miss. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=21338

 

CCSG-9 Sailors Lend a Helping Hand to Local Community

 

“Sailors from Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) recently collected food donations to assist local families in need and delivered them to the Marysville Community Food Bank (MCFB) on 13 December 2005.

In all, more than 266 pounds of food was donated to MCFB, a feat that surpassed expectations. MCFB Director Leslie McCullough said the donated food would go a long way within the community.

“The food will be packaged into bags and handed out to families that come here to pick up holiday meals,” McCullough said. “We’re able to feed about 4,000 people each month with the help of donations.”

Culinary Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Derek Ideker of CCSG 9, originally from Olympia, Wash., was able to personally deliver the donated items and was impacted by the opportunity to give back to the community.

“It really gave me some insight into what the community is doing to help those less fortunate,” Ideker said.

Feeling a bit of the “holiday spirit” after delivering the donations to MCFB, the CCSG 9 Sailors also rolled up their sleeves and volunteered their time to help sort and package the food.

“We rely heavily on volunteers,” McCullough said. “We have about 70 people who volunteer their time here to help, but we’re always looking for more, especially around this time of year.” For the CCSG 9 Sailors, it was not only a time to give, but also a time to be thankful for what they have.

“It was amazing to see how enthusiastic all of the volunteers were, and how it gets done,” Ideker said. “It was great to be a part of it all” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS051220-09 - Release Date: 12/20/2005 6:10:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, MARYSVILLE, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=21465

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2005 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XVIII

Appendix III


Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2005 (Ref. 378A):

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 2005 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President George Walker Bush, 2001-2009 - 43rd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Donald H. Rumsfeld
20 Jan 2001 - 18 Dec 2006 -
13th & 21st

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Gordon R. England - 70th & 73rd

24 May 2001- 24 Jan 2003 and

1 Oct 2003 - 28 Dec 2005

The Honorable Donald C. Winter - 74th

3 Jan 2006 - 13 May 2009

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Admiral Vernon E. Clark - 27th

21 July 2000 - 22 July 2005

ADM Michael Mullen - 28th

22 Jul 2005 - 29 Sep 2007

COMPACFLT, former *CINCPACFLT

 

ADM Gary R. Roughead - 57th

8 Jul 2005, to 8 May 2007

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM James M. Zortman - 29th

Aug 2002 - Aug 2004

Aug 2004 - 2011 - Not Reported

COMCRUDESGRU THREE

Carrier Strike Group and Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG)

RDML J. L. Shuford

 

Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG 9)

RDML Doug Crowder - 7 Sep 2005

RDML John W. Goodwin

7 Sep 2005 - 26 Mar 2007

Chief of Staff, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG )

CAPT Brian Roby

 

*Between 1907 and December 6, 1922, and between February 1, 1941 and October 24, 2002.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CINCPACFLT

 

Rear Adm. Goodwin Assumes Command of CCSG 9

 

“Rear Adm. J.W. (Bill) Goodwin assumed command of Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9, on 7 September 2005. Goodwin relieved Rear Adm. Doug Crowder, who has commanded CCSG 9 since August 2004” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051006-13 - Release Date: 10/6/2005 4:47:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20301

 

\Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2005 were:

 

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT K. L. Card /

CAPT Charles A. McCawley

Executive Officer - XO

CAPT D. Lausman

Administrative Officer

CDR Oren C. Jeffries

Air Officer

CDR David J. Fuhrmann

AIMD Officer, former Maintenance Officer

CDR Gregory A. Stanley

Combat Systems Officer

CDR Ronald E. Center

Legal Department - Command Judge Advocate

LCDR Mark C. Holley

Dental Officer

CDR Richard P. Campbell

Engineering Officer

CDR Chris D. Meyer

First Lieutenant - Deck Department

LCDR Gregory K. Worley

Communications Officer

 

Maintenance Officer

 

Senior Medical Officer

CRD Jamin T. McMahon

Navigator

CAPT Raymond B. Ginnetti

Operations Officer

CAPT (SEL) Matthew J. Faletti

Public Affairs - PAO

LCDR John M. Daniels

Reactor Officer

CAPT Steven J. Dinobile

Religious Department - RMD - Command Chaplain

CAPT (SEL) Paul R. Wrigley

Safety Officer

CDR Troy A. Johnson

Supply Officer

CDR David C. Meyers

Training Officer

CDR (SEL) Carla C. Blair

Weapons Officer

CDR Jon L. Baca

Commander, Carrier Air Wing 2

CAPT Lawrence Burt

Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing 2

CAPT M. Klunder

Command Master Chief, Carrier Air Wing 2

CMDCM M. L. Anjola

 

 

Organizational Structure. Captain Charles A. McCawley assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 17 March 2005, relieving Captain K. L. Card, served as Commanding Officer from 5 November 2002 to 17 March 2005. Captain D. Lausman served as Executive Officer. CMDCM(SW/AW) J. O’Banion served as Command Master Chief.” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) WestPac Cruise Book 2004-05

 

The following accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 2005:

 

Abraham Lincoln conducted her seventh “Westpac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, on her seventh Indian Ocean deployment in support of PASSEX and what would turned out to be Operation Unified Assistance (OUA) in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia, extending operations in the Java Sea via the South China Sea, Andaman Sea and Indian Ocean. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Java Sea in support of Tsunami Relief Efforts due to the tsunami in Sumatra, Indonesia from 30 December 2004 to 1 January 2005 (18 October 2004 to 4 March 2005)” (Ref. 76, 378A-, 1161). 

 

“Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel embarked for quarterly sustainment training in support of the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan on 30 October 2005, to conduct CQ’s for CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California upon departure from 30 October to 11 November 2005” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051102-02 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 12:48:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20841

 

 

Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 June to 8 September 2005 (Chapter XVIII, Appendix I); from 26 September to 18 October 2005 (Chapter XVIII, Appendix II) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2005 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter XVIII, Appendix III

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

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978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

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978-1-365-26038-4