Pierside maintenance availability at Naval Station, Everett, Washington;

5 March 2005; Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California and in the northern Pacific waters for readiness training in support of FRP; in port activities;  conducting her quarterly integrated Strike Group Sustainment Training, which Abraham Lincoln referred to as “sustainment operations,” for quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2; in port activities; quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) conducting Carrier Qualifications for west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 squadrons once embarked at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) JTFEx 05 off the coast of Southern California; Holidays Season and Christmas Stand Down.

5 March to 31 December 2005

Chapter XVIII

 

Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 June to 8 September 2005.

Chapter XVIII, Appendix I

 

Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 September to 18 October 2005.

Chapter XVIII, Appendix II

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2005 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XVIII, Appendix III

 

Chapter XVIII, Appendix I to III

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced a pierside maintenance availability at Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 7 March 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

Captain Charles A. McCawley assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 17 March 2005, relieving Captain Kendall L. Card, ninth Commanding Officer, serving from 15 May 2000 to 17 March 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

Sailors Gather for Memorial Day Remembrance

 

“Hundreds of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Naval Station (NAVSTA) Everett Sailors joined their shipmates’ accross the fleet in honoring those who’ve gone before them in a Memorial Day ceremony at NAVSTA Everett, Washington on 27 May 2005. Rear Adm. Len Hering, commander, Navy Region Northwest, was the day's host.

 

“It’s indeed a great honor for me to take part in this event,” said Hering, “so that we may pay homage to those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. To those who have helped make America what it is; to those who have preserved its heritage given to us by our forefathers; for those who have served in previous times for our country, I take this opportunity to thank you for making the sacrifices and setting the examples that are necessary.”

The ceremony’s keynote speaker, U.S. Senator Paull Shin, spoke of the selflessness of the American service member. Shin, a Korean refugee who was stricken homeless at the age of four, was rescued and later adopted by an American service member during the Korean War. Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Cassandra Alameda, a NAVSTA Everett Sailor, attended the on-base ceremony and listened to Shin’s story.

 

“I was stationed in Korea, and when the senator mentioned Seoul and Inchon, it hit me because I’ve been there,” said Alameda, a Ukiah, Calif., native. “To hear firsthand the effect service members have had on the people of other countries was amazing.” This year’s Memorial Day ceremony was the first Alameda had spent stateside since she’s been in the Navy, and she said being able to share it with shipmates past and present made it more special then ever.


“I feel a lot more pride in not only what we do as a Navy, but also in myself,” said Alameda. “I wouldn’t have wanted to be anywhere else today” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050720-10 - Release Date: 7/20/2005 1:14:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Dave Poe, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=18740

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a pierside maintenance availability at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 7 March to 31 May 2005” (Ref. 378A & 1161).

 

Lincoln, CVW-2 to Return to Sea for Surge Upkeep

 

As reported on 13 June 2005, “following their return from Operation Unified Assistance (OUA) in March and a brief in-port period, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 will return to sea for readiness training in early June.

While pierside at Naval Station Everett, Wash.,
Abe spent the three-month maintenance availability period upgrading and sustaining ship systems to better serve the Navy as the Pacific Fleet’s “surge carrier.” “A typical target manning for a carrier is 90-95 percent during a one-and-a-half year span,” said Personnelman 1st Class (SW) Robert Bywater, Abe’s personnel accounts supervisor, “but to keep up with surge status, we’re working to keep Lincoln at the same 90-95 percent for a three-year span.”

 

Abe’s Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), along with its Sailors, upgraded in significant ways their abilities to serve. In addition to new equipment in many of AIMD’s divisions, Sailors received in-depth training from technical representatives. They gained proficiency in multiple Consolidated Automated Support Systems (CASS). They also were trained on Radar Communication (RADCOM) and Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF), test stations and had all of the workbenches recalibrated in anticipation of the next underway period.

Lincoln has seen a higher-than-average crew turnaround of approximately 300 Sailors this spring. “We’ve spent a lot of money sending strikers to ‘A’ schools and rated personnel to ‘C’ schools and beyond,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Dustin Shead, Abe Training Department’s order writer. Shead also noted Training Department’s further success with “I Division.”

 

Since 2003, the division has served as a jump-off point for new Lincoln Sailors, mainstreaming their basic shipboard qualifications and familiarization to life on the “world’s greatest warship.”

 

“We’ve welcomed almost 200 new Sailors to Lincoln since we’ve been in port,” said Shead. “Whether it’s getting them trained-up on necessary qualifications, or just showing them around their new home port, we’ve done our best to make them feel at home.”

Though the Navy has yet to call upon the Pacific Fleet’s surge carrier a second time,
Lincoln Sailors remain ready to answer the call” (Ref. Story Number: NNS050613-12 - Release Date: 6/13/2005 9:34:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Dave Poe, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=18738

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a pierside maintenance availability at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 7 March to 31 May 2005” (Ref. 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington, for Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) on 1 June 2005, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, in support of Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California and in the northern Pacific waters for readiness training in support of FRP, conducting her quarterly integrated Strike Group Sustainment Training, which Abraham Lincoln referred to as “sustainment operations”” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 (NE)

(1 to 26 June 2005)

 

ull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet

EastPac

NorPac

CVW-2

NE

1 June 2005

26 Jun 2005

Training Operations

26-days

Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California and in the northern Pacific waters for readiness training in support of FRP, conducting her quarterly integrated Strike Group Sustainment Training, which Abraham Lincoln referred to as “sustainment operations.”

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VFA-2

Bounty Hunters -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter - Trainer

NE100

FA-18F

VFA-137

Kestrels - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE200

FA-18E

VFA-151

Vigilantes - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE300

 

FA-18C (N)

VFA-82

Marauders – Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NE400

 

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-131

Lancers - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NE500

EA-6B

VAW-116

Sun Kings -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C 2000

HS-2

Golden Falcons - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -         Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

HSL-47 Det.

Saberhawks - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (Light)

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine

700

SH-60B

VRC-30 Det. 2

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

20, 35

C-2A

(*1)VRC-30 Det. 2 transferred 162159/NE-22 and 162166/NE-31 to VRC-30DET.5 and received 162150/NF-20 and 162176/NF-21 from VRC-30DET.5.

F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in northern Pacific waters for Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) from 1 to 16 June 2005, conducting her quarterly integrated Strike Group Sustainment Training, which Abraham Lincoln referred to as “sustainment operations”” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to embark Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 for Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) on 17 June 2005” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 20 June 2005, visiting from 17 to 19 June 2005, for Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP)” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific for Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP), conducting a second stint with CVW-2 from 20 to 23 June 2005, returning to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to disembark CVW-2 before arriving her home port of Everett, Washington” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 26 June 2005, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, conducting Readiness / Refresher Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific from 23 to 26 June 2005, preceded by a second stint with CVW-2 from 20 to 23 June 2005, returning to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to disembark CVW-2 before arriving her home port of Everett, Washington. Abraham Lincoln was underway in northern Pacific waters for readiness training in support of FRP from 1 to 16 June 2005, conducting her quarterly integrated Strike Group Sustainment Training, which Abraham Lincoln referred to as “sustainment operations.” Abraham Lincoln pulled into NASNI to embark Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 for readiness training in support of FRP on 17 June 2005 and departed NASNI on 20 June 2005, visiting from 17 to 19 June 2005, for readiness training in support of FRP” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 June to 8 September 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 8 September 2005, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, for quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted readiness training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific from 8 to 10 September 2005. Unique to this underway period was a submarine familiarization (SUBFAM) exercise with the Swedish submarine HMS Gotland” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 11 September 2005, to embark Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, for quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 from 8 to 10 September 2005” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 12 September 2005, visiting on the 11th, for quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

“Along with the SUBFAM, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Weapons Department participated in a training evolution nicknamed "Killer Barrel" on 12 September 2005. The event involved firing .50-caliber machine guns at a target set in the water. This training was to test Abe's ship's self defense capabilities” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

An EA-6B Prowler assigned to the “Lancers” of Electronic Attack Squadron One Thirty One (VAQ-131) is signaled onto one of four steam-power catapults prior to launch.

 

050915-N-9079D-124 - Pacific Ocean (Sep. 15, 2005) - An EA-6B Prowler assigned to the “Lancers” of Electronic Attack Squadron One Thirty One (VAQ-131) is signaled onto one of four steam-power catapults prior to launch aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is currently conducting Quarterly Surge Sustainment Training with Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Ronald A. Dallatorre (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=28354

 

A Sailor assigned to the Bounty Hunters of Strike Fighter Squadron Two (VFA-2), inspects a CATM-9 (Captive Air Training Missile).

 

050919-N-4166B-049 - Pacific Ocean (Sept. 19, 2005) - A Sailor assigned to the "Bounty Hunters" of Strike Fighter Squadron Two (VFA-2), inspects a CATM-9 (Captive Air Training Missile), attached to an F/A-18F Super Hornet, as part of morning pre-flight perpetrations on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently conducting Quarterly Surge Sustainment Training off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Jordon R. Beesley (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=2840

 

An SH-60B Seahawk refuels during plane guard duties aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

050919-N-1229B-003 - Pacific Ocean (Sept. 19, 2005) - An SH-60B Seahawk, assigned to the “Saberhawks” of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Four Seven (HSL-47), refuels during plane guard duties aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently conducting Quarterly Surge Sustainment Training off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Patrick M. Bonafede (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=28382

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 21 September 2005, disembarking Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, conducting quarterly surge sustainment training off of the coast of California and or Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) from 12 to 21 September 2005” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

Abe, CVW-2 Complete Surge Sustainment Training

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (Abe) and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 completed  quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 on 21 September 2005. Abe and CVW-2 had joined up at Naval Air Station North Island, Calif., Sept. 11, for the training in support of the Navy's FRP.

Unique to this underway period was a
submarine familiarization (SUBFAM) exercise with the Swedish submarine HMS Gotland. "We're going to show the watches how to recognize an international [periscope] feather in the water," said Lt. Judd Conaster, Abraham Lincoln's assistant flight officer.

Along with the
SUBFAM, Abe's Weapons Department participated in a training evolution nicknamed "Killer Barrel" Sept. 12. The event involved firing .50-caliber machine guns at a target set in the water. This training was to test Abe's ship's self defense capabilities.

To stay current and qualified for underway operations,
Abe Sailors and CVW-2 Sailors train in port as well. Abe's Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) is a prime example of in-port training in action.

Each week, while in port,
AIMD conducts training on safety, Naval Aviation Maintenance Procedures (NAMP), and professional training on each division's underway mission. "We'll take some gear off of the aircraft to study and to train [on]," said Aviation Electronics Technician 1st class (AW) Mathew Collier, AIMD IM-3 division's leading petty officer.

Squadron Sailors train just as hard as
Abe Sailors while on the beach, but in some different settings. Squadron pilots work on their Strike Fighter Weapons and Tactics (SWIFTI) qualifications. SWIFTI is comprised of progressive levels of training and qualifications every pilot must maintain. Even while aboard Abe, pilots continue to work on their important SWIFTI qualifications. "We're always trying to clean up on all of our skills, whether it's air-to-air intercepts or air-to-ground," said Lt. Chris Miranda, a pilot for the Strike Fighter Squadron 34 Blue Blasters and an Avionics Ordnance Division Officer (AVARM) within the squadron.

Even the junior Sailors have to keep up their qualifications. "The PCs (plane captains) have to make sure our jets are flying. We always have to make sure we are ready to deploy, since we are on surge," Miranda said” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS050927-03 - Release Date: 9/27/2005 1:26:00 PM - By Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy Roache, USS Abraham Lincoln PublicAffairs, ABOARD, At sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20254

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 22 September 2005, steaming to her home port, disembarking Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, conducting quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 in support of FRP from 12 to 21 September 2005” (Ref. 76 & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (Abe) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 26 September 2005, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 22 to 23 September 2005, steaming to her home port upon departure from Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on the 22nd. Abe departed her home on the 8th of September 2005, conducting quarterly surge sustainment Readiness Training in support of Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific, Carrier Qualifications off California for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 from 8 to 10 September 2005. Unique to this underway period was a submarine familiarization (SUBFAM) exercise with the Swedish submarine HMS Gotland. Abe pulled into NASNI on 11 September 2005, to embark Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, for Carrier Qualifications off California in support of the FRP on the 12th. The event involved firing .50-caliber machine guns at a target set in the water. This training was to test Abe's ship's self defense capabilities. Along with the SUBFAM Weapons Department participated in a training evolution nicknamed "Killer Barrel" on 12 September 2005, conducting quarterly surge sustainment training off of the coast of California and or readiness training in support of FRP from 12 to 21 September 2005. Abe and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 completed quarterly surge sustainment training off of the coast of California on 21 September 2005, departing NASNI on 22 September 2005, steaming to her home port, disembarking Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 before arriving at NASNI (8 September 2005 to 26 September 2005)” (Ref. 76, 378A, 1161 & Story Number: NNS050927-03 - Release Date: 9/27/2005 1:26:00 PM - By Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy Roache, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD, At sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20254

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Station, Everett, Washington from 26 September to 18 October 2005” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 19 October 2005, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, for quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) conducting Carrier Qualifications for west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 squadrons once embarked at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

Lincoln Storekeepers Start Pilot Program to Improve Supply Process

 

As reported on 24 October 2005, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Supply Department’s S-8 Division Sailors have developed a prototype inventory and supply management system designed to streamline efficiency, productivity and time. Once the new system is implemented, the storekeepers will keep inventory for many divisions, including Abe’s Food Service Division (S-2).

 

“We recently took over 10 storerooms from S-2,” said Storekeeper 1st Class (SW) Brian Button, S-8’s readiness leading petty officer. “Right now, it’s just the frozen and dry goods. Eventually, we plan to take on more.” Ensign Diana Dalphose, Lincoln’s Food Services Officer, said she feels very positive about the new inventory system. “Everybody is very excited,” she said. “We are the only ship that is implementing the system. It will completely revamp the current program and will help maintain better accuracy of our many inventory levels.”

 

According to S-8, better time management for personnel and resources will be the prime advantages gained by handling inventory in this new fashion. With personnel freed up from inventory documentation, there will be a gain in rating-specific man hours. “In recent months, we’ve taken back stores for medical and dental that were typically run by corpsmen,” Button said.

 

“Since then, medical’s manning readiness has increased considerably. While we take care of the inventory, these corpsmen are able to focus on their everyday jobs.” Although the Food Service stores will be inventoried and maintained by storekeepers, the culinary specialists (CS) will still have access to the inventory. “The system is going to be universal. It will be utilized not only for us, but also by the CSs as well,” Button said. From June 2005 through January 2006, the S-8 division will have taken on inventory responsibilities in many other shipboard areas.

 

“The divisions will place an order with us, like anyone else, and we’ll issue their goods to them,” Button explained. Some of the other items range from hazardous materials and reactor materials to candy bars and soda. “If successful, other commands are expected to model their supply inventory systems on Lincoln’s,” Button said. “It’s a lot of work to get everything on line. Once we get to that point, everything’s going to be great. It’s going to pay off dividends in the long run. We’re setting standards for the Navy” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051024-17 - Release Date: 10/24/2005 7:10:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Ty Bjornson, Naval Reserve Center, Everett, Wash (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20710

 

Senior Chief Navy Counselor David Paradise, assigned to Commander Naval Recruiting Command, receives his annual Influenza vaccine in the form of a nasal mist.

 

051028-N-9769P-002 - Millington, Tenn. (Oct. 28, 2005) - Senior Chief Navy Counselor David Paradise, assigned to Commander Naval Recruiting Command, receives his annual Influenza vaccine in the form of a nasal mist. The painless vaccine, called FLUMIST, is sprayed into a person’s nostrils rather than injected by needle. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Jayme Pastoric (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=29458

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 29 October 2005, embarking CVW-2, conducting Carrier Qualifications for west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons as part of quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) in the Eastern Pacific from 19 to 29 October 2005” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

Abe, CVW-2 Stay "Ready" With Quarterly Surge Training

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) rejoined Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel for quarterly sustainment training in support of the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan on 30 October 2005. While Abe and attached personnel may only be out to sea for a few weeks, a lot is being done to make sure everyone is up to speed and fit to fight at any time. “Right now we are in a surge mode,” said Lt. Clint Cody of Abe’s operations department. “We have to maintain a certain amount of mission readiness at all times. Right now, we’re required to be at the most forward-leaning posture, in order to be ready to be called upon if something happens that would require us to go out to sea.”

While underway this quarter,
Lincoln will host Fleet Readiness Squadron (FRS) training pilots, who will be landing on the four-and-a-half acre flight deck for their Carrier Qualifications (CQ). “We’re going to do approximately four days of FRS CQs,” Cody said. “We’ll have new pilots from various platforms learn how to land on a flight deck. They’ve had one opportunity prior to this to actually land on a carrier, but this will be the first time that they’ll be doing both day and night CQs.” After completing training with the FRS pilots, Lincoln will join up with the crew of CVW-2. “CVW-2 will be doing a few days of CQs, while both the Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) will be doing dual scenarios,” Cody said.

 

Even though this is a training situation, the dual battle group scenario is something that could become real in the future. “They (Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet) want us to do coordinated efforts and actually get out there and practice working two carriers together in a small area,” Cody said. “It requires a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air, so they want us to practice it before we find ourselves doing it for real if the situation arises.” Ultimately, maintaining readiness is the name of the game for the ALCSG, and completing training now allows the crew to enjoy a holiday season with families, which is something they weren’t able to do while deployed last year.

 

“If you look at the schedule, we’re actually completing this training early,” he said. “One of the reasons we came out early is that this will get us through the holiday period, allow for some time off, and get us ready for INSURV (Board of Inspection and Survey) in the early part of next year.” Although Abraham Lincoln and CVW-2 Sailors may only be out to sea for a relatively short amount of time in the sense of a conventional deployment, the training and professional knowledge gained will probably prove to be long lasting in order to keep the ALCSG at the Navy’s warfighting tip of the spear” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051102-02 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 12:48:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20841

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel and Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 embarked, departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 30 October 2005, for quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), conducting Carrier Qualifications for CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

A plane captain ignals to the crew in one of his squadron’s F/A-18F Super Hornets during starting procedures aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

051102-N-5384B-065 - Pacific Ocean (Nov. 2, 2005) - A plane captain assigned to the “Bounty Hunters” of Strike Fighter Squadron Two (VFA-2), signals to the crew in one of his squadron’s F/A-18F Super Hornets during starting procedures aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and embarked Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) are currently conducting Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Justin R. Blake (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=29523

 

CCSG 9 Sets Sail for JTFEX

 

As reported on 2 November 2005, “the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Strike Group, led by Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, is participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) off the coast of Southern California through the beginning of November.

The exercise is the final step in preparing the Strike Group for deployment and is designed to test its ability to operate in a complex, hostile environment with other U.S. and coalition forces.

“This is a unique opportunity to improve upon our combat readiness. Now and in the future, the Navy will continue to be a key component of Joint Task Forces,” said Goodwin.

During this “graduate-level” exercise, more than 6,500 Sailors and Marines are working together to hone their operational skills in preparation for their upcoming deployment.

“The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group serves our nation well as we deliver robust and flexible sea power to meet the challenges of the new security environment with our friends, partner, and Allies,” Goodwin said.

Carrier Strike Group 9 is comprised of many different ships and organizations, including
Abraham Lincoln, Carrier Air Wing 2, Destroyer Squadron 9, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051102-04 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 11:01:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20869

 

Lincoln Preparing for Critical January Inspection

 

As reported on 7 November 2005, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors are getting a head start on the upcoming Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) scheduled for early January. While Sailors are getting ready for the inspection, the 100-person INSURV team, along with Lincoln’s senior leadership, helped to prepare Abe Sailors for what they can expect. Through a series of zone inspections, Abe’s leadership is providing guidance and helping to point out areas of concern that may need extra attention before the INSURV team arrives. By completing zone inspections for every department and division on the ship, Sailors aboard Lincoln are optimistic about their success when the actual inspection team arrives.

Capt. Dave Lausman,
Abe’s executive officer, recently released an XO Gram (16-05), which outlines some of the rules necessary for maintaining standards throughout berthing spaces. The XO Gram is available for review on Abenet, the ship’s intranet site, and includes details about the berthing policies. Chief Operations Specialist (SW/AW) Nicholas Desoto, of Abe’s operations department, is helping to ensure the berthing policies are strictly enforced for the assessment. Serving as the habitability coordinator, Desoto is in charge of making sure the berthing spaces are presentable for the INSURV team.

“With the XO Gram installed, we need to concentrate on effectively following it and making sure every rack is the same,” Desoto said. “It’s a uniformity issue and a cleanliness issue.” One of the main issues of concern for the ship’s equipment is securing for sea. “We’re going to be steaming at an excess of 30 knots while doing 18-degree turns,” Desoto said, “so you’re going to see a lot of movement throughout the ship. One of the things the inspection team will look for is to see if we’re secure for sea.”

During a recent captain’s call, Capt. C. A. McCawley,
Abe’s commanding officer, stated the importance of the upcoming inspection and asked for total cooperation throughout the chain of command, comparing INSURV to an open-book test. “We already know what they’re going to be looking for once they get here,” McCawley said. “It’s the job of every person on this ship to make sure that every space is ready for inspection.”

Although
Abe Sailors may believe their ship is the finest in the fleet, it’s up to every individual to prepare their spaces and prove to the INSURV team that Lincoln is “fit to fight” at any time” (Ref. Story Number: NNS051107-06 - Release Date: 11/7/2005 11:33:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20908

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Carrier Qualifications for and CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California from 30 October to 11 November 2005, returning to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 11 November 2005, to disembark CVW-2 before heading to her home port via a port visit to San Francisco, California. A key element of this training included JTFEx 05 with CVW-2 and Commander Destroyer Squadron 9 embarked, and with Mobile Bay and guided missile destroyers Russell (DDG-59) and Shoup, together with Ronald Reagan and ships of her group (4-8 November). Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) practiced doing dual scenarios in preparation for a possible real life situation. The Commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet ordered the strike groups to conduct coordinated efforts and practice working two carriers together in a small area. It required a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into San Francisco, California for a weekend of liberty and Veterans Day celebrations on from 11 to 14 November 2005. The Deck Department rigged the aft brow to a barge on the stern dock to receive ferry passengers” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 14 to 15 November 2005” (Ref. 76, 378A & 1161).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel and Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, Commander Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 16 November 2005, with Charles A. McCawley as the Commanding Officer, conducting quarterly sustainment training in support of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ’s) for west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons in the Eastern Pacific from 19 to 29 October 2005, pulling into Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, on 29 October 2005. Supply Department’s S-8 Division Sailors have developed a prototype inventory and supply management system designed to streamline efficiency, productivity and time. Once the new system is implemented, the storekeepers will keep inventory for many divisions, including Abe’s Food Service Division (S-2). “We recently took over 10 storerooms from S-2,” said Storekeeper 1st Class (SW) Brian Button, S-8’s readiness leading petty officer. “Right now, it’s just the frozen and dry goods. Eventually, we plan to take on more.” Ensign Diana Dalphose, Lincoln’s Food Services Officer, said she feels very positive about the new inventory system. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and its more than 2,000 attached personnel embarked for quarterly sustainment training in support of the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan on 30 October 2005, to conduct CQ’s for CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of Southern California upon departure from 30 October to 11 November 2005. “Right now we are in a surge mode,” said Lt. Clint Cody of Abe’s operations department. Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) practiced doing dual scenarios in preparation for a possible real life situation. The Commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet ordered the strike groups to conduct coordinated efforts and practice working two carriers together in a small area. It required a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air. As reported on 2 November 2005, the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, led by Rear Adm. Bill Goodwin, began participation in a JTFEX off the coast of Southern California through the beginning of November. The exercise is the final step in preparing the Strike Group for deployment and is designed to test its ability to operate in a complex, hostile environment with other U.S. and coalition forces. “This is a unique opportunity to improve upon our combat readiness. Now and in the future, the Navy will continue to be a key component of Joint Task Forces,” said Goodwin. During this “graduate-level” exercise, more than 6,500 Sailors and Marines are working together to hone their operational skills in preparation for their upcoming deployment. “The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group serves our nation well as we deliver robust and flexible sea power to meet the challenges of the new security environment with our friends, partner, and Allies,” Goodwin said. Carrier Strike Group 9 is comprised of many different ships and organizations, including Abraham Lincoln, Carrier Air Wing 2, Destroyer Squadron 9, USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), USS Russell (DDG-59) and USS Shoup (DDG-86). As reported on 7 November 2005, Abraham Lincoln Sailors got a head start on the upcoming Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) scheduled for early January. While Sailors were getting ready for the inspection, the 100-person INSURV team, along with Lincoln’s senior leadership, helped to prepare Abe Sailors for what they can expect. Abraham Lincoln conducted CQs for CVW-2 squadrons, and JTFEX off the coast of Southern California from 30 October to 11 November 2005, returning to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), on 11 November 2005, to disembark CVW-2 before heading to her home port via a port visit to San Francisco, California. A key element of this training included JTFEx 05 with CVW-2 and Commander Destroyer Squadron 9 embarked, and with Mobile Bay and guided missile destroyers Russell (DDG-59) and Shoup, together with Ronald Reagan and ships of her group (4-8 November). Lincoln Strike Group (ALCSG) and Reagan Strike Group (RRSG) practiced doing dual scenarios in preparation for a possible real life situation. The Commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet ordered the strike groups to conduct coordinated efforts and practice working two carriers together in a small area. It required a lot of coordination and a lot of aircraft in the air. Abraham Lincoln returned to NASNI, disembarking CVW-2 before heading to her home port via a port visit to San Francisco, California from 11 to 14 November 2005. The Deck Department rigged the aft brow to a barge on the stern dock to receive ferry passengers. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 14 to 15 November 2005 (19 October to 16 November 2005)” (Ref. 76, 378A, 1161, Story Number: NNS051024-17 - Release Date: 10/24/2005 7:10:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Ty Bjornson, Naval Reserve Center, Everett, Wash (NNS); Story Number: NNS051102-02 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 12:48:00 PM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS); Story Number: NNS051102-04 - Release Date: 11/2/2005 11:01:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) & Story Number: NNS051107-06 - Release Date: 11/7/2005 11:33:00 AM - By Journalist 3rd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20710

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20841

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20869

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=20908

 

Lincoln Sailors Pitch In on Mississippi Gulf Coast

 

“A team of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors used their Thanksgiving leave, usually spent with family and friends, to assist in the daunting task of cleaning up the Mississippi Gulf Coast from 21 to 28 November 2005 in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The Sailors flew from Seattle to Jackson, Miss., then traveled approximately 120 miles to the coast. As they traveled south, Yeoman 3rd Class Benjamin Clay said Katrina became more and more real the farther they went.

"Things looked pretty much untouched in Jackson," Clay said. "Though as we rode south, Katrina's aftermath became more and more obvious. It started with just debris on the side of the road, but by the time we passed Hattiesburg you saw plenty of caved-in roofs and toppled trees, and when we got to the coast, it looked like a war zone. Reality set in very quickly." While in Mississippi, the group was hosted by the Gulf Coast Worship Center (GCWC), a Long Beach, Miss., church. They joined church volunteers who came from across the country, and as far away as Hawaii.

 

The team helped with what the GCWC called "The Feast for 5,000," a Thanksgiving Day meal held in the name of kindness for the storm-ravaged community. The Sailors joined forces with Relief Spark (www.reliefspark.org), a nonprofit organization from Van Nuys, Calif. Led by Lisa Campbell, a Relief Spark volunteer coordinator, the group took to the streets as well. Packed into a 10-foot box truck, they helped Campbell deliver frozen turkeys, purchased locally by her organization, to residents in what's left of Biloxi, Miss.

They also transported almost 100 Christmas trees to the small coastal community of Gaultier, Miss.,in hopes of bringing some holiday cheer to those who may currently have little else. The biggest project of their holiday week was the excavation of one of hundreds of demolished beachfront homes in Long Beach. The Sailors wore respirators and other protective gear as they and the Relief Spark team gutted a home that was devastated by wind and water damage.

One of the biggest dangers in their work, even three months after Katrina made landfall, was the rampant Stachybotrys Chartarum (better known as Black Mold) spores commonly found in hurricane-damaged homes. Black mold has been known to cause long-lasting asthma-related illnesses in its victims. The team exercised their Navy-taught operational risk management (ORM) skills and wore the proper personal protective gear for the work environment.

 

Aviation Support Equipment Technician Christopher Dionisio was also confident in their assessment of the ORM question, "does the benefit outweigh the risk?" Dionisio was 11 and living in the Philippines when Mount Pinatubo erupted in the early 90s and lava swept his and other island communities away.

 

Too young to lend a hand in his homeland's recovery, Dionisio said the benefits outweighed the risks in Mississippi tenfold, and a big part of what he did to help there was in the name of the Pinatubo disaster. "When Pinatubo erupted, there was a huge hand extended to us. Some people may not know that the Lincoln actually showed up and evacuated thousands," Dionisio said.

 

"There wasn't much I could do then, so I wanted to give back in thanks for those who helped me and my family." Though the group didn't go to Mississippi as part of an official Navy project, they had plenty of Sailors behind them and their effort. On short notice, Lincoln's First Class Petty Officer Association (FCPOA) provided funds to help offset airfare costs during the pricey Thanksgiving travel season.

 

Their group donation, in addition to individual contributions from countless Sailors throughout, was crucial in not only getting the Lincoln team to the disaster area, but also played a big part in making sure their shipmates stayed well and had the best protective gear available in the still-hazardous and unstable environment. "Though we had planned this trip for a few months, circumstances only gave us two weeks of actual preparation," said Journalist 2nd Class David Poe.

 

"Whether it was those who found the time and resources to volunteer on such short notice, or those who couldn't join us but said "what can I do to help you?" the way this crew pulled together was truly touching." Poe also said the support the team got from Lincoln Sailors did much to encourage the belief in taking care of one another - whether on the ship taking care of a shipmate who needs help or volunteering one's time to help those less fortunate.

"Once the word got out, people who I have never met before showed up at my office door with funds in hand," Poe said. "I didn't know if they expected a tax receipt or something, but they trusted we would use their generosity for a greater good and only said they were proud of us and wished they could join us.

"Having a crew of more than 2,000 come to our aid like they did made us work that much harder because it was in their names as well as our own” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS051214-12 - Release Date: 12/14/2005 9:49:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Media Department, LONG BEACH, Miss. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=21338

 

CCSG-9 Sailors Lend a Helping Hand to Local Community

 

“Sailors from Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) recently collected food donations to assist local families in need and delivered them to the Marysville Community Food Bank (MCFB) on 13 December 2005.

In all, more than 266 pounds of food was donated to MCFB, a feat that surpassed expectations. MCFB Director Leslie McCullough said the donated food would go a long way within the community.

“The food will be packaged into bags and handed out to families that come here to pick up holiday meals,” McCullough said. “We’re able to feed about 4,000 people each month with the help of donations.”

Culinary Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Derek Ideker of CCSG 9, originally from Olympia, Wash., was able to personally deliver the donated items and was impacted by the opportunity to give back to the community.

“It really gave me some insight into what the community is doing to help those less fortunate,” Ideker said.

Feeling a bit of the “holiday spirit” after delivering the donations to MCFB, the CCSG 9 Sailors also rolled up their sleeves and volunteered their time to help sort and package the food.

“We rely heavily on volunteers,” McCullough said. “We have about 70 people who volunteer their time here to help, but we’re always looking for more, especially around this time of year.” For the CCSG 9 Sailors, it was not only a time to give, but also a time to be thankful for what they have.

“It was amazing to see how enthusiastic all of the volunteers were, and how it gets done,” Ideker said. “It was great to be a part of it all” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS051220-09 - Release Date: 12/20/2005 6:10:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Michael Cook, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, MARYSVILLE, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=21465

 

 

Chapter XVIII (5 March to 31 December 2005)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4