Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington (25 June 2003 to 7 May 2004).

6 May 2003 to 7 May 2004

Chapter XVI

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2003 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XVI, Appendix I, Section 1 of 2

 

 

CVW-14 was transferred to USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) in June 2003” (Ref. 519).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained in port Naval Station Everett, Washington from 6 May to 23 June 2003” (Ref. & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station Everett, Washington on 24 June 2003, for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, to commence Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA). Following the Abraham Lincoln’s return to Everett, the crew went into action preparing and upgrading weapons systems and spaces as part of the DPIA at (PSNS). 68 major ship alterations were planned and executed by Ship's Force personnel teaming with the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and numerous private industry contractors. At a total cost of $250 million, Abraham Lincoln will complete its overhaul and take on the challenges of this new millennium” (Ref. & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington on 25 June 2003, commencing a Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA). At a total cost of $250 million, Abraham Lincoln will complete its overhaul and take on the challenges of this new millennium. Once the ship entered the drydock of PSNS, a number of Self-Help programs were instituted. The ship organized a number of "Tiger Teams" to attack the major self-help projects onboard. These teams were responsible for long matting, tile, paint, lagging, non-skid, ventilation, and ready room chair overhaul. By utilizing these teams” (Ref. 378A).

 

Super Hornet pilots from VFA-115 attached to CVW-14 transferred from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) in June 2003, traveled to New York City to visit the men of New York Fire Department Engine 54, Ladder 4, and Battalion 9 from 10 to 14 July 2003. The naval aviators dedicated their fight against terrorists to the memory of the firefighters who sacrificed themselves on 9/11, and Lt. Comdr. David Little and Lt. Comdr. James Haigler performed a fly-by of the antisubmarine warfare support aircraft carrier USS Intrepid (CV-11) museum, as surviving firefighters and their families gathered on the flight deck” (Ref. 378A).

 

UUV Use In Support of Operation Iraqi Freedom Recounted

 

As reported on 29 August 2003, “although the Iraqi regime collapsed quickly in the face of advancing coalition forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom, their small naval force sowed the narrow Khor Abd Allah waterway with enough explosives to wreak havoc on any vessel trying to reach the supply port of Umm Qasr. The Navy's Special Clearance Team (NSCT) 1, along with Royal Navy and Australian forces, handled the task of exploratory mine hunting in March to render the port safe for incoming humanitarian aid shipments.

Various aspects of the missions were recently discussed by Cmdr. Tony Rodgers, NSCT-1 commanding officer, at the Autonomous Unmanned Vehicle Festival (AUV Fest) 2003, held at Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Keyport, Wash. from 11 to 22 August 2002. The AUV Fest showcased the upcoming new generation of innovations concerning unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV), AUV and mechanical high-tech marvels, from torpedo-shaped drones to miniature multipurpose robots.

"The UUVs are a great tool for application of what we had to do regarding mine detection and clearance," said Rodgers. "We certainly didn't expect anyone to shoot at us, but environmentally, what we had to do was a lot more difficult than initially anticipated." NSCT-1 accomplished the mission with the aid of unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV). They also conducted UUV operations further up the river at Az Zubayr and Karbala, Iraq.

NSCT-1's primary mission is to conduct low-visibility underwater mine and obstacle reconnaissance and clearance operations from over the horizon to the seaward edge of the surf zone. The port of Umm Qasr and associated waterways presented the team with a lot to deal with such as sediment, accumulated debris, and an above average collection of flotsam and jetsam that had to be thoroughly searched. "We used the Remote Environmental Measurement Units Support (REMUS) UUV," explained Rodgers. The REMUS UUV is a two-man portable unit that weighs approximately 80 pounds and is specifically designed to classify and map ocean bottoms.

 

"Although the REMUS UUV does not get press like the dolphins do, we did use it to help hunt out mines. Our job was to determine the presence or absence of mines, as well as be prepared for similar short notice tasking elsewhere with our coalition partners." According to Rodgers, his team went into action by initially checking the bottom for mines, then branched out having the divers conduct tactile searches of the quay wall out into the surrounding water to determine any possible mine burial zones.


"Imagine if a truck pulled up to the edge, and then a load of mines were tossed into the water. Our job is to find and locate exactly where those mines would go under such a scenario," described Rodgers.

 

One of the main challenges in their exploratory mine hunting operation was dealing with tidal extremes of up to 15 feet between high and low tides, and the pull of currents up to five knots. There were also sandstorms that made visibility murky on land, as well as deposited silt and sediment along the wharfs, piers and moorings of the old port city. In all, NSCT-1 conducted 10 missions in the waters off Umm Qasr covering a total of 2.5 million square meters. They discovered and marked 97 man-made objects and shapes, each of which had to be investigated -- even if they turned out to be rusty anchors or old truck tires.

 

In all three locations, a useful by-product of their underwater work was that the data they collected was shared with the Port and Maritime Registry, which will help them in much needed pending dredging operations. "We even supplied the identification of some unknown wrecks under there by using the UUVs," Rodgers noted. NSCT-1's mission proved that by using UUVs in actual field work in difficult wartime conditions, they were able to achieve their military objective and also provide valuable environmental and oceanographic data that will be just as invaluable in the days to come” (Ref. Story Number: NNS030829-05 - Release Date: 8/29/2003 7:48:00 AM - By Chief Journalist (SW) Douglas H Stutz, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, KEYPORT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=9079

 

“The Navy announced that due to “Force Shaping Efforts” resulting from advances in technology, the service would disestablish the Signalman rating (SM), whose sailors had been responsible for visual communications between ships (effective beginning on 30 September 2003 and extending by increments into the following year). About 10% of the SMs could convert into the Quartermaster rating (QM), and the remaining sailors rotated into other ratings. This caused additional burdens temporarily for the sailors of the Navigation Department, however, as they had to cross-train SMs and further in-depth training of QMs in visual communications to assume responsibilities which the SMs had hitherto performed” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Adm. Walter F. Doran, Commander Pacific Fleet, addressed operational issues during a meeting at the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce on 13 October 2003, where he referred to deployments by highlighting USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) just completed cruise as “too long, and they’re going to be very, very hard to sustain. We need to try to get back to six-month-or-less deployments”” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Sailors from VFA-115 attached to CVW-14 assigned to USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) in June 2003, returned to New York to greet firefighters in December 2003. They presented the men a model of Aircraft No. 200, a Super Hornet that flew against the Iraqis, complete with the fire department markings that the aircraft wore during the battles. The firemen reciprocated by giving the pilots a United States flag that had flown over the World Trade Center site in a ceremony at ‘ground zero’” (Ref. 378A).

 

“On December 9, 2003, the U.S. military announced that it had "launched a major ground operation in Afghanistan in an effort to eliminate the remnants of al Qaeda and the Taliban regime overthrown in 2001” (Ref. 327).

 

“At years end 2003, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was under going a Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, commencing on 24 June 2003, departing Naval Station Everett, Washington on 24 June 2003, arriving Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 25 June 2003” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2004 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

“Defective bearings for the rudder posts and Vice Adm. Phillip M. Balisle, Commander Naval Sea Systems Command, announcement that a “lack of attention to detail,” delayed USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) return from drydock, and cited “management failure” as the reason on 4 January 2004, resulting in refloating from drydock pushed back from 16 January to 13 February 2004, while the principal causes of the delays included inclement weather, which curtailed painting during rainy days or in periods of high humidity or dew points, and that both rudder posts required repairs, which incurred additional problems. The Navy had tasked the 30,000 some workers at the yard with several other key projects, including the conversion of fleet ballistic missile submarine Ohio (SSBN-727) into a guided missile submarine (SSGN-726), and the heavy workload imposed additional burdens on workers that forced them to delay an availability on USS Nimitz (CVN-68), and to convert fleet ballistic missile submarine USS Michigan (SSBN-727) into a guided missile submarine (SSGN-727). Vice Adm. Balisle’s comments offended many of these workers and he admitted that he addressed the issues in “a direct, blunt manner.” The admiral also noted his pride at the long shifts that workers completed, and unapologetically explained the crucial timing of returning Abraham Lincoln to sea to fight terrorists: “That said, in times of war, intentions and feelings are a meaningless measure. Delivering the product is the only measure that counts.” Following the Abraham Lincoln’s return to Everett, the crew went into action preparing and upgrading weapons systems and spaces as part of the DPIA at (PSNS). 68 major ship alterations were planned and executed by Ship's Force personnel teaming with the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and numerous private industry contractors. Abraham Lincoln arrived PSNS on 25 June 2003, commencing a DPIA. At a total cost of $250 million, Abraham Lincoln will complete its overhaul and take on the challenges of this new millennium. Once the ship entered the drydock of PSNS, a number of Self-Help programs were instituted. The ship organized a number of "Tiger Teams" to attack the major self-help projects onboard. These teams were responsible for long matting, tile, paint, lagging, non-skid, ventilation, and ready room chair overhaul. By utilizing these teams, Abraham Lincoln has saved over one million dollars and has ensured the spaces are kept in the best possible material condition” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, conducting DPIA from 25 June 2003 to 7 May 2004. As work on Abraham Lincoln extended beyond the initially scheduled deadlines, Vice Adm. Phillip M. Balisle, Commander Naval Sea Systems Command, announced that a “lack of attention to detail” delayed her return from drydock, and cited “management failure” as the reason on 4 January 2004. The principal causes of the delays included inclement weather, which curtailed painting during rainy days or in periods of high humidity or dew points, and that both rudder posts required repairs, which incurred additional problems. Few U.S. facilities had equipment large or sophisticated enough or calibrated to handle the massive rudder posts, and they had to ship them across country for workers to machine the vital gear, since the carrier’s propeller shafts already occupied the machines at Bremerton. Inspectors then discovered that they had received defective bearings and had to begin the process a second time. Defective bearings for the rudder posts and Vice Adm. Phillip M. Balisle, Commander Naval Sea Systems Command, announcement that a “lack of attention to detail,” delayed Abraham Lincoln return from drydock, and cited “management failure” as the reason on 4 January 2004, resulting in refloating from drydock pushed back from 16 January to 13 February 2004, while the principal causes of the delays included inclement weather, which curtailed painting during rainy days or in periods of high humidity or dew points, and that both rudder posts required repairs, which incurred additional problems. The Navy had tasked the 30,000 some workers at the yard with several other key projects, including the conversion of fleet ballistic missile submarine Ohio (SSBN-727) into a guided missile submarine (SSGN-726), and the heavy workload imposed additional burdens on workers that forced them to delay an availability on USS Nimitz (CVN-68), and to convert fleet ballistic missile submarine USS Michigan (SSBN-727) into a guided missile submarine (SSGN-727). Vice Adm. Balisle’s comments offended many of these workers and he admitted that he addressed the issues in “a direct, blunt manner.” The admiral also noted his pride at the long shifts that workers completed, and unapologetically explained the crucial timing of returning Abraham Lincoln to sea to fight terrorists: “That said, in times of war, intentions and feelings are a meaningless measure. Delivering the product is the only measure that counts.” Following the Abraham Lincoln’s return to Everett, the crew went into action preparing and upgrading weapons systems and spaces as part of the DPIA at (PSNS). 68 major ship alterations were planned and executed by Ship's Force personnel teaming with the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and numerous private industry contractors. Abraham Lincoln arrived PSNS on 25 June 2003, commencing a DPIA. Super Hornet pilots from VFA-115 attached to CVW-14 transferred from Abraham Lincoln to USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) in June 2003, traveled to New York City to visit the men of New York Fire Department Engine 54, Ladder 4, and Battalion 9 from 10 to 14 July 2003. The naval aviators dedicated their fight against terrorists to the memory of the firefighters who sacrificed themselves on 9/11, and Lt. Comdr. David Little and Lt. Comdr. James Haigler performed a fly-by of the antisubmarine warfare support aircraft carrier USS Intrepid (CV-11) museum, as surviving firefighters and their families gathered on the flight deck. At a total cost of $250 million, Abraham Lincoln completed its overhaul and take on the challenges of this new millennium. Once the ship entered the drydock of PSNS, a number of Self-Help programs were instituted. The ship organized a number of "Tiger Teams" to attack the major self-help projects onboard. These teams were responsible for long matting, tile, paint, lagging, non-skid, ventilation, and ready room chair overhaul. By utilizing these teams, Abraham Lincoln has saved over one million dollars and has ensured the spaces are kept in the best possible material condition. Major Shipalts include:

 

*Smart Carrier upgrade. Allows monitoring of critical systems while reducing overall manpower requirements with increased efficiency and data accuracy.

 

*CASS RF/High Power/Electo-optical. Gives AIMD capability to repair F/A-18 E/F Super Hornets Avionics repairable assemblies.

 

*CVIC upgrade. Allows faster information flow of intelligence information and real-time current operations picture for the Strike Group Commander.

 

*JP-5 fuel delivery/management system upgrade. Replaces old analog technologies with digital and automated fuel management capabilities.

 

During the 2003 DPIA Abraham Lincoln Sailors performed an extremely large amount of work packages to ensure all required maintenance was completed. Some of the most noteworthy jobs performed by the crew include:

 

*Initiated and performed 326 ship's force jobs in support of overhauling nine weapons elevators.

 

*Replaced 44 Chemical Holding Tank (CHT) soil and waste diverters and scupper valves and 123 remote operating gear assemblies.

 

*Chemical cleaning of over 40,000 linear feet of CHT waste and soil piping in 18 CHT zones.

 

*Replacement of 23 salt-water reducing stations to include 23 2" gate valves, 23 2" relief valves, and 23 reducing valves.

 

*Complete refurbishment of forward and aft CHT tanks and 200 feet of aerator, sprinkler, suction and discharge piping.

 

*Conversion of Eddy Pumps and controllers. In order to integrate with the Smart Carrier system and allow monitoring through Machinery Control Stations and Integrated Condition Assessment System, ships crew replaced all float switches with RADAR Tank Level Indicators.

 

*Replacement of over 500 feet of soil and waste piping throughout the ship.

 

The following work was accomplished in FY03:

 

*Long Matting: 60,730 sq. ft.

*Tile Team: 24,175f sq. ft.

*Paint Team: 112,255 sq. ft.

*Ready Room Chairs: 287

 

Repair Division's Weld Shop supervisor trained six personnel in the complex brazing technique required to repair 325 of the ships watertight doors during DPIA. This effort saved the Navy $250,000.00 in contractor cost for the replacement of the nonferrous wedges and striker plates. Weapons G-2 Division performed around-the-clock maintenance on the magazine sprinkler system, rebuilding 16 of 32 main control valves and 156 of 240 assorted valves. The effort alone saved the Navy $50,000.00 and ensured the integrity and safety of the magazines.

 

Community Relations (COMREL) Projects Abraham Lincoln Sailors were very involved in all sorts of community programs including children sports programs, "Adopt a School," volunteer tutoring for the local high schools, Boy Scouts of America, and church groups. In addition to the many volunteer activities, Abe Sailors supported charities including: food drives, telethons, Toys for Tots, Meals on Wheels, UNICEF, Navy Relief, and CFC.

 

The Abraham Lincoln "Mustang Association is a leader onboard for many of the community projects. During the holidays they raised funds and solicited donations to provide holiday meals for needy military and civilian families.

 

Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD)

 

At the light industrial facility in Everett, WA, AIMD Support Equipment (SE) Division has undertaken the monumental task of re-working all 1,121 pieces of aircraft SE. All SE has been completely disassembled and rebuilt using new consumable parts.

 

Using a CNAP budget of $130,000.00, this rehabilitation project will save the Navy over $550,000.00 and restore the material condition of all SE assets to a like new condition.

 

Air Department

 

The Air Department continues to be the finest in the fleet, with the hardworking Aviation Boatswain's Mates leading the charge to support DPIA. Air Department's Aviation Fuels Division completed an at sea combat repair to #4 service filter crossconnect valve and repaired damage caused by a fire in #5 service pump motor controller during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Both depot level repairs were performed at the peak of combat operations. V-1 has performed the quality assurance monitoring of non-skid application to 97 percent of the flight deck encompassing 152,745 square feet. Additionally, the division has completed the complete refurbishment of 22 light locker tops, 75 percent of all flight deck coaming, six crash and salvage hose baskets, two division spaces and partial refurbishments of 330 square feet of island structure.

 

V-2 Division successfully completed 66 maintenance actions. Critical maintenance was performed on catapult and arresting gear systems, including removal and peening of steam piston cylinders on three catapults and restacking of sheave assemblies on three arresting gear engines.

 

The V-3 Division began DPIA period with 29 percent of the division attending various schools or training evolutions. Further, they have commenced the refurbishment of 14 assigned spaces, 11 lagging jobs, and are currently overseeing the repair of 18 hangar-bay flood drains.

 

V-4 Division safely and efficiently off-loaded 725,000 gallons of JP-5 during three high-visibility pier-side evolutions. They removed the forward and aft JP-5 fuel control consoles to facilitate the Smart Carrier upgrade installation. V-4 personnel commenced the refurbishment of 18 flight deck and hangar deck aircraft refueling stations, and removed 12 JP-5 flood and drain manifolds from the two JP-5 pump rooms. Additionally, they opened, cleaned and inspected 68 JP-5 fuel tanks all in support of DPIA workload.

 

Barge Department

 

With the ship being declared "uninhabitable for the DPIA, the barge/berthing Department had:

 

*Coordinated the crew offload and supervision of overhauls in 32 berthing areas and 14 heads.

 

*Redistributed berthing areas on board to support a Reactor duty section and In port Emergency Team.

 

*Redesignated head facilities on board to support ship and shipyard access.

 

*Facilitated the offload of all 5,000+ mattresses to replace them with new inter-spring, fire-retardant ones mattresses.

 

*Transferred 880 personnel to the CBQ.

 

*Housed 500 duty section personnel on the APL-62 berthing barge.

 

*Transferred most administrative and service functions to the barge to support crew needs, including Medical, Dental, Supply (to include dining, disbursing, ship store, barber shop, post office, MWR and workout facility), Admin, Legal, Security, Chapel, Training (six classrooms), and lockers for over 200 personnel.

 

Deck Department

 

Assisting Reactor Department with installing a 2,500 lb Fire and Flushing Pump, Deck Department riggers transported the equipment from the main deck to the seventh deck Aft Main Machinery Room. Additionally, Deck riggers removed, replaced, and re-installed an 1,800 lb Main Air Conditioning Compressor. This job required moving the compressor 150 frames and five decks to A/C Machinery Room #3.

 

Habitability work by Deck Department's paint team was top-notch, as they completed the preservation of 124 spaces totaling over 84,000 square feet. Deck Department also completed the refurbishment of both boat booms, the B&A Crane Deck, fueling at-sea sponsons, line handling stations, and numerous other departmental spaces.

 

Dental Department

 

During Abraham Lincoln DPIA, Dental Department refurbished the entire clinic from the operatories to the supply rooms. Each of the seven operatories is receiving new Painted Resin Composite (PRC) decking and new ADEC dental chairs and units. Dental Department's main Supply/LCPO office is being renovated with new cabinets, tile flooring, and new desks.

 

Dental Department provided service out of a four-room/four-chair clinic onboard a barge while also utilizing the Naval Station Bremerton Dental Clinic. The Oral Surgeon worked temporarily at the Bremerton Naval Hospital and Branch Dental Clinic at SUBASE Bangor. An aircraft carrier record Dental Health Index (DHI) of 56.41 percent was achieved in May 2003.

 

Engineering Department

 

Upon return from deployment, Engineering Department eagerly attacked the task of removing and replacing 20 reach-in refrigeration units with ozone friendly reach-in units. They removed and replaced 25 washers and 32 dryers from the onboard self-serve laundry spaces and overhauled seven washer extractors, six steam dryers, eight electric dryers, three dry cleaning presses, eight steam presses, and eleven scullery units. These efforts have saved the Navy $10,000.00 in installation costs.

 

During DPIA, Sailors performed a total overhaul of the aircraft elevator stanchion banks and locks, overhauled more than 100 catapult system steam valves, and replaced three hydraulic pump mechanical main seals. This effort alone took 18,720 man-hours and saved over $1.1 million in shipyard repair costs.

 

Utilizing specialized equipment and material provided by CNAP1s Carrier Engineering Maintenance Assist Team (CEMAT), Engineering Department cleaned eight of the AC&R plant condenser units using Rydlyme. This effort reduced down time by 50 percent, saved 500 man-hours, and saved $40,000.00 in rework funds while achieving a five degree improvement in heat transfer capability.

 

Repair Division planned, supervised, and coordinated the construction and painting of a 1,000 sq ft presidential stage; 2,200 sq ft media platform, 1,800 sq ft tiered platform, two 1,2001b camera platforms, and three 150 sq ft speaker tables in preparation for the historic Presidential Address to the nation from the flight deck. White House representatives procured 14,538ft2 of building materials and estimated at least 1200 man hours to complete the project. Repair Division completed all platforms in less than 864 man-hours, utilizing only 5,639 sq ft of materials, saving 8,889 sq ft of building materials for future use.

 

Habitability upgrades were a constant focus for the Damage Control Division that developed a proactive program for the inspection and notification of Damage Control Petty Officers (DCPO) regarding fan coil discrepancies and filter problems. Their efforts reduced trouble calls and trouble shooting man hours by 30 percent.

 

Sailors from Repair Division removed and replaced 25 washers and 32 dryers for three self-serve laundries and assisted with the design and installation of 15 washers and 20 dryers for a new fourth self-serve laundry space. In addition, Repair Division performed complete refurbishment of 133 onboard heads including replacement of 435 sinks, 181 urinals, 373 water closets, and 307 showers.

 

Auxiliary Division

 

Once returned from deployment and housed in the shipyard, EA02 eagerly attacked the task of removing 20 reach-in refrigeration units with ozone friendly reach-in units, removing and replacing 25 washers and 32 dryers from the self-serve laundry mats and overhauling seven washer extractors, six steam dryers, eight electric dryers, three dry cleaning presses, eight steam presses, and 11 scullery units.

 

Their perseverance and attention to detail guaranteed 100 percent turnaround rate for two operational 02N2 plants. EA06 personnel continued to take on the responsibility of providing filter-cleaning services for the entire ship resulting in improved ventilation. Due to their unique skills, EA06 positively impacted Abraham Lincoln’s operations throughout the course of the year. Technicians in Auxiliary Division's Outside Repair Shop, EA08, positively impacted crew morale by replacing over 200 faucets, scuttlebutts, showerheads, and other ship amenities.

 

Additionally, they renovated all waste processor rooms and all compress melt units (CMUs) in order to increase the amount of trash, garbage, and plastic processed by the ship supporting the Navy's regulations regarding environmental protection. EA08 technicians also assisted NAVSEA installation teams in the conversion of all eleven conveyors to the Navy's Smart Carrier System. This conversion will improve the safe operation of Abraham Lincoln’s vertical package conveyors.

 

Auxiliary Division's Catapult Steam workshop, EA10, never ceases to amaze the division. Due to their drive and perseverance, EA10 ensured continued flight operations by meticulously overhauling 30 steam valves and completing repairs on 60 other steam valves to maintain catapult steam pressure. These efforts supported 2,122 launch cycles on CAT #I, 13,135 launch cycles on CAT #2, 24,907 launch cycles on CAT #3, and 34,023 launch cycles on CAT #4. Not only did they assist in flight operations, but they also ensured hot water heaters were operational to provide hot water for the crew. During the ship's availability, EA10 assisted in the removal and replacement of 15 water heaters and 45 gauges. In addition, they prepared their spaces to successfully pass the Material Condition Assessment allowing the ship's reactor to be started.

 

Electrical Division

 

During CY03, the Electricians and Interior Communications Electricians of Electrical Division worked hard at maintaining the tradition of excellence established by their predecessors.

 

E Division has had as many as 96 Sailors and as few as 67 assigned throughout the year. The year brought numerous challenges, most significant being an extended drydock availability in which repairs were made to AESS stations, deck edge doors, elevator stanchions, galley equipment, air conditioning units, K circuit, motor controllers, steering gear, vertical package conveyors, and degaussing coils. Also, numerous class 'C" fires were extinguished and damage repaired. The following is a summary of major events for the year:

 

*Troubleshot and repaired problems with 1MC amplifier.

*Replaced motor bearings #10 A/C Compressor Motor.

*Repaired Degaussing 'M and FI-QI" Coil.

*Various galley and ventilation repair.

*Multiple galley equipment faults and repairs: reefer, deep fat fryer, oven, and grill.

*Assisted repairs on #5 reefer for AC&R shop.

*Multiple corrective maintenance to CMU1s, pulpers, conveyors, and A/C units.

*AESS Station faults corrected.

*Aircraft elevator, divisional doors, and deck edge doors multiple limit switch grounds corrected.

*Re-connected AN/PDR 65. Replaced Port IPDS filters.

*Class 'C' Fire in IC storeroom, replaced and number of receptacles on circuit reduced.

*Installed Cots new washer.

*CHT Limit Switch coordinated with R-Div to replace float switch.

*Faulty relay in telltale control panel for navigation lights-replaced the relay.

*Unrigged Vent motor 1-7-2 for rewinding.

*Detroit switches calibration. 400MG meters calibration.

*CHT float switch replaced.

*Placed all AESS station in Lay-up

*Degaussing run was SAT on both SOUTH and NORTH bound.

*Wrote CASCOR for degaussing M-Coil.

*Fabrication of equipment and support of POTUS.

*Rigged and installed the POTUS power supply; assisted White House Staff in A/V hook up.

*Airflow indicator sensor for Flammable Liquid Storeroom replaced.

*Received circuit card for balancing machine.

*All Flight Deck hog-noses are severely corroded and degraded. This job is accepted by Puget Sound via Ship Alt 9002.

*Aft divisional door has a ground, found ground and corrected.

*Tagged out Rudder Position and Order Indicator for rudderpost removal.

*5MC power supply installed.

*Vent motor installed but the impeller is hitting the side of the housing. foundation motor will be shimmed to compensate for the misalignment. ETR 14 Jul 2002.

*Replaced the power supply module. FTSCPAC technical representative provided a signal generator that simulated the actual shaft revolution input.

*Power Shop 5" lagging for CAT 1 removed by Coastal Marine. Completed.

*Replaced cracked windshield located in Flag Bridge.

*Incinerator supply and recirculation vent motors overhauled by PCE.

*Repaired degaussing 'M" Coil. CASCOR completed.

*Performed optest in preparation for anchor chain removals.

*AFFF Mix Station 12. Replaced switch in mimic panel on the Bridge.

*Disconnected self-serve laundry units electrically in preparation for removal.

*Preparing for chemical flush of 2A and 2B 400 Hz machines.

*Supported Command Safety Stand-down.

*Replaced SW Isolation Valves for lSFGA & 1SFGB.

*Smart Carrier Conference.

*Supported retirement ceremony and Career Fair.

*New Safety instruction drafted by ELO.

*Ventilation removed rudder bearing replacement.

*Ventilation Modifications in Progress by TODD Shipyard.

*20/20 Doors powder-coated.

 

Damage Control (DC) Division

 

During DPIA they fixed more than 300 doors and oversaw the powder coating of more than 175 doors by local IMF facilities. Additionally, they took on the task of ensuring all leaking fire plugs were turned into the valve shop for repair and 430 carbon dioxide bottles were sent off the ship for hydro testing and refill. They also were responsible for coordinating the hydro testing of 25,000 feet of 1.5 inch fire hose. All of this work completed by six personnel.

 

Repair Division

 

Divisional personnel received six NAM’s and 30 Flag LOC’s throughout calendar year 2003. Additionally and most notably, the division established a superb qualification achievement rate:

 

*EAWS - 7

*ESWS - 22

*3-M - 100%

*DC - 95% through 313

*DCSSP - 100%

*DCWS - 100% of those eligible

 

HTC Cook has developed a curriculum and an extensive training program for the division that facilitates learning on the job as well as reinforcing the required theory and shop mathematics. He constantly challenges his workforce with complex practical training that they can apply towards most of the quality projects they produce. Total number of advancements this year: E-6 (I), E-5 (9), E-4 (20).

 

With the ship in dry dock, Repair Division has coordinated with the shipyard the chemical cleaning of the soil drain piping to 18 CHT zones while organizing the cleaning of the FWD and AFT CHT tanks also the overhaul of 200 waste, soil, and scupper CHT diverter valves and Remote Operated Gears Sockets (ROGS) .

 

The welders and brazers maintain a rigorous qualification and training program, which includes special qualifications across a myriad of materials and processes. It is our goal to maintain the highest standards of welding and inspection capability.

 

Repair Division maintains nine coded welders, eight brazers, and two non-destructive test inspectors certified in every process available to the Navy. During CNAP QA Assessment 2003, Repair Division was praised for the maintenance of the welder-brazer program. The training and qualification program that was developed by Repair Division was cited as a benchmark for other divisions to follow, and CNAP audit team has requested that the division make their program available to the rest of the fleet.

 

Utilizing the following metrics, Abraham Lincoln was able to attain the funding to affect major repairs to the CHT system during DPIA 2003; 211 work candidates were screened to Port Engineer for depot level support in the replacement of the diverter valves and ROG’s. Returning the system to full operational capability served to drastically reduce the allocation of funds for logistics support, both at homeport and abroad.

 

*CHT pumping logs were kept in ports recently visited by Lincoln during the 2002 deployment, in three ports we disposed of approximately 2,310,400 gallons of sewage. The average cost is approximately $5,000.00 for every 10,000 gallons disposed. This equates to approximately $1,155,200.00 in just three ports visited during the first half of the deployment.

 

*Man-hours are also of great concern, to have both waste and soil diverted to the tank, it takes 72 man-hours per day of pumping into trucks or barges; fixing the diverters will allow us to divert waste over the side per standard operating procedures. This will drastically reduce the amount of sewage pumped to only 18 man-hours per day.

 

*The average cost of replacing one diverter valve is $5,400.00, and to fix a damaged ROG it’s approximately $3,000.00. We estimate the cost of materials to be in the area of $888,000.00, approximately $267,200.00 less than the cost of transferring sewage in three ports.

 

*Estimations show that repairs and the ability to divert waste will reduce the cost of berth services by approximately $762,500.00 considering that soil only consists of commodes and urinals, and a minimal number of commissary drains.

 

While in DPIA, most of Medical Department's primary care capability was re-established on the barge, followed by a major push to complete the Post Deployment Health Assessment on all crewmembers deployed to OIF. Medical also experienced two key personnel changes; LCDR Wise turned nursing duties to LT Kilday, and LT Mendoza came aboard as the inaugural fill for a newly established Radiation Health Officer billet.

 

Navigation Department

 

Abraham Lincoln got underway once again in late June when it transited to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, W. to begin its availability period. During this time, the Quartermasters and Signalmen became part of the ships work force that would focus on preservation and upkeep of the ship so it will be ready to respond to the nation's needs again. The Navigation Department was responsible for all interior and exterior work on four of the superstructure levels, a daunting task for one of the ship's smallest departments.

 

Reactor Department

 

Reactor Machinery Division's mid-cruise initiative to de-scale all four distilling units resulted in a 20 percent increase in potable water production and increased the operating capacities to an average 98 percent full water production capacity prior to entering the Gulf. Over the extended deployment 80 million gallons of fresh water was produced. During the maintenance availability overseas, Reactor Machinery Division, working with PSNS shipyard workers, overhauled the #3 Main Coolant Water Pump and #2 Main Engine Auxiliary Lube Oil Pump saving the command approximately $250,000.00 in replacement costs and vendor support costs. In addition, they performed more than 250 Class B valve overhauls, reducing costs by avoiding replacement and ensuring uninterrupted plant operations. Following a well-deserved post-deployment leave and upkeep period, Reactor Department started DPIA preparations in earnest. Preparations were completed in late June, when, on 24 June 2003, Abraham Lincoln entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. The DPIA officially commenced the following day.

 

Displaying superb execution in setting maintenance conditions within both reactor plants, Reactor Department exceeded all expectations for the conduct of maintenance and testing, seamlessly serving side-by-side with PSNS personnel throughout  all evolutions.

 

Religious Ministries Department

 

During DPIA at PSNS in Bremerton, WA, Chaplain Sloat was selected for Commander and Chaplain Marshall detached in August 2003. In September 2003, Commander Paul Wrigley reported as the new Command Chaplain. In October 2003, LT Norbert Karava relieved LT Rendon as the Roman Catholic Chaplain.

 

Safety Department

 

Another Safety Department milestone that will benefit Naval Safety fleet-wide, was the development of a new state of the art method for cleaning and sterilizing respirators. This will serve to prevent the spread of communicable diseases and bloodborne pathogens. A first in the fleet, this new program will serve as a model for all Navy ships.

 

Supply Department

 

Supply Department had a record breaking year in 2003. In personnel quality of life programs, solid teamwork between the Supply and Engineering Departments ensured equipment operational status remained consistently above 95%.

 

S-1 Division

 

*Processed and tracked 126 CASREP’s and returned from deployment with one outstanding CASREP part on order.

 

S-2 Division

 

*Successfully moved over 400 pallets of stores from the ship to the barge during DPIA 2003.

 

*Maintained a 99% retention rate for culinary specialists.

 

*Preparations for renovations to all Galleys, CPO, and Wardroom Messes.

 

*Received Outstanding on the FY02 SMI.

 

S-8 Division

 

*Aggressively renovated of over 40 material storerooms.

 

This new program, the idea of the CO, while XO on the Abraham Lincoln during a previous difficult PIA, has the best Sailors training all newly arriving Sailors and providing a positive environment where Sailors can grow. This program started after a long and well deserved six-week post deployment stand down. Starting in June the Training Department began tracking all training that occurred in every department and scheduling mandatory GMT for all departments and prepared our complete relocation to the barge.

 

Weapons Department

 

*In production control innovation and improvement, upon return to NAVSTA Everett, G-1 Division off-loaded over 1,400 items of Armament Weapons Support Equipment (AWSE) in preparation for overhaul at the CNAP Support Equipment Rehab Facility. To date, over 550 items of AWSE, worth $4.5 million, have been completed” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, with Captain Kendall L. Card as the Commanding Officer, for Sea Trials upon completion of Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) from 25 June 2003 to 7 May 2004” (Ref. 378A).

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XVI (6 May 2003 to 7 May 2004)

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4