After 2017 Sea Trials

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Va. on 1 June 2017, for CVW-7 Carrier Qualifications and Flight Deck Certification (FDC) off the coast of North Carolina” (Ref. 76).

 

Abraham Lincoln earns Flight Deck Certification

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) earned its flight deck carrier (FDC) qualifications while underway in the Atlantic Ocean on 7 June 2017. The certification ensures that Abraham Lincoln’s flight deck, as well as the Sailors who conduct flight operations, is capable of safely launching and recovering aircraft.

 

The last jet landing aboard the Abraham Lincoln occurred Aug. 6, 2012, just prior to the ship entering a four-year Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). The certification is a major milestone on the ship’s way to becoming fully mission ready.

 

To certify in flight operations, the Abraham Lincoln Air Department was required to catch 50 aircraft on the first day of flight operations, 110 the following day, 40 of which will be at night. Abraham Lincoln had a total of 160 catches by the end of flight deck certification.

 

“The credit is all on the junior Sailors,” Primary Flight Control Tower Supervisor Aviation Boatswains Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Felix Stone said. “Without them, we would not be able to catch aircraft.” The flight deck certification is the result of countless hours of work during RCOH, Stone said.

 

While in the yards, Air Department re-certified four aircraft elevators and overhauled much of the equipment that supports flight operations including the catapults, arresting gear, safety nets and jet blast deflectors.

 

Even more impressive, Abraham Lincoln is manned with many Sailors who have never seen or participated in flight operations. “Only 60 or 70 percent of the Sailors have seen the flight deck doing flight operations,” Air Boss Cmdr. David Burmeister said. “Still, they contributed like seasoned Sailors to make this a success.”

 

Sailors welcomed the long-awaited opportunity to apply the skills and training they had received as the ship began launching and recovering aircraft. “All the long days, hard work, maintenance and training in the yards finally paid off,” Burmeister said. “It was a rewarding feeling having the first aircraft land.”

 

With the flight deck certified, Abraham Lincoln and the crew can now look forward to continuing routine operations at sea in preparation for future deployment” (Ref. By MC3 Juan Cubano - USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - June 7, 2017 - ATLANTIC OCEAN).

http://www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/news/top_stories/abraham-lincoln-earns-flight-deck-certification/article_7ee7dbd9-73ad-5498-b0b1-2372492f6f83.html

 

     “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Norfolk, Va. on 12 June 2017, conducting CVW-7 Carrier Qualifications and Flight Deck Certification (FDC) off the coast of North Carolina from 1 to 11 June 2017, earning its flight deck carrier (FDC) qualifications while underway in the Atlantic Ocean on 7 June 2017. The certification ensures that Abraham Lincoln’s flight deck, as well as the Sailors who conduct flight operations, is capable of safely launching and recovering aircraft” (Ref. 76 & Abraham Lincoln earns Flight Deck Certification - By MC3 Juan Cubano - USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - June 7, 2017 - ATLANTIC OCEAN).

http://www.militarynews.com/norfolk-navy-flagship/news/top_stories/abraham-lincoln-earns-flight-deck-certification/article_7ee7dbd9-73ad-5498-b0b1-2372492f6f83.html

 

Lincoln Sailors Save a Life

 

“The quick actions and medical training of Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) saved the life of a civilian working aboard the ship on 14 June 2017, while it is moored in Norfolk for a carrier incremental availability in preparation for workups.

At approximately 5:30a.m., Master-at-Arms 2nd class Casey Sanders discovered the man lying on the ground in the hangar bay aboard
Abraham Lincoln.

After quickly identifying that the man was not breathing and had no pulse, Sanders began chest compressions in an attempt to resuscitate him. Within one minute of the casualty alarm, a medical team responded, connecting an artificial external defibrillator (AED). After two shocks from the AED, the machine showed a continuous heart rhythm.

"I was sleeping in my rack when I heard the casualty called over the 1MC so I got up and responded," said Hospital Corpsman 3rd class Drake Gibson. "When I arrived on the scene I took over chest compressions. During my first cycle he started
breathing and making noises. Civilian emergency medical service arrived on scene and took over from there."

The man was transported off-ship by civilian emergency medical service to DePaul Medical Center to receive further treatment.

"For several of the corpsmen this was the first time they had participated in a real-life code event," said Lt. Cmdr. Louis Grass. "This gentleman would have died if it was not for my team."

Abraham Lincoln's Security Department
trains watch standers for any situation that may arise, said Chief Master-at-Arms Brent Ransome.

"It gives me a sense of pride to know that students are taking in the training we provide and are able to translate it into real scenarios," said Master-at-Arms 2nd class Travis Markovich,
Abraham Lincoln's Security Department medical trainer. "It does not surprise me that Sanders responded as he did and saved that man."

The Sailors who responded to the casualty:


* Lt Cmdr. Louis Grass
* Chief Hospital Corpsman Patrick Lumas
* Hospital Corpsman 1st class Naphtali Odongo
* Hospital Corpsman 2nd class Ky Amos
* Hospital Corpsman 2nd class Jamika Lewis
* Hospital Corpsman 3rd class Corinna Youngblood
* Hospital Corpsman 3rd class Drake Gibson
* Master-at-Arms 2nd class Casey Sanders
* Legalman 2nd class James Cameron

For more information, visit
http://www.navy.mil, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), visit
www.navy.mil/local/cvn72/” (Ref. Story Number: NNS170713-03 - Release Date: 7/13/2017 7:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), Public Affairs, NORFOLK (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=101440

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Va. on 30 August 2017, for FRS Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Virginia” (Ref. 76

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Norfolk, Va. on 7 September 2017, for FRS Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Virginia from 30 August to 7 September 2017” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Va. on 8 September 2017, for Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Response operations in the wake of Hurricane Irma from 8 to 14 September 2017” (Ref. 76).

 

Sailors prepare an F-35C Lightning II assigned to the

 

170907-N-CT127-0084 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 7, 2017) Sailors prepare an F-35C Lightning II assigned to the "Grim Reapers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA 101) to launch on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training after its successful completion of carrier incremental availability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Josue Escobosa/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_imagex.asp?id=245274&t=1

 

Lincoln Tests F-35C Lightning II at Sea

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) became one of the few ships in the fleet to trap and launch the F-35C Lightning II on 3 September 2017.

The "Grim Reapers" of Strike Fighter Squadron 101 (VFA 101), from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, are the training squadron for the F-35C.

"The F-35C is still in a testing phase, so it is not fully operational yet," said Lt. Cmdr. Chris Karapostoles, a pilot assigned to VFA 101. "We are the training squadron for the F-35C, so we are onboard this ship conducting our carrier qualification training, qualifying pilots, landing signal officers and maintenance crews."

The launching and recovering of the F-35Cs presented an opportunity for the crew of
Abraham Lincoln to work with a new aircraft and play a role in the development of this new fighter jet.

"Being part of the primary flight control team for the landing and launching of the F-35Cs was such a unique experience," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman Mariana Monima. "The F-35Cs are so amazing and powerful. I feel privileged to have been a part of this historic event."

According to the F-35
Lightning II Pax River Integrated Test Force, the F-35C should reach its initial operational capacity in 2018.

"I love the F-35C," said Karapostoles. "Compared to other jets it's more powerful and really just a beast. Some of the controls are different, which can take a little bit of getting used to, but that's what we have training like this for."

According to the Joint Strike Fighter Fleet Integration Office, the F-35C will introduce next generation strike-fighter aircraft capabilities to the Navy Carrier Air Wings, enabling the Carrier Strike Groups and numbered fleets to effectively
engage and survive a wide range of rapidly evolving threats.

Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training after successful completion of carrier incremental availability” (Ref. Story Number: NNS170911-04 - Release Date: 9/11/2017 11:57:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Norfolk, Va. on 15 September 2017, for Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Response operations in the wake of Hurricane Irma from 8 to 14 September 2017” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Va. on 3 October 2017, for operations in the Western Atlanic on 3 October 2017” (Ref. 76).

 

Command Master Chief of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) James Stedding salutes the national ensign during a burial-at-sea ceremony.

 

171004-N-UX312-0046 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 4, 2017) Command Master Chief of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) James Stedding salutes the national ensign during a burial-at-sea ceremony. Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_imagex.asp?id=250096&t=1

 

Abraham Lincoln Conducts Burial at Sea  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) held a burial at sea for six former Sailors on the ship's aircraft elevador on 4 October 2017.


Cmdr. Stephen Coates,
Abraham Lincoln's command chaplain, spoke during the ceremony, which marked the first burial at sea the ship has held since returning to the fleet earlier this year.

"We pray that the memory of our comrades ... may be ever sacred in our hearts, that the sacrifice which they have offered for our country's cause may be acceptable in your sight, and that an entrance into your eternal peace may, by your pardoning grace, be open unto them," recited Coates.

Historically, burials at sea were used when ships lacked proper means to bury Sailors. Today, the ceremony is one of the
highest honors paid to former service members in recognition of, and appreciation for, distinguished service to the United States.

"Every funeral leaves an impression, but knowing these shipmates had a special connection to the ship was surreal," said Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Jonathan Wright, the firing party leader. "Being able to honor these Sailors one more time before they were laid to rest in the sea was a privilege."

An honor platoon, as part of Navy custom, was formed to represent
Abraham Lincoln ship's company. Lt. Youree Posey, a command chaplain aboard Abraham Lincoln, and Lt. Loreli Owens, a medical officer aboard Abraham Lincoln, committed the remains to the sea.

After the committal, Taps was played by Quartermaster 3rd Class Shelby Haisley and Seaman Destiny Bennett on the bugle. Seven Sailors from
Abraham Lincoln's Weapons Department made up the rifle detail party and rendered a triple volley to honor the veterans and retired members that were laid to rest.

Burials at sea are open to all active duty service members, retirees and veterans who were honorably discharged, as well as their dependent family members. Requests for burials at sea can be made by service members or their familias” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS171031-20 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 2:08:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Damage Control Olympics Aboard Abraham Lincoln  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) held a general quarters unlike any previous drills on 5 October 2017. Instead, Sailors participated in the Damage Control Olympics.


This special training evolution in all three of the hangar bays consisted of different repair lockers going head to head in timed competition to don the firefighting ensemble, repair leaking pipes, and handle hoses.

"This is hands down the best general quarters I've been a part of since joining the Navy," said Personnel Specialist Seaman Richard Dimalanta, a participant in the competition. "It's a great change of pace; getting to put all the knowledge we've learned into action."

Everyone assigned to a repair locker participated in the events, and those waiting for their turn cheered on
shipmates in hopes to complete the challenge before the opposing team.

"This was a really good opportunity for the
Reactor Department," said Machinist's Mate 1st Class Ronald Addams. "In my opinion, this is a great way to boost camaraderie among the crew and better prepare us for the possibility of a damage control emergency."

Abraham Lincoln
Executive Officer Capt. Amy Bauernschmidt noted the positive reception of the competition-centered training and plans to make it a quarterly exercise, with thoughts to make a trophy awarded to the winning repair locker.

"The purpose of this change was to focus training through healthy competition, in order to boost our basic damage control knowledge and skills," said Bauernschmidt. "It was also a great way to shake things up and provide a morale boost to the crew."

The first place winners of the
Abraham Lincoln's first Damage Control Olympics was repair locker 3. Repair 3 will set material condition zebra during the next general quarters drill and will be treated to an ice cream social thereafter.

Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-09 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:26:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln CWIS PAC Fire  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a pre-action aim calibration (PAC) fire on close-in weapons system (CIWS) while underway on 5 October 2017.


CIWS is a radar-guided, rapid-fire 20-millimeter Gatling gun that provides Navy ships with defense against anti-ship missiles. This is the first time testing was conducted on CIWS since
Abraham Lincoln's half-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul maintenance period.

"Exercises like this ensure that we will have effective defensive measures against any threats that could come our way," said Chief Fire Controlman Chris Steenrod.

The exercise consisted of up to three bursts in both a high-rate of fire and low-rate of fire from each gun. The purpose of the PAC fire is to calibrate the point of radar detection to the point from where the rounds are fired.

Each gun mount is equipped with a fire control assembly and a gun subsystem. The fire control assembly is made up of a radar system for
surveillance and detection of targets and a radar system for aiming the gun while tracking the target. The subsystem utilizes a Gatling gun that delivers approximately 75 rounds per second.

"The exercise was excellent," said Fire Controlman 3rd Class Robert Bredan, a CIWS operator. "Our weapons are now calibrated, so it was a success."

When conducting a PAC fire, CIWS operators have several steps they must take to ensure the success of the evolution. Before shooting the CIWS, pre-fire maintenance, involving safety checks and verification rounds, must be completed. Afterwards, post-fire maintenance requires taking apart the guns, verifying the
wear and tear of the equipment, re-greasing the moving parts and putting everything back together.

The CIWS shoot is an excellent example of Sailors working together as a team to accomplish one important goal.

"Everybody played a little role in this," said Bredan. "Air boss secured parts of the flight deck, security stood watch to make sure no Sailors came past the hearing hazard zones, safety played a role creating a safety plan and ensuring the exercise was low-risk. All in all, the departments involved executed the exercise with great teamwork."

Abraham Lincoln is underway conducting training” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-07 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:20:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Garrett LaBarge, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned Norfolk, Va. on 7 October 2017, conducting operations in the Western Atlanic from 3 to 6 October 2017. Abraham Lincoln held a burial at sea for six former Sailors on the ship's aircraft elevador on 4 October 2017. Cmdr. Stephen Coates, Abraham Lincoln's command chaplain, spoke during the ceremony, which marked the first burial at sea the ship has held since returning to the fleet earlier this year. Abraham Lincoln held a general quarters unlike any previous drills on 5 October 2017. Instead, Sailors participated in the Damage Control Olympics. This special training evolution in all three of the hangar bays consisted of different repair lockers going head to head in timed competition to don the firefighting ensemble, repair leaking pipes, and handle hoses. Abraham Lincoln conducted a pre-action aim calibration (PAC) fire on close-in weapons system (CIWS) while underway on 5 October 2017. CIWS is a radar-guided, rapid-fire 20-millimeter Gatling gun that provides Navy ships with defense against anti-ship missiles. This is the first time testing was conducted on CIWS since Abraham Lincoln's half-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul maintenance period” (Ref. 76, Story Number: NNS171031-07 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:20:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Garrett LaBarge, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS), Story Number: NNS171031-20 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 2:08:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS) and Story Number: NNS171031-09 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:26:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103118

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103116

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103119

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Va. on 17 October 2017, for FRS Carrier Qualifications off the coast of North Carolina and TRACOM carrier qulifications off the coast of Flordia” (Ref. 76).

 

New Pilots Qualify Aboard Lincoln  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted 24 student pilots, from Commander, Naval Air Training Detachment for their first landings on an aircraft carrier.


The qualification required pilots to successfully complete 10 arrested landings and four touch-and-goes on
Abraham Lincolns 1,092-feet long flight deck.

"The first landing wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be," said Marine Corps Capt. Nick Deluca, a student pilot from the "Eagles" of Training Squadron 7. "The ship looked really small, but I was running so well that [the Abraham Lincoln Sailors] made it easy on me."

Prior to landing aboard
Abraham Lincoln, student pilots practiced 13 different events at a designated airfield ashore.

"This is one of the last things that they do before they are winged," said Deluca. "After they get their wings, they will be ready to go out into the fleet."

The pilots were not the only ones who worked hard to conduct these qualifications. Air department Sailors were responsible for ensuring the safe launch and recovery of the jets. Several other departments were involved with flight operations, including engineering, operations, reactor, navigation, deck, and combat systems. All led to the successful completion of the week-long evolution.

"We're happy to be back in training mode and requalify with the T-45 aircraft after being in
Refueling Complex and Overhaul for four years," said Air Traffic Controller 2nd Class Marshall Crawford, the air operations branch chief aboard Abraham Lincoln.

Despite the inherent dangers of
flight operations, carrier qualifications proved Abraham Lincoln's ability to work together as a team.

"Our Sailors have been making sure flight operations run smoothly and getting their qualifications and experience needed to be able to work with the aircraft," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Victor Ayala, a leading petty officer of air department's V-2 division.

In total,
Abraham Lincoln completed more than 500 hours of flight operation maintenance, performed 619 launches and recoveries, and qualified 46 personnel in flight deck familiarization while underway, on 17 October 2017” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-04 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:05:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darion Chanelle Triplett, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Lincoln FSA For A Day  

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) first class petty officer association (FCPOA) were selected as "FSA for a Day" and spent a day working with the ship's food service attendants (FSA) on 20 October 2017.


Over the course of three days, junior Sailors made donations to see their favorite first class petty officers (FCPO) work in the galley alongside the food service attendants. The contest selected 27 winners and raised $2,366 with Yeoman 1st Class Lawrence Anderson leading the way with $175.

The money received will go toward a variety of different causes, including the children's holiday party. The FCPOA holds this party annually for the children of Sailors aboard
Abraham Lincoln, giving them a chance to spend time with their family during the holiday season.

"We are an organization of first classes committed to making the ship a better place, training our junior Sailors, and giving back to the community," said Yeoman 1st Class James Thibeau,
Abraham Lincoln's FCPOA secretary.

The selected FCPOs will spend the day working alongside the FSAs and serve in the scullery, trash room and the deep sink.

FSAs are Sailors, who are temporarily assigned to the mess decks to help the culinary specialists serve over 3,500 Sailors during the ship's four meals per day. FSAs are also responsible for keeping the tables clean and washing the trays and utensils.

"It's great having the first classes with us today," said Seaman Tyler Wilson. "It's a big help to have more hands to share the workload with, and it is fun
to hear their naval experiences and the advice they have to offer." Anderson said he was satisfied to do his share of work, though quickly learned just what the FSAs are responsible for on a daily basis.

"I've gained a new appreciation for the blue shirts," said Anderson, who was assigned to the trash room. "It's humbling having to haul trash." Of the 27 FCPOs assigned to FSA, five went to the trash room, six to the deep sink, and 16 to the scullery.

"I really don't mind busting suds back here," said Master-at-Arms 1st Class
Adolfo Ruiz, assigned to the scullery. "It feels good to support a good cause." Abraham Lincoln is underway for carrier qualifications and training” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171101-04 - Release Date: 11/1/2017 7:54:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Return of Lincoln's JETI   

 

“If your berthing is near the fantail and you have been woken up in the middle of the night by what sounds like a jet engine above your berthing, you were right. That was a jet engine, and for Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), those were the sounds of progress.


For the first time in more than five years,
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) installed and successfully ran a Jet Engine Test Instrument (JETI) at full afterburner on 22 October 2017.

"It's our job, and to see that engine going max afterburner, it was pretty awesome," said Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Mark Salinas about being able to work on a jet engine after coming out of the yards. "It really got us going when we were out there. My heart was racing and it was a great rush."

To have the JETI system running is the reward of months of coordinating, planning and installing. For Aviation Machinist's Mate 1st Class Kevin
Mathis, the first successful test was of particular significance as he was part of the team that did the final JETI test run before Abraham Lincoln entered her half-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul maintenance period in 2012.

"We essentially built the system from the ground up after coming out of the yards," said Mathis, the JETI test cell supervisor. "It's a great opportunity for our guys,
AIMD, and the ship to be able to re-establish capability."

The successful JETI test is another step forward in re-instituting
AIMD to full-functioning status. It allows the ability to test jet engines after making necessary repairs while underway.

"This is a major milestone for
AIMD," said Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate Chris Chatterton. "With us now having this capability, it means that we can verify repairs and ready the engine to be put back into an aircraft."

The fully-functioning JETI is also a milestone in the preparation of making
Abraham Lincoln deployment-ready. The sound of the jet engine may be alarming to some, but Sailors can let the noise lull them to sleep knowing it is the sound of CVN-72 roaring back to life” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171101-06 - Release Date: 11/1/2017 8:01:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cody Anderson, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Zachary Taylor demonstrates a proper takedown technique during a Security Reaction Force-Basic (SRF-B) course in the hangar bay aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

171024-N-EN275-0088 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 24, 2017) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Zachary Taylor demonstrates a proper takedown technique during a Security Reaction Force-Basic (SRF-B) course in the hangar bay aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). The ship is underway conducting carrier qualifications and training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_imagex.asp?id=251156&t=1

 

Lincoln Qualifies With OC 

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) completed oelrisen capsicum (OC) spray usage certification on 24 October 2017. Members of the Security Department and the security reaction force basic (SRF-B) course participants lined up to demonstrate all the necessary skills to subdue a security threat while under the effects OC spray.

"The Sailors are required to experience the spray, to understand the effects so they will not abuse it." Said Chief Master-at-Arms David Buitrago. "They have to demonstrate baton techniques, baton strikes, verbal command, mach moves, and take downs through different stations before combining all of the techniques on one last obstacle; the Red Man."

The "Red Man" is a master-at-arms in protective red padding who poses as a
security threat that the Sailors must take down using all their techniques and skills, this time played by Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Travis Markovich. "I believe it's extremely important to train like we fight," said Markovich. "I try to make it as real as possible, actively resisting, and I won't let up until they prove they know what to do."

The Sailors waited their turn and displayed a range of emotion from very motivated to very anxious, watching what they would soon have to endure. "I'm quite nervous and anxious," said Operations Specialist Seaman Rachel Baynard. "
I honestly can't say how bad I think it'll be, just bad in general." Two instructors stuck with each Sailor each as they underwent the test, calling out instructions, reprisals and support every step of the way. "This is a tough but necessary point of their training," said Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Thomas Anderson.

 

"Not only will the Sailors be more hesitant to use the spray freely, but they'll also know how to operate even if accidentally contaminated." The OC spray causes an immediate effect on many of the Sailors, calling for them to push through the discomfort and complete their tasks, to be met with soap and a hose of water to help remove the spray at the end. "It feels very, very bad," said Baynard. "I've never felt this kind of pain before."

It takes a varying amount of time for each Sailor to recover from the effects of
the contamination, but many of them share their pride of not giving up and making it all the way through. "It's not as bad as I thought it would have been, but still pretty bad," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Airman Jasmine Caparosa. "I feel I could have done better, but I'm happy that I managed my way through."

The security forces on board
Abraham Lincoln provide safety to all crew members from tretas” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171101-01 - Release Date: 11/1/2017 7:41:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

 A CT-45C Goshawk assigned to Commander, Naval Air Training Detachment lands on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

171024-N-CT127-137 - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Oct. 24, 2017) A CT-45C Goshawk assigned to Commander, Naval Air Training Detachment lands on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The ship is underway conducting carrier qualifications and training. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Josue L. Escobosa/Released) http://www.navy.mil/view_imagex.asp?id=251179&t=1

 

Lincoln Updates Navigation System  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Navigation Department is undergoing a switch from paper charts to the Voyage Management System (VMS), a fully-electronic system of charts. The majority of the fleet has switched to VMS, which offers instantaneous navigation information and a more reliable Global Positioning System (GPS).

"We are the carrier that is still charting on paper," said Quartermaster 2nd Class Jamar Code. "The only reason why we had not switched earlier is because when the ship went into
Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), it was not certified. In that five years when the ship was in the shipyards, every other carrier got certified to use VMS."

Abraham Lincoln was recently fitted with the new VMS system and is only used as a secondary means of navigation next to paper charts.

"We've only used it since last month," said Master Chief Quartermaster Lacie Hill. "It was installed during
Carrier Incremental Availability (CIA). We went to school and then we started using it the following underway."

The entire
Navigation Department has been training for the Afloat Training Group (ATG) inspection that will qualify them to officially switch to VMS. Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Ringelstein, the assistant navigation officer, said the inspection is anticipated to be completed by the end of the year. Following the inspection, the ship will need official approval from type commander (TYCOM) before it can make the complete switch to VMS.

"We are ready for the inspection," said Ringelstein. "We have been certified for the equipment. Most of the quartermasters and navigation leadership have gone through a navigation operators course, and we have been practicing using
it alongside our paper charts, so we are prepared to navigate by electronic charts as the primary source."

The navigation team will carry out normal navigation operations with VMS for the inspection. The hardware will also be checked to ensure it meets certain Navy standards.

"It's a process where ATG comes [aboard] and inspects us, so they see that we know how to operate," said Code. "Then we have a tailored navigation bill to say what we are going to do and what we are not going to do. After that, we are going to make sure all
of our systems are certified, including our navigation lights and GPS, and make sure they are up to par."

VMS has numerous elements that benefit the way the ship navigates and how efficiently the quartermasters can do their job. The new system will be faster, safer and eliminate potential chart plotting errors.

 

"Right now, when we are in restricted waters, we are required to do three minute fixes," explained Code. "VMS plots every 30 seconds. So every 30 seconds we know where the ship is, so it's safer to navigate. It takes the human error out of the equation."

It may also alleviate some of the quartermasters' workload.

"I think it makes it easier for planning [and] updating, and it takes less man hours," said Hill.

While most of the Navy has already switched to VMS,
Abraham Lincoln will be the first ship to qualify to use VMS 9.34, which is the most advanced version in the fleet.

"I am looking forward to being the first ship qualifying 9.34," said Code. "I think it's a major accomplishment, and it will carry on into the future. We're on the cutting edge of navigational technology."

Ringelstein said once the VMS process is completed, the ship will be able to receive a real-time mark of where it is in the world, which will highly benefit the ship's mission.

"I think we are going in the right direction
," said Ringelstein. "Paper charts, without a doubt, provide reliable information and a solid track which we can travel on; but it's not immediate. That's what is nice about electronic charts. It provides instantaneous information for us and it's more reliable on GPS."

The shift from paper charts to VMS will provide
Abraham Lincoln's Navigation Department with the most advanced charting system in the fleet, but the quartermasters aboard will be able to carry the skill of navigating with both for the rest of their careers.” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-05 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:15:00 AM  - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Sherman, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Makes Potable Water 

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “The Reactor Department aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) works countless hours keeping the ship running and operational. Of their many essential jobs, one in particular sometimes flies under the radar. The desalinization process creates potable water that is safe to drink for crew members and is important in maintaining mission readiness and habitability throughout the ship. "We have four distilling units on board which are used for making sea water into potable water," said Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Joel Cogan, a water control watch stander.

"Sea water gets sucked up, and then gets flash boiled into steam," said Lt. Daniel Sanchez,
Abraham Lincoln's Reactor Department RP-02 Division officer. "The steam is then pumped out and condensed, so we can collect it as distilled water. Chemicals, such as chlorine, are then added to the water to make it safe to drink. It is then moved to the potable water tanks and distributed throughout the ship via potable water pumps."

Once the salt and brine are removed from the water, the natural remnants then redeposited to the sea, said Cogan. This allows the desalinization process to continue without interruptions. This process is not something taught in the machinist mate training pipeline, so it can take a bit of time
in rate to achieve the qualification. "It takes about two years to become senior in rank and then four years to become water control watch qualified," said Cogan. "Once we are qualified, we have weekly training for four hours a week to keep us up-to-date on knowledge involving the reactor plants."

The water control watch oversees the production of more than 400,000 gallons of potable water, including water for the reactor plants, per day. For the reactor personnel standing this watch, it's crucial to maintain accountability of the water, down to the last drop. "We're in charge
of where the water is going, where we're losing water, and making sure we're not wasting water," said Cogan. If the ship loses too much desalinization capacity, it will not be able to keep up with the amount of water used on a daily basis for meal preparation, laundry services, hygiene and consumption. If the ship cannot create potable water, it will eventually lead to constrained water hours for the crew.

The commanding officer determines when to set water hours based on a recommendation from the engineering officer of the watch. It limits when the crew can take
showers and if they're using paper plates and plastic silverware, as opposed to washable dining utensils. Mission essential tasks such as washing aircraft will not be affected by the water restrictions. In the event the ship loses the ability to produce the necessary potable water, it is all hands on deck for reactor department to get the pump back online” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-06 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:16:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alexis Romero, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class (IW/SW) Jessica Kalinin describes a surface contact aboard the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76).

 

160828-N-WA993-158 - YOKOSUKA, Japan (Aug. 28, 2016) Intelligence Specialist 3rd Class (IW/SW) Jessica Kalinin describes a surface contact aboard the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76). Kalinin is a photographer for the Ship's Nautical or Otherwise Photographic Interpretation and Examination (SNOOPIE) team. SNOOPIE team is charged with reporting and recording the presence of unidentified ships or aircraft. Ronald Reagan provides a combat-ready force, which protects and defends the collective maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James Lee/Released) http://www.navy.mil/view_imagex.asp?id=224045&t=1

 

SNOOPIE Team Aboard Abraham Lincoln  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “"Ship's Nautical or Otherwise Photographic Interpretation and Exploitation (SNOOPIE) takes precedence over anything I'm doing, at any time of the day," said Mass Communication Specialist (MC) 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas, a photographer on USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) SNOOPIE team.


The team is comprised of four members, each playing a key role to ensure they
collect as much information on vessels of interest, ships, small boats or aircraft that are unidentifiable to lookouts and the officer of the deck.

"When the tactical action officer (TAO) calls out over the 1MC, 'Away the
SNOOPIE team! Away!,' it's our job, along with the MCs, to go up there and get eight different reference points all around the contact," said Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Andrew Kolb, Abraham Lincoln's SNOOPIE team leader. "Basically, from the intelligence point of view, we have to identify what vessel it is, find out what country it belongs to, what kind of operations it's conducting, and most importantly, whether or not the contact is armed."

The team has five minutes to reach the O-10 level, about 15 minutes to collect information on the contact, and within an hour, turn around a finished product to send to the Office of Naval Intelligence to process.

"I like the fast pace and the adrenaline rush it gives me," said Paulauskas. "I run up to the O
-10 level of the ship and know what I'm doing could potentially be saving lives and is vital information for the Navy."

While the team lead is directing the MC photographer and videographer, the team recorder, Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Wyatt Nelson, is recording everything down in a logbook that will later be used for narration.

"We then create a 30-second video with the MCs' material captured with the narration the recorder had logged," said Kolb. "Then we upload the 30-second file over a secured internet email to the appropriate commands to be processed."

After the
SNOOPIE team has collected all the information, the lead reports to the officer of the deck in the bridge and tells them the information they've gathered.

The next time you hear TAO's call for
SNOOPIE, look around and you may see the SNOOPIE team sprinting to action” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-11 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:35:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Garrett LaBarge, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Aircrew Survival Equipmentman: The Last To Let You Down  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “"Attention to detail" is a phrase that can mean different things to different people, but for the aircrew survival equipmentmen (PR) aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), it means the difference between life and death for the aircrewmen who embark with us.


The aircrew survival shop aboard
Abraham Lincoln is owned by Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department's (AIMD) IM-2 Division. They maintain all of the aviation life support equipment for the attached air wing.

Chief Aircrew Survival Equipmentman Carlos Hunter, who has been in the rate for 20 years, said that PRs service equipment such as parachutes, inflatable life preservers, life rafts, and oxygen systems that keep pilots alert and alive while performing high-altitude operations or agressive maneuvers.

Aircrew survival equipmentmen, commonly known as parachute riggers, primarily maintained parachutes in the past. Now that they maintain all of the survival equipment for pilots and aircrew, the weight of their job has increased drastically.

"I believe we have one of the most important jobs out there," said Aircrew Survival Equipmentman 3rd Class Timothy Dickman. "
When a pilot is going down, you're the last person to let them down. Our gear is what they use when the worst-case scenario arises."

While PRs maintain mission essential survival equipment, they also do alterations and repairs.

"Part of our job is to repair flight equipment and that includes flight suits and some of the gear that they wear which would require us to sew. So sometimes we tailor gear," said Hunter. "One of the biggest misconceptions about our rate is that our main job is to sew things, so a lot of the time we
have people ask us to tailor their pants or sew a patch on. We don't mind doing that, but that's not our only job."

PRs go through an extensive 12-week "A" school at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida. They study aviation basic theory and basic skills required for their rating by completing group instruction and practical applications. Upon graduating, PRs can expect to be sent to a squadron, ship, or a naval air station.

From the smallest stitch to the largest parachute, every job must be performed with diligence and attention to detail in order to ensure
the safety of our aircrewmen” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-10 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shane Bryan, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Sailors load ordnance onto an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the

 

170725-N-NI812-014 - ARABIAN GULF (July 25, 2017) Sailors load ordnance onto an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the "Argonauts" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68), July 25, 2017, in the Arabian Gulf. Nimitz is deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. While in this region, the ship and its carrier strike group are conducting maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners, preserve freedom of navigation, and maintain the free flow of commerce. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ian Kinkead/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_imagex.asp?id=242492&t=1

 

Getting to Know Abraham Lincoln's Aviation Ordnanceman  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “In the Navy, aviation ordnanceman (AO) serve in a variety of roles and have been putting "warheads on foreheads" since before World War II. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), and throughout the fleet, AOs work to ensure naval ships and aircraft have a means of self-defense and, if necessary, are capable of bringing the fight to the enemy. "[Aboard] aircraft carriers we can serve in any one of the "G" divisions, [including] administration, retail ordnance logistics, weapons assembly, small arms, engineering and aviation intermediary maintenance department," said Chief Warrant Officer Bryan Richey, the air gunner aboard Abraham Lincoln.

 

Due to the multi-faceted aspect of the rate, AOs need to maintain proficiency in a variety of fields in order for the ship and its weapons system to operate at full capacity. "The primary job for my division, G-1, is the safe and efficient ammunition handling on the flight deck and hanger decks during all weapons evolutions and vertical replenishments," said Richey. "We are also responsible for the support of all embarked squadrons' ordnance evolutions, and the maintenance, inventory and accuracy of 2,400 pieces of aviation weapons support equipment." However, not all of the AOs, or "guys in red," work up on the flight deck or in the hangar bay.

 

Divisions such as G-3 have far less visible responsibilities, such as working down in the ship's many magazines. "In our weapons magazines we assemble ordnance to be moved up on the flight deck and loaded onto aircraft," said Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Teven Reed, a Sailor assigned to G-3 Division. "We also hold all ordnance and small arms ammunition in various magazines throughout the ship. While we were in the yards, and over the last couple of months, we have been priming, painting and preparing our magazines so we will be ready to do our job when it is our turn to lead the fight."

In preparation for
Abraham Lincoln's return to the fight, AOs and all of weapons department have ensured the safe and complete rehabilitation of more than 230 departmental spaces, 43 weapons magazines, the ships armory, 22 ready stowage and jettison lockers, and the implementation of the new MK-38 gun system. When Abraham Lincoln was called on to assist with providing relief in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, Sailors found themselves serving in various unexpected capacities.

"Aside from helping onload all the relief supplies,
G-1 moved supplies through the hangar bay, G-4 operated the weapons elevator to transport supplies into the magazines for G-3 to store," said Reed. The teamwork displayed by weapons department during Abraham Lincoln's crisis response is a small glimpse of the ordanceman's operational capability. "All divisions working together under the ordnance handling officer and gun boss will ensure that we continue to be instrumental in Abraham Lincoln's command success in assessments, trainings and certifications providing this crew the opportunity to get our ship back into the fight, continuing to defend freedom and democracy around the world," said Richey” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-13 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:44:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Leaving a Legacy Aboard Abraham Lincoln  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “Is it possible for one single Sailor to leave a lasting mark on the history of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) forever? For Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Emily Baker the answer is a clear yes.


Baker grew up in Litchfield, Maine, and has been an artist for as long as she can remember. As a kid, she would often ask for drawings from her family, but eventually she began to create her own. Now, Baker is solely responsible for the aviation boatswain's mate wing mural on
Abraham Lincoln's superstructure.

"I use to ask my siblings to draw for me all the time," said Baker. "At some point they just got tired of it, so I taught myself, and I've been making art ever since."

Baker's self-taught artistic ability has given her opportunities to showcase her paintings at work. During her time aboard
Abraham Lincoln, she was selected to paint a shark-themed mural on a V-5 office door, the captain's eagle on the commanding officer's official fight deck door, and the aviation boatswain's mate rating badge on the island. It is this 50 square-foot flight deck mural she said she feels is her greatest opportunity.

"I think that this is a once in a lifetime chance," said Baker. "It makes me feel proud and a little bit nervous, wondering what people think about it."

One thing is certain; her mural will be a lasting part of the ship's history
.

"In the future, when I'm no longer on this ship, there will always be a sign that I was here," said Baker. "I'll be leaving a legacy, and it feels kind of cool."” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS171031-14 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:49:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cody Anderson, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Food Service Attendants  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “The food service attendants (FSA) play a vital role in the cleanliness and smooth process of preparing for each meal of the day.


The culinary specialists' (CS) aboard
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) primary focus is meal prep, while FSA helps out with cleaning the galley and mess decks.

"There isn't much down time for Sailors in the food service division," said Aviation Ordnanceman Cody Pinson, an FSA. "If we left the mess decks for more than a half hour, there would be a lot of work to catch up on."

Comprised of a variety of ratings, FSAs are sent from each department on the ship and temporarily assigned duty (TAD) to help the CSs with their heavy load.

"The galley and mess decks are important parts of the ship
," said Pinson. "It's a place for everyone to unwind while eating their food. The overall morale in the mess decks is positive."

The average time Sailors work as an FSA is three months in various divisions of food services. They work 16 hours per day in port and 12 hour shifts while out to sea. Serving thousands of Sailors per day takes thorough preparation and is time-demanding, but FSAs devote their work days to ensure everything is set up for the next chow time.

Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Dalton Wright, who leaves the food services division soon, says serving as an
FSA was enlightening.

"I'm going to be a little more diligent while eating on the mess decks," Wright said. "Working as an FSA teaches you to be cognizant of what you leave behind when you're done eating."

Information Specialist 2nd Class Andrew Kolb says that he has newfound respect for FSAs after serving as the mess deck Master-At-Arms for three months.

"Little things go a long way," said Kolb. "Cleaning up after yourself can make FSAs job a lot easier."

"FSAs take good care of the mess decks so that Sailors have a
sanitary place to eat," said Kolb. "As long as Sailors leave the food services division appreciating the long hours devoted to the upkeep of this place, it's worth every minute of it"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-22 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 2:28:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darion Chanelle Triplett, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

Healthy Abes  

 

As reported on 31 October 2017, “Some Sailors burn off the stress of being out to sea through exercise and physical activities aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). For those who do, they have a variety of options to do so.


Nine gyms are available to
Abraham Lincoln Sailors, provided by the ship's Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR/S-7). Jenny Snyder, the Fun Boss aboard Abraham Lincoln is the head of MWR, its activities and equipment. For Snyder, the health of Sailors is her priority.

"Physical fitness is critical to a Sailor's well-being and health," said Snyder. "Even without a fit boss at the moment, we are trying our best to provide any and all possibilities for the crew to get out and get fit. We've been setting up basketball and dodgeball games, and we have another 5K coming up soon."

Snyder said she hopes with all the opportunities and resources provided; all the Sailors aboard Lincoln will pass the next Physical Readiness Test (PRT), which consists of
timed sit ups, push ups, and a cardio event.

"Right now is the best time to start a fitness regimen or keep to the one you have. Some Sailors fall into a relaxed state after the PRT and don't remember to keep up with dieting and exercising," said Snyder. "Before they know it, they're told they have 10 weeks until the test and go into a panic trying to get in shape."

The Connex Box is one of the gym options for Sailors and is located in the hangar bay. It offers various equipment for strength training
and cardio. It is open 0900-1100 and 1930-2130, Monday through Thursday and is managed by Lincoln's Assistant Command Fitness Leader Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Sha'ron Fuller.

"Being physically active is extremely important at sea, it builds the endurance Sailors need to make it through the day and get to come together and break a sweat," said Fuller. "Being fit isn't a goal you can just achieve, it's something you keep chasing after, and while you're chasing it you'll be clearing your mind and melting the stress away. It's a win-win."

Sailors work long hours at sea and constantly have to stay ahead of the game with fitness and
healthy eating habits.

For Sailors looking for a moment away from the long working hours, exercising provides a chance to get out of their work-space and burn some calories.

"It's relaxing to come out here, feel the breeze coming out from sea while exercising," said Naval Air Crewman (Helicopter) 2nd Class Raymond Quinones. "Even with how busy I am out to sea I always make time to get out here, though I mix in weights into cardio to save time."

As important as it is to stay active out to sea, it is just as important to
watch your diet, according to Lt. John McGinniss, Lincoln's physical therapist.

"It is crucial to be mindful of your eating, stay hydrated, and get adequate sleep," said McGinniss. "Your body will thank you for it."

McGinniss also said it's important to get solid, consistent sleep every night so the following day Sailors won't need to find a boost through sugar-filled energy drinks, which can lead to an unwanted increase of appetite, or larger portions of food.

"Get your necessary sleep, water, exercise and don't skip breakfast," said McGinniss. "It's a health choice that'll benefit you down the road."

MWR is looking for volunteers to be fitness instructors for yoga, Zumba, spin class, or other functional fitness classes onboard” (Ref. Story Number: NNS171031-23 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 2:29:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned Norfolk, Va. on _ November 2017, conducting FRS Carrier Qualifications off the coast of North Carolina and TRACOM carrier qulifications off the coast of Flordia from 17 October to 8 November 2017. Abraham Lincoln hosted 24 student pilots, from Commander, Naval Air Training Detachment for their first landings on an aircraft carrier. The qualification required pilots to successfully complete 10 arrested landings and four touch-and-goes on Abraham Lincolns 1,092-feet long flight deck. In total, Abraham Lincoln completed more than 500 hours of flight operation maintenance, performed 619 launches and recoveries, and qualified 46 personnel in flight deck familiarization while underway, on 17 October 2017. Abraham Lincoln first class petty officer association (FCPOA) were selected as "FSA for a Day" and spent a day working with the ship's food service attendants (FSA) on 20 October 2017. Over the course of three days, junior Sailors made donations to see their favorite first class petty officers (FCPO) work in the galley alongside the food service attendants. The contest selected 27 winners and raised $2,366 with Yeoman 1st Class Lawrence Anderson leading the way with $175. If your berthing is near the fantail and you have been woken up in the middle of the night by what sounds like a jet engine above your berthing, you were right. That was a jet engine, and for Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), those were the sounds of progress. For the first time in more than five years, Abraham Lincoln installed and successfully ran a Jet Engine Test Instrument (JETI) at full afterburner on 22 October 2017.
Sailors aboard
Abraham Lincoln completed oelrisen capsicum (OC) spray usage certification on 24 October 2017. Members of the Security Department and the security reaction force basic (SRF-B) course participants lined up to demonstrate all the necessary skills to subdue a security threat while under the effects OC spray. As reported on 31 October 2017, “Abraham Lincoln Navigation Department is undergoing a switch from paper charts to the Voyage Management System (VMS), a fully-electronic system of charts. The majority of the fleet has switched to VMS, which offers instantaneous navigation information and a more reliable Global Positioning System (GPS). As reported on 31 October 2017, “The Reactor Department aboard Abraham Lincoln works countless hours keeping the ship running and operational. Of their many essential jobs, one in particular sometimes flies under the radar. The desalinization process creates potable water that is safe to drink for crew members and is important in maintaining mission readiness and habitability throughout the ship. As reported on 31 October 2017, “"Ship's Nautical or Otherwise Photographic Interpretation and Exploitation (SNOOPIE) takes precedence over anything I'm doing, at any time of the day," said Mass Communication Specialist (MC) 3rd Class Jessica Paulauskas, a photographer on Abraham Lincoln's SNOOPIE team. The team is comprised of four members, each playing a key role to ensure they collect as much information on vessels of interest, ships, small boats or aircraft that are unidentifiable to lookouts and the officer of the deck. As reported on 31 October 2017, “"Attention to detail" is a phrase that can mean different things to different people, but for the aircrew survival equipmentmen (PR) aboard Abraham Lincoln, it means the difference between life and death for the aircrewmen who embark with us. The aircrew survival shop aboard Abraham Lincoln is owned by Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department's (AIMD) IM-2 Division. They maintain all of the aviation life support equipment for the attached air wing. As reported on 31 October 2017, “In the Navy, aviation ordnanceman (AO) serve in a variety of roles and have been putting "warheads on foreheads" since before World War II. Abraham Lincoln, and throughout the fleet, AOs work to ensure naval ships and aircraft have a means of self-defense and, if necessary, are capable of bringing the fight to the enemy. "[Aboard] aircraft carriers we can serve in any one of the "G" divisions, [including] administration, retail ordnance logistics, weapons assembly, small arms, engineering and aviation intermediary maintenance department," said Chief Warrant Officer Bryan Richey, the air gunner aboard Abraham Lincoln. As reported on 31 October 2017, “Is it possible for one single Sailor to leave a lasting mark on the history of Abraham Lincoln forever? For Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Emily Baker the answer is a clear yes. As reported on 31 October 2017, “The food service attendants (FSA) play a vital role in the cleanliness and smooth process of preparing for each meal of the day. As reported on 31 October 2017, “Some Sailors burn off the stress of being out to sea through exercise and physical activities aboard Abraham Lincoln. For those who do, they have a variety of options to do so. Nine gyms are available to Abraham Lincoln Sailors, provided by the ship's Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR/S-7). Jenny Snyder, the Fun Boss aboard Abraham Lincoln is the head of MWR, its activities and equipment. For Snyder, the health of Sailors is her priority” (Ref. 76, Story Number: NNS171031-04 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:05:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darion Chanelle Triplett, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Number: NNS171101-04 - Release Date: 11/1/2017 7:54:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171101-06 - Release Date: 11/1/2017 8:01:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cody Anderson, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171101-01 - Release Date: 11/1/2017 7:41:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-05 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:15:00 AM  - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Sherman, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-06 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:16:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alexis Romero, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-11 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:35:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Garrett LaBarge, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-10 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:30:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shane Bryan, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-13 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:44:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matt Herbst, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-14 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 8:49:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cody Anderson, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-22 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 2:28:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Darion Chanelle Triplett, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS); Story Number: NNS171031-23 - Release Date: 10/31/2017 2:29:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jacob Smith, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103124

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103145

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103144

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103143

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103123

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103122

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103113

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103117

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103114

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103115

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103120

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=103121

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Norfolk, Va. on on 7 December 2017, for FRS carrier qulifications off the coast of North Carolina (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted FRS carrier qulifications off the coast of North Carolina from 7 to 13 December 2017 (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned Norfolk, Va. on 10 December 2017, concluding FRS carrier qulifications off the coast of North Carolina from 7 to 13 December 2017 (Ref. 76).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After 2017 Sea Trials

1 June 2017 to Present

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4