Activities saving the U.S. Navy money during Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

 (1 January 2013 to 12 May 2017 – 2017 Sea Trials)

Volume IV

Chapter VII

 

 

Activities saving the U.S. Navy money during RCOH

 

1 January to 31 December 2013 ($4,000,000)

DEPARTMENT/DIVISION/SAILOR(S)

HOURS

SAVINGS

30 V-2 Division Sailors removed all four catapults from the flight deck.

Man Hours

$500,000

Deck team removed more than 50 percent of Lincoln's tiled floors. The decking team started the project November 2012 when the first half of the Ship Coordinated Offload/Onload Plan (SCOOP) was complete

Man Hours

$3,500,000

Sailors perform fire watch - 10/3/2013

41,270

 

1 January to 31 December 2014 ($16,369,000)

Sailors from the Air Department.

6-months of man-hours

$700,000

Decking team removed of studs and foundations welded to the deck to prepare for the installation of furniture in interior spaces

Man Hours

$1,000,000

Electronic División ET Sailor created a new test routine for a specific circuit card.

Man Hours

$136,000

PM13 Deck team took on the additional task of removing studs and equipment foundations welded to the deck, all in preparation for new equipment and tile installation.

Man Hours

$6,000,000

Fire Controlman Taylor created a process to narrow down the technical issue from an entire circuit board to a single component, which reduces the replacement cost from $10,000 to 20 cents.

Hundreds of man-hours

$160,000

PM13 Deck team assumed the task of repairing the ship's hangar bay ceiling, saving equipment costs and manpower

Man Hours

$4,600,000

Sailors perform fire watch - 12/10/2014

190,000

$3,800,000

1 January to 31 December 2015 ($4,241,000)

Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) use the Navy's 2M (Micro/Miniature) Repair and Gold Disk program to save the Navy a significant amount of money. The Navy developed the Gold Disk Program to save money and time by reducing costs and turnaround time for repairs. "Using the Gold Disk program instead of sending circuit cards out to be replaced, this past fiscal year we have saved roughly $241,000," said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Anton Vasylyuk, assigned to Lincoln's 2M Electronics Division.

Reported

7 Mar 2017

$241,000

1 January to 31 December 2016 (N/A)

1 January to 31 December 2017 (N/A)

Not with standing what hasn’t been reported by the U. S. Navy

TOTAL (2013 to 212 May 2017 - 2017 Sea Trials)

 

25,237,000

1 January to 31 December 2013 ($4,000,000)

 “All four catapults of the Lincoln's flight deck were removed, along with their bottom sheathing on 18 January 2013, due to the effort of 30 V-2 Division Sailors” (Ref. Story Number: NNS130131-11 - Release Date: 1/31/2013 2:46:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71758

“Sailors with the decking team aboard Abe reached a milestone achievement on 9 October 2013 by removing more than 50 percent of Lincoln's tiled floors. The decking team started the project November 2012 when the first half of the Ship Coordinated Offload/Onload Plan (SCOOP) was complete. Instead of paying for contractors to remove Lincoln's tiling, Sailors with the decking team completed an estimated 32,000 man hours saving an estimated $3.5 million on the Refueling and Complex Ooverhaul (RCOH) contract. At the halfway point, the decking team has removed enough tiling to cover Lincoln's 4.5-acre flight deck” (Ref. Story Number: NNS131015-10 - Release Date: 10/15/2013 9:28:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=77087

“Sailors will complete an estimated 200,000 hours of fire watch, which serves as a cost avoidance measure during the carrier's overhaul” (Ref. Story Number: NNS131003-13 - Release Date: 10/3/2013 10:20:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=76948

1 January to 31 December 2014 ($16,369,000)

“Sailors from the Air Department recycled parts from the decommissioned USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in an effort to save the Navy a pocket full of money during Lincoln's Refueling Complex and Overhaul (RCOH). Eight Sailors travelled to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard to acquire equipment to help repair the ship's flight deck fueling station and its two JP-5 fuel pump rooms. Recycling Kennedy's equipment onto Lincoln saved the Navy six months of man-hours and $700,000, according to Lincoln's Air Boatswain, Chief Warrant Officer 4 Anthony Garcia. "Attaining these resources has tremendously impacted the progress of repairing the ship's fueling systems," said Garcia. The eight-Sailor team manually disassembled and transferred more than 100 valves, filters, caps and assemblies without cranes or pneumatic tools, which impressed the chief in charge of the team” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140320-22 - Release Date: 3/20/2014 7:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).                     http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=79787

The decking team estimates they have saved over $1 million in ship's flooring material removal since the beginning of RCOH. The contract involves the removal of studs and foundations welded to the deck to prepare for the installation of furniture in interior spaces. On board Navy ships furniture is attached to the deck with welded studs to prevent it from moving during high seas” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140403-38 - Release Date: 4/3/2014 10:12:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Andriana Genualdi, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).                                               http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=80122

“Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kyle Rushing, assigned to Abe hails from Bothell, Washington. Replacing a single part can cost under a dollar, but an entire new card can cost over $100,000.00." "I got the award for creating a new test routine for a specific circuit card," Rushing said. "It ended up saving the Navy $136,000.00. Now all the technicians in the Navy and Coast Guard follow my new instruction"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140619-13 - Release Date: 6/19/2014 12:07:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).                                                                      http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=81761

The efforts of the PM13 Deck removal team aboard Abe have shaved nearly $6 million off the cost of the ship's Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH). The team started the project in Nov. 2012. Originally, PM13 only removed tile and furniture from the steel subfloors in preparation for the installation of new furniture and flooring. In April 2014 the PM13 team took on the additional task of removing studs and equipment foundations welded to the deck, all in preparation for new equipment and tile installation” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140807-27 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:25:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=82637

“Fire Controlman 2nd Class Bryan Taylor, an Ozark, Alabama native, moved on to work for the Gold Disk Program, a Navy-wide initiative designed to save money. Taylor created a process to narrow down the technical issue from an entire circuit board to a single component, which reduces the replacement cost from $10,000 to 20 cents. In addition to component costs, Taylor's efforts in this project have also saved the Navy hundreds of man-hours that would have been required to remove and replace the circuit boards. For his accomplishments, he recently received the Chief of Naval Operations Gold Disk Award for May 2014 which included a Letter of Commendation and a $1,000.00 cash award” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140821-16 - Release Date: 8/21/2014 4:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Young, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).                               http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=82889

“Personnel from the decking team (PM-13) are saving the Navy $4.6 million by assuming the task of repairing the ship's hangar bay ceiling, saving equipment costs and manpower. With 2,000 square feet of corrosion control and prevention complete, one-third of Lincoln's hangar bay is now ready for the lagging installation process” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141006-10 - Release Date: 10/6/2014 9:11:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).                                                                     http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=83665

“To date, Sailors assigned Abe have avoided costs of approximately $3.8 million by completing nearly 190,000 fire watch hours while the ship undergoes its RCOH in Newport News. The money saved by Sailors conducting fire watch since the beginning of RCOH in March 2013 will be applied later in the project to fund other needed repairs” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141210-04 - Release Date: 12/10/2014 11:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aaron T. Kiser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84810

Lincoln Sailors Save Money, Time Using Gold Disk Program

 

As reported on 7 March 2016, “Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) use the Navy's 2M (Micro/Miniature) Repair and Gold Disk program to save the Navy a significant amount of money. The Navy developed the Gold Disk Program to save money and time by reducing costs and turnaround time for repairs. "Using the Gold Disk program instead of sending circuit cards out to be replaced, this past fiscal year we have saved roughly $241,000," said Electronics Technician 3rd Class Anton Vasylyuk, assigned to Lincoln's 2M Electronics Division” (Ref. Story Number: NNS160307-19 - Release Date: 3/7/2016 4:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert Ferrone, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=93488

 

There are many renovations to the ship that the crew performs. SN Bruce Wayne Henion renovated the Operations Department Office aboard USS Coral Sea (CV-43) installing a ceiling, industrial linoleum, paint, etc. in 1979. This work was not part of the scheduled overhaul, but his carpenter skills paid off. You could say SN Henion saved the U. S. Navy money, yet the man hours of crew renovation through out the Coral Sea was never calculated. Today man hours that save the navy money are counted, but I wonder is the entire crew’s effort during an overhaul calculated in terms of hours for projects not funded by overhauls in general.

 

COH’s and RCOH’s are extensive, so one would assume every space aboard gets renovated. SA Henion spent his three month mess decking chipping away at bulk heads, being a courier for the Operations Department Head, Overhaul coordinator. Crew and Air Wing Personnel were not given the opportunity to have their activities published in articles like the digital formation of words up loaded to the internet allows today. To be able to share stories strengthens the moral of a command. But some things will never change and that includes multi tasking the crew in order to get the job done.

 

Lincoln Sailors Work Outside of Ratings, Save Navy Money

 

As reported on 15 April 2013, “a thousand dollars here, a thousand dollars there. In the middle of a multi-billion dollar-RCOH, who cares, right? The USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crew working at Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipyard's Light Industrial Facility (LIFAC) does. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors assigned to Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipyard's LIFAC continue to save the Navy money by learning new jobs that are not traditionally a part of their ratings.

LIFAC is where
Lincoln Sailors create and restore materials for the ship, including watertight doors, non-watertight doors and ready room chairs. They also create new items, such as funnels and deck drain covers. "We had an order come in to make all new deck drain covers for the entire ship," said Machinery Repairman 2nd Class Nathanael Goodwin. "Over a period of two weeks, we cut and hand punched the holes for 2,000 deck drain covers."

The
Lincoln Sailors at LIFAC come from different rates and departments aboard ship. But LIFAC Sailors are working outside of their rate, meaning that they are also working outside of their comfort zone and usual skill setting. "We are going through a lot of trial and error; every day having to learn something new," said Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class Perry Anderson. "It took the shop about six months to qualify everyone on all of the machines we use here. Thankfully, the (USS Theodore Roosevelt) Sailors are still here. We are learning a lot from them as we start to fill their shoes."

 

Among the many machines at LIFAC are the blast booths. This is where doors and other mechanisms are sandblasted down to bare metal. Near the blast booths are booths for regular painting on non-watertight doors. It's with these stations that Sailors are able to do a lot of different jobs to save the Navy as much money as possible. "I am one of the people on the 'door team' and we are the ones who blast, repair and repaint the watertight and non-watertight doors," said Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 3rd Class Bryant Guest. "We blast and then paint. We are using a new process for ships known as 'powder coating'. It is an alternative to painting.

 

Powder coating lasts 10 times longer than regular paint, won't rust, is environmentally safer, is an easier process and it takes less time to complete." Learning how to become knowledgeable and qualified on the welding stations, blasting bays, paint rooms, machinery to measure and cut steel, and Chem Labs has also had its own set of challenges for each individual Sailor. "It is really important to reuse as much as we can as far as materials go," said Senior Chief Aviation Machinist Mate Roberto Reyes. "With all the different cut backs in funding the Navy is experiencing right now, we try to use the fullest extent of each material we are sent to further our efforts without waste“” (Ref. Story Number: NNS130415-07 - Release Date: 4/15/2013 2:21:00 PM - By Seaman Phylicia Hanson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=73384

 

Abe’s Crew is to be commended to say the least. They really made a difference.

 

Often Yeoman’s are tasked with typing SFOMS (Ship's Force Overhaul Management System) reports when you’re assigned to the Department, where your CO is also the SFOMS director between the ship yard and crew. These days, Overhaul Department’s manage an overhaul.

 

In SN Bruce Wayne Henion’s case, his Division was OX, Operations Department, the Department Head of Operations and SFOMS during the CV-43 Overhaul in 1978 to 1979. Today, there is a separate Overhaul Department.

 

Henion began aboard CV-43 as a Seaman and then Yeoman, was first assigned as 4th Division, Deck Department Yeoman, before assigned to the Operations Department, stationed onboard from December 1977 to early 1981. Henion’s mess decking was as YN, awaiting test results for eventual advancement. Usually, a three month stint mess cooking takes you away from your Division and Departmental duties, but not Henion.

 

SN/YN Henion recalls typing Departmental tasks from FITREPS, Enlisted Evaluations, Top Secret manuals and kept the Operations Department Office message board current during mess cooking renovation three month stint. Serving as the ships SFOMS courier between ship yard and ship.

 

SA Henion recalls his time belonged to the U. S. Navy, and when he finished mess cooking, his duties of being an Operations Department Yeoman became even more challenging, having lost and regained his Top Secret clearance, frocked to YN3 and YN2.

 

As the result of being charged with possession of a pipe in his locker, with no pot in it, and accused of owing a joint found on the stairway of the barracks, the CO, Captain S. R. Arthur, placed SN Henion on restriction and extra duty and Henion was assigned to man the Special Services Office, under the collateral duty direction of the Meteorologist Officer, LCDR Hunt.

 

The XO ordered SN Henion to create an Alcohol and Drug Course for the Crew, but SN Henion could not return to the Operations Department for 4 to 6 months, until his Top Secret Clearance was reinstated. The overhaul of Coral Sea gained YN3 Henion a lot of experience which came in handy for the ships November 1979 to June 1980 Middle Eastern Deployment.

 

Whether you’re swabbing the deck or cleaning the Heads, your effort contributes to the commands mission. SN Henion recalls one of his collateral duties besides being a radioman on the nuclear hose team or during general quarters, manning the radio and hose, SN Henion was assigned the duty of keeping the Officers Head above the Operations Department clean.

 

SN Henion recalls that one time he was cleaning the Head, an Officer from the Air Wing came into the Head. He saw that SN Henion was just leaving a stall after using it and he began to tell SN Henion that he was placing him on report for using an Officers Head.

 

SN Henion told the Officer he had just finished cleaning the Head and that had he left, to use an enlisted head a long distance away, he would have left several different buckets of liquid chemicals used to clean and disinfect un attended.

 

If they had been mixed together, they could be poisonous and even explosive, so leaving these products alone without supervision was not a reasonable thing to do SN Henion recalls telling the Officer, but the Officer still demanded full name, Division, Department, SS No., etc., so SN Henion gave him the information he wanted and took a scolding.

 

Nothing ever happened and the incident was for gotten by this officer or at least he never pursued it further, yet regardless whether this officer had charged me or not, no crewman should leave anything dangerous unattended for any amount of time.

 

It only takes small amounts of some chemicals mixed together to start a fire and there are those who will sabotage your command if they can get access to hazardous materials.

 

Be at all times alert of your surroundings, being aware of compartment change and debris hanging around. When you’re in the ocean you must rely on each other, but there is always the clown that is a bigot or racist who might drop off discriminative pictures on bulk heads, resulting in an all hands call on the hanger deck do to 1,000 angered Crewmen, an incident aboard CV-43 during her 79/80 deployment in the Middle East. There is no going back in port or at sea, once an explosion occurs as a result of sabotage or carelessness, just moving forward to salvage lives and the ship.

 

The above content relating to Seaman Appetence, Seaman, Yeoman and YN3 Bruce Wayne Henion, was written by the discharged YN2 Henion on 18 March 2017.

 

YN2 Henion was honorably discharge in 1983. His story is presented as a tribute to young sailors, those who have served aboard naval vessels, or Air Wing Personnel embarked aboard aircraft carriers, a duty station, unlike any other naval vessel; in his book titled:

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy

(August 1977 to February 1983)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980)

 

 

Activities saving the U.S. Navy money during Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

 (1 January 2013 to 2017 Sea Trials)

Volume IV

Chapter VII

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4