COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) CompTuEx and CQ’s Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team (NPMTT) Drills, assessments and the pre-deployment ORSE off SOCAL OPAREA conducted by the NPMTT Team; conducting the Exercise Northern Edge, with CVW-14 CQ’s, en route to Alaska to conduct Exercise Northern Edge 2002, a multi-threat scenario acted out in Alaskan waters in the Gulf of Alaska and JTFEX off the coast of California during FEP-2 and Sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fifth Indian Ocean deployment, on her 1st North Arabian Sea deployment in support of her 1st Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, on her fifth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment (two cruises to the area during deployment) in support of her 5th Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq (24 July 2002 to 6 May 2003).

1 January 2002 to 6 May 2003

Chapter XV

Part I of III - 1 January to 31 December 2002

Part II of III - 1 January to 5 May 2003

Part III of III - 6 May 2003 - Section 1, 2 & 3

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2002 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XV, Appendix I, Section I of II

 

Abe’s Sixth “WestPac” deployment articles not included in the Narrative, Summary and Time Line presented in Chapter XV, relating to Crew Personnel Stories and Awards, Department and Division, in port crew activities other then arrival or departure articles to ports of call, Chapter XV, Appendix II

Chapter XV, Appendix I, Section 2 of 2 and Chapter XV, Appendix II

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2002 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began 2002 by completing a recent Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team (NPMTT) visit; Inter-Deployment Training Cycle (IDTC) Flight Deck Qualifications in the eastern Pacific, preceded by CART II (Command Assessment of Readiness and Training), administered by ATG PacNorwest and ATG AirPac and INSURV in port moored to the pier at NASNI, San Diego, California, conducting TSTA I en route to Everett, Washington, preceded by INSURV at sea in the SOCAL OPAREA, while the Afloat Training Group Pacific came aboard to conduct the Command Assessment of Readiness Training, TSTA II/III/FEP in the SOCAL OPAREA; AIRPAC FRS CQ’s Det. in the eastern Pacific and enjoyed the holidays season for another well deserved stand down after an exceptionally busy year. Also a safe and successful Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. was conducted from 11 April to 15 October 2001. Great milestones in Environmental Awareness and Industrial Safety were achieved by the Abraham Lincoln Safety Department and her crew through Operational Risk Management (ORh4) Training and awareness programs. A cohesive team effort resulted in the training of over 3000 Lincoln Sailors in the COMNAVAIRPAC Web-Based ORM University in 113 the recommended time. This effort resulted in the highest completion ratio of any sea-based command in the Navy for the program” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 14 January 2002, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, for Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team (NPMTT) Drills and COMPTUEX (Composite Task Unit Exercise) off the Southern California operating area” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on on 7 February 2002, conducting Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team (NPMTT) Drills and COMPTUEX (Composite Task Unit Exercise) off the Southern California operating area from 14 January to 7 February 2002. A sailor fell overboard as the ship performed Carrier Qualifications in southern Californian waters, approximately 90 miles west of San Diego. In addition, about 400 sailors presented to Sick Bay at various times with viral gastroenteritis. One of the key elements of CompTuEx directed the ship’s carrier intelligence center to operate with men of Alpha Platoon from Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) Team 1. The SEALs conducted a special reconnaissance mission that took them to San Clemente Island, about 75 miles northwest of San Diego. For three days and nights the SEALs dug-in and gathered intelligence, transmitting imagery and data to the carrier. The final phase of the exercise taxed participants to their limits, as officers changed the intelligence gathering missions to a scenario that included rescuing two downed airmen. The SEALs found the men and a pair of Seahawks from HS-4 swept in and extracted the SEALs and their rescued victims. Training with the SEALs broadened sailors and gave them valuable experience which would help them during fighting against the Iraqis, and IS2 James Hartje detached from the ship for a month ashore to work with Naval Special Warfare Command to familiarize himself with some of their communications and operational procedures. And during the exercise some Distribution work center sailors also flew to Shiloh to aid in troubleshooting and repairing an SH-60B AESS station. With nine Officers and 42 ship and squadron Corpsmen, the ship started the year still in the IDTC work-up cycle. In January Medical Department saw over 400 cases of Viral Gastroenteritis within a 1 '/2 week period during COMPTUEX from 16 Jan - 6 Feb 02. At this time the ship also lost one Sailor overboard (14 January to 7 February 2002)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 11 February 2002, for Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team (NPMTT) Drills during an underway period in port from 7 to 11 February 2002” (Ref. 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 14 February 2002, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, conducting Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team (NPMTT) Drills during an underway period from 11 to 14 February 2002 and COMPTUEX (Composite Task Unit Exercise) off the Southern California operating area from 14 January to 7 February 2002. A sailor fell overboard as the ship performed Carrier Qualifications in southern Californian waters, approximately 90 miles west of San Diego. In addition, about 400 sailors presented to Sick Bay at various times with viral gastroenteritis. One of the key elements of CompTuEx directed the ship’s carrier intelligence center to operate with men of Alpha Platoon from Sea, Air, and Land (SEAL) Team 1. The SEALs conducted a special reconnaissance mission that took them to San Clemente Island, about 75 miles northwest of San Diego. For three days and nights the SEALs dug-in and gathered intelligence, transmitting imagery and data to the carrier. The final phase of the exercise taxed participants to their limits, as officers changed the intelligence gathering missions to a scenario that included rescuing two downed airmen. The SEALs found the men and a pair of Seahawks from HS-4 swept in and extracted the SEALs and their rescued victims. Training with the SEALs broadened sailors and gave them valuable experience which would help them during fighting against the Iraqis, and IS2 James Hartje detached from the ship for a month ashore to work with Naval Special Warfare Command to familiarize himself with some of their communications and operational procedures. And during the exercise some Distribution work center sailors also flew to Shiloh to aid in troubleshooting and repairing an SH-60B AESS station. “In February 2002, the Food Service Division was announced as the winner of the 2001 Captain Edward F. Ney Award for the best Food Service Division in the Large Afloat class. Lincoln was runner up in 1999 (11 to 14 February 2002)” (Ref. 378B-2002).

 

USS Stennis - aft lookout

 

020311-N-9312L-026 At sea aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) Mar. 11, 2002 -- An aft lookout watch searches the skies and seas for any unusual contacts and personnel who have fallen overboard reporting all incidents to the ship's officer of the deck (OOD). John C. Stennis and Carrier Air Wing Nine (CVN-74) are conducting combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Tina Lamb. (RELEASED)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=1007

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Medical Readiness and Birth Month Medical Surveillance Inspections were held, and Lincoln Medical Department scored the highest score in over two years by AIRPAC Medical fom 12 to 14 March 2002” (Ref. 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 18 March 2002, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, for NPMTT Drills during an underway period in the Eastern Pacific” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Everett, Washington on 21 March 2001, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, conducting Nuclear Power Mobile Training Team (NPMTT) assessments and the pre-deployment Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) in the SOCAL OPAREA, conducted by the NPMTT Team, during an underway period in the Eastern Pacific from 18 to 21 March 2002. From January through March, Medical Department had 17 Medical Reservists who volunteered to complete their Annual Training and assist with the work-up cycle. They were truly an asset to the department and the ship. After pulling back into Everett, Washington, on 14 February, the Navigation Department conducted an extensive maintenance period for the next five weeks. Significant upgrades were conducted in the Pilot House. The ANISPS-64 surface search radar was removed and replaced with the ANJSPS-73 and Furono repeater system. Additionally, major upkeep and preservation was conducted externally and internally on the 010, 09, 08 levels and internally on the 05 level. Underway workup efforts continued through 14 February 2002, at which time the ship returned to Everett far more proficient at underway operations and casualty response. The March inport period provided opportunity for the completion of routine and emergent maintenance within the propulsion plant and an opportunity to train on the lessons learned during the recently completed workups” (Ref. & 378B-2002).

 

“The Secretary of the Navy, Gordon R. England visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), where he spoke to crewmembers in an “All Hands” muster during the forenoon watch on 5 April 2002” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 14 April 2002, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, for Carrier Qualifications, en route to Alaska to conduct Exercise Northern Edge 2002, a multi-threat scenario acted out in Alaskan waters in the Gulf of Alaska and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of California during Fleet Evaluation Period (FEP-2)” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked conducted Carrier Qualifications for CVW-14 en route to Alaska from 14 to 17 April 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked was underway conducting training operations in the Eastern Pacific en route to the Gulf of Alaska from 17 to 22 April 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked aboard anchored at Valdez, Alaska for a port call on 22 April 2002, and then got underway for Exercise Northern Edge 2002, a multi-threat scenario acted out in Alaskan waters in the Gulf of Alaska the same day” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked conducted Exercise Northern Edge 2002, a multi-threat scenario acted out in Alaskan waters in the Gulf of Alaska from 22 to 27 April 2002, and then headed to waters off the coast of California to conduct JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise)” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked aboard steamed through the Eastern Pacific from the Gulf of Alaska to waters off the coast of California to conduct JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) from 27 April to 5 May 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked aboard commenced JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the coast of California on 5 May 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 14 May 2002, conducting JTFEX from 5 to 14 May 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

Captain Douglas K. Dupouy assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 15 May 2002, relieving Admiral James J. Quinn, seventh Commanding Officer, serving from 18 February 1998 to 15 May 2002” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 15 May 2002, in port from 14 to 15 May 2002, while prior to arrival conducted JTFEX from 5 to 14 May 2002” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked conducted Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) enroute to Everett, Washington from 15 to 22 May 2002” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 22 May 2002, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, relieving Admiral James J. Quinn, seventh Commanding Officer, serving from 18 February 1998 to 15 May 2002, conducting Carrier Qualifications en route to Alaska from 14 to 17 April 2002, to conduct Exercise Northern Edge 2002, a multi-threat scenario acted out in Alaskan waters in the Gulf of Alaska, conducting training operations in the Eastern Pacific en route to the Gulf of Alaska from 17 to 22 April 2002, Abraham Lincoln anchored at Valdez, Alaska for a port call on 22 April 2002, and then got underway for Exercise Northern Edge 2002 the same day, conductng Exercise Northern Edge 2002 from 22 to 27 April 2002, and then steamed to waters off the coast of California from 27 April to 5 May 2002, to conduct JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise from 5 to 14 May 2002, arriving Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 14 May 2002, only to depart the next day, in port from 14 to 15 May 2002, conducting Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) en route to Everett, Washington from 15 to 22 May 2002. Abraham Lincoln started off 2002 having just finished TSTA and FEP, completing 100 percent of all required FXP exercises with a final grade of 98.5 during TSTA and Fleet Evaluation Period (FEP-2). The Navigation Department was now ready for work-ups for the upcoming Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf deployment. Meanwhile, the Navy announced that the service would equip several thousand sailors of the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and USS George Washington (CVN-73) Carrier Battle groups the Man Overboard Indicator (MOBI) system, a salt-water activated device to track people who fell overboard. The success of the experiments would determined whether the Navy would introduce MOBI’s Fleet-wide. Upon leaving the Bremerton Industrial Area, the Lincoln began an extensive pre-deployment training regime to include Flight Deck Certifications, TSTA I/II/III, Fleet Evaluation Period (FEP-2), COMPTUEX, Exercise Northern Edge/JTFX and ORSE-2. Throughout April and May USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway again, conducting the Exercise Northern Edge, during which Reactor Department conducted aggressive propulsion plant drill scenarios and further level-of-knowledge training. Prior to returning to homeport Reactor Department successfully completed the ORSE. The ship then returned to Everett and commenced the predeployment leave and upkeep period. The combination of diverse rates within the Lincoln Safety Department complimented by numerous Safety Standdowns enabled an expansive coverage throughout the ship and flight deck to ensure a safe and efficient work atmosphere existed which contributed greatly to an incident free predeployment work-up period (14 April to 22 May 2002)” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

“On 11 June 2002, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crew and family members and personnel from Naval Station, Everett, enhanced a salmon-bearing tributary of Rehab Creek at Naval Radio Station, Jim Creek. The volunteers removed an invasive weed known as canary grass from along the stream, removed other obstructive materials from the streambed, and planted over 245 trees and shrubs along the banks to inhibit further canary grass growth. On June 12, volunteers removed three truckloads of debris from the intertidal area of Naval Magazine Indian Island, including old mooring buoys, old boat parts and a broke down boat shed. Both projects improved the environment and will allow natural flora and fauna to flourish. These efforts result in a tremendous benefit to both the Navy and the community” (Ref. 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM John Kelly embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington 24 July 2002, embarking CVW-14 at San Diego, California, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, on her sixth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fifth Indian Ocean deployment, on her 1st North Arabian Sea deployment in support of her 1st Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001, on her fifth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment (two cruises to the area during deployment) in support of her of 5th Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet in July 1995 reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992 (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet's area of responsibility encompasses about 7.5 million square miles and includes the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman and parts of the Indian Ocean. This expanse, comprised of 25 countries, includes three critical chokepoints at the Suez Canal, the Straits of Hormuz, and the Straits of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen. Abraham Lincoln deployed with the Naval Fires Network, a network-centric warfare system designed to provide real time intelligence correlation, sensor control, target generation, mission planning and battle damage assessment capabilities. In addition, the system allowed ships in the battle group to hit ‘time critical targets’ (for example, terrorists attempting to escape), and share real time targeting and intelligence data with each other. Previous battles against the Iraqis and Serbs had underscored the need to hit what analysts also referred to as ‘rapidly relocatable targets.’ The carrier and Mobile Bay deployed with the MOBI system, and during the cruise Shiloh used the Area Air Defense Control system. Maintenance prior to deployment, installation: Replaced the AN/SPS-64 surface search radar with AN/SPS-73 and Furono repeater system from 14 February to 20 July 2002. In addition, VFA-115 embarked with 12 F/A-18E Super Hornets, and HC-5 embarked with two MH-60S Seahawks, marking the first deployment of these types of aircraft on board the ship. The carrier also put to sea with her first F414-GE-400 Super Hornet Jet Engine Test Instrumentation Cell, and 1,000 pound class JDAMs for use with F/A-18Es. As they set sail, Lt. Corey L. Pritchard of VFA-115 accomplished the initial deployed Super Hornet trap on board the carrier during a series of carrier qualifications over the first few days. The squadron dedicated their deployment to the memory of the firefighters of Ladder Company 4 of Midtown Manhattan, which lost 15 men to the terrorist attacks of 9/11. At one point, sailors painted the names of 12 of these heroes onto each of their Super Hornets to honor the firemen, and some also adopted one of the firehouse’s slogans for their cruise patches: “Pride of Midtown. Never Missed a Performance. She will under go her eighth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 (NK)

(24 July 2002 to 6 May 2003)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command       (6th Arabian

/ Persian Gulf dep.) (1st North Arabian Sea dep.))

6th WestPac 6th IO

5th OSW

1st OEF

 

CVW-14

NK

24 July 2002

6 May 2003

Western Pacific

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone, 2nd Iraq & Afghanistan War

Persian Gulf

8th FWFD

287-days

1st Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), the "military response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, commencing on 7 October 2001 and 5th Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-31

Tomcatters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NK100

F-14D

VFA-115

Eagles - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK200

FA-18E

VFA-113

Stingers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK300

FA-18C (N)

VFA-25

Fist of the Fleet -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK400

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-139

Cougars - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NK500

EA-6B

VAW-113

Black Eagles - Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-4

Black Knights - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -      Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VS-35

Blue Wolves - Sea

Control Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VRC-30 Det. 1

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

 

Grumman - Greyhound

30, 31

C-2A

 “In addition, VFA-115 embarked with 12 F/A-18E Super Hornets, and HC-5 embarked with two MH-60S Seahawks, marking the first deployment of these types of aircraft on board the ship. The carrier also put to sea with her first F414-GE-400 Super Hornet Jet Engine Test Instrumentation Cell, and 1,000 pound class JDAMs for use with F/A-18Es. As they set sail, Lt. Corey L. Pritchard of VFA-115 accomplished the initial deployed Super Hornet trap on board the carrier during a series of carrier qualifications over the first few days. The squadron dedicated their deployment to the memory of the firefighters of Ladder Company 4 of Midtown Manhattan, which lost 15 men to the terrorist attacks of 9/11. At one point, sailors painted the names of 12 of these heroes onto each of their Super Hornets to honor the firemen, and some also adopted one of the firehouse’s slogans for their cruise patches: “Pride of Midtown. Never Missed a Performance”” (Ref. 378A).

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

“A number of vessels joined USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Strike group comprised of Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE (COMCRUDESGRU THREE), Commander Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, RADM John Kelly, Carrier Air Wing 14; Cruiser Destroyer Group 3 and Destroyer Squadron 31 consisting of the guided-missile cruisers USS Mobile Bay (CG-53) and USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile destroyer USS Paul Hamilton (DDG-60); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigates USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and USS Ruben James (FFG-57); replenishment ship USS Camden (AOE-2); and attack submarines USS Honolulu (SSN-718) and USS Cheyenne (SSN-773). Amphibious Squadron 5 and USCG Law Enforcement Det. 106 was assigned in 2002” (Ref. 377, 378A & 681E).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 20 to 22 July 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled into Naval Air Station, North Island North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to embark CVW-14 at Naval Air Station, North Island North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 22 July 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked departed Naval Air Station, North Island North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 24 July 2002, visiting from 22 to 24 July 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific conducting Carrier Qualifications from 24 to 26 July 2002 and then steamed to en route to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 26 July to 1 August 2002, arriving at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 1 August 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 3 August 2002, arriving on 1 August 2002, en route to Sasebo” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

MOBI is Revolutionizing Ship Safety

 

As reported on 13 August 2002, “during its deployment, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) will be part of the evaluation process that will change the way the Navy handles man overboard situations. A new three-piece system is now in place to take the guesswork out of knowing if a Sailor is possibly in the water. A transmitter the size of a Rubik’s Cube, a receiver consisting of a whip antenna connected to a small box the size of an answering machine, and a direction finder that points out the relative bearing of the transmitter make up the new man overboard indicator (MOBI) system. With MOBI, the Navy is in the process of revolutionizing safety standards aboard ships.

 

“The system will highly increase the probability of discovering Sailors overboard and then quickly finding them,” said William Dull, a representative from Briar Tek, the company that won the bid to produce MOBI for the Navy two years ago. This system will be the first to use active technology for the man overboard situation, rather than the normal passive mode of manual detection through the exclusive use of lookouts, according to Chuck Collins, the director of operations for the company. Three hundred of these transmitters have been passed out so far on board Abe, with an additional 1,200 distributed among the rest of the battle group. Sailors will wear the transmitters in the dye-marker pouches in their float coats.

 

During the deployment, the system will be evaluated to determine possible improvements before it goes Navywide. Currently, the George Washington and Abraham Lincoln Battle Groups are the only ones to use MOBI, but the Navy plans to have it in place fleet wide sometime in 2003, said Collins. The eventual price tag throughout the Navy rounds out to about $250.00 per Sailor. “That’s not bad when you consider that every float coat costs $350.00,” said Collins.

 

If Sailor falls overboard, the transmitter will activate upon contact with salt water. An antenna located on the O-10 level will receive the signal, which is then displayed on a receiver on the bridge. The signal can be detected up to 18 nautical miles away. An alarm will sound near the Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch station, and the serial number of the transmitter in the water will be displayed on the screen. The receiver also displays the number of transmitters in the water in the event there is more than one Sailor overboard. After the signal is received, an antenna on the tower picks up the direction of the signal and displays it on the direction finder in front of the Captain’s chair.

 

MOBI also comes with a separate portable direction finder that can be attached to the rigid-hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to help speed up the recovery when the RHIB is deployed. Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class Ken Crowther, who stands the Boatswain’s Mate of the Watch on board, said the addition of MOBI is definitely a good thing. He also added that it should not change the focus or function of the lookouts, though, because in the event of failure, there still need to be eyes looking into the water at all times. Lt. Tom Baker, an officer of the deck (OOD) on board, was very positive about the effect the MOBI will have on the bridge watch. “It’s definitely a great advance in technology toward a safer working environment,” said Baker.

 

“And it will make life a lot easier up on the bridge, because the system tells the direction of the man overboard, and that will help the OOD make the decision what kind of turn the ship needs to make for the recovery,” he continued. And if anyone is worried that the system is expensive or difficult to maintain – once a year, pop open the transmitter’s back with a Phillips-head screwdriver and change the 9-volt battery inside” (Ref. Story Number: NNS020813-20 - Release Date: 8/13/2002 5:58:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Ryan Hicks, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - SAN DIEGO (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=3140

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific en route to Sasebo, Japan from 3 to 16 August 2002, arriving on the 16th” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Sasebo, Japan on 19 August 2002, visiting Sasebo, Japan from 16 to 19 August 2002. Three F/A-18C Hornets from VFA-25 flew ashore to Kadena AFB for an air-to-air training detachment during this port period” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Sea of Japan, Western Pacific and South China Sea en route to Hong Kong, China from 19 to 23 August 2002” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Hong Kong on 27 August 2002, visiting Hong Kong from 23 to 27 August 2002” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea en route to Singapore from 27 to 31 August 2002

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Singapore from 31 August to 5 September 2002 and then headed to the Northern Arabian Sea. During her transit, the Abraham Lincoln successfully conducted port calls to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Saesebo, Japan, Hong Kong, and Singapore; three of which were precision anchorages. During the deployment, the ship hosted command receptions for over 3,000 area civic and military dignitaries in Sasebo, Hong Kong, and Singapore” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2002).

 

F-14D makes an arrested landing

 

020830-N-1969N-018 - At sea aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aug. 30, 2002 - An F-14D “Tomcat” fighter jet assigned to the “Tomcatters” of Fighter Squadron Three One (VF-31) makes a safe arrested landing following a rain storm off the coast Singapore. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Stephen Neel. (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=2625

 

Tomcatters Get New Commanding Officer

 

“Cmdr. Paul A. Haas, a native of Indianapolis, relieved Cmdr. Victor R. Olivarez as the commanding officer of Fighter Squadron from 31 on 30 August 2002 in a change-of-command ceremony conducted while underway in the South China Sea. Olivarez served as commanding officer of Fighter Squadron 31 since April 2001. During his tenure the Tomcatters filled a critical roll in the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Battle Group, bringing a unique Strike capability with the combination of their Forward Air Controller (Airborne) role as well as their precision strike capability against the most difficult targets utilizing their LANTIRN FLIR capabilities. Under his leadership the Tomcatters enjoyed an enviable reputation through their professionalism and execution. His next duty assignment will be as the operations officer at Commander, Third Fleet.

Haas joined the Navy on Jan. 4, 1985, after graduating from Purdue University with a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical science in 1984. Receiving his commission as an Ensign in 1985, he reported to flight training at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Texas. After completing the F-14A Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus in VF-124 at NAS Miramar, Calif., his first fleet tour was with the VF-154 “Black Knights” on board
USS Constellation (CV 64) and USS Independence (CV 62) during Operation Desert Shield. In April 1991, he served as an adversary instructor pilot, flying the A-4E “Skyhawk” with the VC-1 “Blue Alii” at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii, and the T-2C “Buckeye,” A-4F/M “Skyhawk,” and the F-16N “Falcon” with the VF-126 “Bandits” at NAS Miramar.

He graduated from the Naval Fighter Weapons School in 1992, and during his tour with the “Bandits,” he served as the Quality Assurance and Maintenance Officer. Haas returned to the carrier fleet in September 1994 flying the F-14D for the VF-2 “Bounty Hunters” on board
Constellation. He served as Quality Assurance, Assistant Operations, Training, and Maintenance Officer, and participated in Operation Southern Watch. In January 1997, he reported to the F-14 Fleet Replacement Squadron, the VF-101 “Grim Reapers,” stationed in NAS Oceana, Virginia, where he served as Maintenance Officer, Training Officer, and Operations Officer, flying the F-14A/B/D. In August 1999, he was selected to attend the USMC Command and Staff College in Marine Corps Base Quantico and was awarded a master’s in Military Studies in June 2000.

He served as the Commander Fighter Wing Atlantic Readiness Officer from June 2000 until April 2001, when he reported for duty as the Executive Officer of the VF-31 “
Tomcatters” on board the Abraham Lincoln, flying the F-14D. Haas has more than 3,300 flight hours in five different aircraft and more than 500 carrier landings on board seven different carriers.

 

His personal awards include the Meritorious Service Medal with gold star, the Air Medal (Strike), Navy-Marine Corps Commendation Medal with gold star, and the Navy-Marine Corps Achievement Medal with gold star. The “Tomcatters,” one of eight squadrons and one detachment in Carrier Air Wing 14, are on a regularly scheduled deployment with Abraham Lincoln in support of Operation Enduring Freedom” (Ref. Story Number: NNS020919-08 - Release Date: 9/19/2002 1:02:00 - PM From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=3581

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea en route to Northern Arabian Sea via the Strait of Malacca through to the Indian Ocean from 5 to 11 September 2002 p. The Medical Department spearheaded a series of Anthrax and Smallpox vaccinations. These vaccinations were administered to the entire crew, air wing, and all other ships in the strike group. The Medical Department keenly planned and executed this massive undertaking with minimal impact on preparations for upcoming hostilities. This evolution enabled the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group to enter the Arabian Gulf fully combat ready for any contingency that might arise. Medical Department started the new year with a fairly full and seasoned complement of nine officers and 41 ship and squadron Hospital Corpsmen” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Northern Arabian Sea on 11 September 2002, entering the Fifth Fleet AOR and relieved USS George Washington (CVN-73) on the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks on 9/11, on station to support Operation Enduring Freedom, and will also support Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq once arriving in the Persian Gulf” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Sailors spell out

 

020911-N-3241S-004 - At sea aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sep. 11, 2002 - In response to the President's message, "Be Ready," USS Abraham Lincoln Sailors spell out "READY NOW" as the Lincoln Battle Group reports on station to conduct combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Lincoln and her embarked Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW 14) are currently deployed and will join the Washington Battle Group, which is scheduled to return to it’s homeport of Norfolk, Va., in the near future. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Virginia K. Schaefer. (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=2673

 

“On 13 September 2002, Captain Kevin C. Albright, Commander CVW-14, and Comdr. Jeffrey R. Penfield, the commanding officer of VFA-115, flew the first Super Hornet sorties from the ship as she sailed in the northern Arabian Sea, on a mission against militants in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, operations against al-Qāidah terrorists in and around Afghanistan and those who supported them. Penfield later received the Bronze Star for his flights against the enemy during this deployment” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Northern Arabian Sea, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from 11 to 21 September 2002. At one point during Operation Enduring Freedom, a Prowler from VAQ-139 accomplished the squadron’s first field landing with night vision goggles, at Bagram AB, Afghanistan. But Catapult Nos 2 and 3 developed leaks due to in service wear and corrosion of a 2 inch trough heating drain, which forced sailors to laboriously repair the gear and return the systems to full operation while underway. In addition, Jet Blast Deflector No. 1 failed due to improper manufacture of an actuator base that opened and closed the deflector. The problem destroyed substantial cooling piping and brass fittings, but sailors restored the vital system within 12 hours” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz, into the Persian Gulf from 22 to 25 September 2002. The Navigation Department flawlessly placed the ship on station in the Arabian Sea and the Arabian Gulf in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Southern Watch” (Ref. 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Bahrain from 25 to 28 September 2002, and then steamed in the Persian Gulf and commenced combat operations on the 28th in support of Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

“At about 1330, an aircraft flare dispenser ignited near the bomb farm on the flight deck USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 18 October 2002 in the Arabian Gulf. AWSC Randy Horner, the Ordnance Division’s leading chief petty officer, reacted quickly and grabbed the burning cylinder, ran 20 yards to the edge of the flight deck and tossed the device overboard. Normally used with F-14 Tomcats as decoys for heat-seeking missiles, the flares contained 80 internal units that burned at 1,600 degrees. “By the time I reached it, about 20 or 30 of [the internal units] were burning,”

 

Horner recalled. “When I grabbed the handle [of the dispenser], it burned my hands a little, like grabbing a hot pan with the water boiling over.” Shipmates raced over to help the sailor control the potential conflagration. Horner’s rapid reactions averted what could have escalated into a terrible fire, and he received the Navy Achievement Medal for his actions, his sixth such award during the senior chief’s 25 years of service” (Ref. 378A).

 

At sea aboard USS Reuben James (FFG 57) Oct. 22, 2002 -- Damage Controlman 1st Class David Hernandez studies his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) books in his rack aboard the guided missile frigate.

 

021022-N-4309A-128 - At sea aboard USS Reuben James (FFG-57) Oct. 22, 2002 -- Damage Controlman 1st Class David Hernandez studies his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) books in his rack aboard the guided missile frigate. A Sailor’s rack is the only place that he can actually call his home while underway. Rueben James is participating in United Nations sanctioned Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO) in the Central Command Area of Operation in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Southern Watch. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class

Aaron Ansarov. (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=3231

 

Captain Kendall L. Card assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 5 November 2002, relieving Captain Douglas K. Dupouy, eighth Commanding Officer, serving from 15 May 2000 to 5 November 2002” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Lt. John Turner, a 34-year-old Super Hornet pilot, and Lt. Eric Doyle of VFA-115, flew the first Super Hornet combat live-fire actions from the ship, in Aircraft No. 202 and Aircraft No. 206 on 6 November 2002. The men dropped four Mk 84 (GBU-31 [guided bomb unit] (V) 4, J109 target penetrator) 2,000 pound JDAMs against an Iraqi command and control facility near Tallil, and two surface-to-air missile systems near Al Kut, both locations situated to the southeast of Baghdad, in response to Iraqi provocations against coalition aircraft” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Four weeks prior to combat operations in Iraq, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) assisted VF- 31 with a short-timeline incorporation of three JDAM technical directives (AVC 4997, AVC 5123, and AVC 5124) on 12 F-14D aircraft. AIMD completed the modification of all 12 APG-71 Digital Display Indicators, Data Processor, and AYK-14 Mission Computers in record time. AIMD's effort provided the Strike Group Commander with long-range F-14 bombing assets that became crucial during critical combat missions over Northern Iraq” (Ref. 378B-2003):

 

“Gen. Tommy R. Franks, USA, Commander Central Command, led a troupe of United Services Organization (USO) entertainers on board that included singers Wayne Newton and Neal McCoy, comedian Paul Rodriquez and two Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders, to share the Thanksgiving holidays with the crew on 26 November 2002. Paul Hamilton sailed alongside the carrier, which also enabled her crew to enjoy some of the entertainment” (Ref. 378A).

 

General Tommy Franks speaks with Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln

 

021126-N-9593M-081 - At sea aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Nov. 26, 2002 - Commander, United States Central Command, General Tommy Franks, speaks with Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln during a recent USO sponsored concert. General Franks spoke of the importance of the carrier's mission before introducing legendary entertainer Wayne Newton and his cast of friends who performed aboard the aircraft carrier. Abraham Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW-14) are currently deployed on a scheduled six-month deployment conducting combat missions in support of Operation Southern Watch. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Philip A. McDaniel. (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=3470

 

USO Brings Entertainment to USS Abraham Lincoln Sailors

 

“Gen. Tommy R. Franks, commander of U.S. Central Command, led a troupe of entertainers featuring Wayne Newton to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) for a United Services Organization (USO) show on 26 November 2002. Newton is the USO’s Celebrity Circle chairman, and brought country singer Neal McCoy, comedian Paul Rodriguez and two Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders to entertain the Sailors during the Thanksgiving holidays.

More than 3,000 Sailors attended the show and provided a colorful backdrop with a multicolored ensemble of flight deck jerseys, utilities and khakis. Sailors surrounded the stage, sat atop aircraft and looked down from “vulture’s row” on the O-10 level just to get a glimpse. With USS
Paul Hamilton (DDG-60) sailing alongside the carrier, Abraham Lincoln Battle Group Commander Rear Adm. John Kelly took the stage and introduced Franks, who in turn addressed the crew.

“The fact of the matter is, y’all are a long, long ways from home,” said Franks with his trademark Texas drawl. “You’ve got (a lot of family) and loved ones about one-half of a world away. “We have a lot of respect for all of you, because last time I checked, there wasn’t anybody drafted into this. We all raised our hands and said ‘we can do the work.’ Thank you for doing the work.”

Franks introduced Newton and helped him start the show with Chuck Berry’s “Promised Land.” Newton went on to entertain the crew with his brand of entertainment that has made him Las Vegas’ number one draw. The Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders joined Newton to provide a little choreography and returned when McCoy sang his hit “Shake.”

During the song, McCoy joined the crowd, and while he sang, the cheerleaders danced on stage. He found plenty of fans in the crowd. “Neal McCoy was my favorite. I love the songs he sang,” said Lt. Kendra Ryan of Abe’s reactor division. “I think it’s fantastic that (the entertainers) took the time to come out here and put this break in their schedule.

While some Sailors enjoyed the singing, some really needed a good laugh. “Paul Rodriguez was pretty funny. I like to laugh, and I’ve seen him before,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Handler 3rd Class (AW) Daniel Estrada. “Although Franks was pretty funny, too.”

When Rodriguez took the stage, he belayed his trademark Hispanic background. “Today, I’m not just Hispanic. I’m an American. Where else but America can two Hispanics get a ride with an Italian guy to go to a Chinese restaurant, and then get arrested by a black cop?” Rodriguez joked.

 

On a more serious note – for Rodriguez – he added, “I know that talk is cheap. That’s why I traveled 8,000 miles to say ‘hello’ to you. I came here with Wayne, and I’d come here again anytime. “You are the reason I’m able to be a fool and not get arrested or thrown in jail. You are the muscle of our country and have earned our respect.”

It was a good thing for the Sailors, who are four months into their six-month deployment, to get a show from entertainers who have sold out arenas, Las Vegas shows and large comedy club venues. But the entertainers didn’t see their actions as merely giving. “This has definitely been fun,” said Dallas Cowboy cheerleader Kelly Kirchoff. “The crew always comes up to us and says how much it means to them, but it means so much to us to come over here and see all the men and women.

“They work every day to keep the freedom back home. There’s not a single day that we don’t think of (deployed military members), and keep them in our prayers.” Newton closed the show with his trademark “Danke Schene,” then invited all the entertainers, Franks, Kelly, and Abraham Lincoln Commanding Officer Capt. Kendall L. Card to the stage.

The group sang “God Bless America” with the crew, then spent some time taking pictures and signing autographs with the crew before they prepared to depart the carrier. Rodriguez reminded the Sailors what is waiting for them when their duty is done. “Hurry up and come home, because the food is nice and the (people) are fine – we’re all praying for you, and God bless,” he said.

“You don’t realize how special you are,” said Franks. “These people have come out here for you, and they get not one dime for it. They’re here because you are as great as you are”” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS021214-02 - Release Date: 12/15/2002 2:30:00 PM - By Journalist 1st Class Keith Jones, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=4886

 

Country musician Trace Adkins entertains Sailors

 

021127-N-1969N-021 At sea aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Nov. 27, 2002 -- Country musician Trace Adkins entertains Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln during a USO-sponsored concert held in the ship’s hangar bay. Sailors took advantage of the opportunity to meet Mr. Adkins ‘up close and personal,’ for photo opportunities and personalized autographs. USS Abraham Lincoln is deployed on a regularly scheduled deployment conducting combat missions in support of Operation Southern Watch and Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Stephen Neel. (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=3539

 

Country Star Treats Abraham Lincoln Sailors to Live Show

 

As reported on 17 December 2002, “Country singer and songwriter Trace Adkins came to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) for Thanksgiving, away from his wife and kids, to be with the crew, and he made his reasoning perfectly clear. “I didn’t come over here as an entertainer,” he said. “I came over here as a grateful, thankful American to say that we miss you, and we’ll be glad when you get back home. Thank you for what you’re doing.” His message also came in the form of a show on 27 November 2002 in front of a full house in the ship's hangar bay. He brought his backing band, and with the help and support of the USO, he brought the equipment to make the night into the closest thing to a real concert you could get on an aircraft carrier in a hot zone. Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. William Fallon, Rear Adm. John Kelly and Capt. Kendall Card made a few quick remarks to introduce the set, and then came the voice that shook the room and rattled the walls.

 

“Good evenin’,” came the voice from underneath a worn, brown cowboy hat. “Good to see ya.” It takes a big man to produce a sound that huge. It also takes a big man to survive being shot in the heart, being run down by a bulldozer, riding out a hurricane while working on an offshore oil rig, and having a finger and his nose reattached in two separate incidents. He’s got four albums out, has played live in front of more than 2,000,000 people since 1996, has been nominated and awarded for all types of music awards, and has appeared on several TV shows such as “Austin City Limits" and “Late Night with David Letterman.” And this is the man who came to the ship on Thanksgiving to say how much he appreciates what the military's doing. “I’m honored to be here,” said Adkins, his first words after getting on stage. “I’ve been looking forward to this for some time.

 

I never dreamed I’d get an opportunity to do something like this. This is one of the best perks - if not the best perk - that I’ve ever gotten since I’ve been doing this for a living. I love every one of you.” After that introduction, he started his show with a mellow, slightly darker, down-tempo #1 hit of his, “This Ain’t No Thinkin’ Thing,” and from there moved through “I Left Something Turned on at Home,” “Every Light in the House,” the tongue-in-cheek Copenhagen love song, and several others, including an upbeat tune called “Chrome." Between songs during the show, Adkins presented Card with a book of letters from an elementary school teacher in California, received a Fighter/Attack squadron 25 shirt from one Sailor and a coin from another, and gave a hug to Airman Carrie Bousman, whose father had written an e-mail to his Web site. During his time aboard, Adkins’ voice rumbled wherever he was, whether it was singing in the hangar bay or talking to Sailors down in the mess decks as he signed autographs on flyers, pictures and guitars. During a quick interview at one point in his tour of the ship, Adkins explained why he was out here.

 

“When they asked me if I had any interest in doing USO stuff, I immediately said yes. You know, I’ve often thought about it -- I have kids, and, as a father, the protection I can offer them extends to about the perimeter of my yard, and beyond that I have to rely on other people. Thanks to ya’ll, they can sleep peacefully at night, and I’m very grateful and thankful.” During his stay, he went out on the flight deck to see a set of flight operations, and between the size of the ship and what he’d just seen, he was a little overwhelmed. “I was thinking,” he mused, “when that first guy hollowed out that log and put it in the water, I don’t think he even envisioned that it would get to this”” (Ref. Story Number: NNS021217-05 - Release Date: 12/17/2002 8:35:00 AM - By Journalist 2nd Class Ryan Hicks, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=4887

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)

 

021128-N-8794V-015 - Central Command area of responsibility (Nov. 28, 2002) - An aerial ‘bow shot’ of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during her regularly scheduled deployment conducting combat operations in support of Operation Southern Watch. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Third Class Kittie VandenBosch. (RELEASED) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=3564

 

Pacific Naval Air Forces’ Force Master Chief Visits Abe

 

“Pacific Naval Air Forces' Force Master Chief, Keith Goosby, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 4 December 2003 to talk to Sailors about conditions around the fleet and upcoming programs. Goosby addressed crew members of the ship and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 to offer words of encouragement about the current deployment. “Don’t let your guard down,” he said, emphasizing each word with a verbal punch. “Because when you’ve had a chance to have the kind of successes that you’re having out here right now, it’s very easy for you to get to the point where you let some complacency come in. You don’t do it intentionally. It just kind of creeps in on it’s own. Don’t let getting home and your eagerness to get there spoil what you’re doing right now.”

Goosby also asked a lot of questions to the crew, gauging their responses to various aspects of the Navy that affect all of their lives - everything from attrition and retention, to education, training, pay raises and quality of life benefits. He received a particularly emphatic response when he mentioned that the Navy is trying to do away with rating exams as they are done today. According to Goosby, the new method replacing it will deal with a “five vector” model that takes into account qualities Sailors need to have to prove themselves as viable for advancement, rather than by placing so much emphasis on written, standardized tests. This will be just one of the improvements brought about by Task Force EXCEL. Throughout his speech, he repeatedly mentioned there are problems with today’s Navy but reiterated the policymakers in the Navy are working to fix them.

“I kind of wish that when I was coming up, I had the kind of advantages you have now,” he said. “Because I think your Navy, if it is not the employer of choice, it is getting to be the employer of choice.” The master chief spent a good amount of time talking about the concept of “force shaping.” According to Goosby, force shaping is making sure the Navy gets the right kind of people at the right place at the right time. Then the Navy must ensure they have the training they need when they get there. “One of the worst things we can do is put a person in a position and expect something out of them,” he said, “and yet, we have not properly trained them.”

He said the Navy is currently 2 percent overmanned, the maximum allowed by law. So force shaping is how the Navy intends to reshuffle, retrain and regroup to satisfy both the needs of the Navy and the individual needs of Sailors. He closed his presentation by allowing Sailors to ask questions, answering the ones he could and taking notes to find out the answers to the ones he couldn’t. Afterward, Goosby talked to the command master chiefs of each of the squadrons and toured the ship, talking to Sailors to find out what issues were their top priorities. “I put a magic wand in your hand right now,” he said to about a dozen Sailors. “Tell me, if you could change one thing about the Navy, what would it be?”

 

Airman Brandon Williams from Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron 4's line shack was one of the Sailors Goosby talked to. “I think the deployment is going great,” said Williams. “I don’t have too many problems here.” And what about the magic wand? “It’d be good to get some more pay,” he said. “And the master chief said we’ll be getting that 4.1 percent raise in January.” Other answers ranged everywhere from selective reenlistment bonuses to teamwork, discipline and even the length of weekends.

 

Goosby met with Sailors from Sea Control Squadron 30, Fighter/Attack Squadron 113, aviation avionics, electrical, and airframe shops and many others as he made his way around the ship. He left the ship with a word of caution to the crew about keeping focus during the rest of their deployment. “It’s not over until it’s over,” he said. “When that last line goes over, then you’re done. But until then, stay safe, and keep doing what you’re doing”” (Ref. Story Number: NNS021224-03 - Release Date: 11/19/2002 8:50:00 PM - By Journalist 2nd Class Ryan Hicks, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=5035

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf, conducting combat operations in support of Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq from 28 October to 6 December 2002. In December 2002: At one point, a small Class “A” fire broke out in the Socket Pouring Room. The fire damaged overhead lighting fixtures and burned cableway for No. 4 ACE control, indication and stanchions, though sailors controlled the blaze without casualties. As ongoing negotiations with the Iraqis, however, concerning Saddam Hussein and his Ba’ath party cronies, and their abuses of human rights and weapons of mass destruction program (which many analysts at the time perceived as a substantive menace) appeared to deteriorate, rumors circulated across the media that the Navy would extend the ship’s deployment. Sailors struggled with homesickness and longed to share Christmas with families, but anticipated longer separations. “Just focus on the day,” Capt. Kendall L. Card, the skipper, counseled his crew. “Keep your head on the swivel.” As tensions among crewmembers mounted, the captain added “Get over it” to emphasize their commitment to the war. Sailors began to joke about the phrase to momentarily alleviate homesickness, and some started to wear t-shirts sporting the skippers’ expression. After aircraft flew their last Southern Watch mission, the ship came about for the Arabian Sea via Bahrain for a port call” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a second port call at Bahrain on 6 December 2002” (Ref. 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a second port call at Bahrain from 6 to 10 December 2002, and then steamed to the Persian Gulf, for the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman to the Arabian Sea through to the Indian Ocean en route to Fremantle, Australia on 11 December. During her time in the Gulf, the Abraham Lincoln made two port calls to Bahrain. Both, of course, were precision anchorages due to the excellence of a skilled navigation team” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman from 10 to 15 December 2002, to the Arabian Sea through to the Indian Ocean en route to Fremantle, Australia, departing the 5th Fleet operating area on 15 December 2002” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman from 10 to 22 December 2002, en route to Fremantle, Australia via the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean, departing the 5th Fleet operating area on the 15th” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) paid a much deserved port visit to Perth, Australia on 22 December 2002” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Fremantle, Australia from 22 to 28 December 2002. During an extended holiday visit, it was rumored the ship could return to the Persian Gulf, yet a course for home was engaged via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Abraham Lincoln steamed from Fremantle, Australia to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 18 to 31 December 2002, when the determination was made to return to the northern stretches of the Arabian/Persian Gulf in C5F AOR. First order of business was a working port visit to Perth, Australia where they took the opportunity to consult several urgent and chronic cases to the local medical specialists—with great results from the local providers under the new TRICARE/International SOS support contract. They attempted to restock on critical shortages, and found most items available. Abraham Lincoln left port healthier than it had been in several months; despite the fact the crew still required several immunizations for the return to operational theater” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2002).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed from Fremantle, Australia to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 28 to 31 December 2002, when the determination was made to return to the northern stretches of the Arabian/Persian Gulf in C5F AOR. After Perth, readiness preparations were key priorities. Anthrax immunizations were still required by 4,800 crewmembers, as well as Smallpox. Medical responded with shotex's in February after resolving several logistics problems in obtaining the Smallpox vaccine. End result, entire crew accomplished in three major evolutions totally over 15,000 actual sticks. Note: Most of crew received only first and second in the series of Anthrax immunizations prior to our departure from theater. For the year, the Navigation Department navigated over 8 1,000 nautical miles and conducted over 35 replenishments at sea and 20 restricted navigation details. The Navigation Department also qualified four Master Helmsman and five Quartermaster of the Watches. Nine members of the department became ESWS qualified and two became EAWS qualified. Furthermore, the ship qualified 19 Officer of the Decks underway and five Command Duty Officers underway. During the year of 2002, the Navigation Department, comprised of both Signalmen and Quartermasters, performed flawlessly. The Signalmen consistently demonstrated their visual communications prowess, just as the Quartermasters expertly navigated the Abraham Lincoln across the seas” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2002).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XV (1 January 2002 to 6 May 2003)

Part I - 1 January to 31 December 2002

 

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4