Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) activities at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

 (1 January to 31 December 2014)

Chapter III

Part I of II - 1 January to 19 November 2014

Part II of II - 20 November to 31 December 2014

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln Makes the First Call

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted its first internal phone call using the Integrated Voice Network (IVN) since Lincoln's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 20 November 2014. Capt. Ronald Ravelo, commanding officer, Abraham Lincoln, received the call from Lincoln's RCOH Program Manager Bruce Easterson from a separate location inside the ship.

"This is one small step for the project and one large step for the project-kind," Ravelo said, adding that it was wonderful to enter into a compartment and immediately notice the significant changes that have been accomplished.

The space containing one of three nodes to operate the full system began its reconstruction back in 2012 when
Lincoln first started the RCOH process. In order to install the IVN system, Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) workers had to remove the legacy system and replace it with the latest technology.

"It is nice to have the IVN system operational," said Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Paul Johnson who arrived aboard
Abraham Lincoln in August 2012 and witnessed the transformation of the J-Dial system to the new IVN system as it went through the process of construction and light-off.

According to Easterson, having a third of the IVN system operational is another in the string of milestones
Lincoln has successfully achieved since the RCOH execution phase started back in March 2013. "This is a significant milestone because it's the first step towards bringing this major communication system to operational status," Easterson said. "We're very proud of the Navy, Newport News Shipbuilding and vendor cooperation that made this possible."

Along with the installation of the IVN system, the NNS team working on the project also took steps to make the space containing this equipment less constricted and easier to work in during construction. The NNS team finished the space in record time, completing the project four months ahead of schedule.

"When Lincoln
pulled into Newport News, the space had already been gutted during the Smart Start phase," said Floyd Shelton, Lincoln's RCOH construction manager. "We were ready to install the IVN system, the cables, put in new foundations and update the power systems at arrival at NNS."

Chief Interior Communications Cindy Lambert reflected on the teamwork involved to complete her space transformation. "I am very proud of the hard work done by Newport News Shipbuilding"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS141125-28 - Release Date: 11/25/2014 3:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Participate in Man Overboard and Evacuation Drills

 

“In preparation to return to the fleet, Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in emergency evacuation and man overboard drills on 20 November 2014. As part of shipyard protocol, any ship that is successfully undocked must complete a series of safety tests within 30 days, two of which are the man overboard and evacuation drills. "These drills are extremely critical to the success of the ship," said Bobby Brown, the safety superintendent for Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS). "We [NNS] are required to do several drills once a ship hits the water after being in dry dock, but the number one priority when having these drills is ship's force and civilian safety." Ship's force and NNS personnel have been assigned muster locations for emergencies. Once a drill is called away, shipboard and NNS divisional supervisors have the responsibility to ensure every Sailor and civilian on board can be accurately accounted for in a timely manner.

 

"In order for these drills to work, and for us to know if we have 100 percent accountability, we selected nine NNS personnel and we took them to a trailer to simulate missing personnel," Brown said. "If a division called us to say they accounted for everyone while one of their personnel is in the trailer, then we know which division we need to sort things out with." Given all of the new Sailors aboard Lincoln who have never been out to sea, practicing accurate man overboard drills are vital to the mission readiness of the ship. Training these Sailors now on how to respond will ensure that they know how to react when faced with a real emergency. "We wanted to make the man overboard drill as real as possible, so that when an actual casualty unexpectedly occurs, ship's force and civilian workers alike will know exactly what to do," Brown said. All personnel working near the location of a potential man in the water casualty are expected to seek out the life ring buoy closest to them.

 

Division X-36, riggers in charge of docking, undocking and man overboard procedures, were the first responders in the water. The drill was expected to last no more than 50 minutes, but was completed in a little over 35 minutes. "The importance of a well-trained crew cannot be overstated," said Lincoln executive officer Capt. Todd Marzano. "If a real emergency were to occur, the difference between life and death could very well be dependent on the quality of training they received." During man overboard drills, departments assemble their personnel while Lincoln's deck department carries out search-and-rescue procedures to guarantee their Sailors develop timely, safe and efficient training in the event of a real emergency. Drills are planned to occur on an annual basis and will continue to test the integrity of the Sailors and shipyard during the duration of Lincoln's time in the shipyard” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141124-13 - Release Date: 11/24/2014 1:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Command Leadership Visits AIMD Sailors

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department's (AIMD) GE Warehouse were recognized by Lincoln's leadership during a visit on 24 November 2015.

Lincoln's commanding officer, executive officer and command master chief also conducted an inspection during their visit with Sailors.

"There's a lot of production happening on the ship, but a little-known fact is the work being done by some of the unsung heroes like the Sailors working here at the warehouse," said Capt. Ronald Ravelo,
Lincoln's commanding officer. "This morning I was glad to be able to come here and recognize AIMD Sailors for outstanding uniforms and let them know what a fantastic job they are doing."

Work centers for the
Lincoln are disbursed across the ship, the floating accommodation facility, the GE Warehouse, and the Light Industrial Facility building. Because of this separation, many Sailors were grateful that Ravelo took the time for the inspection.

"I appreciate that the CO took time out of his schedule to participate in the inspection," said Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Corey Underwood. "It felt good to know that he cares enough about us to visit Sailors outside of the normal ship's force."

For more than a year,
Lincoln Sailors have maintained a great deal of flexibility while standing watches, manning critical spaces and keeping pride in the ship even though many of them work away from it the majority of the time.

"We may not have the same work as the ship but it's the same intensity," said Aircrew Survival Equipmentman 2nd Class Patricia Bermudez. "Production is very high and being recognized for the work we do off the ship by the upper chain of command is a great morale boost."

Although it is a challenging task to prepare a warship to get back underway
and out into the fight, Ravelo says he knows everyone is doing their part and is ready for the mission at hand.

"Everyone can appreciate the hard work all
Lincoln Sailors are doing right now," Ravelo said. "In this one corner of Lincoln nation it's great to be able to recognize that they are training and preparing to get the ship underway just like any other ship's force Sailors"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141125-29 - Release Date: 11/25/2014 4:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aaron T. Kiser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SUFFOLK, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln's Division of Technology Wizards

 

As reported on 4 December 2014, “with technology rapidly growing and evolving and thousands of Sailors assigned to each ship, an aircraft carrier needs a team of network professionals to handle the complex computer networks.

Every department on a carrier is mission essential; without one piece of the puzzle, the rest of the picture would be incomplete.

Aboard
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and within the Combat Systems Department, there exists the Automated Data Processing (ADP) Division -- a team of experts working on the ship's computer systems. Without them, other Sailors would not be able to communicate as effectively, file paperwork electronically, or use countless other software systems that are necessary to complete their daily tasks.

"If you can't log on, can't open your email or get access to the command's share drive, then you can't do your work," said Information Systems Technician 1st Class Makeisha Ervin. "Without the IT [Information Systems Technician] community, the ship's communications couldn't function. We have to get information out."

Every Sailor aboard
an aircraft carrier is given an account within the ship's network. The account gives them access to email and other computer systems needed to complete necessary tasks.

"When we have a new member of the command they need an account," said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Jermain Manning. "In ADP, one of our missions is to create user accounts so our crew can officially work, send emails and update programs and other systems. We ensure every critical system works. There are a lot of systems that the Navy uses in order to stay operationally intact."

During the
Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), everyday tasks can prove more challenging than they would be while the ship is fully operational.

"Everything we do right now has to go through the Newport News Shipbuilding's network," Ervin said. "We're temporarily using their network due to the fact that we're revamping ours. Once everything is complete we should be back in charge of our own network."

In order to stay current with the rapidly growing state of technology, the IT community is constantly training and re-certifying.

"I went to a six-month networking course," Manning said. "During it I got a
Security+ certificate, Network+ certificate and a slew of others. It gives you a well-rounded view of every side of the computer network."

In some cases, IT training that may only be a few years old can become outdated. While technology is always growing and spreading, it is also changing over time.

"Our training has to constantly change and we have to re-certify in certain things within the IT community," Manning said. "The reason is that technology and information changes dramatically. It works just like nature. A computer virus that's active now may mutate within two weeks. Our training is basically a vaccine in order to stay current in our ongoing battle with cyber warfare."

According to Ervin, Sailors from ADP have recently been receiving their Security+ certifications, which is another major piece toward meeting the command mission.

"Recently the IT rating has mandated that every IT has to
have the Security+ certificate," Manning said. "Basically it trains ITs to be able to securely and efficiently work on their network."

Manning expresses how vital this training is to helping the ITs contribute to the ship's mission.

"The rest of the ship can't do its job without us," Manning said. "We're living in a time where technology has really taken over. It's a more efficient way to file paperwork and contact one another, and our job is basically to make sure everyone else on the ship can do theirs. We're just as important
as every other Sailor onboard"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141204-08 - Release Date: 12/4/2014 1:57:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln's Medical Department Maintains Crew Health and Readiness

 

“The Medical Department spaces aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Floating Accommodation Facility were filled with the hustle of the corpsmen on 4 December 2014, helping keep Lincoln's crew healthy as winter season draws near.

The department's primary mission is to help maintain the overall health of the crew. In order to complete this task they offer a variety of different services including some that many Sailors may not know about.

"The
Medical Department offers several different services to the crew in support of each member's health care," said Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Amanda Martinez. "Some of the services provided within the Medical Department include sick hall, preventive and aviation medicine, radiation health, mental health, and pharmacy."

While
Lincoln is undergoing Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) there are some difficulties and differences that Medical, as well as the crew, experience that are not felt by an operational aircraft carrier.

"Some challenges such as being in the shipyard, really takes a toll on a lot of the service members," Martinez said. "The high demand to complete
ROCH on time adds stress to Sailors' lives along with trying to balance a personal life as well."

As service members ask questions about their health care needs, they need to take a moment to realize just how busy that job can be. Caring for more than 2,000 Sailors is a huge undertaking that the
Medical Department tackles on a daily basis.

With a small amount of space located in the corner of the Floating Accommodation Facility, one way that the medical department can accomplish this mission is with the patience and understanding of the Sailors on board.

"We appreciate everyone's time and would like for them to understand exactly what we do here to make sure the ship can function and Sailors' needs are met," Martinez said” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS141204-11 - Release Date: 12/4/2014 2:32:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathon Lockwood, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Assigned to Reactor Department Perform Vital Roles in RCOH

 

As reported on 4 December 2014, “the Reactor Department performs a vital role during the Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) process that nuclear powered USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) undergo.


The largest of 18 departments aboard
Lincoln, the Reactor Department is made up of 460 personnel who are divided into six divisions. One of the personnel assigned to the department, Master Chief Machinist's Mate Tyrone A. Wright, Reactor Department Maintenance Division's leading chief petty officer, emphasized the importance of training and qualification requirements achieved during the overhaul period.

"Even though many of us in the department won't see an operational environment for another few years, in order to maintain operational qualifications,
Sailors still have to learn how to operate a plant without seeing it operate," Wright said. "We have extensive training on any new or temporary system prior to using them."

Wright added that his department rotates on a four-section duty schedule in additional to their regular hours to maintain the obligations during the overhaul period.

The reactor itself is key to the operation of an aircraft carrier because the ship's power comes from the reactor plant. The ongoing overhaul has extended the life of the ship an additional 25 years without the need for refueling” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS141204-16 - Release Date: 12/4/2014 4:50:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian C. Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Personnel Specialist Help Sailors Navigate the Yards

 

As reported on 8 December 2014, “Personnel specialists working in the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Administration Department provide a vast collaboration of talent and skills that helps to maintain the day-to-day operations while Lincoln undergoes its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) in Newport News.

Being vigilant when it comes to payday, assisting their shipmates through the complexity of military moves and transitions, and advising even the most prepared Sailor is the job of a personnel specialist.

Seaman Tamara Wilson, a clerk for the Educational Services Officer (ESO) said the mission of the Admin department is to allow their fellow Sailors the ability to focus on operating the ship rather than the administration burdens that come with being a Sailor.

"We give Sailors peace of mind," said Wilson. "It can be very stressful not knowing where you stand in your
career and we make sure that Sailors feel comfortable and know exactly what's going on [with their careers] and what their next step is."

The
RCOH for any member of ship's company can have its share of obstacles. For the personnel specialists, the challenges have a slight twist.

"The personnel specialists do not work on the ship or the Floating Accommodation Facility, so it kind of takes us out of the loop a little bit," Wilson said.

Personnel Specialist 1st class Clay Drew, the military pay leading petty officer for the ship explains that despite the difference in location the work load is just as intense as any other Sailor working on board.

"I'm surrounded by outstanding Sailors every day making
the shop work. Just recently our yeomen hashed out a massive amount of evaluations," Drew said. "Our ESO team is building worksheets for the upcoming exam cycle. So there are definitely a lot of moving parts and work."

Although not being as visible as their shipmates has its disadvantages, the work performed by the personnel specialists is focused on the mission of the ship and the future on their shipmates as well.

"We care about our fellow shipmates, and we always try to make sure their paperwork is in order and taken care of so they can be sure
of where they stand in their career 100 percent," Wilson said” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141208-27 - Release Date: 12/8/2014 3:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Evan Parker, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailor Earns NAM for Overhaul Effort

 

“Machinist's Mate 2nd Class William B. Roten, from Ladson, S.C., assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) received a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for his overhaul maintenance he performed during the ship's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 9 December 2015.

Roten played a key role by overhauling six motor-driven fire pumps and prepared them to be shipped to a remote repair facility. As a result, Roten's department recommended him for the award. "It is truly a great honor to receive such an award," said Roten. "The hard work really paid off and I am proud that my contribution has increased the progress of the work."

After graduating from Salisbury High School in 2003, Roten worked as a landscaper before enlisting in the U.S. Navy. Following his completion of boot camp, he attended basic mechanic "A" school
and Navy propulsion training unit before reporting aboard Lincoln.

"Being in the shipyards poses many unique challenges for Sailors," said Master Chief Machinist's Mate Tyrone A. Wright, who oversees
Reactor Department's Work Control and RX40 Divisions. "However, he has been a stalwart Sailor."

Roten serves as work center supervisor for his secondary division and is personally responsible for 10 Sailors who routinely seek out his technical expertise. "Since Lincoln has been in the shipyard, I've gotten a better understanding of the design of the reactor plant and my knowledge on maintenance practices has increased," said Roten.

Roten was recently advanced to the rank of Petty Officer 2nd Class, a milestone with increased responsibility that came as a result of the Selective Training And Reenlistment Program, which carries an automatic promotion and a considerable financial bonus
.

Despite the bonus, Roten explained that being in the shipyards has its benefits and downsides. "The maintenance and administrative processes take a lot longer, especially when coordinating with the shipyard on a daily basis," said Roten. "But on the plus side, I can see my family every day."

Roten is now diligently working on bringing the plant and ultimately the ship back to a fully operational status” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS141212-03 - Release Date: 12/12/2014 7:37:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Perform Nearly 190,000 Fire Watch Hours, Save $3.8 Million

 

As reported on 10 December 2014, “to date, Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) have avoided costs of approximately $3.8 million by completing nearly 190,000 fire watch hours while the ship undergoes its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) in Newport News.

The money saved by Sailors conducting fire watch since the beginning of
RCOH in March 2013 will be applied later in the project to fund other needed repairs.

"Fire Watch has been a critical Ship's Force contribution to this
RCOH," said Capt. Ronald Ravelo, commanding officer, Abraham Lincoln. "Early in the project it was determined that some significant labor cost savings needed to be found."

Fire watches also serve as a vital first line of defense against preventable casualties. These watches are manned as a safety precaution during various types of work, such as grinding, cutting and welding.

"The hours of fire watch that our crew provided were arguably our biggest contribution to this effort," said Ravelo. "But it really makes sense we contribute in this manner when you take a practical and pragmatic view. Ultimately this is our way of ensuring that hot work is
performed safely and correctly on our ship."

Chief Warrant Officer 4 Christopher Bruceross further discussed the important role the fire watch team performs aboard
Abraham Lincoln. "The fire watch team assists with observing all work with potential for causing a fire at the work site," said Bruceross. "They verify there are no discrepancies at the hot-work site with potential for causing a fire and ensure they are resolved prior to commencing work."

Bruceross also recognizes the Sailors' dedication to fire watch and, ultimately, their dedication to the ship. "Standing a fire watch is uneventful with intent," said Bruceross. "Our team has ownership of their role, which is critical to the safety of the ship, our fiscal responsibilities, and our involvement with contracted production during
RCOH."


Sailors assigned to these watches not only provide their time, but are a liaison between Sailors and the civilian contractors that work in the shipyard.

"I think the upside to this job is that it allows you to explore the ship, the schedule is good and I learn a lot from the contractors," said Airman Ehren Bass. "Most of them have been working on ships for a while, and know a lot about the
Lincoln"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141210-04 - Release Date: 12/10/2014 11:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aaron T. Kiser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Weapons Department: Builds Spaces and Better Sailors

 

As reported on 10 December 2014, “Refueling Complex and Overhaul (RCOH) presents many challenges for both a ship as well as the Sailors undergoing it and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) experience is no exception. Sailors in many departments and divisions can expect to work outside of their rate during RCOH, but one thing that has remained constant for Sailors assigned to Lincoln's weapons department is that they are leading the charge when it comes to unconventional workloads.

 

"We have a couple of different jobs that we are doing right now during RCOH that are unrelated to ordnance," said Lt. Cmdr. Jack Hurley, Lincoln's ordnance handling officer. "We are handling transportation, the lagging team and the berthing team. We still have ongoing work that we are doing with elevator maintenance and magazine rehab as well." Although their mission might have changed somewhat while in the shipyard, weapons department still is contributing significantly during the overhaul.

 

"We have completed 19 of the 39 berthing spaces that we have been assigned to refurbish during of RCOH," said Hurley. "We have close to 70 Sailors in transportation, 30 of which are temporary assigned duty from other departments." According to Hurley, the work done by Sailors assigned to the transportation division plays a pivotal role in supplementing the mission while in the shipyards.

 

"We are helping things run around here," Hurley said. "No one would get anywhere without transportation; we take everybody to all the safety standdowns, testing and other mission-essential events." Sailors in weapons department face the shipyard challenges head on with innovative tactics. Two of Hurley's Sailors, Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Joshua Smith and Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class Shawn Wingle spearheaded study group sessions on a regular basis, which had proven results this exam cycle. "Sixty people showed up to the training sessions," said Hurley.

 

"We had 28 people who advanced this cycle, which is almost double what we had the last time." According to Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class Joshua Smith, who also implemented mock exams, Power Points and even field training reflected on the effective hands-on approach to advancement studying implemented by his department.

 

"Other departments could definitely benefit from programs like ours because people learn through experience and teaching," said Smith. "When you mention money, you have everyone's attention. If you make the subject matter fun and use a hands-on approach, you will see the light bulbs start to turn on."

 

One challenge about advancement for Sailors assigned to weapons department is that while the ship is currently not at sea, the Sailors have less experience with the intricacies of their rate -- a challenge that Wingle has seen firsthand.

 

"It was evident that most Sailors had never built or even seen ordnance," Wingle said. "I took the challenge and ran with it. I have always had good results helping Sailors learn our rate and I knew this would be no different. The biggest thing to teaching Sailors anything is to put it in terms they understand."

 

Although much about their jobs has changed, there are still a few in-rate requirements that remain” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141210-16 - Release Date: 12/10/2014 4:31:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Derry Todd, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

CNP Holds All Hands Call

 

“Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran and enlisted advisor Fleet Master Chief April Beldo held an all-hands call for Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Pre-Commissioning Unit USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) at the Hampton Roads Convention Center on 5 November 2014.

Moran and Beldo spoke to the almost 2,400 Sailors about their responsibilities while in the shipyard and provided additional information about uniform changes, pay and benefits, manning and the direction of the future Navy. Moran also took questions from Ford and
Lincoln Sailors in a town-hall format. A growing concern of long deployments and the impact on families was a common topic.

"I know that long deployments are a concern for many of you," said Moran. "As long as we have commitments in the Middle East and around the world, coupled with a backlog of ship maintenance, we will have eight or nine month deployments, but we're making real progress on shortening them. As we catch up on the maintenance we should see most ships return to traditional deployment lengths in the next year or so."

Moran also discussed
a little known option for Sailors who need career flexibility or time off work varying reasons, a sabbatical for Sailors. "There's a program called the Career Intermission Program (CIP)," said Moran. "This program is for Sailors who need to handle personal business. You can take up to a three-year break in service, but for every year you take, you give us two years back.

 

We want to grow the program, allow Sailors across the fleet to use CIP for needed career flexibility--to start a family, go to school, take care of elderly parents or whatever they deem necessary." Moran closed out the all-hands call with a discussion about trust. Encouraging leaders at all levels to create an environment where trust runs up and down the chain of command” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141106-22 - Release Date: 11/6/2014 8:34:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, HAMPTON, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Safety Department Promotes Preventative Measures to Keep Sailors Safe

 

As reported on 12 December 2014, “everyone knows that safety is a cornerstone of any ship or shipyard environment and every day on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors are working to fix and preserve their ship. However, in doing so, they are always on watch and at the top of their game when it comes to the safety of themselves and their shipmates around them.

 

Currently, USS Abraham Lincoln is undergoing its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), one of the most challenging events that an aircraft carrier undertakes following 25 years of service.

"Safety is basically a reminder for Sailors to do the right thing," said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Kathryn Teague,
Lincoln's enlisted safety committee meeting coordinator. "Everyone knows what is right and what is wrong, so our department exists as a preventative measure to Sailors' health as well as preventing material damage."

Safety oversees many programs required for ship's force including
Lincoln's Safe Ride Program, hearing conservation, personal protective equipment and Lincoln's lead safety program. Although most of these programs apply ship-wide, Safety Department is one of the few organizations that work beyond the regular work schedule, looking out for Sailors on and off the clock.

"Everyone knows our programs, whether it is the driving under the influence board on the quarter deck or having safe ride cards issued to every Sailor on board," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Ashley Tucker, who has spent the last year working within the
Safety Department.

 

"There is always someone looking out for those on liberty because we account for the safety of the entire crew, not just the ship," said Tucker. According to Teague, Safety Department is a major player in enforcing ship-wide safety and that the best way to be successful ship-wide, everyone must work together to create a safer work environment” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141212-04 - Release Date: 12/12/2014 7:38:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2014 Results

 

Revenues were $1.93 billion for the quarter and $6.96 billion for the year Segment operating margin was 7.0 percent for the quarter and 8.4 percent for the year Total operating margin was 7.5 percent for the quarter and 9.4 percent for the year Excluding a $47 million non-cash goodwill impairment charge:

 

Segment operating margin was 9.4 percent for the quarter and 9.1 percent for the year Total operating margin was 9.9 percent for the quarter and 10.1 percent for the year Diluted earnings per share was $1.05 for the quarter and $6.86 for the year Adjusted diluted earnings per share was $2.19 for the quarter and $7.14 for the year Cash from operations was $402 million for the quarter and $716 million for the year

 

"Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) reported fourth quarter 2014 revenues of $1.93 billion, compared to $1.94 billion in the same period of 2013. Total operating income was $144 million and total operating margin was 7.5 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014, compared to $174 million and 9.0 percent in the same period last year.

 

Diluted earnings per share in the fourth quarter of 2014 was $1.05, compared to $1.82 in the same period of 2013.

 

Diluted earnings per share in the fourth quarter of 2014 included $0.75 for the non-cash goodwill impairment charge and $0.49 for the one-time expense for early extinguishment of debt. Diluted earnings per share in the fourth quarter of 2013 included $0.24 for the favorable hurricane insurance recoveries. Fourth quarter 2014 diluted earnings per share included $0.10 of benefit for the FAS/CAS Adjustment, compared to $0.08 of expense in fourth quarter 2013. Adjusting for these items, diluted earnings per share was $2.19 in the fourth quarter of 2014, compared to $1.66 in the fourth quarter of 2013.

 

Cash provided by operating activities in the fourth quarter of 2014 was $402 million, an increase of $110 million from the same period in 2013. Free cash flow in the fourth quarter was $328 million, an increase of $90 million from the same period last year. These increases were due primarily to decreases in accounts receivable partially offset by increases in capital expenditures. For the full year, revenues were $6.96 billion, an increase of $137 million or 2.0 percent over 2013.

 

Total operating income was $655 million and total operating margin was 9.4 percent in 2014, compared to $512 million and 7.5 percent in 2013. Diluted earnings per share in 2014 was $6.86, compared to $5.18 in the prior year. Diluted earnings per share in 2014 included $0.75 for the non-cash goodwill impairment charge and $0.49 for the one-time expense for early extinguishment of debt. Diluted earnings per share in 2013 included $0.83 for the favorable hurricane insurance recoveries and $0.22 for the closure of the Gulfport facility.

 

Diluted earnings per share in 2014 included $0.96 of benefit for the FAS/CAS Adjustment, compared to $0.79 of expense in 2013. Adjusting for these items, diluted earnings per share was $7.14 in 2014, compared to $5.36 in 2013.

 

Cash from operating activities for 2014 was $716 million, an increase of $480 million from 2013. Free cash flow in 2014 was $551 million, an increase of $454 million from 2013. These increases were due primarily to decreases in accounts receivable and retirement benefit funding, partially offset by increases in capital expenditures.

 

New business awards for 2014 were approximately $10.1 billion, of which $0.5 billion was awarded in the fourth quarter, bringing total backlog to $21.4 billion as of Dec. 31, 2014.

 

"Overall, 2014 was a great year for our company," said Mike Petters, HII's president and CEO. "Strong execution at Ingalls and Newport News helped us achieve solid operational performance and improved financial results, which mitigated the impact of pressure at Universal Pegasus due to the drop in oil prices. We delivered improved margin performance and strong cash flow for the year and are on track to achieve our 2015 segment operating margin goal."

 

2014 Goodwill Impairment Charge

 

During the fourth quarter of 2014, the company recorded a non-cash goodwill impairment of $47 million related to its Other segment. The Other segment, established in the second quarter of 2014 following the acquisition of UPI, is sensitive to developments in the oil and gas industry. The impairment was primarily driven by the recent drop in oil prices and the resulting decrease in industry market multiples. The company evaluates goodwill values for impairment annually on November 30, or when evidence of potential impairment exists. The company determined that the estimated fair value of its remaining reporting units exceeded their corresponding carrying values as of November 30, 2014” (Ref, NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 19, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)). Results of Operations Full Report at

http://newsroom.huntingtoningalls.com/releases/huntington-ingalls-industries-reports-fourth-quarter-and-full-year-2014-results

 

Huntington Ingalls Reports 2% Revenue Jump for FY 2014; Mike Petters Comments

 

“Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE: HII) has announced financial results for the fourth quarter and full 2015 fiscal year ended Dec. 31, 2014. The shipbuilding giant said its revenue grew 2 percent to $6.96 billion from 2013 figures, profit rose to $338 million over the prior year and the operating margin reached 9.4 percent for the full 2014 fiscal year from the 7.5-percent figure in 2013.

 

Mike Petters, president and CEO of HII, said the company’s full-year results “mitigated the impact of pressure at Universal Pegasus due to the drop in oil prices.”

 

Huntington Ingalls purchased Universal Pegasus, a project management services provider for energy customers, in May 2014 to grow in the oil and gas markets.

New contracts in fiscal 2014 totaled $10.1 billion and the company says its backlog sits at $21.4 billion as of Dec. 31, 2014.

 

Revenue in the company’s Newport News Shipbuilding business rose 3.5 percent for the full 2014 fiscal year to $4.54 billion over 2013 and 4.8 percent for the fourth quarter to $1.26 billion over the prior year period.

 

Huntington Ingalls attributed the increase in that segment in part to higher sales in energy, which the company said was driven by its January 2014 acquisition of The S.M. Stoller Corp.” (Ref. Ross Wilkers February 20, 2015, Financial Report, News).

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries 2013 Revenues Increased

 

“Huntington Ingalls Industries reports Fourth Quarter & Year 2013 financial results with increased revenues in each period. Highlights are as follows:

 

•Revenues were $1.94 billion for the fourth quarter and $6.82 billion for 2013
•Segment operating margin was 8.7 percent for the fourth quarter and 8.3 percent for the full year
•Total operating margin was 9.0 percent for the fourth quarter and 7.5 percent for 2013
•Diluted earnings per share was $1.82 for the quarter and $5.18 for 2013
•Adjusted diluted earnings per share was $1.66 for the quarter and $5.36 for 2013
•Cash and cash equivalents were $1.0 billion at year-end

Segment operating income in the fourth quarter was $169 million, compared to $140 million in the same period last year, mainly driven by improved contract performance. Total operating income for the quarter was $174 million, compared to $106 million in the same period of 2012. This increase was primarily attributable to increased segment operating income and favorable variances in deferred state income taxes and the FAS/CAS Adjustment. Total operating margin was 9.0 percent for the quarter, compared to 5.8 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012.

For the year, revenues were $6.82 billion, an increase of 1.7 percent over 2012. Segment operating income for the year was $567 million, compared to $457 million last year. Total operating income for the year was $512 million, compared to $358 million in 2012. 2013 diluted earnings per share was $5.18, compared to $2.91 in 2012. Adjusted diluted earnings per share, which excludes the impact of
hurricane insurance recoveries, the Gulfport closure and the FAS/CAS Adjustment, was $5.36 in 2013, compared to $3.95 last year.

Cash provided by operating activities in the fourth quarter of 2013 was $292 million, a decrease of $81 million from the same period last year, and for the year was $236 million, a decrease of $96 million from 2012. The decrease in 2013 operating cash flow was primarily driven by an increase in income tax payments and retirement benefit funding. New business awards for 2013 were approximately $9.4 billion, of which $0.7 billion was awarded in the fourth quarter, bringing total backlog to $18.0 billion as of Dec. 31, 2013.

"As HII's three-year anniversary approaches, I am pleased with the operational improvements achieved by our team and the resulting financial performance,"
said Mike Petters, HII's president and CEO. "The last of our under-performing contracts, LHA-6 America, will be delivered in the coming weeks, performance continues to improve at Ingalls, and we are on schedule to meet our 2015 operating margin goal" “ (Ref. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 27, 2014 (MarineLink.com)).

http://www.marinelink.com/news/huntington-industries364819

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) activities at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

 (1 January to 31 December 2014)

Chapter III - Part I of II - 1 January to 19 November 2014

Part II of II - 20 November to 31 December 2014

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

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EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

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