Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) activities at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

 (1 January to 31 December 2014)

Chapter III

Part I of II - 1 January to 19 November 2014

Part II of II - 20 November to 31 December 2014

 

 

Lincoln Sailors and Leadership Improving Zone Inspection Process During RCOH

 

As reported on 4 February 2014, “Lincoln leadership across USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are motivating and mentoring Sailors to maintain the zone inspection process during the Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). "I think the most important part of zone inspection is motivating Sailors by the level of involvement by the upper chain," said Lt. Terry Johnson, USS Abraham Lincoln's material maintenance management (3M) officer. "Our Executive Officer Capt. Randall Peck is involved on a regular basis. During inspections he mentors the Sailors explaining all aspects of the inspection good or bad.

 

That honesty and ownership is transferred into the rest of the leadership, and it spreads throughout the crew." Johnson added that the type of feedback serves to set the tempo on board the carrier during RCOH. Johnson's team breaks up the entire ship into 12 zones that are inspected by senior enlisted or junior officers on a rotating basis every week. Each inspection site is checked for fire hazards, electrical and structural safety, cleanliness and readiness. The inspection can be daunting with shipyard work drastically affecting the condition of the ship's spaces.

 

"When so much work and demolition is being done by the shipyard, there is a natural tendency to lose ownership. Retaining a robust zone program is one of the best ways for the Lincoln crew to maintain control of the material condition unaffected by the shipyard and to retain ownership and responsibility for conditions of safety and cleanliness throughout the ship that are important to the project's outcome," said Johnson. Johnson added that maintaining the ship's most fundamental programs, such as the zone inspection program, builds on the ship's legacy of excellence and will quickly get the ship back to life and the Lincoln back in the fight.

 

"That tempo is directly reflected in how well a ship's crew is prepared to transfer from an RCOH mentality to preparing for certification for battle readiness when the shipyard period is done," said Johnson. Johnson said that 3M creating a better program by standardizing the inspection criteria and procedures throughout the command. "We are taking a serious approach to training zone inspectors and the standardization of inspection criteria," said Johnson. "Every week we reiterate a specific area on what to look for and how to look for it. We still have a way to go, but I feel our zone inspector training approach is one of the more robust programs in the fleet."

 

The zone inspection process as a whole hasn't changed, added Johnson, but the vision of the ship during the zone inspection process has changed. "Instead of focusing our efforts based on a warship going into a fight, we are looking more towards maintaining ownership of or our home while people come in and make repairs," said Johnson. In a shipyard environment, Johnson added that an abundant amount of pieces and parts are taken apart or removed, but utilizing the zone inspection process allows Sailors to maintain the ship's equipment to set standards of material condition, safety, and cleanliness.

 

"The more we focus on these areas now, the easier it will be when all the shipyard workers are on another ship and we are looking at battle readiness again," said Johnson. "Zone inspections have improved the 3M process by incorporating a real life look at all of the work that is being done by outside activities and work being done by the Sailors and how it affects the ship. Ship's force use of regular inspections to visualize problems and get the correct documentation of material status is a huge part of the success of Material Maintenance Management Zone Inspection program"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140204-18 - Release Date: 2/4/2014 8:55:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln's Combat Systems Department Achieves its First Milestone in RCOH

 

“Less than a year after USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrival into Newport News Shipbuilding for a 42.5-month Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), Combat Systems Department marked a successful milestone with the installation of the AN/SPS-49 radar tower on 11 February 2014.

The AN/SPS-49 radar tower was installed on the flight deck near the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier's island.

Cmdr. Christopher Haden,
Lincoln's Combat Systems Officer, emphasized the quality work involved in the removal of SPS-49 and the installation of the tower.

"The reinstallation is a significant milestone as it signifies the beginning of the rebuilding phase of the
RCOH," said Haden. "Once the main structures are put into place, then it will be ready to bring on the electronic equipment and bring the Combat Systems portion of USS Abraham Lincoln back to life."

Electronics Technician 3rd Class Kyre Carter, from Cincinnati, Ohio, is assigned to
Lincoln's Combat Systems Department and is responsible for maintaining the AN/SPS-49 radar.

"To have the tower on the ship signifies that I will begin the maintenance to do my job here in
RCOH," said Carter.

Carter is just one of two Sailors on board
Lincoln out of 2,500 Sailors who is directly responsible for the maintenance of AN/SPS-are49. She reflected on the skill needed to maintain this vital asset for the ship's defense.

"Just to know that it is on me to maintain the AN/SPS-49 and for me to do my job is a good feeling for me personally," said Carter, who recently completed a four-month AN/SPS-49 V(8) "C" School in San Diego, Calif., graduating with a 93 percent grade average. "It does feel good to know that I have the skill set required and am a necessity to
the ship to maintain the AN/SPS-49 radar"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140218-18 - Release Date: 2/18/2014 8:58:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Million Dollar Sailor Program Trains Lincoln Sailors

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) joined Sailors from other area commands for a "Million Dollar Sailor" financial planning course at Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) in Newport News on 20 February 2014.

The course is designed for service members and their families who want to become more financially stable. The class covered topics such as financial goal setting and implementation, debt reduction, saving, investing and long-term wealth building.

"The Million Dollar Sailor program is used to educate Sailors on properly managing their finances," said Faye Smith, an accredited financial counselor for the FFSC.

According to Smith, with the course's training, Sailors and their
families can develop skills to benefit themselves and give them the knowledge they need to stay stable for the rest of their lives.

 

"Sailors are encouraged to bring their spouses to the classes," said Smith. "This is important as well because while Sailors are deployed, their spouses can continue to properly manage the finances." Operations Specialist Seaman Edgar Barraza, a Lincoln Sailor, explained why he signed up for the program.

"My department was where I first heard of the program and I was immediately interested," said Barraza. "Hopefully this will allow me to manage my finances more efficiently to stay out of debt. I learned a few things about money handling that I didn't know before."

The two-day interactive program was developed by getting a wide range of ideas from several professionals from different areas.

"This program originated in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from a financial counselor who wanted to give Sailors an overall picture about where their
money is going and he helped develop it," said Smith. "He coordinated with developers in other areas to get this program off the ground and it's been great so far."

The course is one of 16 Personal Financial Management Programs offered at FFSC. Any service member who is interested in learning how to take better care of their money can take the course.

"With tools learned from the program, a Sailor could potentially be a millionaire by the time they plan to retire from the Navy," said Smith"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS140221-17 - Release Date: 2/21/2014 3:24:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln PM-11 Outpaces Installation Expectations

 

As reported on 13 March 2014, “Sailors assigned to the berthing team aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are expediting through the process of moving Sailors back onto the ship.

In the last few months, 36 Sailors on the team have completed six out of 39 berthing spaces, according to Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Terrence Parks, the berthing rehabilitation team leader.

The team set July 2015 as the deadline to complete all berthing rack installation and October 2015 for complete berthing refurbishment.

Even with all the accomplishments of the
PM-11 team, Parks cautions Sailors to remain vigilant in order to not damage berthing decks by transiting through them during refurbishment.

"This can cost us hundreds of potential man-hours as well as thousands of dollars in added cost and material waste, said Parks."

For example, the cost to repair a footprint in the onestep floor covering is $300, including one kit of onestep ($96), two kits of sealer ($130) and labor ($74).

"Ultimately, it deteriorates the progress that we've made together as a team," said Parks.

Currently,
Lincolns' berthing team is slated to complete the project nearly a year prior to the planned crew move aboard date in February 2016” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140313-21 - Release Date: 3/13/2014 4:33:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Rehab Team Saves Navy Nearly $3/4 Million

 

As reported on 20 March 2014, “Sailors from the Air Department aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) recycled parts from the decommissioned USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in an effort to save the Navy a pocket full of money during Lincoln's Refueling Complex and Overhaul (RCOH).

Eight Sailors travelled to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard to acquire equipment to help repair the ship's flight deck fueling station and its two JP-5 fuel pump rooms.

Recycling
Kennedy's equipment onto Lincoln saved the Navy six months of man-hours and $700,000, according to Lincoln's Air Boatswain, Chief Warrant Officer 4 Anthony Garcia.

"Attaining these resources has tremendously impacted the progress of repairing the ship's fueling systems," said Garcia.

The eight-Sailor team manually disassembled and transferred more than 100 valves, filters, caps and assemblies without cranes or pneumatic tools, which impressed the chief in charge of the team.

"Our Sailors put forth a Herculean effort on a major project for the improvement of our ship," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Fueling) Chief Cory Lee.

"It's as if we transplanted the vital organs of
CV-67 and placed them into the Lincoln," said Garcia. "Naval vessels are like human bodies, its crew is the soul, its leadership the mind, and the fuel is the ships lifeblood. V-4 keeps that lifeblood pumping."

V-4 Division
is the aviation fueling unit within the Air Department responsible for fueling aircraft and maintaining the ship's fueling systems” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140320-22 - Release Date: 3/20/2014 7:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Completes First Year in RCOH

 

“March 28, 2014 marks the end of the first year in the Refueling Complex and Overhaul (RCOH) for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) at Newport News Shipyard in Newport News, Va. According to a 2002 study by the Research and Development National Defense Institute, "The midlife RCOH of a nuclear aircraft carrier may be the most challenging engineering and industrial task undertaken anywhere." Getting Lincoln back in the fight on time and below budget is a long, complicated process with many moving parts, but the more than 2,500 Sailors, 3,000 shipyard workers and contractors have stepped up to the challenge, according to the ship's commanding officer.

 

"Everywhere around the ship, you can see progress being made," said Capt. Karl Thomas, Lincoln's commanding officer. "It's easy to see and hear this progress all around us when we walk the deck plates." Lincoln has many teams of Sailors, shipyard workers and contractors driving the success of the first phase of RCOH, commonly known as the "rip-out" stage. One of these teams, the decking team, removed more than 300,000 square feet of tile from the ship, the equivalent of Lincoln's 4.5 acre flight deck. This effort saved an estimated $3.5 million for taxpayers. Another initative to save the Navy money includes the refurbishment instead of replacement of the ship's components.

 

According to Chief Cryptological Technician (Maintenance) Timothy Nerbonne, approximately 40 percent of the water-tight doors and scuttles can be fixed at our light industrial facility (LIFAC). At LIFAC, the doors undergo cleaning, paint and rust removal, and powder coat painting before they return to the ship. Other areas of accomplishment since Lincoln started RCOH include: the reinstallation of the long range air search radar tower, completion of the port and starboard rudder stock repairs, the refurbishment of 230 of 399 water-tight doors tied to undocking, and the blasting and priming of the hull of the ship below the water line. Each accomplishment would not be possible without both personnel and safety.

 

From ensuring watchstanders are present to put out potential fires during welding, to powering down electrical equipment during maintenance - every step is accomplished effectively and safely by the integrated team of Sailors, shipyard workers and contractors. The next 12 months will be a transition from the "rip-out" phase to the "rebuilding" phase of RCOH. 2014 is important for the ship because Lincoln's personnel will begin to take back owenership of their spaces, and seeing the ship come back together and looking like it's supposed to is good for morale, said Thomas. "The shipyard workers and Sailors should be very proud of what they have accomplished thus far," said Thomas. "I know that I am very proud to see how far we've come in one year"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140328-08 - Release Date: 3/28/2014 12:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rusty Pang, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=79956

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc.: Huntington Ingalls Industries Reports First Quarter Results - 2013

 

“Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) reported first quarter 2014 revenues of $1.59 billion, up 2.0 percent compared to the same period last year. First quarter diluted earnings per share was $1.81, compared to diluted earnings per share of $0.87 in the same period of 2013. Adjusted diluted earnings per share for the quarter was $1.53, compared to $1.17 in the comparable period of 2013.

 

Segment operating income for the first quarter was $137 million, compared to $120 million in the same period last year. Total operating income for the quarter was $159 million, compared to $95 million in the same period last year. Adjusted operating income for the first quarter, which excludes the FAS/CAS Adjustment, was $137 million, or 8.6 percent of revenue, compared to $118 million, or 7.6 percent of revenue, in the comparable period of 2013. The increase in adjusted operating income was primarily attributable to risk retirement at Ingalls on the LPD-17 San Antonio-class (LPD) program and National Security Cutter (NSC) program and at Newport News on the CVN-78 Gerald R. Ford construction contract.

 

New business awards for the quarter were approximately $2.2 billion, consisting primarily of contracts for continued construction preparation for CVN-79 John F. Kennedy and construction of NSC-7 Kimball. Total backlog at the end of Q1 2014 was $18.7 billion, of which $13.0 billion was funded.

 

"Notwithstanding continued debate surrounding the defense budget and the impact of sequestration, HII has continued to maintain a healthy backlog and strong operating performance at both segments," said Mike Petters, HII's president and chief executive officer. "With the delivery of LHA-6 America in April 2014, HII has reached a significant milestone on its path to 9 plus percent margins in 2015."

 

Ingalls revenues for the first quarter decreased $3 million, or 0.5 percent, from the same period in 2013, driven by lower sales in amphibious assault ships, partially offset by higher sales in the NSC program and surface combatants. The decrease in amphibious assault ships revenues was due to lower volumes on LHA-6 America and LPD-25 USS Somerset, partially offset by higher volumes on LPD-27 Portland. Revenues on the NSC program were higher due to higher volumes on NSC-5 James and NSC-6 Munro construction contracts. Surface combatants revenues were higher due to higher volumes on DDG-117 Paul Ignatius and DDG-114 Ralph Johnson construction contracts.

Ingalls operating income for the quarter was $43 million, an increase of $19 million over the same period in 2013. Ingalls operating margin was 7.9 percent for the quarter as compared to 4.4 percent in Q1 2013. These increases were primarily due to risk retirement on the LPD and NSC programs.

 

Key Ingalls highlights for the quarter:

 

· LPD-25 USS Somerset sailed away from the Avondale Shipyard

· LHA-6 America completed successful acceptance sea trials

· Received a $602 million contract modification to fund construction of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer DDG-119

· Received a $497 million contract to fund construction of NSC-7 Kimball

 

Newport News revenues for the first quarter increased $35 million, or 3.5 percent, from the same period in 2013, primarily driven by higher sales in aircraft carriers and the acquisition of The S.M. Stoller Corp. Higher revenues in aircraft carriers were primarily due to increased volumes on the execution contract for the CVN-72 USS Abraham Lincoln refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) and the inactivation contract for CVN-65 USS Enterprise, partially offset by lower volumes on the execution contract for the CVN-71 USS Theodore Roosevelt RCOH and the construction contract for CVN-78 Gerald R. Ford. Submarine revenues related to the SSN-774 Virginia-class submarine (VCS) program remained stable as lower volumes on Block II boats following the delivery of SSN-783 USS Minnesota were offset by higher volumes on Block III construction and Block IV advance procurement.

 

Newport News operating income for the quarter was $94 million, a $2 million decrease from the same period in 2013. Newport News operating margin was 9.0 percent for the quarter, down from 9.5 percent in Q1 2013. These decreases were mainly related to lower risk retirement on the VCS program and the execution contract for CVN-71 USS Theodore Roosevelt RCOH, partially offset by risk retirement on the construction contract for CVN-78 Gerald R. Ford.

 

Key Newport News highlights for the quarter:

 

· Acquired The S.M. Stoller Corp., a leading provider of environmental, nuclear, and technical consulting and engineering services to the Department of Energy, Department of Defense and private sector

· Opened a field office in Aiken, S.C., as part of its continuing efforts to expand the company's business in the Department of Energy and commercial energy markets

Received a $1.295 billion contract modification to a previously awarded construction preparation contract for CVN-79 John F. Kennedy” (Ref. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., May 8, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)). First Quarter 2014 Highlights Full Report at:

 

Lincoln's Decking Team Saves Navy Money

 

As reported on 3 April 2014, “the decking team aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) estimates they have saved over $1 million in ship's flooring material removal since the beginning of RCOH the Navy money by taking on a Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) contract.

The contract involves the removal of studs and foundations welded to the deck to prepare for the installation of furniture in interior spaces. On board Navy ships furniture is attached to the deck with welded studs to prevent it from moving during high seas.

During
Lincoln's RCOH many spaces are scheduled to receive updated furniture. These new layouts require the removal of old studs and the installation of new ones.

"They're going into the space, cutting out the unwanted studs, and grinding them flush to the deck," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Anthony Serio, the decking team's leading petty officer. "Anything that's on the deck and not supposed to be there is removed and smoothed."

Accepting the task added four months' worth of work for the team which has to be completed in a two month timeframe; the team's
deadline is the end of April. To speed up the process and prevent mistakes, departments across the ship have identified and marked studs for removal in spaces they own.

"This is a ship wide effort for all departments to identify what needs to be removed in each of their spaces," said Chief Warrant Officer 3 Christopher Smith, the decking team's officer in charge. "Having the studs marked ahead of time makes the process of us coming in to prep the deck go smoothly."

The decking team's primary responsibility is to remove the different types of flooring from the
steel subfloor to allow fresh surfaces to be installed. Serio said the decking team took the news of the additional tasks in stride and will get the work done in the allotted timeframe.

"Every time Ship's Force is asked to take on another task, we do, and we do it with pride and professionalism," said Cmdr. Vincent Janowiak,
Lincoln's chief engineer. "In addition to the cost savings, what we are really doing is ensuring the success of this project by fostering an environment of team work.

 

We always get the job done, and that's something to be proud of"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140403-38 - Release Date: 4/3/2014 10:12:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Andriana Genualdi, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors train to Assist Ship's Security Force

 

As reported on 14 April 2014, “the 30-round magazine slips into the receiver and the Sailor checks that it is seated correctly. He takes a deep breath, letting silence fill the air as his concentration builds. Peering through the iron sights, he focuses on the target 15 yards away.

The click of the safety temporarily breaks the silence as the pad of his index finger starts to squeeze the trigger. He takes one final breath, and fires.

The explosion of the round, along with all the others, resonates throughout Naval Weapons Station Cheatham Annex's small arms firing range as Sailors shoot to
qualify as security personnel.

Small arms qualification is vital to the process that Sailors complete as they qualify for security duty aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).

Lincoln's current security manning requirements demand more Sailors than the Masters-at-Arms assignment, resulting in the need for temporary additional personnel on Lincoln's security force to protect the ship during Refuling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

Initially, Sailors expecting to go on security patrols complete several Naval Knowledge Online (NKO) courses and a Security Reaction Force Training Basic (SRF-B) class as well as weapon fundamentals, non-lethal weapons fundamentals and reaction force techniques.

"We qualify on the weapons with which we stand watch along with (oleoresin capsicum - "oc" or "pepper") spray," said Information Systems Technician 1st class Amanda Lamberth, a security watch commander.

Once the Sailors have completed their training they are qualified to augment security watches.

"The training of the ship's security force is our main objective in [the ships armory],"
said Avation Ordnanceman 3rd class Edward Yazbak, a firearms instructor. "Through comprehensive training, we give security department expert knowledge in all weapons.

Members of security are trained in using and handling the M16, M9, M500, M14 and M240 guns. "I'm glad that I am able to contribute to
Lincoln's safety and teach security personnel the skills that they can use in any situation that they may face," said Yazbak” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140414-02 - Release Date: 4/14/2014 7:48:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Matthew Young, YORKTOWN, Va. (NNS)).

 

With the refueling, complex overhaul, well underway, USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) is apparently getting her island modified. “Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced April 30, 2014 that its Newport News Shipbuilding division recently placed a new upper-level structure on top of USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) island, which is similar to an airport control tower. The aircraft carrier is undergoing its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), during which the shipyard refuels the ship's reactors, paints the ship's hull, modernizes systems and performs a complete recapitalization of the entire ship.

A photo accompanying this release is available at:
http://newsroom.huntingtoningalls.co...aDetailsID=870.

The structure, which will contain the ship's primary flight control systems when outfitted and serves as the platform for many of its various radars and antenna systems, is one of the largest structure lifts that will be performed during the
RCOH process. At 88 feet long and 32 feet wide, the structure weighs about 68 long tons, which is equal to the weight of nearly a dozen elephants. It was set into place using the 310-ton gantry crane that straddles dry docks 10 and 11.

"An
RCOH is an extremely complex engineering and construction project that requires more than 30 months of advance planning and more than three years to accomplish," said Chris Miner, Newport News' vice president of in-service aircraft carrier programs. "This lift represents just one of many significant events we complete to return this ship to the Navy fully equipped and modernized to defend our nation for another 25 years. I applaud the thousands of shipbuilders who are working tirelessly to safely return this great ship to the Navy on schedule and within budget."

USS Abraham Lincoln arrived at Newport News on 28 March 2013 and is on track to redeliver in 2016. RCOH is the mid-life refueling overhaul and maintenance availability of a Nimitz-class carrier that produces a recapitalized carrier capable of supporting current and future warfare doctrine and continuing to operate as the centerpiece of the U.S. Navy fleet and national defense for another 25 years. Huntington Ingalls Industries designs, builds and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe.

 

For more than a century, Huntington Ingalls Industries has built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. The company also provides a wide variety of products and services to the commercial energy industry and other government customers, including the Department of Energy. Employing more than 38,000 in Virginia, Mississippi, Louisiana and California, its primary business divisions are Newport News Shipbuilding and Ingalls Shipbuilding. For more information about Huntington Ingalls Industries, visit: HII on the web: www.huntingtoningalls.com” (Ref. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., April 30, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)).

On May 31, Newport News Shipbuilding placed a new lower main mast section on USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), which serves as the platform for the ship's various ship sensors and radars. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFnni7ozZss&app=desktop

 

The arresting gear engine for the two-wire of the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) is raised from the flight deck.

 

130603-N-MC421-021 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 3, 2013) The arresting gear engine for the two-wire of the The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is raised from the flight deck to be removed from the ship for repairs. Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling complex overhaul in Newport News, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael S. Raney/Released)

 

Lincoln's In-port Emergency Teams Maintain Readiness

 

As reported on 11 June 2014, “an aircraft carrier out to sea is an inherently dangerous environment, with the possibility of an emergency never more than one mistake away. Sailors must always be prepared to respond at a moment's notice.

The same is true for a carrier in the shipyard;
Sailors always need to be ready to respond to an emergency. Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) practice their emergency response skills during daily in-port emergency team (IET) drills.

IET drills require Sailors to respond to simulated emergency scenarios such as fires, chemical spills, flooding and many other possible shipboard casualties quickly and effectively.

"It's important to know how to respond to an in-port emergency," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Vincent Mendes, a medical responder for the eight IETs aboard
Lincoln. "The ship is still a dangerous work environment where fires and injury can occur just as easily as if it were out to sea."

"We have to stay sharp and well trained because anything can happen and we have to be ready for that," said Hull Technician 3rd Class Miguel Gonzales, a firefighter on one of the IETs. "From first aid response to damage control drills we are taught to handle these situations, we train so we can be prepared for anything."

From on scene firefighting methods to casualty investigation, first response and first aid emergency response, Sailors
are trained no differently while in the shipyard than when out to sea. "There are still casualties that can occur while we are dry-docked so we try to maintain our readiness and keep the training fresh in the minds of our trainees," said Mendes.

As the saying suggests, "practice makes perfect."
Lincoln Sailors continue to practice and maintain damage control readiness, always seeking to be perfect when an emergency happens and lives are at stake.

"I understand that we can get rusty on this subject," said Mendes. "However it's still our job and it's important for us to stay grounded on this aspect not only for ourselves but for those around us"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS140611-03 - Release Date: 6/11/2014 7:38:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailor Saves Navy $136,000

 

As reported on 19 June 2014, “Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kyle Rushing, assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), hails from Bothell, Washington. He graduated from Inglemoor High in 2009 and began his naval career July 21, 2009.

"I originally joined the Navy because I wanted money for school," Rushing said. "I ended up making rank pretty fast, and that combined with the fact that I love my job and I'm pretty good at it is why I'm going to stay in the Navy for life." He reported to
Lincoln March 24, 2011. His role on the ship since then has been to repair circuit cards.

"When circuits break on the ship they troubleshoot the repairs, bring us the card and we'll determine if it's fixable," Rushing said. "If it is, we find out which part needs to be replaced. Replacing a single part can cost under a dollar, but an entire new card can cost over $100,000.00" Rushing is an example of an ideal Sailor, possessing both knowledge of his rate and a hard work ethic. "Personally what makes me happy and keeps me going is hard work,"
Rushing said.

 

"I've never been a fan of sitting around and waiting for something to do. If the work is challenging it ends up being a lot more fun and also rewarding. That's why I love my job so much." Rushing recently received a Chief of Naval Operations Gold Disk Award from Lincoln's commanding officer, Capt. Karl Thomas. "I got the award for creating a new test routine for a specific circuit card," Rushing said. "It ended up saving the Navy $136,000.00. Now all the technicians in the Navy and Coast Guard follow my new instruction."

 

Along with his regular duties as a Sailor, Rushing is his department's surface and air warfare device program assistant coordinator as well as the command's surface warfare program tracker. Rushing also helps out in the community, spreading the helpful image of the Navy around the Hampton Roads area. "I coach basketball for the kids at the YMCA between six and eight years old," Rushing said. "I absolutely love it. It's my favorite sport but when I was younger I never really stuck with it. It feels good passing on my love for the game." Rushing is a dedicated Sailor who not only gains experience on the job and gives back to his community, but also takes his studies home with him in order to advance his career.

 

"My short term goal is making first class," Rushing said. "I've been reading electronic training books in order to get me closer. Studying also helps my hobby where I make my own electronic circuits and circuit cards. Reading and practicing is fun to me because it furthers my knowledge of my rate, as well as gets me closer to my degree in electrical engineering. Most of all it helps my long term goal, which is making chief"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140619-13 - Release Date: 6/19/2014 12:07:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Workers for Newport News Shipyard install the starboard side rudder of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

140624-N-DH811-007 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 24, 2014) Workers for Newport News Shipyard install the starboard side rudder of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling and complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, in Newport News, Va. ( U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Benjamin T. Liston/Released)

 

Another RCOH Milestone Complete aboard Lincoln

 

“Thirteen divisions of Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) successfully re-installed the port and starboard rudder aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 24 June 2014.

The overhaul and installation of the rudders is considered a huge success for
Lincoln's Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) because the job was not initially planned.

"Conducting an inspection early in the dry dock period revealed problems that needed to be corrected," said Cmdr. Vincent Janowiak,
Lincoln's chief engineer. "The work was very intrusive to the ship and getting this kind of work done prior to undocking the ship on its original schedule was a huge undertaking for the shipyard."

The removal process of the rudders started in August 2013. Once the rudders were removed they were sent to the NNS machine shop for checks and then to X10 division for structural repairs.

The installation of the rudders took five days and was made possible by the use of cranes and the outstanding teamwork of shipyard workers from M53, O38, 043, X10, X11, X18, X31, X32, X33, X36, X
42, X43 and X70 divisions.

"We used 50 ton chain falls in the dry dock to rig the rudder into place while a crane lowered the rudder stock from the flight deck through the ship to the fourth deck," said Mike Bridges, X70 lead. "We then lined the rudder stock up with the rudder and began the install process."

According to Bridges, the rudder installation was one of the biggest growth work jobs during the undocking period.

"It was truly a group effort from a lot of different trades to pull together to be committed to make this job
go as well as it did," Bridges said. "When you are a part of a team that works hard like they did, it makes your job easy"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140821-07 - Release Date: 8/21/2014 2:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seamen Apprentice Matthew Young, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Attend Shipyard Tour

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) had the privilege of attending a special employee-led tour of the Newport News Shipyard on 2 July 2014.

The primary purpose of the tour was to recognize the excellent work being done by the Sailors nominated as the
Lincoln's Sailors of the Quarter. The awardees, Personnel Specialist 1st Class Mishell Brownlee, Ship's Serviceman 2nd Class Hector Lamboy, Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Sandra Guzman, and Seaman Jordyn Finnesgard were joined by members of their divisions.

During the tour,
Sailors got a behind-the-scenes look at the shipyard's foundry, heavy plate bay and the main machine shop.

"The tour introduces the ship's force to the scope of work that goes on behind the scenes; the work we never see nor appreciate," said Lt. j.g. Amber Nguyen, the deck officer aboard the
Lincoln. "The shops that we were able to visit really opened our eyes to the amount of work it takes to turn a single piece of sheet metal into a huge multi-billion dollar warship."

The group came away from the tour with a deeper understanding for the role that Newport News Shipbuilding plays in the
Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) that Lincoln is currently undergoing and reinforced the unique partnership that the crew has with the shipyard.

"It's amazing to know how long some of the shipyard employees have been working on these types of ships," said Ship's Serviceman 1st Class Marquita Canada. "It gives me reassurance that our ship is in good hands."

Even though many
Lincoln Sailors will no longer be stationed on board the ship as it finishes its yard period, tours like this provide an understanding for what their hard work is ultimately leading towards - getting the ship back to sea.

"The tour was very well put together," said Lt. Amelia Lawton. "It was awesome to see this whole project from the shipyard's perspective"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS140709-10 - Release Date: 7/9/2014 11:52:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Levels 010 and 011 of the island of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) are replaced.

 

140418-N-ZZ999-001 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (April 18, 2014) Levels 010 and 011 of the island of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are replaced as part of the ship's refueling and complex overhaul. (U.S. Navy photo Courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries by John Whalen/Released)

 

Arresting gear engine three is installed aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

140719-N-WP865-026 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (July 19, 2014) Arresting gear engine three is installed aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72). Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser/Released)

 

Lincoln Completes RCOH Milestone: Reinstalls Arresting Gear Engines

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors and Newport News Shipbuilding's (NNS) O-73 Division successfully re-installed the ship's arresting gear engines three and four, on 19 July 2015.

The re-installation process took just over three hours and was made possible by the use of cranes and outstanding teamwork of Sailors and shipyard workers.

"The re-installation of our number three and four arresting gear engines marks a major milestone in
Lincoln's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and eventual return to operational service," said Assistant Air Boss Cmdr. Christopher Martinez.

The arresting gear engines underwent a year-long overhaul in Lakehurst, N.J. before being returned to
Lincoln.

"The overhaul process in New Jersey is a very tedious procedure," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1st Class Lehi Juarezmedina, the leading petty officer in charge of the arresting gear engine installation. "The arresting gears appear to be in like new condition and will service
Lincoln well throughout the rest of her days as a warship."

Arresting gear engines one and two are slated to be re-installed in September 2014, using the same installation process as engines three and four.

"The re-installation of
Lincoln's remaining two engines in just over a month from now will be another major step towards flight deck certification," Martinez said. "It will allow Air Department's 'Green Shirts' to begin training to operate the arresting gear engines at sea."

To re-install the arresting gear engines, two holes measuring approximately 45 feet long by 15 feet wide were cut through the flight deck. Then, an NNS crane was used to meticulously lower the engines into their precise resting place on the first deck of
Lincoln.

"Installing the arresting gear engines on time is one of the most important measures taken in the
RCOH process," said Juarezmedina. "This was a major accomplishment, and the shipyard workers and Sailors aboard Lincoln should be very proud of the progress they are making"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140729-17 - Release Date: 7/29/2014 10:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) attend a mast-stepping ceremony on the flight deck in Newport News, Va.

 

140805-N-GM095-011 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Aug. 5, 2014) Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) attend a mast-stepping ceremony on the flight deck in Newport News, Va. Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rusty Pang/Released)

 

Newport News Shipbuilding Installs Final Mast Section on USS Abraham Lincoln

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) marked a major milestone in her Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 5 August 2014. Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), installed the final section of the ship's main mast, the 38-foot upper mast section. The last section of the mast, weighing 33 tons, was lifted in sequence by two cranes. The shipyard's 310-ton gantry crane lifted the mast section onto the flight deck, and then a mobile crane on the flight deck lifted the section into its final position on the mast. The mast, when erected, is too tall for the 310-ton gantry crane to travel over, so the mobile crane completed the lofty installation. During refurbishment, the original round mast pole was removed and replaced with a modified, tapered square pole to increase strength and keep electrical piping systems enclosed for survivability purposes. The square pole is also larger, which allows for waist high rails and easier access to all areas by internal ladders.

"Today marks another important moment in the
RCOH of USS Abraham Lincoln," said Chris Miner, Newport News' vice president of in-service aircraft carrier programs. "The installation of the ship's mast is an accomplishment that brings the carrier one step closer to completing its complex overhaul-a milestone for both the shipbuilders and the ship's crew, who work diligently together to improve and upgrade this massive vessel. Once complete, the ship will be able to serve the Navy another 25 years." Lincoln's RCOH is 45 percent complete and on track for delivery in October 2016. "The ceremony today highlights the workmanship, ingenuity and tenacity of the shipyard workers, Sailors, and contractors who have poured their hard work and labor into RCOH," said Abraham Lincoln's Commanding Officer, Capt. Karl O. Thomas. "I am inspired by the dedication of every member of the integrated team and their commitment to getting Lincoln back to the fight."

Lincoln arrived at Newport News in March 2013 to begin the RCOH process. During the carrier's RCOH, the shipyard refuels the ship's reactors, paints the ship's hull, modernizes systems and performs a complete recapitalization of the entire ship. This process produces a recapitalized carrier capable of supporting current and future warfare doctrine. Once the RCOH is complete, Lincoln will continue to operate in the U.S. Navy fleet for another 25 years. Huntington Ingalls Industries designs, builds and manages the life-cycle of the most complex nuclear and conventionally powered ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard. For more than a century, HII's Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. HII also provides engineering and project management services expertise to the commercial energy industry, the Department of Energy and other government customers. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs more than 39,000 people operating both domestically and internationally"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140807-23 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:16:00 PM - From Newport News Shipbuilding and USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Save Navy $6 Million

 

“The efforts of the PM13 deck removal team aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) have shaved nearly $6 million off the cost of the ship's Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH). At a cake cutting ceremony on 6 August 2014 to celebrate 100 percent completion of tile removal, Lincoln's Commanding Officer, Capt. Karl O. Thomas, showered praise upon the men and women who make up the team.

"Thank you very much for your hard work on reaching this milestone," Thomas said. "It is because of your efforts that we are able to stay ahead of schedule and get the ship back to the fight." The
PM13 team consists of Sailors reassigned from departments throughout the ship who prepare the steel subfloors on the ship for re-tiling. Many of them had never used tools such as sledge hammers, pneumatic and electrical demolition hammers and deck crawlers needed to complete the arduous tasks.

The team started the project in Nov. 2012. Originally,
PM13 only removed tile and furniture from the steel subfloors in preparation for the installation of new furniture and flooring. In April 2014 the PM13 team took on the additional task of removing studs and equipment foundations welded to the deck, all in preparation for new equipment and tile installation.

Lincoln
Chief Engineer Cmdr. Vincent Janowiak estimates the Navy saved millions of tax payer dollars simply by having Sailors work in areas such as PM13. "In addition to the cost savings, what we are really doing is ensuring the success of the (RCOH) project," Janowiak said. "Every time the ship's force is asked to take on another task we always get the job done and we do it with pride and professionalism." Over the course of the project, PM13 Sailors met many milestones including accomplishing portions of the RCOH project 18 months ahead of schedule.

"Applying a culture of starting tasks early enabled the team to finish 18 months ahead of any other previous
RCOH carrier," said PM13's Division officer, Chief Warrant Officer Three Christopher Smith. Lincoln is the fifth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier to undergo RCOH. Despite working around a labyrinth of hoses, temporary wiring, replacement parts and material, one of the biggest challenges may have been accomplishing their milestones without disrupting other shipyard activities.

"
PM13 leadership worked with Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, and various contractors to coordinate all work between the ship's force and shipyard workers throughout the process of deck removal," Smith said. "This accomplishment allowed other work throughout the ship to continue without interference"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140807-27 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:25:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Capt. Karl O. Thomas, outgoing commanding officer of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), relinquishes command with a salute to Rear Adm. Troy

 

140807-N-DH811-077 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Aug. 7,2014) Capt. Karl O. Thomas, outgoing commanding officer of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), relinquishes command with a salute to Rear Adm. Troy "Mike" Shoemaker, commander of Naval Air Force Atlantic, during the ship's change of command ceremony at Victory Landing, Newport News, Va., Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Benjamin T. Liston/Released)

 

Lincoln Welcomes New Commander

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) held a change of command ceremony on 7 August 2014 at Victory Landing Park in Newport News, Virginia. Capt. Ronald L. Ravelo assumed command from his brother-in-law Capt. Karl O. Thomas. "This may be the first time that (one family member) has taken command from another," said guest speaker, Rear Adm. Troy M. Shoemaker, commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic. Ravelo's sister, Junifer, is married to Thomas. In his remarks, Shoemaker praised Thomas for the success of his command and stated his expectations of the new commanding officer of Lincoln.

 

"I've had the privilege to observe (Thomas') bold, decisive leadership style in the crucible of a Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH)," Shoemaker said. "He has consistently provided clear guidance and direction to the entire project team and all are focused on integrity, accountability and safely achieving a common goal." During the ceremony, Thomas gave the credit for his success to his crew. "This crew has created a culture of Sailors taking care of Sailors," Thomas said. "As a result, we have enjoyed tremendous success."

Thomas, a native of northern Virginia, assumed command of Lincoln in August 2012 after the ship's last deployment and delivered her to Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries for her 42 month overhaul. Through
his guidance and perseverance, Lincoln has set a new standard for ships in RCOH, reaching milestones well ahead of schedule and preparing her for her return back to the fleet.

 

His next assignment will be commanding officer, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70).
Another unique and historic aspect of
Lincoln's change of command is the fact that Ravelo is the first Filipino-American to command an aircraft carrier in the U.S. Navy.
"My father is a retired chief storekeeper," Ravelo said. "He left his family and friends to join the Navy and settle in America. I well up with pride for the Filipino community, but this is not any more special than any of the other Americans around us today."

Ravelo most recently served as commanding officer of USS
Comstock (LSD-45). He shared his excitement to command the Lincoln crew and his admiration of their accomplishments under Thomas. "I assure you, your legacy is intact as (we) step up and continue the fine heritage that you have set in motion," Ravelo said. Ravelo recognizes that he will not lead alone, but respects the crew that will finish RCOH during his time as commanding officer. "The real national treasure and the key to our success is the 500 Sailors you see gathered in ranks around us who represent the 2,500 crew members of Lincoln and the 3,000 shipbuilders of Newport News Shipbuilding," Ravelo said. "I am and will always be committed to giving you the tools you need to succeed"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140807-26 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:24:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailor Uses Science and Ingenuity to Save Navy $160,000

 

As reported on 21 August 2014, “Sailors join the Navy for a variety of reasons. For one Sailor it was as simple as following in a parent's footsteps. Fire Controlman 2nd Class Bryan Taylor, an Ozark, Alabama native, joined the Navy in 2008 to see the world.

"Like my father did," Taylor said. Taylor arrived on board
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in November 2009 after completing his initial training at Advanced Combat Direction System School. Taylor deployed with Lincoln twice (September 2010 to March 2011 and December 2011 to August 2012) including a world tour; visiting countries such as Thailand, Dubai and Turkey.

During Taylor's first deployment, he was promoted to second class petty officer, earned his Surface Warfare pin and was awarded a Flag Letter of Commendation by Rear Adm. Troy Shoemaker. "I attribute my success to my hard work and dedication," Taylor said. "Deployments are no joke. I was working 12 to 14 hour days six days a week."

 

Success didn't stop after deployment. He moved on to work for the Gold Disk Program, a Navy-wide initiative designed to save money. When Lincoln pulled into Newport News Shipbuilding to begin her Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) in March 2013, Taylor was sent to Naval Undersea Warfare Center in the St. Julian's Annex in Portsmouth, Virginia to begin working for the Gold Disk Program where he would eventually save the Navy $160,000.00.

"I am currently a 2M (miniature/micro)/ MTR (Module Test and Repair) technician repairing circuit cards and creating test routines (gold disks) for the Navy to save money throughout the fleet," Taylor said. The Navy developed the
Gold Disk Program to save money and time by reducing costs and turnaround time for repairs. Within this program, Taylor created a process to narrow down the technical issue from an entire circuit board to a single component, which reduces the replacement cost from $10,000 to 20 cents.

In addition to component costs, Taylor's efforts in this project have also saved the Navy hundreds of man-hours that would have been required to remove and replace the circuit boards. For his accomplishments, he recently received the Chief of Naval Operations Gold Disk Award for May 2014 which included a Letter of Commendation and a $1,000.00 cash award.

"I'm glad to have the time I've contributed at
work equate to hundreds of thousands of dollars saved by the Navy; it's a great feeling," Taylor said” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140821-16 - Release Date: 8/21/2014 4:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Young, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Decking Team Slated to Save Navy Nearly $4.6 Million

 

As reported on 6 October 2014, “as USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) approaches its next phase in the Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH), personnel from the decking team (PM-13) are saving the Navy $4.6 million by assuming the task of repairing the ship's hangar bay ceiling.

With 2,000 square feet of corrosion control and prevention complete, one-third of
Lincoln's hangar bay is now ready for the lagging installation process.

According to
PM-13 Division officer, Chief Warrant Officer Christopher Smith, by taking on this job the PM-13 team is saving the Navy nearly $4.6 million in labor, equipment costs and manpower.

"The ship's force's initiative taking on the overhead task is a perfect scenario for
PM-13 and V-3 Sailors to collectively work towards a completion of a goal while saving Lincoln's RCOH contractor cost $4.6 million for all three hangar bays," Smith said.

To meet their September 2015 deadline,
PM-13 currently maintains their already-large workload of deck rehabilitation with eight Sailors on a rotating schedule assigned to the hangar bay ceiling project.

"It's a lot of work. It's a grueling process at times, but to see the result of the work we do every day is a reward in itself," said
PM-13 assistant lead petty officer Aviation Boatswains' Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Josie Marks. "It's our ship and we're helping to rebuild her in support of our mission"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141006-10 - Release Date: 10/6/2014 9:11:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Beginning to Move Aboard

 

“50 Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began the first steps toward the crew move-aboard on 23 October 2014 when they loaded Inport Emergency Team (IET) and Reactor Department berthing accomodations onto the ship.

"It all works into the process of getting the ship where it needs to be which, in the scheme of things, helps us make progress getting through the
Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and back to where the ship needs to be," said Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Roderick Jessamy, the readiness leading chief petty officer.

The 50 Sailors loaded approximately 40 pallets of berthing material onto the ship and stacked mattresses to be moved into the berthing for IET and Reactor department duty section personnel.


The purpose of the move-aboard is to decrease delays in both IET's response to a shipboard casualty and
Reactor's response to a reactor casualty.

"It benefits Sailors because it eliminates difficulties caused by a situation where IET is needed on the ship immediately and has to transit from the Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) to the ship," said Aviation Electronics Technician Chief Nathan Cork. "It makes handling and preventing emergencies much easier."

Sailors worked hard to move the materials onto the ship efficiently and safely. The working party was divided into sections to accomplish tasks relating to the berthing on-load.

"I'm very happy for the turnout, I got all of my 50 people," Jessamy said. "It shows
that we are motivated and we are interested in what is going on with the ship. We can be teammates when we are allied to achieve our Lincoln mission"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141028-20 - Release Date: 10/28/2014 8:54:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Ashley Raine Northen, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) transits to a neighboring pier during a flooding dry dock and undocking evolution.

 

141103-N-IK431-181 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Nov. 03, 2014) The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transits to a neighboring pier during a flooding dry dock and undocking evolution. Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aaron T. Kiser/Released)

 

About 500 shipbuilders assisted with the undocking of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) on Monday. Lincoln was moved from a dry dock to an outfitting berth at Newport News Shipbuilding, where its refueling and complex overhaul will be completed. Photo by Ricky Thompson/HII

 

About 500 shipbuilders assisted with the undocking of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on Monday. Lincoln was moved from a dry dock to an outfitting berth at Newport News Shipbuilding, where its refueling and complex overhaul will be completed. Photo by Ricky Thompson/HII. Newport News, Virginia – 3 November 2014.

 

US Navy Aircraft Carrier Leaves Drydock

 

“With tugboats guiding it into the James River, the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln was moved from one of Newport News Shipbuilding’s drydocks to an outfitting berth on Monday. With this move, Newport News, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) (HII), officially completed the drydock portion of the carrier’s mid-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), the company announced two days late, November 5, 2014 3:21 PM release.

Video of undocking:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QcHoBNo8rc

 

Now at Outfitting Berth 1, the carrier will undergo final outfitting and testing.

“The end of the drydock portion of the RCOH marks a significant milestone in the life of an aircraft carrier,” said Chris Miner, Newport News’ vice president of in-service aircraft carrier programs. “With Lincoln in the water, shipbuilders and sailors can focus on the final restoration, outfitting and testing of the ship’s systems. Moving her to the outfitting berth marks the point when the crew move aboard process begins and we bring the ship back to life.”

During the drydock phase of the
RCOH, Lincoln underwent extensive repair and construction work both inside and out to revamp the ship. Inside, Newport News shipbuilders re-preserved hundreds of tanks and replaced thousands of valves, pumps and piping components. On the outside, they painted the ship’s hull, updated the propeller shafts and installed refurbished propellers.

For these last 24 months before the carrier’s redelivery, shipbuilders will finish up the overhaul and installation of the ship’s major components and test its systems. Shipbuilders must make sure that the electronics, combat and propulsion systems are all operational before the carrier is re-delivered to the Navy in 2016. These final months will also be dedicated to modernizing the ship’s living quarters and making them habitable for the sailors as they move aboard. The first group of sailors began moving into the living spaces on 23 October 2014” (Ref. Marine Link - By Eric Haun, November 5, 2014 & NEWPORT NEWS, Va.,
November 5, 2014 3:21 PM (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)).

 

Lincoln Leaves Drydock

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was returned to the water on 3 November 2014, nearly two years after entering the dry dock at Newport News Shipyard, Va.

The undocking of the ship is a significant milestone in the
Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) process.

According to a 2002 study by the Research and Development National Defense Institute, "The midlife
RCOH of a nuclear aircraft carrier may be the most challenging engineering and industrial task undertaken anywhere."

"Flood dry-dock and undock are called key events, but from the perspective of the crew, it is very significant in what it represents," said Capt. Ronald Ravelo,
Lincoln commanding officer, "It's the moment we go from looking more like a building back to being a united states ship."

Up next for
Lincoln is the transition from the "rip-out" phase to the "rebuilding" phase. In the coming months Lincoln Sailors will begin the internal rebuilding of the ship. During this process spaces will be painted, furniture will be installed, and compartment will receive finishing touches as the crew continues preparations to make Lincoln a warship that will be redelivered to the fleet.

"The ship went from being tugged from Norfolk Naval Station, put into dry dock, to back in the water floating and this is the first time we have been so since the very first stages of
RCOH," Ravelo said” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141104-04 - Release Date: 11/4/2014 11:08:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Gary A. Prill, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Sailors Pause to Focus on Safety

 

“Sailors assigned to the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) took time to stop and talk about the upcoming holiday season and different ways to stay safe during a safety standdown at the Hampton Roads Convention Center on 4 November 2014.

Capt. Ronald Ravelo,
Lincoln's commanding officer, addressed the crew about some of the different ways in which the holidays can be tough on Sailors, and that they are not alone.

"It is hard enough being away from home and family throughout the year, but the holidays make you miss home that much more," said Airman Hannah Vernooy. "It was great to hear about the programs set in place to make Sailors feel more at home through the holiday period."

Among the topics covered during the stand-down, some of them include: avoiding driving under the influence (DUI), sexual assault prevention, domestic abuse prevention
, suicide awareness and prevention and other general tips to help Sailors enjoy their holidays safely.

"There was a lot of good information put out at this safety stand-down," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Airman Samantha Yates.

Along with safety tips, information was put out on the progression of
Lincoln and Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), and what Sailors can expect in the months moving forward.

"We are back in the water now," Vernooy said. "I know that the entire crew has been working hard and putting in the man hours, and we are really starting to see it pay off"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS141106-25 - Release Date: 11/6/2014 8:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NORFOLK (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Receive Command Ball Caps

 

“Leadership of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began issuing newly-authorized command ball caps to its Sailors on 14 November 2014.

Command ball caps were authorized for wear Navywide with the Navy Working Uniform by the chief of naval personnel in NAVADMIN 200/14, effective Sept. 1.

Though the addition of this optional uniform item may seem insignificant, it holds a deeper meaning to the Sailors. The reinstatement of the command ball caps brings a sense of tradition to
Lincoln Sailors, especially the more seasoned Sailors aboard.

"I feel like having these command ball caps is going back to tradition," said Chief Ship's Serviceman Geanice Huff. "Back when we used to wear utilities, we would wear ball caps, and it's good to see us getting back to that."

Chief Logistics Specialist Damon Hankins believed that these ball caps give Sailors a greater sense of Navy pride, and were indicative of the ship's ultimate mission.

"These ball caps symbolize what it means to be in the Navy," Hankins said. "These are a change, and we'
re always changing. At some point we will be moving out of the [ship] yard, and when you put this cover on, it means you're ready to fight."

Hankins is also optimistic about how the crew will respond to the debut of the new ball caps. "However, because these aren't mandatory to wear, I believe the crew will be more receptive to wearing them."

Sailors are taught to take pride in their appearance, especially while in uniform. Hankins believes that by wearing the command ball cap, Sailors feel not only a sense of pride in their command, but
in themselves as well.

"When I wear my eight-point cover, I'm still a chief," Huff said. "To anybody looking at me, I'm just a chief. It gives me a sense of pride to wear the command ball cap, because anybody looking at me could say 'that's a Sailor from the Lincoln.' That means a lot, because I'm proud of being at this command."

For more information regarding proper wear of the command ball cap, refer to NAVADMIN 200/14” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS141119-09 - Release Date: 11/19/2014 2:19:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Receive Hose-Handling Training

 

“Loud voices boom and charged hoses spray from the fantail of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 17 November 2014, as Sailors received training on hose-handling procedures.

Chief petty officers and first class petty officers from the In-port Emergency Team (IET) gathered around a live hose during a fire simulation. Chief Navy Counselor Yenier Ramirez, Damage Control Training Team (DCCT) lead, looked as Sailors shout the command, "Relieve the nozzleman."

Ramirez explained that the key to being mission ready is being prepared for any casualty that may arise.

"It's been a long time since we've had a real threat of a fire," said Ramirez. "I want my duty section to get a realization of how powerful a fully-charged hose truly is so
that nobody is surprised when we do have to fight a fire."

Aviation Technician 1st Class Shelldon Hunter, a member of duty section eight's IET, also recognized the significance of drills such as this hose-handling evolution.

"These types of drills are important because we are all responsible for taking care of the ship," said Hunter. "Part of our responsibility is understanding and being prepared for any situation."

Ramirez takes mission-readiness as a personal responsibility, and has made it his personal mission to keep his duty section prepared.

"Being prepared is the key to being successful," he
said. " 'You fight as you train, and you train as you fight'"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141119-18 - Release Date: 11/19/2014 8:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

New Ombudsmen Join the Lincoln Team

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) received three new ombudsmen and one recertified ombudsman on 19 November 2014

Jessica Pugh, Cailla Impelido-Dayoan, Toni Eckert and Danielle Campbell graduated from the Ombudsman Program at the Newport News Fleet and Family Center, certifying them as the official
Lincoln ombudsmen.

An ombudsman is a volunteer trained to offer support to families of Sailors and is the official liaison between the commanding officer and families of his Sailors. During a crisis the ombudsman provide the family with necessary resources.

"These ladies are going to be your direct voice to me," said Capt. Ronald Ravelo, Lincoln's commanding officer. "The ombudsman program was started in 1970 by our then Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Elmo Zumwalt. He conceived a program where he recognized a way by which our Sailors' families' voices could be heard by the command leadership."

Prospective ombudsmen
receive training that ensures they have all the tools available to them to assist the needs of Lincoln families.

"The training was very informative, we learned about a lot of resources to help the families and direct them to where they need to be," said Toni Eckert. "It also gave me a lot of insight into how different organizations work, what they do and what we have to do as ombudsmen for the families and Sailors."

The new ombudsmen chose to volunteer for these positions in the command to help out Sailors and to better understand the way Navy programs operate.

"I became an ombudsman because I wanted to provide a service to our Sailors and
their families," said Jessica Pugh. "With me becoming an Ombudsman I can help do that and help them with any need they may have. I just have a desire to work with people and this is something that I have wanted to do."

Because the ombudsmen are the direct link between Sailors' families and the command, they have a responsibility to understand both the needs of families and the commitments Sailors have to the command.

"The thing I am looking forward to most is being able to help the families," said Cailla Impelido-Dayoan. "I just wanted to be
able to provide all of the important information to everybody"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141125-12 - Release Date: 11/25/2014 9:05:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Ashley Raine Northen, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Makes the First Call

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted its first internal phone call using the Integrated Voice Network (IVN) since Lincoln's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 20 November 2014. Capt. Ronald Ravelo, commanding officer, Abraham Lincoln, received the call from Lincoln's RCOH Program Manager Bruce Easterson from a separate location inside the ship.

"This is one small step for the project and one large step for the project-kind," Ravelo said, adding that it was wonderful to enter into a compartment and immediately notice the significant changes that have been accomplished.

The space containing one of three nodes to operate the full system began its reconstruction back in 2012 when
Lincoln first started the RCOH process. In order to install the IVN system, Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) workers had to remove the legacy system and replace it with the latest technology.

"It is nice to have the IVN system operational," said Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Paul Johnson who arrived aboard
Abraham Lincoln in August 2012 and witnessed the transformation of the J-Dial system to the new IVN system as it went through the process of construction and light-off.

According to Easterson, having a third of the IVN system operational is another in the string of milestones
Lincoln has successfully achieved since the RCOH execution phase started back in March 2013. "This is a significant milestone because it's the first step towards bringing this major communication system to operational status," Easterson said. "We're very proud of the Navy, Newport News Shipbuilding and vendor cooperation that made this possible."

Along with the installation of the IVN system, the NNS team working on the project also took steps to make the space containing this equipment less constricted and easier to work in during construction. The NNS team finished the space in record time, completing the project four months ahead of schedule.

"When Lincoln
pulled into Newport News, the space had already been gutted during the Smart Start phase," said Floyd Shelton, Lincoln's RCOH construction manager. "We were ready to install the IVN system, the cables, put in new foundations and update the power systems at arrival at NNS."

Chief Interior Communications Cindy Lambert reflected on the teamwork involved to complete her space transformation. "I am very proud of the hard work done by Newport News Shipbuilding"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS141125-28 - Release Date: 11/25/2014 3:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

 

Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) activities at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

(1 January to 31 December 2014).

Part I of II - 1 January to 19 November 2014

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4