2014 Articles not related to Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH)

Chapter III, Appendix II

Part I of II - 1 January to 31 December 2014

 

 

Lincoln Receives AFFF, Increases Ship's Firefighting Capabilities

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began moving tanks of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) on board the ship on 14 January 2015, achieving another key milestone in moving the ship out of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

AFFF is an extinguishing agent used for fire suppression. AFFF provides a layer of foam which prevents the escape of fuel vapors and excludes oxygen from fuel source while providing limiting cooling effect. AFFF is the primary firefighting agent used in combating petroleum fires, also known as Class B fires.

Moving AFFF on board is an important step to increasing the ship's readiness, and the Sailors assigned to
Abraham Lincoln's Engineering Department set aside time before the evolution to ensure that the on load went as planned.

"Prior to the evolution, we had Sailors conduct an analysis on all 10,000 gallons of the AFFF in storage at the DC warehouse," said Damage Controlman 1st Class Kent Crouch, the team leader. "Basically, the purpose of this analysis is to check for water or other contaminants in the AFFF concentrate. If there are contaminants in the concentrate, then the AFFF is unsatisfactory."

AFFF is an integral part of shipboard firefighting, and is the main firefighting agent aboard
Abraham Lincoln.

Crouch explained the importance of restoring firefighting capabilities aboard the ship.

"Our main goal for this evolution is to prepare the sprinklers and a couple stations," Crouch said. "Also to bring the fire systems for our main spaces back to life."

Damage Controlman 3rd Class Anthony J. Nobel, a safety observer for the evolution, had only positive things to say about the ship's progress through the
RCOH.

"As far as top side production is concerned, we're about 20 percent ahead of schedule, and this evolution is pushing us along even further," Nobel said. "This is just the first step, and we have no plans of slowing down” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS150126-04 - Release Date: 1/26/2015 8:08:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Commanding Officer Holds All-Hands Call

 

“Capt. Ron Ravelo, commanding officer of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), held a two-day all hands call for Lincoln Sailors at Naval Station Norfolk, V a. from 21 to 22 January 2015.

Ravelo addressed the collective 2,300 Sailors about the positive progress that
Lincoln is making, as well as the evolution of every Sailor's respective roles as they move into the final stages of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

This March,
Abraham Lincoln will mark its second year of its overhaul at Newport News Shipyard with a planned completion date in October 2016. During the all-hands call, Ravelo highlighted the pride he has for his crew who are dedicated to returning Lincoln to sea.

"Every day I look forward to arriving to work and in doing so, I am encouraged by the energy, commitment and resiliency of my Sailors," said Ravelo.

Ravelo also stressed bystander intervention as a point of importance throughout the all-hands call, and had members of the Coalition for Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) speak to the crew.


"You are all shipmates, whether on watch or off duty," said Chief Fire Controlman Bethany Ross,
Lincoln's CSADD senior enlisted advisor. "The same way you wouldn't let a shipmate walk into a dangerous area, is the way you should act when you see a shipmate pick up their keys after a night of drinking."

Additionally, Ravelo reiterated the importance of damage control, firefighting, warfare designations and advancement exam preparation.

Ravelo also gave his Sailors words of encouragement and recognized their hard work.

"Ordinary Sailors doing extraordinary things, that's you guys," Ravelo said. "That's what I see out of this group, day in and day out"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS150126-12 - Release Date: 1/26/2015 12:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NORFOLK (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Conducts Integrated Fire Drill with Newport News Shipbuilding Fire Department

 

“Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in an integrated fire drill alongside the Newport News Shipbuilding Fire Department (NNSFD) on 22 January 2015 to test the two team's response time and cooperation.

"This training is extremely important while the ship is docked in Newport News Shipbuilding. It allowed the two teams to coordinate the response times and a procedure in the event a fire occurs," said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Kevin Davis.

Abraham Lincoln's In Port Emergency Team responded first by setting boundaries and combating the simulated class alpha fire.

"The In Port Emergency Team did a great job responding in a timely manner and controlling the fire until the Newport News Fire Department arrived and took control of the fire," said Davis. "The turnover between the two times was excellent and built a great working relationship with the two parties."

NNSFD responds to all casualties (fire, flooding, and medical) onboard
Lincoln. In the case of a fire, once notified, the response time is fast enough that NNSFD can provide hose team relief at the scene of the fire.

The objective of these drills, added Davis, is to help teach both the Sailors and the Fire Department how to rapidly respond to casualties, while also learning to work together to overcome the obstacles in front of them” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS150202-17 - Release Date: 2/2/2015 1:11:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Paul Manukin, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln's Safety Department Replacing Disposable Ear Plugs with Permanent Ear Plugs

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) have a new item to go along with the uniform of the day. Lincoln's Safety Department began issuing personal ear plugs that will permanently replace old disposable ear plugs on 26 January 2015.

"By issuing ear plugs and making it a part of Sailor's uniform, we hope it will drive the efforts and overall effect of thinking safety first," said Information Systems Technician 1st Class Dwayne Lewis, one of
Lincoln's safety supervisors.

The idea to replace the disposable ear plugs was suggested from the deck plates.

"It was a collective decision. We took a look at the numbers and decided issuing Sailors ear plugs will help save the ship money," said Lewis, who added the ship has found innovative ways to save money in the past by using Sailors' ideas, with this being no exception.

Lt. Cmdr. Scott Dunn,
Lincoln's assistant safety officer and industrial hygiene officer said while issuing Sailors their own ear plugs will save money, it also reminds our crew of the ship and shipyard hazards.

"Wearing hearing protection in an industrial environment is critical to maintaining healthy hearing," said Dunn. "Your hearing is a key to quality of life and needs to be protected"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS150203-11 - Release Date: 2/3/2015 4:34:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Evan Parker, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Use Talent and Tenacity to Restore ACA during RCOH

 

As reported on 3 March 2015, “six decks below the hangar bay, three Sailors from Auxiliary division have spent countless hours completing the task of restoring air conditioning to the aft end of the ship. This is the most recent Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) milestone, known as Air Conditioning Aft (ACA), and is a major step in getting USS Abraham Lincoln back in the fight and fully mission capable.

The goal of ACA was to restore ship's air conditioning and supporting systems back up on the aft part of the ship. This four-month evolution is important to support follow-on milestones. AC's will provide electronic cooling to eventually support combat systems testing in addition to ensuring crew comfort in work spaces. ACA is a milestone for
RCOH that will support Shore Steaming and Crew Move-Aboard (CMA).

Chief Machinist's Mate Anthony Robbins described Fireman Michael Prevost as "Johnny on the Spot", Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Jeffrey Hartman as the shop's "technical expert", and Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Robert Wooten as the "workhorse". Clearly, they are filling three vital roles in the installation of the ACA.

Teamwork was an important element in the success of this complicated evolution that was made up of many moving parts and players.

"This whole process was helped along by Newport News and our contractors, who took the
time to teach these guys," Robbins said. "We've got contractors who've been doing this for decades, and having them here teaching us how to do things was a valuable tool to have."

The process of restoring the air conditioning plants has helped inexperienced Sailors get valuable time gaining hands on training with the equipment.

"When I first came in, I was a little lost because I came in the middle of the evolution," Prevost said. "As I started working with the guys more, I got more involved and started understanding it."

Robbins attributed much of his
on the job training to Hartman, who is no stranger to playing the "supervisor" role.

"I brought a lot of technical expertise from being the only one in the shop that saw this on deployment. It was beneficial for me to have the knowledge base of being able to teach these guys what they're looking at and accomplishing, when doing these jobs," Hartman said.

Prevost, as an undesignated fireman assigned to the Engineering Department, specifically benefitted from this training and his hard work has caught the attention of his fellow Sailors.

"I want Prevost to pick up
machinist's mate," Hartman said. "He's one of the hardest charging firemen I've seen in a long time."

Paired with the timeliness and enthusiasm of Prevost, and Hartman's technical knowledge, Wooten's hard work started to get the ball rolling.

"Wooten has been an absolute workhorse," Robbins said. "He was the guy responsible for getting all of our pumps back after they were overhauled; he was the guy most involved in that aspect of the evolution, and he's doing a fantastic job."

The trio's teamwork, perseverance and leadership fueled the progress of the evolution, keeping them ahead of schedule and on pace to get the Lincoln back into the fight.

"Here in
AC&R, we operate together, because we're a family," Hartman said. "In my opinion, there's no better shop to be in, as far as camaraderi"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS150303-29 - Release Date: 3/3/2015 3:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Sailors Assigned to Lincoln's Air Department Save Navy $4.6 million in Manpower Costs

 

As reported on 23 March 2015, “Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Air Department have performed a variety of tasks during the ship's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) in Newport News to return the Abraham Lincoln to sea under budget and on time.

Having already removed old lagging material from the ceiling of hangar bays 1, 2 and 3,
Air Department is in the process of installing new materials which has a direct savings of more than $4.6 million in man hour costs.

This installation process began just prior to
Lincoln's upcoming two-year anniversary of its arrival into Newport News Shipbuilding. Lincoln arrived at the shipyard on March 28, 2013. "Tearing down and replacing the lagging in the hangar bays is a huge task that V-3 Division of Air Department is tackling head-on," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Joseph Dennison, V-3 Division's leading petty officer. "It is a job that our Sailors are learning on the fly, but they are doing incredible work and keeping a great attitude while doing it."

Air Department consists of five divisions and more than 460 Sailors.
Air Department's mission moving forward is to get all of their personnel trained as professional Sailors and complete maintenance and repairs necessary to prepare for crew move-aboard. "The Sailors in Air Department have always had a great work ethic and a positive outlook towards being in the yards," said Lt. Jonathan Kindel, Air Department's V-4 Division officer. "The work they do isn't the most glamorous or rewarding, but they always manage to keep a great attitude while doing quality work."

Dennison echoed Kindel's assessment of Sailors assigned to
Air Department and is proud of the work they are performing to return Lincoln to sea. "I am very proud to be part of Air Department aboard Lincoln," Dennison said, "They are a big reason we have the best warship in the Navy." During RCOH Sailors assigned to Air Department are responsible for rebuilding Lincoln, but also stay focused on eventually returning to sea. "We are taking a ship that is 25 years old and working with Newport News Shipbuilding to build a ship that will last 25 more years," said Kindel.

"When we leave the yards, things will pick up and it's important to be ahead of the curve and have our personnel trained and ready for what lies ahead"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS150323-12 - Release Date: 3/23/2015 4:09:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Sailors and Newport News Shipbuilding Participate in Project Team Development Meeting

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) attended an Integrated Project Team Development Step V meeting at Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Hampton on 27 March 2015, alongside their counterparts at Newport News Shipbuilding and Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair. The team-building meeting, held at Bayview Commonwealth Center, was the fifth event of its kind held to discuss the major milestones to be obtained throughout the remaining complete Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) period. USS Abraham Lincoln first arrived into Newport News Shipbuilding on March 28, 2013 for its mid-life availability and just marked its second official year in the shipyard.

Capt. Ron Ravelo, commanding officer,
USS Abraham Lincoln, addressed the attendees highlighting not only what lies ahead for the crew and shipyard to obtain, but also emphasized how team work, tenacity and a winning attitude can assist in reaching the objective - returning USS Abraham Lincoln to the fleet by the fall of 2016. "I told my crew it's about the win, having a winning attitude going into RCOH and maintaining that winning attitude coming out of RCOH," said Ravelo, who discussed the unique aspect of the various crews that have contributed to the RCOH process. "During the entire 44-month RCOH period three distinct crews will have served aboard USS Abraham Lincoln."

The first two crews performed a specific mission, which was to rip-out and refurbish the ship, but the third crew will be tasked with rebuilding the ship and returning
USS Abraham Lincoln to the fleet. RCOH Program Manager Bruce Easterson also spoke about the unique team-building experience attendees can gain by their participation at the team-building meeting. He also emphasized the importance of passing information learned today to the deckplates charged with completing RCOH.

"What we do here today needs to be passed down to the deckplates," said Easterson, who added that as a "team we can respect what we have accomplished, evaluate where we are, and be optimistic about the future." During the first two years of
Lincoln's RCOH period key systems were modernized, such as aircraft launch and recovery equipment, aircraft handling, aircraft fueling and servicing, and weapons handling and storage; command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, reconnaissance and surveillance systems.

In the third year of the overhaul,
USS Abraham Lincoln will complete the massive task of hangar bay preservation and restoration, island structure modifications, completion of major combat systems installation and other key areas of modernization"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS150330-15 - Release Date: 3/30/2015 1:39:00 PM - By Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Cragg, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, HAMPTON, Va. (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Installs Catapult Covers, Marks Another RCOH Milestone

 

“Another step towards the completion of the Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) was achieved on 18 May 2015 when the covers for catapult one were installed on the flight deck of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).

The installation of the covers lasted three days and was performed by Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS). Getting the four catapults back to an operational state is the current focus of
Lincoln's Air Department.

"The biggest advantage to the covers being installed is that it gives our junior Sailors a chance to see what the catapults look like once they're back together," said Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate Larry Pugh,
V-2 Division's maintenance chief. "We've been able to go up to the flight deck and actually have them put eyes on what we've been trying to explain to them."

The catapult covers on an aircraft carrier bridge the catapult trough to provide a smooth, continuous flight deck and provide support for the shuttle that launches aircraft. They also provide a channel for the grab that retrieves the shuttle after a launch. With the catapult covers in the process of being installed,
Lincoln's flight deck now has more space and a new look.

"The metal sheds covering the catapult were removed to facilitate the trough cover installation," Cmdr. Timothy Tippett,
Lincoln's Air Boss said. "It is a visible change to the flight deck and it gives Lincoln the look of a true aircraft carrier rather than a ship under construction."

The catapult overhaul process started at the very beginning of the
RCOH, and Lincoln is scheduled to start catapult testing this fall. "With the covers being installed it is allowing NNS to perform critical alignment tests," Pugh said.

Lincoln's Air Department has already saved more than $8 million in man-hours and parts by recycling parts from the decommissioned USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and removing and replacing old lagging on the ceiling of hangar bays 1, 2, and 3. These are just some examples of the hard work they have been putting in throughout the RCOH process.

"
Air Department has worked tirelessly to restore their spaces and equipment throughout the ship during this RCOH process," Tippett said. "They have dedicated themselves towards getting Lincoln out of the yards on time and their hard work is paying off and is not going unnoticed. I couldn't be more proud of my Sailors"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS150526-07 - Release Date: 5/26/2015 11:22:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Installs Primary Air Search Radar, another RCOH Milestone Achieved

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Newport News Shipbuilding's shipyard workers reached another milestone during the current Refueling Complex and Overhaul (RCOH) on 5 May 2015, successfully reinstalling the ship's AN/SPS-48 primary air search radar antenna on Lincoln's island.

Sailors and shipyard workers teamed up together to complete the two-day installation, assembling the components the first day and lifting the radar to the island the following day.

"Installing the radar on time is one of the most important measures taken in the refueling and complex overhaul process," said Lt. Loudon Westgard, a division officer assigned to the
Combat Systems Department. "This was a major accomplishment, and the shipyard workers and Sailors aboard Lincoln should be very proud of the progress they are making."

The AN/SPS-48 is a long-range, three-dimensional air search radar that allows for 360 degrees of coverage and the ability to detect the height of a target above the surface of the water. The radar system was deployed in the 1960s as the primary air search sensor for anti-aircraft warships and is the predecessor of the AEGIS system used currently on other Navy ships.

The SPS-48 antenna is now the second antenna to be installed on the
Lincoln's island, which was enlarged during the overhaul. Over the next few months the Combat Systems Department along with Newport News Shipbuilding will continue to install additional antennas for navigational, communications and aircraft landing functions.

"Our goal as a department is to get the equipment back on board and return the
Lincoln back as an operational warship," Westgard said. "The next few months will be a crucial time for us as the ship starts to bring the systems online and begin the testing process"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS150513-01 - Release Date: 5/13/2015 8:50:00 AM - By Mass Communication 3rd Class Ryan L. Wampler, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln Installs Fire Search Radar

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and shipbuilders with Newport News Shipbuilding successfully reinstalled the SPQ-9 and AN/SPS-10 surface search Radio Detection and Ranging on the ship's mast on 13 May 2015, reaching another key milestone during the current Refueling and Complex Overhaul.

This evolution is a part of the continuing effort to reinstall combat systems equipment and get
Lincoln ready to return to the fleet.

"These RADAR systems provide vital functions for safe navigation of the ship," said Lt. Loudon Westgard, a division officer assigned to the
Combat Systems Department. "These RADAR systems are the primary sensors for Surface Warfare."

The AN/SPS-10 is a three-dimensional surface search RADAR that allows for 360 degrees of coverage and is used for the detection, ranging and tracking of surface targets.

In addition to surface search, the SPQ-9 also provides fire control data to the combat system for anti-ship cruise missile defense.

Over the next few months the
Combat Systems Department along with Newport News Shipbuilding will continue to install additional antennas for navigational, communications and aircraft landing functions” (Ref. Story Number: NNS150526-26 - Release Date: 5/26/2015 3:23:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Abraham Lincoln's Engineering Department Continues to Attain Early Shipyard Milestones

 

As reported on 30 July 2015, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Engineering Department, completed the certification process to enable a portion of the ship's collection, holding, and transfer (CHT) system operational this July at Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Virginia.

Lt. Michael Blackwood, who oversees the CHT system aboard Abraham Lincoln, discussed the importance of bringing online this capability ahead of schedule.

"Bringing portions of the CHT system online allows production work to start on the aft galley and mess decks," said Blackwood. "I think we're in good hands and have taken a significant step in the right direction to get the ship operational and back to the fleet."

Hull Maintenance
Technician 1st Class Kennith Malone emphasized the importance of this key system and attaining this milestone.


"Habitability; it's a major milestone in order to get the ship back into a livable condition," said Malone.

With Crew Move Aboard scheduled for February 2016, bringing key systems online is critical to
Lincoln's ongoing Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

"We are significantly ahead of schedule. When it comes to
RCOH we want to get the CHT online in order to take care of the ship's needs," said Malone, who added that the aft portions of CHT from frame 180 aft were online. "The faster we can get them online throughout the ship the less time is spent for people running back and forth to the Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF). It enables people to stay in one work area and not have to go from FAF to ship and back just to eat."

Hull Maintenance Technician 2nd Class Kobi Thurman added that turning on CHT affects the entire ship's
crew.

"Quality of life is the biggest thing that can help affect crew move aboard. We can't have people move onto a ship and not be able to have personal hygiene, showers, heads, and water," said Thurman. "It really allows the comforts of home"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS150730-07 - Release Date: 7/30/2015 11:50:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) attend a mast-stepping ceremony on the flight deck in Newport News, Va.

 

140805-N-GM095-011 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Aug. 5, 2014) Sailors aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) attend a mast-stepping ceremony on the flight deck in Newport News, Va. Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling complex overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rusty Pang/Released)

 

Steam Testing Begins on USS Abraham Lincoln

“Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Newport News Shipbuilding division has
reintroduced steam to the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln to begin final testing of the ship’s steam-powered systems, the company announced in an August 27, 2015 2:41 PM release.

Moored at Outfitting Berth 1 at Newport News,
Lincoln is in the final stages of its mid-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). Shipbuilders and Sailors are beginning to test steam-powered systems on board, including the main engine complex and the electrical generators.

“As steam is reintroduced into
Lincoln’s piping systems and equipment is operated, the ship is truly coming back to life,” said Chris Miner, Newport News’ vice president of in-service aircraft carrier programs. “Once the work and final testing, including sea trials, is complete, Lincoln will be redelivered to the Navy as one of the most technologically advanced Nimitz-class carriers in the fleet.”

Lincoln’s RCOH began on 28 March 2013 at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries in Newport News, Va. The entire process takes about 44 months. Newport News shipbuilders will complete more than 23 million man-hours of maintenance and modernization work preparing Lincoln for its return to the U.S. Navy fleet. The ship is on track to be redelivered in 2016.

Lincoln is the fifth Nimitz-class ship to undergo RCOH, a major life-cycle milestone. Once RCOH is complete, Lincoln will be one of the most modern and technologically advanced Nimitz-class aircraft carriers in the fleet, and will continue to be a vital part of the nation's defense.

 

“We achieved another major milestone recently by establishing shore-steaming capabilities, thanks to my counterparts at Newport News Shipbuilding, but also to the men and women serving aboard USS Abraham Lincoln and many others who all played an important role in accomplishing this feat,” said CAPT Ronald Ravelo, the ship’s commanding officer. For more information about Huntington Ingalls Industries, visit: HII on the web: http://www.huntingtoningalls.com” (Ref. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., April 30, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)).

 

Lincoln Closer to Bringing Flight Deck Back to Life

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) V-2 Division teamed with shipbuilders from Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) to lower power cylinders into catapult one on Lincoln's flight deck in Newport News on 7 October 2015. This is just the most recent milestone Lincoln has reached during its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

"Lowering the launching cylinders is a huge milestone in bringing the catapult back on line," said Chief Warrant Officer Casey Nalley, the aviation launch recovery equipment boatswain aboard
Lincoln. "All four catapults were completely overhauled, including the replacement of 112 tons of trough structure and the peening [reshaping] of each individual cylinder."

According to Nalley, there are two rows of launching engine cylinders aligned in parallel in the catapult trough. The cylinders contain the launching engine pistons and provide an overall length of 325 feet. Each cylinder is twenty-one inches in diameter. The evolution took the effort of practically the entire division.

Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Angelique Truex,
V-2's leading chief petty officer, was impressed by the work and attitude of her Sailors during the evolution. "About 30 Sailors had to be in-sync to lower the cylinder successfully," Truex said. "Everyone was pretty excited to see the catapult being put together. Most of these Sailors are brand new, so it's good for them to see what they actually joined the Navy to do."

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Airman Apprentice Tyleek Harris, assigned to
Lincoln's V-2 Division, was excited to take part in the evolution, knowing the impact it has on Lincoln completing RCOH and getting back to the fleet. "There's still a lot of work to be done," Harris said. "This is a huge step in bringing Lincoln back to a functional warship, and it feels good to be part of it."

Capt. Ron Ravelo, commanding officer aboard
Lincoln, is happy with the work that has been accomplished, but wants his Sailors to continue to push through the RCOH period, and redeliver Lincoln to the fleet.

"This is the first in many steps to bringing the flight deck back to life," Ravelo said. "What air department has accomplished is definitely a highlight of this entire project. Working with NNS we have done a tremendous amount of work up [on the flight deck] and achieved a tremendous amount of success in maintaining our timeline"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS151015-10 - Release Date: 10/15/2015 8:31:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Rob Ferrone, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Takes on Noise-Induced Hazards

 

As reported on 28 October 2015, “As simple as it may sound, noise is one of the most common health hazards to Sailors in the Navy. Whether serving aboard an aircraft carrier during its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) or conducting operations in the middle of the Gulf, Sailors are exposed to noise every day.

According to the Navy Safety Center, in 2014 noise-induced hearing loss was the Navy's number one occupational health expense. The resulting consequences to the Navy from hearing loss include lost time, reduced productivity, military disability settlements and expenses for medical treatment, such as hearing aids. During
RCOH, Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are taking the lead in minimizing noise-induced hazards.

 

A group of Lincoln Sailors assigned to the Deck Department have been trained to apply a special coating of paint on the bulkheads of some of the ship's common areas. This paint is designed to reduce noise and vibration within these spaces and will be evaluated for future use. "The Navy has taken steps forward to reduce noise levels inside the ship in preparation for the arrival of the Joint Strike Fighter squadrons," said Lt. Cmdr. Scott Dunn, assistant safety officer aboard Lincoln.

 

"The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has been working on ways to reduce the impact from flight deck noise on decks below." The Lincoln's noise abatement paint team is leading the way in helping to meet the ONR goals of more noise reduction on board ships. "One of the ways to provide some noise reduction is to coat structural and joiner bulkheads with a special paint that has been reported to reduce noise levels by about five to seven decibels (dB)," Dunn added. "This is a significant reduction. Based on the way we measure noise, about every three dB doubles the noise level.


ONR will come out and will determine the effectiveness of the coatings that
Lincoln Sailors have applied in a majority of the compartments just below the flight deck." The spray the team uses is a sound and vibration dampening paint specifically designed for marine applications. "It's more coating than a paint. It has properties that will dampen the vibrations and noise that transmit through metal bulkheads," said Ens. Joel Newberry, Lincoln's assistant first lieutenant. "The coating is being applied to living and working spaces that are directly affected by the high-level noise caused by flight deck operations."

The ensign said he hopes this procedure will help improve living conditions on the ship for the benefit of the crew. "This procedure helps us make those areas safer and healthier for future
Lincoln Sailors," he added, referencing the decreased noise levels” (Ref. Story Number: NNS151028-08 - Release Date: 10/28/2015 3:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Blake, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Lincoln Sailors Conduct Aircraft Elevator Testing

 

As reported on 31 October 2015, “Sailors and shipyard workers aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) moved a flight deck elevator that hasn't seen use in two years during an operational test of the equipment.

Throughout this equipment testing,
Lincoln's Engineering and Air Departments ensured that the pumps work properly, electrical and mechanical systems are operating normally, and checked computers for full diagnostic efficiency to maintain safe and fully functioning operations.

"I've worked around this type of equipment before and being able to see this evolution is a great opportunity," said Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Joseph Dennison. "Making sure the equipment works is important, but we always want our Sailors to have a safe working environment as well."

Given the vast amount of work to get such a task accomplished, it gives
Lincoln Sailors a moment to pause and reflect on how far the ship has come while pushing forward to get the ship back into the fight.

"The ship is starting to come back to life and we all know that it's because of the work we put into it," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class James Carson. "It's awesome to see the ship coming back to life and know that you get to see it through all the way."

Sailors aren't the only ones putting in the hard work. Gregg Flick, a consulting field engineer for AMSEC, oversaw this evolution and has worked on many projects involving ships to get them ready for sea.

"It's something that I believe in and there's always new challenges to help with," Flick said. "I was never in the military, but this is my way of serving the Sailors who are our nation's first line of defense"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS151021-14 - Release Date: 10/21/2015 2:05:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Aaron Kiser, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries Reports Third Quarter Results

 

Revenues were $1.8 billion for the third quarter of 2015

Segment operating margin was 9.6 percent, up from 8.8 percent in Q3 2014

Total operating margin was 11.1 percent, up from 10.0 percent in Q3 2014

Diluted earnings per share was $2.29 for the quarter

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the quarter were $671 million

 

Nov 05, 2015, “Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) reported third quarter 2015 revenues of $1.8 billion, up 4.8 percent compared to the same period last year. Third quarter diluted earnings per share was $2.29, compared to diluted earnings per share of $1.96 in the same period of 2014. Adjusted diluted earnings per share for the quarter was $1.98, compared to $1.67 in the same period of 2014.

 

Segment operating income for the third quarter was $172 million, compared to $151 million in the same period last year. Total operating income for the quarter was $200 million, compared to $171 million in the same period last year. The increase in operating income was primarily attributable to higher performance at Ingalls on the LHA-6 America-class and the LPD-17 San Antonio-class programs, as well as a favorable FAS/CAS Adjustment. New contract awards were approximately $0.8 billion for the quarter, bringing total backlog at the end of Q3 2015 to $23.3 billion, of which $12.5 billion was funded.

 

"Strong execution at Ingalls resulted in solid operating performance during the quarter," said HII President and CEO Mike Petters. "We remain on track to achieve our 9-plus percent shipbuilding operating margin target for 2015"” (Ref. NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Nov. 5, 2015), Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc.).

 

Third Quarter 2015 Highlights Full Report at http://newsroom.huntingtoningalls.com/releases/hii-3q-2015-results

 

Lincoln BMs Receive Coxswain Training Before Accepting RHIBs

 

As reported on 6 November 2015, “Several boatswain's mates assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) Deck Department recently completed a two-week coxswain training course at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, to familiarize themselves with rigid-hull inflated boat (RHIB) operations.

The course was required for them to earn their small boat operations qualification.

The first week of the course was conducted in the classroom and students received training on the fundamentals of
RHIB maneuvering and practiced driving in a simulator. During the second week, they got to take to the seas, to really experience RHIB driving.

"When Sailors go back to their commands, they will have the basic familiarization with a small craft," said Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Andrew Woods, coxswain instructor for Center for Surface Combat Systems Detachment East. "They learn the rules of the road, and we go over what conditions are normal for a boat. The course trains these guys so that when they go back out to their commands, they can help provide readiness for the fleet."

The Sailors spent as many as six hours out in the water learning to control the
RHIB. The training helped them prepare to drive Lincoln's own RHIBs, which will be returning to the ship later this year after being removed at the beginning of the ship's Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

"It's a great experience [to] go through the course," said Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Tyrell Alexander. "It gives us some experience on the
RHIBs, so that [when] we get ours back on board, we have Sailors who know how to drive them."

Sailors learned how to drive the
RHIBs during normal operations and rescue missions, and even how to tow another craft with the RHIB. The training that local Hampton Roads area-Sailors get at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story mirrors the training of their counterparts in similar courses at other fleet concentration areas.

"I have a better feel of learning how to be a coxswain. I learned how to drive a boat and a lot of techniques I didn't know before I took this course. I learned a lot," said Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Seth Ellrich. "Even through we are in the shipyard, we have a lot of qualified coxswains now, so we won't have to rely on just one person. We have six people [within the department] that are now fully-qualified and know what actions to take in case we happen to be out at sea"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS151106-17 - Release Date: 11/6/2015 2:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William Blake, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Adm. James Caldwell Visits Newport News Sailors

 

“Adm. James Caldwell, Jr., director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, visited the Newport News Shipyard (NNS), on 16 November 2015, to speak to Sailors assigned to ships and submarines in construction or maintenance periods at NNS.

This was the first time Caldwell visited NNS since being appointed director of the program. As part of his visit, he addressed Sailors and shipbuilders in the Virginia Class Submarine Consolidated Facility. During his speech, Caldwell mentioned the importance of getting warships out into the fleet and the significant impact they have on international security.

"Having an increased naval presence is important to the world," Caldwell said. "We can help calm conflicting nations by having ships in areas they're needed in."

Caldwell touched on the fact that, historically, having a strong Navy was crucial during the early year's of our country, and highlighted that today's modern fighting force comes from proud traditions of naval service.

"Water served as protection for our budding nation," Caldwell said. "It helped protect our trade and invested interest in commerce when our nation started."

While the admiral spoke, Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Krystal Clark, assigned to Nimitz-class aircraft carrier
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), listened along with many other Sailors, and shared the impression his words had on her.

"I've always felt that the U.S. has had a long history of excellence, and hearing the admiral talk about it makes me proud to be a Sailor," Clark said. "By talking to us about the importance of our jobs, it helps me realize the gravity of the position we're all in. I keep in mind ship, shipmate, self."

After speaking to the Sailors, Caldwell and employees of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) toured
Abraham Lincoln” (Ref. Story Number: NNS151119-13 - Release Date: 11/19/2015 2:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Aaron T. Kiser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2015 Results

 

Revenues were $1.9 billion for the quarter; $7.0 billion for 2015

Segment operating margin was 6.5 percent for the quarter; 9.5 percent for 2015

Total operating margin was 7.6 percent for the quarter; 11.0 percent for 2015

Diluted earnings per share was $1.06 for the quarter; $8.36 for 2015

Adjusted diluted earnings per share was $1.95 for the quarter; $7.33 for 2015

Cash from operations was $411 million for the quarter; $828 million for 2015

Free cash flow was $309 million for the quarter; $640 million for 2015

 

“Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) reported fourth quarter 2015 revenues of $1.9 billion, down 1.1 percent from the same period last year. Total operating income in the quarter of $144 million and total operating margin of 7.6 percent were in line with total operating income and margin in fourth quarter 2014. Diluted earnings per share in the quarter was $1.06, compared to $1.05 in the same period last year. Diluted earnings per share in the fourth quarters of 2015 and 2014 included the impacts of non-cash goodwill impairment charges, one-time expenses related to the early extinguishment of debt and favorable FAS/CAS Adjustments. Diluted earnings per share in fourth quarter 2015 also included the impact of a non-cash intangible asset impairment charge. Excluding these items, diluted earnings per share in the quarter was $1.95, compared to $2.19 in the same period last year.

 

For the full year, revenues of $7.0 billion increased 0.9 percent over 2014. Total operating income was $769 million and total operating margin was 11.0 percent for the full year, compared to $655 million and 9.4 percent, respectively, in 2014. Diluted earnings per share for the year was $8.36, compared to $6.86 in 2014. Diluted earnings per share in 2015 and 2014 included the impacts of non-cash goodwill impairment charges, one-time expenses related to the early extinguishment of debt and favorable FAS/CAS Adjustments. Diluted earnings per share in 2015 also included the impacts of a favorable insurance litigation settlement and a non-cash intangible asset impairment charge. Excluding these items, diluted earnings per share in 2015 was $7.33, compared to $7.14 in 2014.

 

New business awards for 2015 were approximately $7.6 billion, of which $0.7 billion was awarded in the fourth quarter, bringing total backlog to $22.0 billion as of Dec. 31, 2015. “2015 was a pivotal year for HII as we achieved the 9-plus percent segment operating margin goal we established when we stood up the company back in 2011,” said Mike Petters, HII’s President and CEO. “I am very pleased with the operational improvements accomplished by the team since we spun and the resulting financial performance.”

 

Fourth Quarter 2015 Significant Events

Goodwill Impairment Charge

 

During fourth quarter 2015, the company recorded a non-cash goodwill impairment charge of $16 million related to its Other segment. The impairment was a result of the continued deterioration of market fundamentals in the oil and gas services industry, driven by further declines in oil prices, numerous industry-wide project deferrals and customers' capital spending cuts.

 

Purchased Intangible Assets Impairment Charge

 

During fourth quarter 2015, the company recorded a non-cash intangible asset impairment charge of $27 million related to its Other segment. The purchased intangible assets consisted primarily of customer relationships and, to a lesser extent, trade names and developed technology. Considering current oil and gas market conditions and expectations, the company performed an impairment test in December and determined that the carrying value of the oil and gas asset group was greater than the sum of the asset group undiscounted pre-tax cash flows generated over the useful life of the primary asset, resulting in the impairment” (NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 18, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)). Results of Operations Full Report at:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014 Articles not related to Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH)

Chapter III, Appendix II

Part I of II - 1 January to 31 December 2014

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4