USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2014 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter III

Appendix I

 

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2014:

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 2014 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President Barack H. Obama Barack Hussein Obama, 2009- 2017 - 44th

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Robert M. Gates - 22nd
18 Dec 2006 - 1 Jul 2011

The Honorable Leon Panetta - 23rd

Incumbent
July 1, 2011 - Feb. 27, 2013

The Honorable Chuck Hagel - 24th

Feb. 27, 2013 - Feb. 17, 2015

Secretary of the Navy

B. J. Penn (acting) 13 March 2009 to 19 May 2009

The Honorable Raymond Edwin "Ray" Mabus - 75th

Incumbent

19 May 2009 to 20 January 2017

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Gary R. Roughead - 29th

29 Sep 2007 - 23 Sep 2011

ADM Jonathan W. Greenert - 30th

23 Sep 2011 to 18 September 2015 http://www.navy.mil/cno

COMPACFLT, former *CINCPACFLT

ADM Robert F. Willard - 58th

8 May 2007 - 25 Sep 2009

ADM Patrick M. Walsh - 59th

25 Sep 2009 - 20 Jan 2012

ADM Cecil D. Haney - 60th  
January 20, 2012 - October 16, 2013

ADM Harry B. Harris Jr. 61st

October 16, 2013 - May 27, 2015

COMNAVAIRLANT

RADM Richard J. O'Hanlon 2010-2013 RADM Ted N. Branch 2013-2015

 

*Between 1907 and December 6, 1922, and between February 1, 1941 and October 24, 2002.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CINCPACFLT

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2014

Were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

 

Executive Officer - XO

 

Administrative Officer

 

Air Officer

 

AIMD Officer

 

Combat Systems Officer

 

Religious Department - RMD - Command Chaplain

 

Legal Department - Command Judge Advocate

 

Dental Officer

 

Engineering Officer

 

Deck - First Lieutenant

 

Communications Officer

 

Maintenance Officer

 

Senior Medical Officer

 

Navigator

 

Operations Officer

 

Intel Department

 

Media - Public Affairs - PAO

 

Reactor Officer

 

Safety Officer

 

Supply Officer

 

Training Officer

 

Weapons Officer

 

 

"An RCOH is an extremely complex engineering and construction project that requires more than 30 months of advance planning and more than three years to accomplish," said Chris Miner, Newport News' vice president of in-service aircraft carrier programs. "This lift represents just one of many significant events we complete to return this ship to the Navy fully equipped and modernized to defend our nation for another 25 years. I applaud the thousands of shipbuilders who are working tirelessly to safely return this great ship to the Navy on schedule and within budget." Abraham Lincoln arrived at Newport News on 28 March 2013 and is on track to redeliver in 2016. RCOH is the mid-life refueling overhaul and maintenance availability of a Nimitz-class carrier that produces a recapitalized carrier capable of supporting current and future warfare doctrine and continuing to operate as the centerpiece of the U.S. Navy fleet and national defense for another 25 years.

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries designs, builds and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe. For more than a century, Huntington Ingalls Industries has built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. The company also provides a wide variety of products and services to the commercial energy industry and other government customers, including the Department of Energy. Employing more than 38,000 in Virginia, Mississippi, Louisiana and California, its primary business divisions are Newport News Shipbuilding and Ingalls Shipbuilding. For more information about Huntington Ingalls Industries, visit: HII on the web: www.huntingtoningalls.com” (Ref. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., April 30, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)). http://globenewswire.com/news-releas....V5Prc8HR.dpuf

 

The following accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 2014:

 

As reported on 4 February 2014, Lincoln leadership across USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are motivating and mentoring Sailors to maintain the zone inspection process during the Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). "I think the most important part of zone inspection is motivating Sailors by the level of involvement by the upper chain," said Lt. Terry Johnson, Abraham Lincoln's material maintenance management (3M) officer. "Our Executive Officer Capt. Randall Peck is involved on a regular basis. During inspections he mentors the Sailors explaining all aspects of the inspection good or bad. Less than a year after Abraham Lincoln arrival into Newport News Shipbuilding for a 42.5-month RCOH, Combat Systems Department marked a successful milestone with the installation of the AN/SPS-49 radar tower on 11 February 2014. The AN/SPS-49 radar tower was installed on the flight deck near the island. Sailors from Abraham Lincoln joined Sailors from other area commands for a "Million Dollar Sailor" financial planning course at Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) in Newport News on 20 February 2014. As reported on 13 March 2014, Sailors assigned to the berthing team aboard are expediting through the process of moving Sailors back onto the ship. In the last few months, 36 Sailors on the team have completed six out of 39 berthing spaces, according to Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Terrence Parks, the berthing rehabilitation team leader. The team set July 2015 as the deadline to complete all berthing rack installation and October 2015 for complete berthing refurbishment. Even with all the accomplishments of the PM-11 team, Parks cautions Sailors to remain vigilant in order to not damage berthing decks by transiting through them during refurbishment. As reported on 20 March 2014, Sailors from the Air Department aboard Abraham Lincoln recycled parts from the decommissioned John F. Kennedy in an effort to save the Navy a pocket full of money during Lincoln's RCOH. Eight Sailors travelled to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard to acquire equipment to help repair the ship's flight deck fueling station and its two JP-5 fuel pump rooms. Recycling Kennedy's equipment onto Lincoln saved the Navy six months of man-hours and $700,000.00, according to Lincoln's Air Boatswain, Chief Warrant Officer 4 Anthony Garcia. March 28, 2014 marks the end of the first year in the RCOH for Abraham Lincoln. Getting Lincoln back in the fight on time and below budget is a long, complicated process with many moving parts, but the more than 2,500 Sailors, 3,000 shipyard workers and contractors have stepped up to the challenge, according to the ship's commanding officer. The decking team, removed more than 300,000 square feet of tile from the ship, the equivalent of Lincoln's 4.5 acre flight deck. This effort saved an estimated $3.5 million for taxpayers. Another initative to save the Navy money includes the refurbishment instead of replacement of the ship's components. According to Chief Cryptological Technician (Maintenance) Timothy Nerbonne, approximately 40 percent of the water-tight doors and scuttles can be fixed at our light industrial facility (LIFAC). At LIFAC, the doors undergo cleaning, paint and rust removal, and powder coat painting before they return to the ship. Other areas of accomplishment since Lincoln started RCOH include: the reinstallation of the long range air search radar tower, completion of the port and starboard rudder stock repairs, the refurbishment of 230 of 399 water-tight doors tied to undocking, and the blasting and priming of the hull of the ship below the water line. Each accomplishment would not be possible without both personnel and safety. From ensuring watchstanders are present to put out potential fires during welding, to powering down electrical equipment during maintenance - every step is accomplished effectively and safely by the integrated team of Sailors, shipyard workers and contractors. The next 12 months will be a transition from the "rip-out" phase to the "rebuilding" phase of RCOH. 2014 is important for the ship because Lincoln's personnel will begin to take back owenership of their spaces, and seeing the ship come back together and looking like it's supposed to is good for morale, said Thomas. "The shipyard workers and Sailors should be very proud of what they have accomplished thus far," said Thomas. "I know that I am very proud to see how far we've come in one year." As reported on 3 April 2014, the decking team aboard Abraham Lincoln estimates they have saved over $1 million in ship's flooring material removal since the beginning of RCOH the Navy money by taking on a R. Ford. The contract involves the removal of studs and foundations welded to the deck to prepare for the installation of furniture in interior spaces. On board Navy ships furniture is attached to the deck with welded studs to prevent it from moving during high seas. During Lincoln's RCOH many spaces are scheduled to receive updated furniture. These new layouts require the removal of old studs and the installation of new ones. As reported on 14 April 2014, The 30-round magazine slips into the receiver and the Sailor checks that it is seated correctly. Small arms qualification is vital to the process that Sailors complete as they qualify for security duty aboard Abraham Lincoln. With the refueling, complex overhaul, well underway, Abraham Lincoln is apparently getting her island modified. “Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced April 30, 2014 that its Newport News Shipbuilding division recently placed a new upper-level structure on top of Abraham Lincoln island, which is similar to an airport control tower. The aircraft carrier is undergoing its RCOH, during which the shipyard refuels the ship's reactors, paints the ship's hull, modernizes systems and performs a complete recapitalization of the entire ship. A photo accompanying this release is available at: http://newsroom.huntingtoningalls.co...aDetailsID=870. The structure, which will contain the ship's primary flight control systems when outfitted and serves as the platform for many of its various radars and antenna systems, is one of the largest structure lifts that will be performed during the RCOH process. At 88 feet long and 32 feet wide, the structure weighs about 68 long tons, which is equal to the weight of nearly a dozen elephants. It was set into place using the 310-ton gantry crane that straddles dry docks 10 and 11. On May 31, Newport News Shipbuilding placed a new lower main mast section on Abraham Lincoln, which serves as the platform for the ship's various ship sensors and radars. As reported on 11 June 2014, “an aircraft carrier out to sea is an inherently dangerous environment, with the possibility of an emergency never more than one mistake away. Sailors must always be prepared to respond at a moment's notice. The same is true for a carrier in the shipyard; Sailors always need to be ready to respond to an emergency. Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln practice their emergency response skills during daily in-port emergency team (IET) drills. IET drills require Sailors to respond to simulated emergency scenarios such as fires, chemical spills, flooding and many other possible shipboard casualties quickly and effectively. As reported on 19 June 2014, “Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kyle Rushing, assigned to Abraham Lincoln was award for creating a new test routine for a specific circuit card," Rushing said. "It ended up saving the Navy $136,000.00. Now all the technicians in the Navy and Coast Guard follow my new instruction." Another RCOH Milestone Complete aboard Lincoln. Thirteen divisions of Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) successfully re-installed the port and starboard rudder aboard Abraham Lincoln on 24 June 2014. The overhaul and installation of the rudders is considered a huge success for Lincoln's RCOH because the job was not initially planned. Sailors from Abraham Lincoln had the privilege of attending a special employee-led tour of the Newport News Shipyard on 2 July 2014. During the tour, Sailors got a behind-the-scenes look at the shipyard's foundry, heavy plate bay and the main machine shop. Abraham Lincoln Sailors and Newport News Shipbuilding's (NNS) O-73 Division successfully re-installed the ship's arresting gear engines three and four, on 19 July 2014. The re-installation process took just over three hours and was made possible by the use of cranes and outstanding teamwork of Sailors and shipyard workers. The arresting gear engines underwent a year-long overhaul in Lakehurst, N.J. before being returned to Lincoln. Arresting gear engines one and two are slated to be re-installed in September 2014, using the same installation process as engines three and four. "The re-installation of Lincoln's remaining two engines in just over a month from now will be another major step towards flight deck certification," Martinez said. "It will allow Air Department's 'Green Shirts' to begin training to operate the arresting gear engines at sea." To re-install the arresting gear engines, two holes measuring approximately 45 feet long by 15 feet wide were cut through the flight deck. Then, an NNS crane was used to meticulously lower the engines into their precise resting place on the first deck of Lincoln. Abraham Lincoln marked a major milestone in her RCOH on 5 August 2014. Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), installed the final section of the ship's main mast, the 38-foot upper mast section. The last section of the mast, weighing 33 tons, was lifted in sequence by two cranes. The shipyard's 310-ton gantry crane lifted the mast section onto the flight deck, and then a mobile crane on the flight deck lifted the section into its final position on the mast. The mast, when erected, is too tall for the 310-ton gantry crane to travel over, so the mobile crane completed the lofty installation. During refurbishment, the original round mast pole was removed and replaced with a modified, tapered square pole to increase strength and keep electrical piping systems enclosed for survivability purposes. The square pole is also larger, which allows for waist high rails and easier access to all areas by internal ladders. "The installation of the ship's mast is an accomplishment that brings the carrier one step closer to completing its complex overhaul. The efforts of the PM13 deck removal team aboard Abraham Lincoln have shaved nearly $6 million off the cost of the ship's RCOH. At a cake cutting ceremony on 6 August 2014 to celebrate 100 percent completion of tile removal, Lincoln's Commanding Officer, Capt. Karl O. Thomas, showered praise upon the men and women who make up the team. Abraham Lincoln held a change of command ceremony on 7 August 2014 at Victory Landing Park in Newport News, Virginia. Capt. Ronald L. Ravelo assumed command from his brother-in-law Capt. Karl O. Thomas. As reported on 21 August 2014. The Navy developed the Gold Disk Program to save money and time by reducing costs and turnaround time for repairs. Within this program, Sailors join the Navy for a variety of reasons. For one Sailor it was as simple as following in a parent's footsteps. Fire Controlman 2nd Class Bryan Taylor, an Ozark, Alabama native, created a process to narrow down the technical issue from an entire circuit board to a single component, which reduces the replacement cost from $10,000.00 to 20 cents. As reported on 6 October 2014, as Abraham Lincoln approaches its next phase in the RCOH, personnel from the decking team (PM-13) are saving the Navy $4.6 million by assuming the task of repairing the ship's hangar bay ceiling. With 2,000 square feet of corrosion control and prevention complete, one-third of Lincoln's hangar bay is now ready for the lagging installation process. According to PM-13 Division officer, Chief Warrant Officer Christopher Smith, by taking on this job the PM-13 team is saving the Navy nearly $4.6 million in labor, equipment costs and manpower. 50 Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln began the first steps toward the crew move-aboard on 23 October 2014 when they loaded Inport Emergency Team (IET) and Reactor Department berthing accomodations onto the ship. The 50 Sailors loaded approximately 40 pallets of berthing material onto the ship and stacked mattresses to be moved into the berthing for IET and Reactor department duty section personnel. The purpose of the move-aboard is to decrease delays in both IET's response to a shipboard casualty and Reactor's response to a reactor casualty. With tugboats guiding it into the James River, the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln was moved from one of Newport News Shipbuilding’s drydocks to an outfitting berth on Monday. Abraham Lincoln was returned to the water on 3 November 2014, nearly two years after entering the dry dock at Newport News Shipyard, Va. The undocking of the ship is a significant milestone in the RCOH process. With this move, Newport News, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) (HII), officially completed the drydock portion of the carrier’s mid-life RCOH, the company announced two days late,  November 5, 2014 3:21 PM release. Video of undocking: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QcHoBNo8rc. Sailors assigned to the Abraham Lincoln took time to stop and talk about the upcoming holiday season and different ways to stay safe during a safety standdown at the Hampton Roads Convention Center on 4 November 2014. Now at Outfitting Berth 1, the carrier will undergo final outfitting and testing. With Lincoln in the water, shipbuilders and sailors can focus on the final restoration, outfitting and testing of the ship’s systems. Moving her to the outfitting berth marks the point when the crew move aboard process begins and we bring the ship back to life.” During the drydock phase of the RCOH, Lincoln underwent extensive repair and construction work both inside and out to revamp the ship. Inside, Newport News shipbuilders re-preserved hundreds of tanks and replaced thousands of valves, pumps and piping components. On the outside, they painted the ship’s hull, updated the propeller shafts and installed refurbished propellers. For these last 24 months before the carrier’s redelivery, shipbuilders will finish up the overhaul and installation of the ship’s major components and test its systems, making sure that the electronics, combat and propulsion systems are all operational before the carrier is re-delivered to the Navy in 2016. These final months will also be dedicated to modernizing the ship’s living quarters and making them habitable for the sailors as they move aboard. The first group of sailors began moving into the living spaces on 23 October 2014. Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran and enlisted advisor Fleet Master Chief April Beldo held an all-hands call for Sailors assigned to Abraham Lincoln and Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford at the Hampton Roads Convention Center on 5 November 2014. Leadership of Abraham Lincoln began issuing newly-authorized command ball caps to its Sailors on 14 November 2014. Command ball caps were authorized for wear Navywide with the Navy Working Uniform by the chief of naval personnel in NAVADMIN 200/14, effective Sept. 1. Loud voices boom and charged hoses spray from the fantail of Abraham Lincoln on 17 November 2014, as Sailors received training on hose-handling procedures. Chief petty officers and first class petty officers from the In-port Emergency Team (IET) gathered around a live hose during a fire simulation. Abraham Lincoln received three new ombudsmen and one recertified ombudsman on 19 November 2014. Abraham Lincoln conducted its first internal phone call using the Integrated Voice Network (IVN) since Lincoln's RCOH on 20 November 2014. Capt. Ronald Ravelo, commanding officer, Abraham Lincoln, received the call from Lincoln's RCOH Program Manager Bruce Easterson from a separate location inside the ship. In preparation to return to the fleet, Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln participated in emergency evacuation and man overboard drills on 20 November 2014. As part of shipyard protocol, any ship that is successfully undocked must complete a series of safety tests within 30 days, two of which are the man overboard and evacuation drills. Sailors from Abraham Lincoln Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department's (AIMD) GE Warehouse were recognized by Lincoln's leadership during a visit on 24 November 2015. Lincoln's commanding officer, executive officer and command master chief also conducted an inspection during their visit with Sailors. As reported on 4 December 2014, with technology rapidly growing and evolving and thousands of Sailors assigned to each ship, an aircraft carrier needs a team of network professionals to handle the complex computer networks. Every Sailor aboard an aircraft carrier is given an account within the ship's network. The account gives them access to email and other computer systems needed to complete necessary tasks. The Medical Department spaces aboard Abraham Lincoln Floating Accommodation Facility were filled with the hustle of the corpsmen on 4 December 2014, helping keep Lincoln's crew healthy as winter season draws near. As reported on 4 December 2014, the Reactor Department performs a vital role during the RCOH process that nuclear powered Abraham Lincoln undergo. The largest of 18 departments aboard Lincoln, the Reactor Department is made up of 460 personnel who are divided into six divisions. As reported on 8 December 2014, Personnel specialists working in the Abraham Lincoln Administration Department provide a vast collaboration of talent and skills that helps to maintain the day-to-day operations while Lincoln undergoes its RCOH in Newport News. Machinist's Mate 2nd Class William B. Roten, from Ladson, S. C., assigned to Abraham Lincoln received a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for his overhaul maintenance he performed during the ship's RCOH on 9 December 2015. Roten played a key role by overhauling six motor-driven fire pumps and prepared them to be shipped to a remote repair facility. As a result, Roten's department recommended him for the award. "It is truly a great honor to receive such an award," said Roten. "The hard work really paid off and I am proud that my contribution has increased the progress of the work." As reported on 10 December 2014, “to date, Sailors assigned to Abraham Lincoln have avoided costs of approximately $3.8 million by completing nearly 190,000 fire watch hours while the ship undergoes its RCOH in Newport News. The money saved by Sailors conducting fire watch since the beginning of RCOH in March 2013 will be applied later in the project to fund other needed repairs. "Fire Watch has been a critical Ship's Force contribution to this RCOH," said Capt. Ronald Ravelo, commanding officer, Abraham Lincoln. "Early in the project it was determined that some significant labor cost savings needed to be found." Fire watches also serve as a vital first line of defense against preventable casualties. These watches are manned as a safety precaution during various types of work, such as grinding, cutting and welding. As reported on 10 December 2014, RCOH presents many challenges for both a ship as well as the Sailors undergoing it and Abraham Lincoln experience is no exception. Sailors in many departments and divisions can expect to work outside of their rate during RCOH, but one thing that has remained constant for Sailors assigned to Lincoln's weapons department is that they are leading the charge when it comes to unconventional workloads. "We have completed 19 of the 39 berthing spaces that we have been assigned to refurbish during of RCOH," said Hurley. "We have close to 70 Sailors in transportation, 30 of which are temporary assigned duty from other departments." According to Hurley, the work done by Sailors assigned to the transportation division plays a pivotal role in supplementing the mission while in the shipyards. As reported on 12 December 2014, “everyone knows that safety is a cornerstone of any ship or shipyard environment and every day on board Abraham Lincoln Sailors are working to fix and preserve their ship. However, in doing so, they are always on watch and at the top of their game when it comes to the safety of themselves and their shipmates around them” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140204-18 - Release Date: 2/4/2014 8:55:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140218-18 - Release Date: 2/18/2014 8:58:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140221-17 - Release Date: 2/21/2014 3:24:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140313-21 - Release Date: 3/13/2014 4:33:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140320-22 - Release Date: 3/20/2014 7:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140328-08 - Release Date: 3/28/2014 12:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rusty Pang, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140403-38 - Release Date: 4/3/2014 10:12:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Andriana Genualdi, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140414-02 - Release Date: 4/14/2014 7:48:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Matthew Young, YORKTOWN, Va. (NNS); NEWPORT NEWS, Va., April 30, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE); Story Number: NNS140611-03 - Release Date: 6/11/2014 7:38:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140619-13 - Release Date: 6/19/2014 12:07:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140821-07 - Release Date: 8/21/2014 2:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seamen Apprentice Matthew Young, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140709-10 - Release Date: 7/9/2014 11:52:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140729-17 - Release Date: 7/29/2014 10:53:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140807-23 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:16:00 PM - From Newport News Shipbuilding and USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140807-27 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:25:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140807-26 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:24:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS140821-16 - Release Date: 8/21/2014 4:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Young, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141006-10 - Release Date: 10/6/2014 9:11:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141028-20 - Release Date: 10/28/2014 8:54:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Ashley Raine Northen, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Marine Link - By Eric Haun, November 5, 2014 & NEWPORT NEWS, Va., November 5, 2014 3:21 PM (GLOBE NEWSWIRE); Story Number: NNS141104-04 - Release Date: 11/4/2014 11:08:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Gary A. Prill, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141106-25 - Release Date: 11/6/2014 8:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brenton Poyser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NORFOLK (NNS); Story Number: NNS141119-09 - Release Date: 11/19/2014 2:19:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141119-18 - Release Date: 11/19/2014 8:43:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141125-12 - Release Date: 11/25/2014 9:05:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Ashley Raine Northen, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141125-28 - Release Date: 11/25/2014 3:14:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141124-13 - Release Date: 11/24/2014 1:55:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141125-29 - Release Date: 11/25/2014 4:01:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aaron T. Kiser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SUFFOLK, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141204-08 - Release Date: 12/4/2014 1:57:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141204-11 - Release Date: 12/4/2014 2:32:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathon Lockwood, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141204-16 - Release Date: 12/4/2014 4:50:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian C. Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141208-27 - Release Date: 12/8/2014 3:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Evan Parker, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141212-03 - Release Date: 12/12/2014 7:37:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141210-04 - Release Date: 12/10/2014 11:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aaron T. Kiser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141210-16 - Release Date: 12/10/2014 4:31:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Derry Todd, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141106-22 - Release Date: 11/6/2014 8:34:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Brandon Davis, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, HAMPTON, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS141212-04 - Release Date: 12/12/2014 7:38:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 19, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE); Ross Wilkers February 20, 2015, Financial Report, News) and NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 27, 2014 (MarineLink.com)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=78904

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http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84620

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84639

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84597

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84640

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84718

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84723

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84716

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84781

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84847

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84810

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84809

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84306

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84848

http://newsroom.huntingtoningalls.com/releases/huntington-ingalls-industries-reports-fourth-quarter-and-full-year-2014-results

https://www.govconwire.com/2015/02/huntington-ingalls-reports-2-revenue-jump-for-fy-2014-mike-petters-comments

http://www.marinelink.com/news/huntington-industries364819

 

Activities saving the U.S. Navy money during RCOH

 

1 January to 31 December 2014

DEPARTMENT/DIVISION/SAILOR(S)

HOURS

SAVINGS

Sailors from the Air Department.

6-months of man-hours

$700,000

Decking team removed of studs and foundations welded to the deck to prepare for the installation of furniture in interior spaces

Man Hours

$1,000,000

Electronic División ET Sailor created a new test routine for a specific circuit card.

Man Hours

$136,000

PM13 Deck team took on the additional task of removing studs and equipment foundations welded to the deck, all in preparation for new equipment and tile installation.

Man Hours

$6,000,000

Fire Controlman Taylor created a process to narrow down the technical issue from an entire circuit board to a single component, which reduces the replacement cost from $10,000 to 20 cents.

Hundreds of man-hours

$160,000

PM13 Deck team assumed the task of repairing the ship's hangar bay ceiling, saving equipment costs and manpower

Man Hours

$4,600,000

Sailors perform fire watch - 12/10/2014

190,000

$3,800,000

TOTAL

N/A

$16,369,000

“Sailors from the Air Department recycled parts from the decommissioned USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in an effort to save the Navy a pocket full of money during Lincoln's Refueling Complex and Overhaul (RCOH). Eight Sailors travelled to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard to acquire equipment to help repair the ship's flight deck fueling station and its two JP-5 fuel pump rooms. Recycling Kennedy's equipment onto Lincoln saved the Navy six months of man-hours and $700,000, according to Lincoln's Air Boatswain, Chief Warrant Officer 4 Anthony Garcia. "Attaining these resources has tremendously impacted the progress of repairing the ship's fueling systems," said Garcia. The eight-Sailor team manually disassembled and transferred more than 100 valves, filters, caps and assemblies without cranes or pneumatic tools, which impressed the chief in charge of the team” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140320-22 - Release Date: 3/20/2014 7:17:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=79787

The decking team estimates they have saved over $1 million in ship's flooring material removal since the beginning of RCOH. The contract involves the removal of studs and foundations welded to the deck to prepare for the installation of furniture in interior spaces. On board Navy ships furniture is attached to the deck with welded studs to prevent it from moving during high seas” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140403-38 - Release Date: 4/3/2014 10:12:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Andriana Genualdi, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=80122

“Electronics Technician 2nd Class Kyle Rushing, assigned to Abe hails from Bothell, Washington. Replacing a single part can cost under a dollar, but an entire new card can cost over $100,000.00." "I got the award for creating a new test routine for a specific circuit card," Rushing said. "It ended up saving the Navy $136,000.00. Now all the technicians in the Navy and Coast Guard follow my new instruction"” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140619-13 - Release Date: 6/19/2014 12:07:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Wesley T. Buckett, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=81761

The efforts of the PM13 Deck removal team aboard Abe have shaved nearly $6 million off the cost of the ship's Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH). The team started the project in Nov. 2012. Originally, PM13 only removed tile and furniture from the steel subfloors in preparation for the installation of new furniture and flooring. In April 2014 the PM13 team took on the additional task of removing studs and equipment foundations welded to the deck, all in preparation for new equipment and tile installation” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140807-27 - Release Date: 8/7/2014 8:25:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Danian Douglas, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=82637

“Fire Controlman 2nd Class Bryan Taylor, an Ozark, Alabama native, moved on to work for the Gold Disk Program, a Navy-wide initiative designed to save money. Taylor created a process to narrow down the technical issue from an entire circuit board to a single component, which reduces the replacement cost from $10,000 to 20 cents. In addition to component costs, Taylor's efforts in this project have also saved the Navy hundreds of man-hours that would have been required to remove and replace the circuit boards. For his accomplishments, he recently received the Chief of Naval Operations Gold Disk Award for May 2014 which included a Letter of Commendation and a $1,000.00 cash award” (Ref. Story Number: NNS140821-16 - Release Date: 8/21/2014 4:18:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Young, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=82889

 “Personnel from the decking team (PM-13) are saving the Navy $4.6 million by assuming the task of repairing the ship's hangar bay ceiling, saving equipment costs and manpower. With 2,000 square feet of corrosion control and prevention complete, one-third of Lincoln's hangar bay is now ready for the lagging installation process” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141006-10 - Release Date: 10/6/2014 9:11:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=83665

“To date, Sailors assigned Abe have avoided costs of approximately $3.8 million by completing nearly 190,000 fire watch hours while the ship undergoes its RCOH in Newport News. The money saved by Sailors conducting fire watch since the beginning of RCOH in March 2013 will be applied later in the project to fund other needed repairs” (Ref. Story Number: NNS141210-04 - Release Date: 12/10/2014 11:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aaron T. Kiser, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=84810

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2014 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter III

Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4