Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) activities at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

(1 January to 31 December 2013).

Chapter II

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2013 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter II, Appendix I         

 

2013 Articles not related to Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH)

Chapter II, Appendix II

Part I of III - 1 January to  20 August 2013 

Part II of III - 21 August to 24 October 2013

Part III of III - 25 October to 31 December 2013    

 

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

“The Navy announced that it would reassign Abraham Lincoln Security Division from the Weapons Department to the Operations Department prior to October 2005. The ship proactively accomplished this move by August 2005, which thrust the division into a new environment. Abraham Lincoln rendesignated her Ship Self Defense Force the Naval Security Force, and utilized ship’s company to augment the force. She thus established the Integrated Security Force; each department on board supported a team of 102 sailors who melded into the Security Division to protect the ship while she visited ports. This involved extensive training regimens for crewmembers that included tactical team movements and basic law enforcement procedures” (Ref. 378A).

 

Lincoln Sailors Save Shipyard, Navy $500,000

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) completed a major step in its overhaul and saved the Navy nearly $500,000 when all four catapults of the Lincoln's flight deck were removed, along with their bottom sheathing on 18 January 2013, due to the effort of 30 V-2 Division Sailors.

"Not only is the catapult removal process unprecedented for ship's forces during an Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) period, but we also did it quickly," said V-2 Division officer Lt. j.g. Matt McCauley. V-2's Sailors also removed the catapult's sheathing bands and panels. "That is almost 18 tons of steel in total, as well as the insulation or 'lava-rock' from the catapult's trough," said Senior Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Frank Bartanowitz, V-2 Division.

V-2 Division's teamwork with Huntington Ingalls Industries - News News Shipbuilding shipyard workers allowed them to begin their inspection for structural corrosion beneath the catapult troughs sooner. In all, Lincoln's V-2 Division saved 4,800 man-hours of labor from shipyard workers, saving the Navy $480,000.

"It's difficult to remove more than 20 years of hardened grit in bad weather," said Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (equipment) Salvatore Gumina. "Pure teamwork is what makes this group of Sailors work so well, on or off land, underway or during
RCOH."

And that teamwork is a hallmark of
V-2, according to one of its Sailors. "Whether people believe it or not, this is what we do. Teamwork is what we do day in and day out," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 2nd Class Joshua Smith.

V-2 Division is now taking on the task of removing the side sheathing in each catapult's trough, which will save the Navy and the shipyard even more money” (Ref. Story Number: NNS130131-11 - Release Date: 1/31/2013 2:46:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71758 

 

“On 8 February 2013, the US Navy announced that it is not issuing the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) RCOH contract to Huntington Ingalls Industries because of fiscal constraints resulting from the use of a continuing resolution (CR), instead of a proper appropriations bill. This delay of unspecified length will also affect USS George Washington’s RCOH. The Navy’s press release can be summarized as a memo to Congress saying: “not funding us as we asked is bad. “There is a bit of gamesmanship involved as the continuing resolution was a known quantity months ago”” (Ref. Mar 31, 2013 20:16 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff). http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/Shall-Not-Perish-RCOH-for-CVN-72-USS-Abraham-Lincoln-06255

 

Nuclear refueling is latest budget crisis cut

“The refueling overhaul of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was postponed by the Navy — another manifestation of Congress’s inability to pass a 2013 defense funding bill. The ship was scheduled to move in mid-February from Virginia’s Norfolk naval base to Newport News Shipbuilding to begin a $3.3 billion, three-and-a-half-year overhaul. The work, called a Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH), is a major mid-life job that renews the ship to serve another 20-25 years. The Navy needs $1.5 billion to cover the work through the end of September, which is the end of fiscal 2013. While Congress granted $96 million in October to cover expenses for the first half of the fiscal year, that money runs out after March, and the Navy doesn’t want to make the move to Newport News without knowing whether it has the money to continue the work in the spring.

 

For now, the Lincoln will remain pierside at the naval base until Congress sorts out the funding picture. Any significant delay in beginning the Lincoln’s RCOH will ripple through years of carrier scheduling. A carrier undergoing RCOH typically spends about 18 months in drydock at Newport News. As soon as Lincoln completes her drydock period, the dock is scheduled to receive the carrier Enterprise to defuel its reactors and prepare her for eventual dismantling. By the time that job is complete, the George Washington, the next carrier to undergo the refueling overhaul, is scheduled to arrive. Across those three jobs, the dock is scheduled to have a carrier in it into early 2018 for all except a handful of weeks.

Any delay, the Navy noted in a statement, will also have an impact on carrier maintenance and operational availability, and increase the
Lincoln’s RCOH costs. Congress can address the Lincoln’s funding shortfall by taking special action to address the cost differences or, the Navy noted in a statement, by passing a 2013 defense spending bill. “The fiscal uncertainty created by not having an appropriations bill — and the measures we are forced to take as a result — place significant stress on an already strained force and undermines the stability of a fragile industrial base,” the Navy said in a statement announcing the ROCH delay” (Ref. By Christopher P. Cavas - Staff writer, Posted: Friday Feb 8, 2013 14:53:54 EST).

 

Lack of Funding Affects USS Lincoln Refueling and Complex Overhaul

 

“The aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) will not start due to a lack of funding, the Navy said 8 February 2013. Lincoln was expected to move to Newport News shipyard next week to begin the overhaul. However, as a result of the fiscal constraints resulting from the ongoing continuing resolution (CR), the contract for the RCOH has not been issued to Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc.

Lincoln will remain pierside at Naval Station Norfolk until sufficient funding is received to start the execution of the RCOH. In the meantime, the ship's Sailors continue to conduct maintenance. In their 50 year life spans, one RCOH is scheduled for the midpoint of an aircraft carrier's service life. Lincoln was commissioned 23 years ago Nov. 11, 1989. The impact of postponing CVN-72's RCOH is three-fold:


* the time scheduled for the
RCOH will have to be lengthened because the overhaul won't begin when it was expected,
* delayed redelivery of
Lincoln to the fleet,
* and impacts to industry (takes away money/jobs and can delay subsequent scheduled availabilities).

Cancelling or delaying maintenance creates a significant backlog of deferred maintenance and affects future year schedules and costs, as well as future readiness. The delay in
Lincoln's RCOH will affect other carrier work. Because of the short time available between sequential dockings, the delay will also result in day-for-day impacts to the defueling of the recently inactivated Enterprise (CVN-65) and the start of USS George Washington's (CVN-73) RCOH.

A yearlong CR impacts funds for fuel, parts, ship and aircraft repairs, base operations, maintenance for buildings, roads and runways, and salaries for our government employees and contractors. The fiscal uncertainties created by not having an appropriations bill and the measures the Navy is forced to take as a result, place significant stress on an already strained force and undermine the stability of a fragile industrial base” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS130208-17 - Release Date: 2/8/2013 4:14:00 PM  - From Defense Media Activity - Navy , WASHINGTON (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=71992

 

A $40 million contract modification for “additional advance planning efforts” related to CVN-72’s RCOH was awarded on 27 February 2013 to Huntington Ingalls Industries. To be more specific, it involves additional advanced planning, ship checks, design, documentation, engineering, procurement, fabrication and preliminary shipyard or support facility work. “All shipboard work will take place at Naval Station Norfolk [VA] because of delay in awarding the RCOH due to the continuing resolution. This effort will mitigate schedule impacts and help preserve the skilled work force.” In other words, it keeps them busy, preventing layoffs that could lead to the permanent loss of skilled workers who go elsewhere (N00024-10-C-2110).

http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14573

 

Aircraft Carriers: How Budget Cuts Delay Overhauls And Trim The Fleet

 

“With all the services reining in spending to cope with the current budget crisis, the second and third-order effects of cutbacks will ripple through the force for years. While the Army “has it worst” by the Pentagon comptroller’s own assessment, the most complicated impacts are on the Navy, whose carefully planned maintenance schedule is falling apart. The fleet has already had to halve its aircraft carrier presence in the Persian Gulf, but delayed and cancelled overhauls will ultimately mean fewer ships in service in the years to come.

 

Ships require a lot of maintenance to work to stay ready for action, and none more than nuclear aircraft carriers. In addition to the regular pierside pitstops every type of vessel has to make, Nimitz-class carriers need their reactors refueled and thoroughly overhauled halfway through their 50-year service life. This massive “Refueling and Complex Overhaul” (RCOH) can only be performed at one shipyard in the nation, Huntington Ingalls Newport News yard in Virginia, so the next carrier has to come in as soon as the previous one is done.

 

But last month the Navy delayed the USS Abraham Lincoln‘s overhaul indefinitely for lack of funds. That will in turn delay the next carrier on the schedule, the George Washington, and so on down the line. The graphic above (click to see full size) vividly portrays the sheer complexity of a RCOH – over 20 million man-hours, “equivalent to building the Golden Gate Bridge, twice” – and the tight heel-to-toe sequence of carrier overhauls that the budget crisis has now disrupted. There’s an element of propaganda here, of course:

 

The infographic was created for a campaign by the Aircraft Carrier Industrial Base Coalition, whose roughly 400 member companies have an obvious financial interest in keeping the work going and their cashflow flowing. Founded in 2004, ACIBC wrote Congressional leaders in February asking them to extricate overhaul funding from the budgetary gridlock and is holding an “Action Day” on Capitol Hill today which kicked off at 11.

 

Such groups are notoriously prone to pitching inflated estimates of the jobs lost from cuts to their pet programs, but that’s not what ACIBC is doing here. Lobbyists they may be, but in this graphic they’re sticking to the facts – and the facts are unnerving enough.

 Breaking Media, Inc. By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr. on March 20, 2013 at 11:15 AM

http://breakingdefense.com/2013/03/sequester-cr-and-carriers-how-postponed-overhauls-ripple-throug

 

uss abraham lincoln cvn-72 refueling and complex overhaul rcoh

 

Newport News, Virginia – 28 March 2013

 

Image result for uss abraham lincoln cvn-72 refueling complex overhaul rcoh photos

 

Newport News, Virginia – 28 March 2013

 

Image result for uss abraham lincoln cvn-72 refueling complex overhaul rcoh photos

 

Newport News, Virginia – 28 March 2013

 

Delayed 6 Weeks, Aircraft Carrier Arrives at Shipyard

 

“Huntington Ingalls Industries welcomed the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) to its Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division March 28, 2013, following a six-week delay in its arrival. Lincoln was originally scheduled to arrive Feb. 14 for its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), but it was among the Navy projects delayed due to uncertainties surrounding the defense budget and funding of the work. The ship's transit to NNS is being funded under a planning contract.

"We are pleased Congress passed, and the president signed, this important legislation, which enabled the Navy and Newport News Shipbuilding to move the
Lincoln to our shipyard today and begin the RCOH," NNS President Matt Mulherin said. "Most importantly, this provides continued job security and stability for our workforce and provides continuity of our RCOH programs, which contribute so significantly to the defense of our great nation." NNS' overhaul team began working on the ship at the Navy base in Norfolk and made progress prior to Lincoln's arrival at NNS.

"The ship-shipyard team has worked hard to prepare the ship for a successful start to refueling complex overhaul," said Capt. Karl Thomas, the ship's commanding officer. "Since our Norfolk arrival in August, I've been very pleased with the energy of the entire Newport News shipyard, Supervisor of Shipbuilding and Lincoln crew. We're committed to getting this project off on the right foot, completing it on time, and getting the ship modernized and back into the fleet ready to serve."

The
RCOH represents 35 percent of all maintenance and modernization in an aircraft carrier's 50-year service life. Lincoln's RCOH will include the refueling of the ship's reactors, as well as extensive modernization work to more than 2,300 compartments, 600 tanks and hundreds of systems. In addition, major upgrades will be made to the flight deck, catapults, combat systems and the island” (Ref. MarineLink.com - March 28, 2013). http://www.marinetechnologynews.com/news/delayed-weeks-aircraft-carrier-476074

 

CVN-72 Carrier RCOH: Shall not Perish

 

“On 29 March 2013 HII in Newport News, VA receives a $2.595 billion cost-plus-incentive fee contract for USS Abraham Lincoln’s RCOH, now that the Consolidated and Further Continuation Appropriation Act for Fiscal Year 2013 [H.R. 933] has been enacted into law. This contract was not competitively procured under the authority of 10 U.S.C. 2304(c)(1), and the award begins with $10 million in FY 2012 Shipbuilding and Conversion funding.

 

Lincoln’s RCOH will include the standard refueling of the ship’s reactors, as well as extensive modernization work to more than 2,300 compartments, 600 tanks, and hundreds of systems. Major upgrades will be made to the flight deck, catapults, combat systems and the island. Work is expected to begin immediately and continue through November 2016 (N00024-13-C-2108).

 

Nuclear reactors save a lot of diesel fuel on huge ships like aircraft carriers, but there’s a catch. Mid-way through the ship’s 50-year life, the nuclear reactor needs to be refueled. The resulting “Refueling and Complex Overhaul” (RCOH) is a long, complex, potentially hazardous, and very expensive process, which also includes widespread upgrades throughout the ship. Anyone who has ever done home renovations knows that the opportunity to make upgrades can be nearly irresistible in these situations. In truth, this stage in the carrier’s life is an excellent time for that kind of work.

 

The USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was built by Northrop Grumman’s Newport News sector. Commissioned on Nov 11/1989 and homeported in Everett, Wa., CVN-72 is expected to remain in service until 2039. As it approaches its mid-life stage, however, its mid-life upgrade and reactor refueling likewise approaches. Its counterpart USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) completed its RCOH at the end of 2009, and USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN-71) is underway. CVN-72 will become the 6th American carrier to undergo this procedure.

 

The RCOH Process

 

After nearly 25 years of service, the USA’s nuclear aircraft carriers undergo a 3-year maintenance period to refuel their nuclear reactors, upgrade and modernize combat and communication systems, and overhaul the ship’s hull, mechanical and electrical systems. This is the refueling and complex overhaul. During an American Nimitz class carrier’s 50 year life span, it has 4 Drydocking Planned Incremental Availabilities and 12 Planned Incremental Availabilities. It has only one RCOH, however, which is the most significant overhaul the boat receives. HII says that the 3-year RCOH represents 35% of all maintenance and modernization in a Nimitz Class aircraft carrier’s 50-year service life.

 

The new “CVN-21Gerald R. Ford class will have a redesigned nuclear power plant that makes use of design advances in order to increase the reactors’ output, and drop the number of people required to operate them. Modern reactors aboard US submarines will never need refueling, but their platforms only have a 30-year safe design life. The CVN-78 Ford Class will last much longer, and so their high-output reactor will still face mid-life RCOH procedures.

 

For the Nimitz Class, costs are generally above $3 billion per RCOH – a sum that could build a smaller carrier like the non-nuclear, 50,000 ton America Class from scratch” (Ref. Mar 31, 2013 20:16 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff).

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/Shall-Not-Perish-RCOH-for-CVN-72-USS-Abraham-Lincoln-06255

 

Beyond the Lincoln’s RCOH, the future becomes less certain. The USA has laws forcing the Navy to maintain a certain number of carriers, but the reality is that the number of naval fighter squadrons is dropping, and the cost of new planes is rising. As entitlement budgets and a colossal debt load start to bite, hard decisions could lie ahead for the some members of the American carrier fleet.

 

For now, however, RCOHs to keep existing carriers in service are being planned and executed fairly smoothly. As one might expect, Northrop Grumman and the US Navy will attempt to apply lessons from the previous 5 RCOH efforts to the USS Abraham Lincoln.

 

Contracts & Key Events

 

Unless otherwise specified, all contracts are issued to Northrop Grumman’s Newport News (now Huntington Ingalls Industries) shipyard in Newport News, VA by US Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, DC.” (Ref. Mar 31, 2013 20:16 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff). http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/Shall-Not-Perish-RCOH-for-CVN-72-USS-Abraham-Lincoln-06255

 

Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class Perry Anderson, assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln, uses a plasma cutter to cut a steel metal.

 

130417-N-HB951-030 NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (April 17, 2013) Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class Perry Anderson, assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln, uses a plasma cutter to cut a steel metal. Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a four-year refueling complex overhaul in Newport News, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Phylicia A. Hanson/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=150006

 

The arresting gear engine for the two-wire of the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) is raised from the flight deck.

 

130603-N-MC421-021 - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 3, 2013) - The arresting gear engine for the two-wire of the The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is raised from the flight deck to be removed from the ship for repairs. Abraham Lincoln is undergoing a refueling complex overhaul in Newport News, Va. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael S. Raney/Released) http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=153522

 

Lincoln Leads the Way in Hearing Conservation

 

“The Office of Naval Research together with the Uniformed Services University's department of preventive medicine and biometrics began using the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 15 July 2013 as a test platform to study the effects of 24 hour noise exposure on Sailors.

The study will span two years and will measure the noise exposure of Sailors attached to aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships while on deployment and in the shipyards.

According to Cmdr. Michael Stevens, assistant professor at the Uniformed Services University, the goal of the study is to accurately identify the amount of harmful noise Sailors are exposed to in different environments.

"We are trying to get better data to help fight hearing loss," said Cmdr. Jennifer Rous, assistant professor at the Uniformed Services University. "Hearing loss costs the Department of Defense billions each year."

Lincoln will be able to use the information gathered to improve working conditions, according to the ships assistant safety officer Lt. John Engel.

"The
Safety Department is going to be able to use this information to raise the level of safety on the ship," said Engel. "We will be able to better tailor the level of personal protection equipment worn to individual tasks and environments to better protect our Sailors, along with increasing the effectiveness of our training program."

The research team aboard
Lincoln is using a new device to measure noise in decibels and record it for analysis.


"The device has three microphones," said Stevens. "One microphone records the ambient noise in the area of the Sailor; the other two microphones are inside foam earplugs and measure the noise that makes it past the hearing protection used by the Sailor."

Measuring the amount of ambient noise on the ship and the amount of noise in the Sailor's ears not only lets the researchers know how noisy an area is, but how effective the protection being worn is.

"The ultimate goal of our research is to identify specific tasks that are always loud so we can
work with ship designers to build quieter ships," said Rous” (Ref. Story Number: NNS130725-06 - Release Date: 7/25/2013 8:05:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary A. Anderson, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=75560

 

Lincoln Sailors Maintain Critical Skillsets During RCOH

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conduct damage control response and rescue training during in-port emergency team drill (IET) daily for duty Sailors on 24 July 2013.

"It's important to know how to respond to an in-port emergency," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Vincenti Mendes IET drill corpsman.

IET drills include first aid responses such as stretcher bearing, wound repairs and rescue breathing. Damage control instructors also train Sailors on how to investigate, report and respond to fires and flooding. These simulated emergencies require instructors and trainees to act efficiently and quickly.

"We have to stay sharp and well trained because anything can happen and we have to be ready for that," said Hull Technician Fireman Miguel Gonzales. "From first aid response to damage
control drills we are taught to handle these situations. We train so we can be prepared for anything."

Even though
Lincoln is currently undergoing a Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH), drills are still conducted daily.

"We train to maintain our readiness and keep the training fresh in the minds of our trainees," said Mendes” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS130802-02 - Release Date: 8/2/2013 8:15:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Jeremiah Mills, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=75730

 

Lincoln's First Commanding Officer Mentors Lincoln Sailors

 

“The first commanding officer of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Newport News to speak to Lincoln Sailors attending ballast training on 25 July 2013.

Ballast training is designed for at risk junior Sailors to help push them back in the right direction during their Navy career.

Retired Rear Adm. Bill Hayden visited the training to reflect and share his wisdom about
Lincoln's current Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries.

Hayden was there for a monumental moment in
Lincoln's history called "acceptance," the moment when the Navy takes responsibility for the ship.

"We got to raise the flag at the stern of the ship for the first time," said Hayden. "At that moment I became the commanding officer of the pre-commissioning unit."

Hayden reflected on receiving honors after crossing the quarterdeck after acceptance of the aircraft carrier.

"I remember the morning they first rendered me honors," said Hayden. "I looked around for this big tall guy with a top hat on and realized they meant me."

Hayden said that coming back to
Lincoln after so many years has brought back many memories of the shipyard and he plans on continuing to support the carrier and its Sailors” (Ref. Story Number: NNS130729-41 - Release Date: 7/29/2013 2:30:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kathleen L. Church, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=75637

 

Lincoln Sailor Collaborates with Newport News Shipbuilding on Safety Initiatives

 

“A USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailor discussed the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier's general hearing conservation at a Newport News Shipbuilding Safety Expo on 2 August 2013.

Lt. John Engel, assistant safety officer was invited to speak with shipyard employees and contractors about noise levels of common industrial tasks in the shipyard.

"The Expo provided attendees an opportunity to learn about safety awareness initiatives implanted around the ship yard," said Engel who added that attendees also had opportunities to share ideas and collaborate on future safety initiatives. "It does nothing for a team to develop a best practice if that practice is not shared."

The expo was attended by Newport News Shipbuilding employees, specifically those involved in Safety Task Teams throughout the shipyard. Julie Lane,
USS Abraham Lincoln construction supervisor, Newport News Shipbuilding, helped coordinate the expo and reflected on the quality of teamwork exchanged between the shipyard and military while the carrier undergoes a Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

"Lt. Engel has been an instrumental part of the Newport News safety task team on the
CVN-72 RCOH program," said Lane. Engel added that during his presentation he also discussed hearing conservation away from the shipyard environment.

"I also discussed the potential damage of listening to one's iPod at the full volume, 95-100 dB, for more than hour can potentially have serious degradation to one's hearing," said Engel. Bob Hafer, lead general foreman, Newport News Shipbuilding, reflected on Engel's safety awareness lecture and his commitment to safety.

"Lt. Engel presented the Hearing Conservation Program information in a way that made sense to the work force. They were able to easily relate the noise
levels presented to both their work and family life," said Hafer. "His strong commitment to sharing the effects of noise on our lives was reflected by his willingness to come in and present after being on duty the evening before."

In mid-July, the Office of Naval Research together with the Uniformed Services University's department of preventive medicine and biometrics began using
USS Abraham Lincoln as a test platform. The study aboard USS Abraham Lincoln uses a device that measures noise in decibels and records it for analysis.

 

The study will span two years and will measure the noise exposure of Sailors attached to aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships while on deployment and in the shipyards” (Ref. Story Number: NNS130819-22 - Release Date: 8/19/2013 2:52:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=76007

 

Lincoln Supply Department Receives Blue "E"

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Supply Department received the 2012 Supply Blue "E" Award for Supply Excellence on 13 August 2013.

Capt. Michael Ropiak, Commander Naval Force Atlantic force supply officer, visited Lincoln to present the award to Lincoln Supply personnel and congratulate them for their outstanding effort.

"I'm familiar with the yards and I know it's difficult for some," said Ropiak. "You've all shown you can handle this with proficiency and enthusiasm and I'm proud to award this honor to the
Lincoln."

The
Blue "E" is awarded annually to supply departments that demonstrate excellent quality and efficiency, as judged by a comprehensive multiple-day supply management inspection. Additionally, the command had to continually meet standards of excellence with monthly improvements during the year.

"This is
Lincoln's ninth consecutive Blue 'E'," said Cmdr. Eric Oettl, Lincoln's Supply officer who thanked all of the Sailors past and present who contributed to earning the Blue "E" Award. "Thanks for the outstanding work."

Oettl went on to highlight the effect winning the
Blue "E" had on Lincoln's other achievements.

"Without this award,
Lincoln could not have won the Battle 'E'," said Oettl. "Without it we wouldn't have been the best west coast carrier in the fleet."

Ropiak closed ceremony with a cake-cutting and words of encouragement.

"Many of you will be here for the years to come," said Ropiak. "I encourage you to continue your history of excellence and take it with you all the way back to sea"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS130814-14 - Release Date: 8/14/2013 2:38:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kyle Henley, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=75950

 

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) returned to Norfolk, Va. on 29 August 2013, conducting Sea Trials from 25 to 28 August 2013, conducting Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) from 29 August 2009 to 29 August 2013. Theodore Roosevelt departed Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation on 25 August 2013, for Sea Trials; began simulating an at sea environment "Fast Cruise" at Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation on 19 August 2013; rotated position "turn ship" at pier at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) on 17 May 2013; left dry dock and transited the James River, relocating from dry dock 11 to a pier 2 at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC), for the second half of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 21 May 2011; entering Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation, for a RCOH on 29 August 2009. The Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) awarded a $2.4 billion contract to Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation, for the RCOH of Theodore Roosevelt on 26 August 2009; began a shipboard coordinated off-load and outfitting plan (SCOOP) at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. on 15 June 2009. The SCOOP process involves unloading all shipboard equipment, furniture and tools not welded, wired or piped into place. Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation has been awarded a planning contract option from the U.S. Navy for the RCOH of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt. This option is valued at $186.4 million and continues work awarded in 2006. The total estimated value of the contract is $558.2 million. Theodore Roosevelt returned to Norfolk, Va. on 21 May 2009, conducting off-load of ammunition off the coast of Virginia from 18 to 21 May 2009, for RCOH at Newport News, Virginia, Grumman Corporation. Teamwork is often the theme of any evolution that takes place on an aircraft carrier. Aboard Theodore Roosevelt, teamwork has been the most important component in the ammunition off-load the ship is currently executing” (Ref. 76; 1107 - Story Number: NNS110523-11 - Release Date: 5/23/2011 1:32:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (EXW) Joey Morgon, USS Theodore Roosevelt Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); Story Number: NNS090901-18 - Release Date: 9/1/2009 4:45:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Nathan L. Lockwood, USS Theodore Roosevelt Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS); 1107 - TR Sailors work together to complete safe ammo off-load - By MC3 Dominique Watts, May 20, 2009; 1096 - Northrop Grumman Awarded $558 Million Planning Contract for USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) Work - NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - Nov. 16, 2006; 1125 - Story Number: NNS090617-20 - Release Date: 6/17/2009 10:10:00 PM - By MC2(SW) Bonnie Williams, USS Theodore Roosevelt Public Affairs, NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) & 1108 - Northrop Grumman Awarded Planning Contract Option for USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) Work - NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Jan. 4, 2008 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=60561

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=47954 http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46258

http://www.irconnect.com/noc/press/pages/news_releases.html?d=133798

http://www.tr.surfor.navy.mil/newsstories/May%2009/05-20-2009-1.html

http://www.nn.northropgrumman.com/news/2006/111606_news.html

 

Lincoln's Deck Drain Team Performs Vital Maintenance during RCOH

 

As reported on 27 September 2013, “a four-man deck drain team on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is hard at work inspecting and maintaining the carriers' 6,000 deck drains during its Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

Chief Hull Technician Gloria Velsko, Repair Division, and PM 36 team leader emphasizes the importance of the team's contribution to RCOH.

"This team is vital to the carrier's sanitization purposes by ensuring the drains are clear and free of debris to prevent any flooding," said Velsko who added her team is responsible for completing nearly 5,000 tasks during the overhaul. "Their job also ties ensuring the health and comfort and stability of the ship by ensuring these deck drains are draining properly."

Velsko added that her personnel are responsible for quarterly inspections throughout the ship to verify that deck drain covers are installed and remain installed to prevent debris from clogging or collecting in the waste drain system, as
the ship is exposed to excessive dirt and grime during RCOH.

PM36 Sailors will inspect the 6,000 drains once during a calendar year added Velsko.

"We want to ensure these drains have a secure seal and drain properly," said Velsko. "PM36 refurbishes existing strainers and valves. In the instances where they cannot be refurbished, they replace them"” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS130927-01 - Release Date: 9/27/2013 7:24:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=76797

 

Lincoln Sailors Performed More than 41,000 Hours of Fire Watches during RCOH

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) have completed 41,270 fire watch man hours while the ship undergoes its 42.5-month Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) in Newport News on 30 September 2013.

USS Abraham Lincoln is one of several carriers at Newport News Shipbuilding to take on fire watch hours while undergoing RCOH.

Sailors will complete an estimated 200,000 hours of fire watch, which serves as a cost avoidance measure during the carrier's overhaul.

Capt. Karl Thomas, commanding officer,
USS Abraham Lincoln emphasized the crucial role Sailors are performing during their fire watches.

"These Sailors are significantly contributing to the overall mission," said Thomas, who added the latest fire watch hours completed represents a significant cost avoidance measure of millions of dollars since the carrier arrived at Newport News Shipbuilding in March.

The money saved by Sailors conducting fire watch will be used later in the project to fund other repairs.

Thomas added that fire watches are an important tool as the first line of defense against potential casualties.

"There is a tremendous amount of welding and grinding going
on around the ship. As we've seen on other ships, fires can be extremely devastating," said Thomas. "This fact makes the job of a fire watch that much more important."

Fire watches are manned as a safety precaution during various types of hot work to include grinding, cutting and welding” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS131003-13 - Release Date: 10/3/2013 10:20:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=76948

 

Lincoln's Head Repair Team Excels at Tackling the 'Dirtiest Jobs'

 

“Eight Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) PM 29 Head Repair Team are tackling some of the "dirtiest jobs" on board during its 42.5-month Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) in Newport News on 9 October 2013.

USS Abraham Lincoln's Commanding Officer Capt. Karl Thomas and Command Master Chief Gregg Weber met with the team for the weekly CO's Podcast to learn how they are supporting the carrier's RCOH effort.

"This team is a great example of leadership opportunities our Sailors are harnessing to guide and mentor other Sailors while tackling an assortment of crucial repairs during
RCOH," said Weber.

PM 29's Head Repair Team works on 135 of
Lincoln's heads, but also maintains mirrors, sinks and showers. Their goal is to refurbish these heads to an almost "new" state by the end of RCOH.

Chief Hull Technician Gloria Velsko,
Repair Division, PM 29 team leader emphasized the importance of this team's role during RCOH.

"During
RCOH the team will remove damaged equipment and repair, replace or test to ensure proper operation," said Velsko.

Hull Technician 3rd Class Joey Potts, otherwise known as the "toilet specialist", a term of endearment used by his fellow PM 29 Sailors, for his extensive experience fixing heads.

"While at times this job can be difficult, in the end, the team is made up of a special group of Sailors who come together to get these sometimes smelly jobs done," said Potts, who has performed nearly 1,000 maintenance calls on heads while assigned to
USS Abraham Lincoln.

To learn more about the PM 29 Head Repair Team, watch the latest
USS Abraham Lincoln's video podcast by visiting: www.youtube.com/ussabrahamlincoln72” (Ref. Story Number: NNS131010-14 - Release Date: 10/10/2013 12:04:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=77040

 

Lincoln's Decking Team Reaches Halfway Point

 

“Sailors with the decking team aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) reached a milestone achievement on 9 October 2013 by removing more than 50 percent of Lincoln's tiled floors. The decking team started the project November 2012 when the first half of the Ship Coordinated Offload/Onload Plan (SCOOP) was complete.

Instead of paying for contractors to remove Lincoln's tiling, Sailors with the decking team completed an estimated 32,000 man hours saving an estimated $3.5 million on the Refueling and Complex Ooverhaul (RCOH) contract. At the halfway point, the decking team has removed enough tiling to cover Lincoln's 4.5-acre flight deck.

"This project is one of those jobs where you can see what you have accomplished," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Justin Hanrahan, a production supervisor in the decking team.

In order to work efficiently, Sailors are split into teams and are assigned to spaces of the ship that need to be worked on. When asked about his impression of the decking team's accomplishments, Capt. Karl Thomas, commanding officer,
USS Abraham Lincoln said, "This is one of the most physically demanding and difficult jobs across the ship. They have tremendous pride in the job that they've accomplished to date, and I am always impressed at the positive attitude exhibited by this high performing team."

Lincoln's Air Boatswain, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Chris Smith reflected on the utilization of the preventative maintenance (PM) 13 team and its removal of tile, painted decks, plastic roof cement (PRC), non-skid and terrazzo areas prior to Lincoln's arrival at Newport News Shipbuilding resulting in the development of streamline processes and cost savings.

"We set goals at the beginning of the day by assigning small rooms that can be completed in a normal working day," said Smith. "Sailors will stay productive and busy by having a goal that is attainable." Smith added through the implementation of other initiatives to streamline the process on preservation of decks resulted in more cost savings.

"Additionally through lessons learned PM 13 discovered that electrical equipment is the most efficient and cost effective tools to use, which will provide cost savings
for future RCOH projects," said Smith. "The hard charging Air Department Sailors are given clear objectives to accomplish with an end result of achievement."

Sailors who work to remove tile are required to use safety equipment, including a respirator, safety goggles and hearing protection, while operating one of the decking team's many electrical jackhammers” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS131015-10 - Release Date: 10/15/2013 9:28:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Christopher Huot, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=77087

 

Lincoln Progressing in Rebuilding Berthing Spaces

 

“Sailors assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) PM 11's berthing team are beginning the rebuilding process by overhauling spaces and bringing in replacement racks on 20 November 2013.

The PM 11 team, consisting of 31 Sailors, successfully removed more than 1,500 racks from Lincoln spaces prior to the carrier's arrival at Newport News Shipbuilding. During the last year, Lincoln Sailors have modernized the berthing spaces by sanding, painting and installing new decks and racks to eventually get the carrier ready to move the crew aboard.

"I have been here since March and the progress the berthing team has made has been amazing," said Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Terrence Parks, berthing rehabilitation team leading chief petty officer. "Having Sailors from other departments temporarily assigned to the berthing crew not only allows us to work faster and more efficiently, but it also gives the ability to every Sailor on the ship to help contribute to getting the
Lincoln back out to the fleet."

The berthing team, led by
Weapons Department, started in November 2012, and after only seven months they were able to have all 37 berthing areas gutted, prepped and ready to begin the modernization.

The rehabilitation of the berthing areas is planned in three distinct phases. The first phase consisted of completely cleaning the berthing areas. The second phase involves preparing the spaces for painting. The last phase will consist of installing new furniture, new racks, lockers and laundry bins.

"Currently all 37 spaces have completed the first phase, while 10 spaces have completed phase two and are awaiting phase three," said Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Michael Mock, assistant berthing production
leading chief petty officer. "We have three or four more spaces that have been started on phase two."

To learn more about the PM 11 Berthing Team, watch the latest
USS Abraham Lincoln's video podcast by visiting: www.youtube.com/ussabrahamlincoln72” (Ref. Story Number: NNS131120-16 - Release Date: 11/20/2013 8:15:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jonathon L. Lockwood, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=77756

 

Knowledge Management Officer Tracks Lessons Learned During RCOH

 

As reported on 21 November 2013, “as USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) undergoes its 42.5-month Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) in Newport News, Va., Lincoln's knowledge-management officer is gathering lessons for future carriers' use.

Lt. Michael Misch, assigned to Lincoln's Operations Department and known to the crew as the "kingpin of lessons learned", estimates he has compiled more than 100 lessons learned in the past year and looks forward to gathering more lessons to streamline processes aboard the carrier.

"Most of the lessons learned are for follow-on carriers that will undergo their
RCOH upon arrival at Newport News Shipyard," said Misch. "However, some of the lessons learned will directly assist ship's force by correcting a deficiency immediately." Misch added that the lessons learned he captures can assist the ship's force in turning around plans to implement a cost-saving procedure or steps to stream line a process.

"Personally I have enjoyed this job," said Misch, who also said he looks forward to working with his Newport News Shipbuilding counterparts to investigate a new approach to solving a problem. "There are times where maybe the shipyard workers know something that we
don't know because they have seen it before or there is something happening on our side that the shipyard could assist us."

Misch, along with his counterparts at Newport News Shipbuilding, recently launched a contest to bring in additional lessons learned from both the shipyard and ship's force. "This was the first time Newport News Shipbuilding is doing one as well at the same time," said Misch. "We share lessons learned boxes." Misch said combining forces with Newport News Shipbuilding in the lessons learned collection process has the potential for fixing unforeseen problems down the road.

"It
is important that I am able to network with the shipyard knowledge-management officer to communicate and possibly fix a problem," said Misch. Rickey Roach, process improvement analyst and supervisor of shipbuilding Newport News knowledge manager, reflected on harnessing lessons learned while a carrier is undergoing RCOH and the benefits to follow-on carrier crews.

"Mike has done a fantastic job keeping the Ship engaged in knowledge management. The ship has also been very good about learning from the lessons on other
RCOH's, and we look forward to learning more as we move forward in this availability," said Roach” (Ref. Story Number: NNS131121-26 - Release Date: 11/21/2013 7:59:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=77826

 

Lincoln Sailors Receive Recognition for Achieving Major Engineering Milestone during RCOH

 

“Three junior enlisted Sailors serving aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) were recognized by Capt. Karl Thomas, commanding officer, for their involvement in reenergizing the port-side firefighting main water supply eight weeks ahead of schedule, on 27 November 2013. The port and starboard fire mains contribute to a host of critical functions on the ship, providing water for firefighting, toilets, sinks and showers. The restoration of a ship's fire main will also ensure the its safety when Newport News Shipbuilding floods Lincoln's dry dock area.

"Your attention to detail and leaning forward is another great example of ship's force dedication to complete
RCOH (refueling complex overhaul) on time," said Thomas, who also said the three Sailors went "above and beyond" the call of duty to accomplish the mission. Damage Controlman 2nd Class Alissa Reiher, one of the three Sailors recognized by Lincoln's commanding officer received a Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for leading a 16-person valve maintenance team that was instrumental in changing out many of the ship's valves as well as tracking all of the replacements being repaired by Newport News Shipbuilding and contractors.

"I'm stunned, I feel individually undeserving of the award because there are so many others who were just as instrumental," said Reiher, who has served on board
Lincoln for three years. Hull Technician 2nd Class Matthew Berg and Damage Controlman 3rd Class Evan Marshall, were both recognized by the commanding officer and received command coins for their involvement with achieving an engineering milestone ahead of schedule.

"It's nice just doing your job," said Marshall, who has served aboard
Lincoln for nearly five years. Like Reiher, Berg was honored to be recognized alongside his peers. "It means a lot and I'm honored that my peers that I work with received recognition," said Berg. Chief Warrant Officer 4 Gregory Collins, Lincoln's damage control assistant, emphasized the Sailors' clear-cut objectives during RCOH.

"These Sailors have maximized their productivity and worked toward a clear objective to accomplish the
RCOH mission," Collins said. "I am proud of them." Master Chief Machinist's Mate Romeo Encarnacion praised the Sailors during the awards ceremony. "This is one of many milestones we will accomplish during RCOH," said Encarnacion.

In addition to the ship's force, the Carrier Engineering Maintenance Assist Team and Newport News Shipbuilding worked together to replace more than 120 valves ahead of schedule to allow for the re-energizing of the port-side firemain” (Ref. Story Number: NNS131202-13 - Release Date: 12/2/2013 1:56:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=78013

 

 

Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) activities at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

 (1 January to 31 December 2013)

Volume IV, Chapter II

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

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978-1-365-26038-4