U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS participating in SLEP, COH/RCOH (1964 to 9 May 2017) at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Selected Restricted Availability (SRA); Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (EDSRA); Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) and Docked-DPIA

(1998 to 2016)

Volume IV, Chapter I

Part I of IIUSS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Nimitz (CVN-68) RCOH

Part II of IIUSS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69, USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) RCOH.

 

 

“In the United States nuclear Navy, Refueling and Overhaul (ROH) refers to a lengthy process or procedure performed on nuclear-powered Naval ships, which involves replacement of expended nuclear fuel with new fuel and a general maintenance fix-up and often modernization of the entire ship. In theory, such a process could simply involve only refueling or only an overhaul, but nuclear refueling is usually combined with an overhaul. An ROH usually takes a year to two years or longer to perform at a Naval shipyard. Time periods between ROH's on a ship have varied historically from about 5-20 years (for submarines) to up to 25 years (for Nimitz-class aircraft carriers). For modern submarines and aircraft carriers, ROH's are typically carried out about midway through their operating lifespan. 

At a shipyard, a ship to undergo ROH goes into a drydock, which is then closed off from the sea. Then water is evacuated from the drydock with blocks placed under the hull, so the ship's hull will rest on the blocks. At the end of the ROH, the drydock is refilled with water so the ship can float and be let out to sea.

 

To start ROH, operating procedures are used to shut down and cool down the propulsion power plant to bring it to desired temperatures, pressures, and other conditions. During the ROH, ship's Navy crew stand shutdown watches, and civilian shipyard workers do much of the repair, maintenance, and installation work. During an ROH, all personnel in a maintenance work area are commonly required to wear a hard hat. Land-based Naval reactor prototype plants have also undergone similar refueling and overhauls, not at a shipyard but at whatever facility they are located.

 

Refueling

 

In a nuclear-powered ship, the nuclear fuel is essentially a solid inside a reactor core which is inside the ship's nuclear reactor. Once a reactor core has gone critical, meaning it has been used during a reactor operation, highly radioactive nuclear fission products have formed in the core, and the core has become highly radioactive. Refueling involves taking the expended core out of reactor and putting in a new core with fresh nuclear fuel. Because it is so radioactive, removing a core with expended nuclear fuel from a reactor requires elaborate radiological handling precautions. The internal surfaces inside of a reactor plant that has been critical are considered radioactively contaminated.

 

All water that has come into contact with the inside of such a reactor plant is considered radioactive and requires radiological handling and disposal precautions. In addition to radiological training and qualification required for working in radiation areas or with radioactive materials or contamination, radiation exposure to workers is monitored to ensure maximum exposure limits are not exceeded.

 

Overhaul

 

The overhaul commonly includes extensive maintenance and renovation work and checks of various systems and equipment aboard the ship. A major overhaul also typically includes upgrading various systems and equipment to modernize it; for example, old analog electrical equipment may be replaced by new digital electronic equipment. The work for such overhauls is typically planned out by engineers well in advance and new equipment is obtained for any replacements or installations.

 

An example of renovation work done during refueling and overhauls of submarines is the conversion of a fleet ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) to a guided missile submarine (SSGN). Such a conversion consists of taking the ballistic missiles and their silos out of the missile section in the submarine, and replacing them with more than 100 Tomahawk cruise missiles and special operations force insertion platforms which can carry up to 66 special operations personnel. The first four Ohio-class submarines have undergone such conversions during their midlife refueling and overhauls” (Ref. [1]).

 

During an overhaul, an extensive testing program is conducted. Numerous test procedures that have been written are followed, data is recorded as required, and logs of the testing are kept. Among tests that can be conducted include: radiography to test critical welds, testing of fluid systems and other pressure boundaries which includes hydrostatic testing to detect any leaks, and testing of electrical and mechanical setpoints for various types of equipment such as sensor input setpoints for various kinds of automatic trips and safety valve relief pressure setpoints. At the finish of the ROH, the testing data records are bound and retained as a permanent documentation record resulting from the ROH.

 

When the ship is ready to go towards the end of the ROH, the power plant is warmed or brought back up to the desired operating temperature and pressure and can then be started up when ready. Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) is a process for refueling and upgrading nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in the US Navy performed at a Naval shipyard. The nuclear reactors that power some aircraft carriers typically use up their nuclear fuel about halfway through their desired 50-year life spans.

 

Because carriers can last so long before being retired, they are refueled and refurbished with an RCOH to extend their useable lifetime. At the same time a ship is refueled, it is given a complex overhaul in which broken or worn parts are repaired or replaced and systems are modernized.

 

The modernization typically includes an upgrade of ship’s combat systems and warfighting capabilities, its internal distribution systems are upgraded, and allowance is made for future upgrades over the ship’s remaining operational service life. Given the size of an aircraft carrier and the number of systems and subsystems it has, an RCOH is extremely complex, costly (several billion dollars), and time-consuming. Each RCOH is planned to take almost three years” (Ref. [2], [3] & [4]).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refueling_and_overhaul

 

Ref. 1035 - JOINT FLEET MAINTENANCE MANUAL - VOLUME II - INTEGRATED FLEET MAINTENANCE - MAINTENANCE AND MODERNIZATION PROGRAM - VOLUME II, PART I, CHAPTER 2 - RCOH - Refueling and Complex Overhaul https://fas.org/nuke/guide/usa/doctrine/navy/jfmm/vol2/TOC.htm

 

Ref. A - Aircraft Carrier Fleet Services / Refueling and Complex Overhaul

http://www.nn.northropgrumman.com/capabilities/rco.html - Not Active

Ref. B - RCOH - Not Active

http://www.sb.northropgrumman.com/products/acfleetservices/index.html

 

References - Refueling and Complex Overhaul - Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refueling_and_overhaul

 

1. Unmanned Undersea Vehicles And Guided Missile Submarines: Technological and Operational Synergies - February 2002

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/cst/csat27.pdf

 

2. CVN-68 Nimitz-class Modernization /  http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/cvn-68-mods.htm

 

3. USS Theodore Roosevelt Headed Into Mid-Life Overhaul - Sep 04, 2013 11:02 UTC by Defense Industry Daily staff

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/uss-theodore-roosevelt-headed-into-midlife-overhaul-02810/

 

4. Refueling and Complex Overhaul / http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refueling_and_overhaul

 

Note that the new CVN-21 Class will have a redesigned nuclear power plant whose features will affect its RCOH. The new system is expected to make use of advances from the USA’s Seawolf and Virginia Class submarine reactors, in order to eliminate expensive reactor refueling completely, increase the reactors’ output, and drop the number of people required to operate them.

 

“With their uniquely qualified work force and specialized facilities, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN), former Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, is the only shipyard to perform overhaul and refueling work on Nimitz-class aircraft carriers, a three-year project that includes the refueling of both the ship's reactors, as well as significant modernization work.

 

Huntington Ingalls Industries designs, builds and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe. For more than a century, Huntington Ingalls Industries has built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. The company also provides a wide variety of products and services to the commercial energy industry and other government customers, including the Department of Energy.

Employing more than 38,000 in Virginia, Mississippi, Louisiana and California, its primary business divisions are Newport News Shipbuilding and Ingalls Shipbuilding. For more information about Huntington Ingalls Industries, visit:

 

HII on the web: www.huntingtoningalls.com

HII on Facebook: www.facebook.com/HuntingtonIngallsIndustries

HII on Twitter: twitter.com/hiindustries

 

http://globenewswire.com/news-release/2014/04/30/632045/10079286/en/PHOTO-RELEASE-Newport-News-Shipbuilding-Installs-New-Upper-Level-Structure-on-USS-Abraham-Lincoln-CVN-72.html#sthash.V5Prc8HR.dpuf

 

U.S. Aircraft Carriers participating in Complex Overhaul (COH) and or Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)) - 1964 to Present

 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER

COMM

FROM

TO

eighth Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) – Pre-Overhaul Availability from 3 October to 2 November 1964, receiving her “second successive” Battle Readiness Pennant, as well as repeated “E” awards for her Air, Engineering and Reactor and Weapons Departments, on 9 October. Shifted from her anchorage at Hampton Roads up the James River to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia for her first Refueling and Overhaul (ROH) on 2 November 1964.

25/11/61(C)

 

03/10/64

02/11/64

 

eighth Enterprise (CVN-65), former CVA(N)-65 – Shifted from her anchorage at Hampton Roads up the James River to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia for her first Refueling and Overhaul (ROH) on 2 November 1964.

 25/11/61

02/11/64

 

22/06/65

seventh Ranger (CVA-61) – COH at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

10/08/57(C)

30/09/66

30/05/67

fifth Independence (CV-62) – Complex Overhaul (COH) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia

10/01/59

Feb 1967

Nov 1967

eighth Enterprise (CVN-65), former CVA(N)-65 – RCOH – Departed Alameda, California and steamed to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia for her Second Refueling and then returned to the west coast.  Departed Pier 2 on 11 October 1969, proceeding down the Elizabeth River for Sea Trials on 16 January 1971.

 25/11/61

22/08/69

20/01/71

third Constellation (CVA-64) – DSRA at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington

27/10/61(C)

08/05/70

Dec 1970

Kitty Hawk (CV-63), former CVA-63 – COH

Entered dry dock at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash.

 29/04/61

08/03/76

01/04/77

seventh Ranger (CV-61), former CVA-61 – Dry docked for a COH at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

10/08/57(C)

09/02/77

Mar. 1978

eighth Enterprise (CVN-65), former CVA(N)-65 – COH at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, departing for Operation Southwest Passage, the return to NAS Alameda, California

25/11/61

11/01/79

08/02/82

third Constellation (CV/CVA-64) – 14-month Complex Overhaul (COH) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash. to allow the carrier to operate the new F/A-18AI

27/10/61(C)

 

Dec 1982

Feb 1984

Nimitz (CVN-68), former (CVA(N)-68 – COH at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia

03/05/75

17/06/83

22/07/84

Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVB-43 & CV-42 – COH at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Wash.

01/10/47

 

17/10/83

18/01/85

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69 – COH at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia

18/10/77

26/10/85

26/04/87

Carl Vinson (CVN-70) – COH at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash.

13/03/82

22/09/90

06/04/93

eighth Enterprise (CVN-65), former CVA(N)-65 – RCOH - additional updates required through 1995 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia

25/11/61

12/10/90

23/09/94

Forrestal  (CV-59), former CVA-59 – A 14-month COH at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard

01/10/55

 

14/09/92

14 est/11/93

John F. Kennedy (CV-67), former CVA-67 – COH at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard

07/09/68

13/09/93

13/09/95

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69 – COH (Drydock No. 11) at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia

18/10/77

11/10/95

26/01/97

second Kitty Hawk (CV-63), former CVA-63 – Phase 1, FY 97 – A $110 million project COH at Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California & Phase 2, FY 97 COH at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, including three months in dry dock in Bremerton

29/04/61

21/05/97 to 15/12/97

01/01/95 to Mar. 1998

Nimitz (CVN-68), former (CVA(N)-68) – RCOH at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia

03/05/75

26/05/98

28/06/01

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69 – RCOH at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia - a 36-month $2.5 billion

18/10/77

22/05/01

25/03/05

Carl Vinson (CVN-70) – RCOH

at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia

13/03/92

11/11/05

11/07/09

Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) – RCOH at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia - 2009 - RCOH. Commenced a shipboard coordinated off-load and outfitting plan (SCOOP) at Naval Station Norfolk June 15, preceded by off-loading ammunition off the coast of Virginia from 18 to 21 May 2009 in preparation of ROCH

25/10/86

29/08/09

29/08/13

Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) – RCOH at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia (Huntington Ingalls) Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)  / Moved  to Drydock 11

11/11/89

28/03/13 to

 

 

USS George Washington (CVN-73) – RCOH at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia (Huntington Ingalls) Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN)

04/07/92

2017 to

 

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and USS Nimitz (CVN-68) RCOH

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)


“Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) “pledges to be the "go to" resource for aircraft carriers, delivering lifecycle services for nuclear powered aircraft carriers. An important milestone in a carrier’s 50 year lifecycle is the Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) which occurs around midlife.’

 

“During an American Nimitz Class carrier's 50 year life span, it has 4 Drydocking Planned Incremental Availabilities and 12 Planned Incremental Availabilities. It has only one RCOH, however, which is the most significant overhaul the ship receives during its 50-year life span” (Ref. 674).

 

“After nearly 25 years of continuous service, an aircraft carrier undergoes a three year maintenance period to refuel its nuclear reactors, upgrade and modernize combat and communication systems and overhaul the ship's hull, mechanical and electrical systems. This is the refueling and complex overhaul. Upon redelivery, the carrier will be ready for another 25 years of service.

 

Newport News will continue to refuel Nimitz-class carriers for several decades” (Ref. A).

 

“With their uniquely qualified work force and specialized facilities, Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia is the only shipyard to perform overhaul and refueling work on Nimitz-class aircraft carriers, a three-year project that includes the refueling of both the ship's reactors, as well as significant modernization work” (Ref. A & B).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) commenced pre-overhaul availability at NOB Norfolk, Virginia on 3 October 1964” (Ref. 362A).

 

“Less than a week later USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) received another accolade which was a fitting reward for a year of history making events and outstanding achievement, whren on 9 October 1964, Vice Admiral Ramsey, Commander Naval Air Forces, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, awarded the ship her second Battle Readiness Pennant and Plaque with additional repeated "E" awards for her Air, Weapons, Engineering and Reactor Departments on 9 October 1964. Competing with all the ships in the Atlantic Fleet of her type, Enterprise earned top scores in overall efficiency and readiness during fiscal year 1964 to win the coveted award” (Ref. 329B-1964 & 362A).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) underwent pre-overhaul availability at NOB Norfolk, Virginia from 3 October to 2 November 1964, receiving her “second successive” Battle Readiness Pennant, as well as repeated “E” awards for her Air, Engineering and Reactor and Weapons Departments, on 9 October 1964” (Ref. 329B-1964 & 362A).

 

“In late October 1964, USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) operated off the Virginia capes, both “to purge her tanks” in preparation for entering drydock, and to afford 1,220 dependents a chance to sail out with her for a brief cruise, viewing an aerial firepower demonstration and an underway refueling” (Ref. 362A).

 

On 2 November 1964, USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) shifted from her anchorage at Hampton Roads up the James River to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia and entered drydock for her first Refueling and Overhaul (ROH), having steamed upward of 200,000 miles, equivalent to eight circumnavigations of the globe, on her original fuel supply and recovering over 42,000 aircraft, in three years of commissioned service” (Ref. 362A).

 

“New Year's Day 1965 found USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) in drydock receiving her first refueling and overhaul since her commissioning three years before” (Ref. 329B-1965).

 

On 17 February 1965, work on the hull of USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) was completed, the drydocks were flooded and tugs guided the carrier out of Shipway 11 and over to Pier 8, Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, where she was moored for additional work, focusing upon refueling. Compartments were built to suit new needs and her fighting ability was increased by “various innovations"” (Ref. 329B-1964 & 362A).

 

“In May 1965, the tempo of operations increased as systems were tested and new personnel reported aboard USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) from special schools and training commands” (Ref. 329B-1965).

 

Captain James L. Holloway III who will assume command on 17 July 1965, and after 18 months of nuclear training, arrived aboard USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) on 10 May 1965” (Ref. 329B-1965).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) was notified on 1 June that as of 1 October 1965, her homeport was to be changed from Norfolk, Va., to Alameda, Calif. She was originally scheduled to steam to the West Coast around South America in a leisurely trip that would put her into several ports” (Ref. 329B-1965).

 

On 9 June 1965, USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) tested her propulsion systems, turning around, stern away from the waterfront area, so that her four powerful screws would not damage the docks” (Ref. 329B-1965).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) was tied fast to the docks, simulating underway conditions for five days during her fast cruise from 9 to 13 June 1965” (Ref. 329B-1965).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) conducted Refueling and Overhaul (ROH) at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia from 3 October to 2 November 1964 to 22 June 1965, hull work performed while in drydock from to 2 November 1964 to 31 December 1964, and later at Pier 8 where she was moored for additional work, focusing upon refueling. Compartments were built to suit new needs and her fighting ability was increased by “various innovations from 31 December 1964 to 22 June 1965, before being towed down the James River to the Atlantic. She underwent extensive rejuvenation and was introduced to new systems and concepts.

 

Among these new innovations was the he Integrated Operational Intelligence System (IOIS), a most significant technological improvement, was installed. Developed by North American Aviation, it is composed of an I01 Center, an Airborne Systems Support Center (ASSC), and a squadron of RA5C supersonic reconnaissance aircraft, IOIC receives and develops the film received from a RA5C Vigilante reconnaissance plane. The significant photos are then selected iniaturized and filed. The information extracted from the photos is transferred to IBM cards and recorded on magnetic tapes to be stored for future use. Included in IOIC are computers which rapidly research and plot desired targets and their defenses. This computerized method of storing and researching targets reduces the old system of hand filing and retrieval from days and hours to a matter of minutes.

 

The IOIC received and processed photographic intelligence data, storing it for future use, equipped with computers that rapidly researched and plotted “desired targets and their defenses.” The system was all weather and day/night capable. The Satellite Navigation System (SatNav), exceeding “the Loran System in precision fixes,” was also installed. Developed by Johns Hopkins University, Md., SatNav utilized data transited from the satellite orbiting the earth five times daily, a revolutionary integration of systems at that time. To provide space for the new system’s receivers, and for greater range on the Loran, the mainmast was raised 10 feet and a second yardarm was added. An oil-fired boiler was installed for electricity “Hotel circuit and ventilation when the ship was in port for long periods, enabling the reactors to be temporarily shut down.

 

This permits the reactors to be shut down while "fossil powerw takes over the duties of heating, lighting and air-conditioning. All the aviation electronic shops were remodeled to better handle the increasing complex of electronic gear on modern aircraft. To allow for even greater needs, two new shops were built.

 

Two sponsons were added, while the port missile sponson was converted into a 280-man compartment to accommodate wartime manning. All four shafts were removed and two were replaced. A variety of other repairs were performed on the ship's hull and compartments.

 

In replacing the cores, a 15-foot hole was cut in the flight deck and eight smaller holes were cut in the hangar deck over each of the reactors and shielded, new fuel clusters were placed i n the reactors after the old cells, encased in water, were removed to a nuclear disposal plant. During the refueling and overhaul period, VADM Hyman Rickover made several trips to Norfolk to observe the operation. He praised the ship’s performance and predicted even better performance as nuclear cores were perfected. CDR John A. Smith, ship's reactor officer, was awarded a Navy Commendation Medal for Special Achievement by the Secretary of the Navy” (Ref. 329B-1965 & 362A).

 

Among these new innovations was the Integrated Operational Intelligence Center (IOIC). Developed by North American Aviation, it was composed of an IOI Center, an Airborne Systems Support Center (ASSC) and a squadron of supersonic RA-5C reconnaissance aircraft. The IOIC received and processed photographic intelligence data, storing it for future use, equipped with computers that rapidly researched and plotted “desired targets and their defenses.” The system was all weather and day/night capable. The Satellite Navigation System (SatNav), exceeding “the Loran System in precision fixes,” was also installed. Developed by Johns Hopkins University, Md., SatNav utilized data transited from the satellite orbiting the earth five times daily, a revolutionary integration of systems at that time. To provide space for the new system’s receivers, and for greater range on the Loran, the mainmast was raised 10 feet and a second yardarm was added. An oil-fired boiler was installed for electricity and ventilation when the ship was in port for long periods, enabling the reactors to be temporarily shut down. In addition to renovating existing aviation shops, two new ones were built. A pair of sponsons was added, while the port missile sponson was converted into a 280-man compartment to accommodate wartime manning. All four shafts were removed, two of were replaced. During the overhaul and refueling period, Vice Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, Director, Division of Naval Reactors, Atomic Energy Commission, visited the ship several times, praising the performance of the her crew. The ship was ready for sea again by June 1965, an exhausting effort for all involved. Enterprise was notified of her transfer to the Pacific Fleet on 1 June. Initial planning provided for her transit to the west coast around South America in a “leisurely trip,” putting into several ports en route. Upon arrival in the Pacific Fleet, Enterprise was scheduled to proceed to Alameda, establishing her “residency for several months.” Eventually, she was to deploy to Vietnam. On 9 June 1965, Enterprise tested her propulsion systems, turning around, stern away from the waterfront area, so that her four powerful screws would not damage the docks.

 

A week later, she began a new experience for her crew when she took a “fast cruise.” Still moored, the ship simulated underway conditions for five days. Enterprise successfully completed sea trials off the Virginia capes, from 22 to 24 June 1965, under the personal direction of Vice Admiral Rickover. The propulsion trials included steaming at full power and an emergency reversal test, together with aircraft launching and recovery, as well as “check out” of all ship’s systems and equipment, completing her First Refueling and Major Overhaul at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, and made preparations for her transfer to the Pacific Fleet to provide support to the growing war in Vietnam; returned to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, and underwent her first refueling and overhaul (2 November 1964 to 22 June 1965)The effort required getting Enterprise again ready for sea was recognized on 25 June, when Commander John A. Smith, Reactor Officer, received the Navy Commendation Medal, citing his “meritorious achievement in the field of naval reactor operations.”  However, normal planning for her shift of home ports was disrupted in late August, word being received that because of the build-up in the U.S. commitment to South Vietnam, the ship would take the faster route around Africa, reporting directly to Commander, 7th Fleet (Com7thFlt) as Carrier Task Unit 77.7.1, under ComCarDiv-3, TG 77.7. Departure was rescheduled for late October, and the crew increased the “intense pace that was not to relax until the ship left the line the following year.” Already under pressure to transfer their families between coasts, the officers and men of the ship commenced “frantic” efforts to relocate literally thousands of dependents. Enterprise was refloated and assigned to Com2ndFlt on 5 July 1965, remaining under that command through 30 September 1965” (Ref. 329B-1965 & 362A).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) departed Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, for Sea Trials off the Virginia capes, down the James River to Hampton Roads on 22 June 1965, under the personal direction of Vice Admiral Rickover. The propulsion trials included steaming at full power and an emergency reversal test, together with aircraft launching and recovery, as well as “check out” of all ship’s systems and equipment; conducted Refueling and Overhaul (ROH) at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia from 3 October to 2 November 1964 to 22 June 1965, hull work performed while in drydock from to 2 November 1964 to 31 December 1964, and later at Pier 8 where she was moored for additional work, focusing upon refueling. Compartments were built to suit new needs and her fighting ability was increased by “various innovations from 31 December 1964 to 22 June 1965, before being towed down the James River to the Atlantic. The effort required getting Enterprise again ready for sea was recognized on 25 June June 1965, when Commander John A. Smith, Reactor Officer, received the Navy Commendation Medal, citing his “meritorious achievement in the field of naval reactor operations” (Ref. 329B-1965 & 362A).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) returned to Norfolk, Va. on 24 June 1965, successfully completing Sea Trials from 22 to 24 June 1965 off the Virginia capes, under the personal direction of Vice Admiral Rickover. The propulsion trials included steaming at full power and an emergency reversal test, together with aircraft launching and recovery, as well as “check out” of all ship’s systems and equipment; conducted Refueling and Overhaul (ROH) at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia from 3 October to 2 November 1964 to 22 June 1965, hull work performed while in drydock from to 2 November 1964 to 31 December 1964, and later at Pier 8 where she was moored for additional work, focusing upon refueling. Compartments were built to suit new needs and her fighting ability was increased by “various innovations from 31 December 1964 to 22 June 1965, before being towed down the James River to the Atlantic” (Ref. 329B-1965 & 362A).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) was assigned to Com2ndFlt on 5 July 1965” (Ref. 362A).   

 

“On 12 August 1969, USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) with crewmen’s automobiles arrived NOB Norfolk, Va., with Captain Forrest S. Petersen as the Commanding Officer, ending her homeport transfer from Naval Air Station, Alameda, California announced on 10 July 1969, due to the carrier’s second Refueling, scheduled for at least 50 weeks. Her mammoth dimensions precluded a transit of the Panama Canal and forced her to steam through the Eastern and Southern Pacific around Cape Horn operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, steaming through the Southern and North Atlantic to Norfolk, VA., Enterprise crossed the equator at 108º08’W, on 18 July 1969, “Neptunus Rex” inducting 2,380 “lowly pollywogs into the brotherhood of Trusty Shellbacks.” A little less than a week later, the crew saw land for the first time in 10 days “as the sunrise silhouetted Terra del Fuego,” at 0857 on 24 July 1969. Uncommonly for the region, the ship encountered calm seas, partly cloudy skies and air temperatures of 40º F, during her Cape Horn transit. Rio de Janeiro “welcomed” Enterprise from 29 July to 2 August 1969, and she held public visiting daily, limiting passes to people who had obtained them from the U.S. Embassy. Following her Brazilian visit, Enterprise continued on, and ultimately arrived at her new home port, proceeding up the Elizabeth River to her berth at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard to commence overhaul, where she will enter Dry Dock No. 8, prior to making a “deadplant transit” to her builders’ yard of Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia. Her tenth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission November 25, 1961, with Captain V. P. de Poix in command (14 July to 12 August 1969)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise & 72, 76, 329B-1969 & 362B).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) entered Dry Dock No. 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 22 August 1969, commencing her overhaul on 12 August 1959, her second Refueling scheduled to begin in October 1969 at Dry Dock No. 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard” (Ref. 329B-1969 & 362B).

 

“On 11 October 1969, USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) made a “deadplant transit” to her builders’ yard of Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, proceeding up the Elizabeth River for her second Refueling, entering Dry Dock No. 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 22 August 1969, proceeding up the Elizabeth River to commence her overhaul on 12 August 1969 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard” (Ref. 329B-1969 & 362B).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) was moored alongside Pier 2, at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, from 11 October 1969 to 31 December 1969” (Ref. 329B-1969 & 362B).

 

“A small fire destroyed the flag bag on the starboard side of the bridge of USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) on 14 May 1970 (the damaged bag was replaced), the work proceeded uneventfully” (Ref. 329B-1970 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) homeport was changed from Norfolk, Virginia to Alameda, California on 15 September 1970” (Ref. 329B-1971 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) was moved away from Pier 2, at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, to turn her bow in on 23 December 1970, then remoored alongside Pier 2 the same day, arriving Pier 2 on 11 October 1969, when the ship made a “deadplant transit” to her builders’ yard of Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, proceeding up the Elizabeth River for her second Refueling on 11 October 1969, entering Dry Dock No. 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 22 August 1969, proceeding up the Elizabeth River to commence her overhaul on 12 August 1969 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard” (Ref. 329B-1969/1970/1971 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) was moored alongside Pier 2, at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, from 11 October 1969 to 31 December 1970, moving away from Pier 2, to turn her bow in on 23 December 1970, then remoored alongside Pier 2 the same day, arriving Pier 2 on 11 October 1969, when the ship made a “deadplant transit” to her builders’ yard of Newport News Shipbuilding Company, proceeding up the Elizabeth River for her second Refueling on 11 October 1969, entering Dry Dock No. 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 22 August 1969, proceeding up the Elizabeth River to commence her overhaul on 12 August 1969 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. A small fire destroyed the flag bag on the starboard side of the bridge of Enterprise on 14 May 1970 (the damaged bag was replaced), the work proceeded uneventfully, remaining in yard hands through the end of 1970. During that time, an administrative detachment traveled to Alameda to provide “…logistical, transportation and administrative coordination, primarily for families in the area, including new families reporting in” for the change in homeport that would follow” (Ref. 329B-1969/1970/1971 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) Personnel manning levels as of 1 January 1971:

 

1 January 1971

 

Officers: 154

Ship’s Company:

 

Marine Detachment: 71

Civilians: 27

 

Enlisted:

Ship’s Company: 2,530” (Ref. 329B-1971).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) conducted fast cruise while anchored at X-ray anchorage, moored alongside Pier 2, at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia from 9 to 12 January 1971. Its purpose was to evaluate and exercise all departments following the 1ong overhaul period. This fast Cruise involved the conduct of all normal operations which the ship would carry out during her forthcoming transit to the West Coast of the United States and her subsequent deployment to the Western Pacific. Specific areas which were exercised included the setting of the underway steaming watch, a simulated collision and flooding, flight quarters, General Quarters (including fire drills), testing the main engines and practice air” (Ref. 329B-1969/1970/1971 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) moved away from Pier 2, to turn her bow in on 23 December 1970, then remoored alongside Pier 2 the same day, arriving Pier 2 on 11 October 1969, when the ship made a “deadplant transit” to her builders’ yard of Newport News Shipbuilding Company, proceeding up the Elizabeth River for her  second Refueling on 11 October 1969, entering Dry Dock No. 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 22 August 1969, proceeding up the Elizabeth River to commence her overhaul on 12 August 1969 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. A small fire destroyed the flag bag on the starboard side of the bridge of Enterprise on 14 May 1970 (the damaged bag was replaced), the work proceeded uneventfully, remaining in yard hands until 16 January 1971. During late 1970, an administrative detachment traveled to Alameda to provide “…logistical, transportation and administrative coordination, primarily for families in the area, including new families reporting in” for the change in homeport that would follow. During the overhaul, an Improved Rearming Rate Program (IRRP) was initiated on board Enterprise; a “total systems approach” for faster weapons handling and loading, including strikedown / strikeup rates, together with enlarged elevators and power operated doors and ready service magazines. Communications improvements included modernizing UHF facilities.  In addition, retrofitting the IOIC and the Naval Intelligence Processing System (NIPS) improved the reliability of “Multi-sensor interpretation,” enhancing intelligence processing. However, regarding modifications to NTDS, delays were incurred due to the age of some parts, some of which were no longer available and had to be manufactured by the shipyard. The Mk 2 Mod 1A Ships Inertial Navigation System (SINS) was replaced by the Mk 3 Mod 7 SINS, providing data on ship’s position, velocity and attitude to ship’s systems such as Aircraft Inertial Navigation Systems (AINS). A satellite navigation system and Loran C were installed. The AN/URN-20 TACAN dual system replaced the single transceiver system, and AN/SPN-10 radar was upgraded by the addition of AN/SPN-42. The flight deck, gallery walkway and fantail washdown system was modified from sea water to a sea water/”light water” foam fire fighting system. The high capacity protein foam system was modified into a high capacity light water foam system. The ship’s eight reactor plants were refueled, and a distilling plant capable of handling 70,000 gallons per day was installed. This second nuclear refueling gave Enterprise the ability to steam unrefueled for 10–13 years of combat operations. Enterprise was repainted, a laborious process requiring the chipping and preservation of her “skin,” together with refurbishment of all major spaces and equipment. A complete resurfacing of the hanger and flight decks with non-skid was accomplished. All 12 of the ship’s boats were overhauled and “re-outfitted”. For a detailed discussion of this overhaul period see USS ENTERPRISE 1970 Command History forwarded under USS ENTERPRISE ltr CVAN 65/32 Ser 087 of 13 March 1971. This second nuclear refueling gave Enterprise the capability of steaming unrefueled for the next ten to thirteen years of steaming” (Ref. 329B-1969/1970/1971 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) departed Pier 2, at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia on 17 January 1971, proceeding down the Elizabeth River for Sea Trials in the Virginia Capes Operating Area on 17 January 1971, she will return to Norfolk, Va., conducting her second Refueling from 12 August 1969 to 16 January 1971, conducting two fast cruises while anchored at X-ray anchorage, moored alongside Pier 2, at Newport News Shipbuilding Company from 15 to 16 January 1971, her first from 9 to 12 January 1971. Its purpose was to evaluate and exercise all departments following the 1ong overhaul period. This fast Cruise involved the conduct of all normal operations which the ship would carry out during her forthcoming transit to the West Coast of the United States and her subsequent deployment to the Western Pacific. Specific areas which were exercised included the setting of the underway steaming watch, a simulated collision and flooding, flight quarters, General Quarters (including fire drills), testing the main engines and practice air. Enterprise moved from Pier 2, to turn her bow in on 23 December 1970, then remoored alongside Pier 2 the same day, arriving Pier 2 on 11 October 1969, when the ship made a “deadplant transit” to her builders’ yard of Newport News Shipbuilding Company, proceeding up the Elizabeth River for her second Refueling on 11 October 1969, entering Dry Dock No. 8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 22 August 1969, proceeding up the Elizabeth River to commence her overhaul on 12 August 1969 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. A small fire destroyed the flag bag on the starboard side of the bridge of Enterprise on 14 May 1970 (the damaged bag was replaced), the work proceeded uneventfully, remaining in yard hands until 16 January 1971. During late 1970, an administrative detachment traveled to Alameda to provide “…logistical, transportation and administrative coordination, primarily for families in the area, including new families reporting in” for the change in homeport that would follow” (Ref. 329B-1969/1970/1971 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) returned to Pier 12, NOB Norfolk, Va. on 20 January 1971, conducting Sea Trials off the Virginia capes from 17 to 19 January 1971, with her newly-designed nuclear reactor cores which contained enough energy to power her for the next 10 years ensued under the direct observation of Admiral Hyman G. Rickover of the Naval Ships Systems Command observing on 18 and 19 January, departing Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, proceeding down the Elizabeth River for Sea Trials on 17 January 1971, conducting her second Refueling from 12 August 1969 to 16 January 1971, conducting two fast cruises while anchored at X-ray anchorage, moored alongside Pier 2, at Newport News Shipbuilding Company from 15 to 16 January 1971, her first from 9 to 12 January 1971” (Ref. 329B-1969/1970/1971 & 362C).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) remained in port at  Pier 12, NOB Norfolk, Va. from 20 January to 3 February 1971, completing the final outfit to the regular overhaul and correcting minor discrepancies uncovered during the Sea Trials and loaded supplies before beginning her return voyage to North Island Naval Air Station, San Diego, Ca.” (Ref. 329B-1968 & 362C).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) made the move across the James River to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, for a Complex Overhaul (COH) on 17 June 1983. USS America (CV-66) provided a team to assist Nimitz’s crew with their overhaul from 1 to 30 April 1984.

 

Nimitz ended Complex Overhaul (COH) on 22 July 1984, conducted from 17 June 1983 to 22 July 1984, the first such refit for a Nimitz-class ship. The ship remained drydocked at Shipway 11 from 17 June to 3 December 1984, after which she was towed to the company’s Pier 2. USS America (CV-66) provided a team to assist Nimitz’s crew with their overhaul from 1 to 30 April 1984.

 

Nimitz remained at Pier 2 until 23 July 1984. The crew lived on board General William O. Darby (IX-510) from 22 July 1983 to 20 June 1984. The Navy attempted to provide for the crew and their dependents during the difficult overhaul, and christened a 220 foot barge Nimitz Park, positioned alongside General William O. Darby from 3 October 1983. Nimitz Park boasted eight laser sailboats, a picnic area and a fishing facility.

 

Complex Overhaul, installations: Two RIM-7H5 Basic Point Defense Missile System (BPDMS) NATO Sea Sparrow; three Mk 15 Mod 1 Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS). Developed in response to the ongoing threat poised by sea-skimmer and anti-ship cruise missiles, CIWS was a last-ditch “fast-reaction” defense system against those missiles, combining on a single mount fire control radars and a six barrel M61A1 Vulcan (Gatling) gun firing tungsten alloy projectiles at a rate of up to 4,500 rounds per minute. During initial test firings Nimitz’s CIWS gunners savaged the target, leaving only the swivel connecting to the tow cable; Flag Data Display System and new NTDS (both of which they actually completed installing during Navy sea Trials.

 

Nimitz made the move across the James River from Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company upon completion of Complex Overhaul (COH) on 23 July 1984, for post-overhaul contractor’s Sea Trials; returning to Norfolk, Va. on 26 July 1984, conducting post-overhaul contractor’s Sea Trials from 23 to 26 July 1984, conducting a COH from 17 June 1983 to 22 July 1984, the first such refit for a Nimitz-class ship.

 

Nimitz accomplished her first McDonnell Douglas F/A-18A Mode I Automatic Carrier Landing System certification on 30 September 1984. Nimitz returned to Norfolk, Va. in October 1984, conducting Shakedown Training in the Cuban Operating Area from 27 to 28 September 1984 after departing her home port in late September 1984.

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced SCOOP in preparation of her up coming Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 15 August 1990, when Enterprise became non-operational on 15 August 1990, and two new acronyms entered the crew's jargon: SCOOP and Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF). The Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) required the crew to remove everything from the ship that was not essential for the yard period. This included removing items as large as the ship's four 480,000 lb. catapults and smaller items” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) cut the ribbon establishing Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) during a ceremony on 8 August 1990” (Ref. 362F).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Air Department’s, V-4 Division commenced the ship’s JP-5 offload on 16 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Communications Department commenced Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 16 August 1990 and Scooped over 4,000 line items for ship's force accomplishment” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

 “USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Air Department’s, V-4 Division conducted the ship’s JP-5 offload from 16 to 17 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Air Department’s, V-4 Division commenced fresh water flush of the entire JP-5 fuel system, a task normally reserved for shipyard contract on 20 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department’s V-4 Division completed a major JP-5 offload from 16 to 17 August 1990 and fresh water flush of the entire JP-5 fuel system, a task normally reserved for shipyard contract from 20 August to 7 September 1990. The Air Department tackled their offload portion of the Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) requirements during this period and was complete prior to the end of the month of August. Air Department's full attention turned to preparations and training for overhaul” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 24 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 24 to 28 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

“The crew of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held a Ship's party at Busch Gardens on 24 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

“VADM Fetterman, COMNAVAIRPAC, visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 30 August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

“Four one week underway periods kept all personnel busy maintaining and cleaning equipment. In addition, Engineering Department’s M Division spaces outside the propulsion blocks were cataloged and Scooped. Early overhaul work was started while at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from April to August 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held the E-4 Exam for Sailors on 5 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held the E-5 Exam for Sailors on 11 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Alumni Tour was held on 12 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held the E-6 Exam for Sailors on 13 September 1990. The Deck Department held extensive training to help personnel prepare for the September Navy-wide rating examination cycle in September” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) E-4 and below personnel reported to the Floating Accomodation Facility on 17 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 20 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 20 to 25 September 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) nominated by NCS Roosevelt Roads as Multi-Channel HF Performer of the Month, conducting July to September 1990. The ship's COMSEC account was disestablished” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

Underway for local operations and Carrier Qualifications, E-Division of the Engineering Department of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted testing from July to September 1990. Among the many accomplishments, restoration of 58 Bus after a fire, repaired number two SFMG, performed emergent repairs on flight deck lighting transformers, repaired water line lights on the island, repaired and rewound 5JV2 sound powered phone circuit, repaired various fire pump motors and CHT motor and controllers.

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) begins apartment move-in on 1 October 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) remained in port Norfolk, Virginia from 14 August to 11 October 1990. Upon the ship's arrival in Norfolk, Virginia from her 1989/90 World Cruise, AIMD's mission and complement changed virtually overnight. The department rapidly implemented plans which they had formulated long before the arrival. AIMD was the first department to complete USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Ships Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) evolution. During this successful operation, the department offloaded more than 10,000 Operating Space items (500 pallets) in less than 45 days, while simultaneously offloading more than 14,000 Individual Material Readiness List (IMRL) items for long-term storage. Also, the department transferred over 2,200 items of IRML equipment to support the requirements of other fleet and shore activities. These achievements were remarkable considering that these events occurred while the department decrewed to and overhaul manning level of 75 personnel. In support of Enterprise's overhaul manning plan, AIMD transferred 126 personnel to various overhaul departments, including berthing and head rehab, transportation, tanks and voids, repair, housing, special surfaces, crew support and the Light Industrial Facility. The balance of the department was left to face the monumental task of accomplishing over 1364 assigned jobs in support of the Current Ship Maintenance Project (CSMP), which entailed completion of 1,205 total work package key-ops requiring an estimated 27,640 man-hours. AIMD's Central Technical Publications Library (CTPL), 28 disbursed libraries and the Supply Response Support (SRS) library were consolidated into one location. The CTPL will manage, inventory and update over 9,700 publications throughout the overhaul period. This represents a 26 percent increase in library volume with a 65 percent reduction in personnel. In order to meet this challenge, AIMD has implemented the ADRL (Automatic Distribution Requirement List) system. This program will increase the accuracy and speed of change receipts, updates and inventories utilized in support of CTPL. The Support Equipment division was once again tasked with performing a comprehensive Intermediate and Depot level rework on 325 items of Ground Support Equipment valued at over $10 million. This effort was accomplished two weeks ahead of schedule at a savings of over $200,000. In conjunction with this evolution, local Maintenance Requirement Cards were designed and implemented to ensure the performance of an aggressive PMS program on all items placed in long-term storage. These and many more industrious efforts, performed in support of the overhaul, continued to demonstrate AIMD's total commitment to Enterprise and its mission, regardless of the operating environment” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) DC/R Division went through a major restructuring of divisional personnel in support of the complex overhaul from July to September 1990. Over 50 percent of DC/R personnel were transferred to overhaul department and SFOMS. This was also a period of training with over 2,644 hours completed during the quarter. August marked the beginning of Operation Desert Shield, which required a complete inventory of CBR equipment by the Chemical Warfare Group and eventual shipment to the forward deployed units. The last DC/R spaces were Scooped and an additional 125 watertight doors and scuttles were repaired by the DCPO shop. The CO2 shop completed overhaul of the P-250s and all of the armored hatches” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) Engineering Department continued excellent support for ship's underway periods from April to October 1990. Inport periods mainly utilized for Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) and associated overhaul preparations. A Division of Engineering Department continued providing routine hotel and repair services to all other departments on board. The division accomplished numerous emergency repairs on vital equipment in support of daily operations. The ship's catapult steam systems, hydraulic equipment, air conditioning systems, refrigeration plants, emergency diesel generators, air compressors, O2N2 plants, laundry and galley equipment were all maintained at their maximum levels of usefulness despite their age, lack of maintenance time, and lack of repair parts. The emergency diesel generators provided all ship's electrical power for the move from Norfolk to Newport News Shipyard. The move was accomplished with minimum problems, even though the time for planning was limited due to Hurricane Lili. The photo lab provided complete SCOOP photography of all ship spaces and major equipment prior to entering Newport News Shipbuilding” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).  

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was in port Norfolk, Virginia from 14 August to 11 October 1990” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) shifted berths from Norfolk, Virginia, conducting a "Dead Stick Move" over to Pier 2, Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, for her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted, 18 days ahead of schedule to avoid Hurricane Lili, on 12 October 1990. The move to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company was accomplished without benefit of days of pre-move planning meetings. An emergency deadstick move to Newport News Shipyard due to hurricane warnings was met with great success as was the norm for M-Division. The Engineering Department’s E Division provided emergency electrical power for ship movement from Norfolk to Newport News Shipyard during hurricane Lili. The majority of machinery was placed in the category of inactive equipment maintenance for the complex overhaul. Review and update continued on overhaul packages. Man-up of ships Overhaul Department neared completion drawing down Air Department to 250 people, or about 40 percent of operational strength. Many challenges arose as personal protective equipment and security passes had to be quickly issued to all hands, and three weeks worth of work planned for Norfolk had to be replanned for the shipyard. Work proceeded pretty much on schedule, however; Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) was completed, the Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) became operational. Large-scale manpower shifts were made in order to begin the job of rebuilding and refueling "Big E." Bachelors and geographical bachelors moved into over 450 apartments, provided rent-free by the government. Approximately 90 buses and vans began rolling, as the new Transportation Department began shuttling the crew between parking lots, .the ship, and home. New off-ship facilities opened, including a PSD at 32nd Street, DD Jones warehouse in Chesapeake, the Integrated Logistics Overhaul facility in Portsmouth, the Ship's Force Overhaul Management System facility in Newport News, and the Fleet Aviation Logistic Support Center at NAS Norfolk, Virginia. Deck Department transferred the majority of its veteran personnel to the new1y formed Overhaul Department” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76, 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

ADM Demar, Naval Reactors, visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 17 October 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) First, Second and Third Divisions of Deck Department and Side Cleaners were consolidated into one division in November 1990 and six Deck Department petty officers were sent TAD to USS Tarawa (LHA-1) for six months in support of Operation Desert Shield during the month.

 

The Overhaul Department was established in November of 1990 as the central organization responsible for administration and coordination of the overhaul work package scheduled for accomplishment by the ship's force personnel. Its function also includes direct liaison with the Newport News Shipyard work force, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Newport News, Norfolk Naval Shipyard and other IMA's and Naval Supervisory agencies.

 

The Overhaul Department essentially grew out of the old Maintenance Department and is comprised of several subfunctions and divisions. Its organization is shown on the next page. The Overhaul Department responds to a wide variety of maintenance and rework tasks including the refurbishment of heads and berthing areas, ventilation systems, lagging and insulation, electronic equipment and computer overhaul. The Overhaul Department will inspect and rework as necessary all tanks and voids on the ship, reduce weight by removing unnecessary cables and other equipment, and monitor the entire ship for fire prevention. Facilities under its purview allow the Overhaul Department to rebuild pumps, valves and motors, as well as manufacture simple pm to support the ship's force work package. Other personnel in the overhaul organization support the ship in such ways as 3M, technical manual and ship's blueprint updating, quality assurance, scheduling, supply and administration” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

Most of the crew of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) onloaded Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF), a $20 million barge fitted with berthing, galleys, office space and medical facilities from 1 to 5 November 1990. The Ship's Coordinated Offload/Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) required the crew to remove everything from the ship that was not essential for the yard period. This included removing items as large as the ships four 480,000 lb. catapults, and smaller items which eventually filled 4,000 pallets” (Ref. 329B-1990 & 362F).

 

RADM McGinley visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 7 November 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) held a cutting the ribbon ceremony, establishing Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) on 8 November 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

During a reception at The Mariner’s Museum, Hampton, Va., sponsored by the local Chamber of Commerce, the mayors of Newport News and Hampton officially welcomed crewmembers to the Hampton Roads Peninsula area when the cities of Newport News and Hampton declared "USS Enterprise Day" in simultaneous proclamations on 14 November 1990. Also in November, Enterprise sent six deck department petty officers to the amphibious assault ship Tarawa (LHA-1) for six months in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) commenced Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia on 21 November 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) conducted Hometown flight at Pier 11, NOB, Norfolk, Virginia from 21 to 26 November 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

“COMNAVAIRPAC visited USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 28 November 1990. Air Department developed a Ship's Force Hydro Plan for the JP-5 Fuel System, and submitted this plan to COMNAVAIRPAC for approval. The Overhaul Work Definition Conference (WDC) was completed this month” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

“A Christmas Party at Raddison for the crew of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was held from 4 to 5 December 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

“All Hands Respirator Fit Training on board USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was by completed and holiday leave periods began on 14 December 1990. Shipyard shut down for two weeks over Christmas and New Years was authorized” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

After steaming 33,302.3 nautical miles, moving from California to Virginia, and offloading an entire aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) crew members enjoyed a well deserved leave, taking Christmas and New Years leave as they prepared for the Complex Overhaul. On Christmas morning, the crew of Enterprise was informed that they had won the 1990 Golden Anchor award for retention programs. A very quiet month for Deck Department as Christmas leave standdown was in effect” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

YEAR END 1990 DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION HISTORY

 

“Combat Systems In addition, a perfect personnel safety record was maintained throughout the Year by the Operations Department of USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and all carrier landing systems and communication suites functioned at peak performance during three post-deployment carrier landing qualification periods.

 

Communications Department main emphasis in the last quarter was an effective transition to the extended overhaul at Newport News from October to December 1990. Over 80 spaces were Scooped and much equipment was placed in storage. The guard for message traffic was transferred to SUPSHE' Newport News while Enterprise's Message Center continued to remain operational 24 hours a day during overhaul

 

Engineering Department

 

A Division preparations for Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and drydock were the highlights of this time period from October to December 1990. The aircraft elevators and Hydraulics Shop were kept busy loading shipyard equipment. The catapults were down for overhaul. The AC&R Shop drained down the complete chill water system in preparation for major A/C shipalts. The whole division was kept busy checking the shipyard work packages for errors, omissions and duplications.

 

Resin discharge, steam plant dryout, main shaft bearing reaction test, and propulsion plant asbestos removal kept all personnel of M Division at a high tempo of production from September to December 1990.

 

E Division provided over 500 mega watts of electrical energy for the ship's needs during 1990, removing 18,000 pounds of dead-end cables, processed over 12,000 trouble calls, expended 1,200 man hours repairing flight deck lighting in support of flight operations, rewound 109 motors, 14 of which were for other ships and completed more than 100 Casualty repairs from. E Division installed new shorepower stations, POT&I of all 1-MC speaker systems and the 5MC system, repaired and rewired X16J1/2/3/4 sound powered phone circuits, replaced and rewired 6JZ sound powered phone circuit, replaced and rewired pyrometers on emergency diesel generators, recalibrated ship's cathodic protection system, replaced bus failure alarms throughout the ship, repaired various fire pump motors and repaired CHT motors and controllers from October to December 1990.

 

As CBR equipment was sent from Enterprise to the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield, the DC/R Division personnel received a well-earned Christmas holiday. A total of 49 people finished the move off the ship into the government supplied housing and over 30 families completed the long trek from the west coast to the Virginia Peninsula. Threats of a hurricane forced Enterprise to make a, move from Norfolk to Newport News early, and the Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) went into full swing. More DC/R personnel transitioned into SFOMS areas and DC/R DCPO shop finished the last of the watertight doors and successfully implemented a four section watch bill rotation. It was also a period of time when funding required much of the shipyard planned work to be shifted into the ship's work force package areas or deferred work to Puget Sound Availability. The DCPO shop finished the last of the watertight doors and completed repairs on another 75 armored hatches. Despite the reduction in personnel and the increase in planned work, DC/R Division met all of the requirements for fire fighting, casualties, and preventive maintenance.

 

Military Justice

 

In 1990, 54 cases were disposed of at special courts-martial, with 14 of them resulting in the accused receiving a BCD in addition to forfeitures, brig time, and reductions in rate. Over 41 cases were disposed of at summary courts-martial. The Discipline Officer processed 915 report chits, of which 390 individuals appeared at NJP. The Captain held mast on 84 occasions during this period. The Legal Office processed 10 individuals at administrative discharge boards.

 

The Carrier Judge Advocate and Assistant Carrier Judge Advocate saw over 144 clients on consumer protection, divorce, tax, landlord/tenant etc, problems. A total of 540 notarial acts and 410 powers of attorney were performed, and numerous wills were prepared.

In 1990, 87 claims with a total dollar value of $28,608 were processed for crew members who were victims of larcenies of personal property or damage attributed to acts beyond their control. Legal Department provided 18 briefs and lectures to crewmembers including Command Duty Officers and Assistant Command Duty Officers, and Indoctrination Division personnel.

                             

Calendar year 1990 was a busy, productive year, with the Medical Department completing a major deployment, then offloading all of its equipment and personnel to set up shop on the FAF.

 

Accomplishments included:

 

12,251 personnel treated

15,654 prescriptions filled

13,633 lab tests done

1,922 immunizations given

2,897 X-rays shot

189 admissions to the ward

36 surgical cases

External inspectors found much that was praiseworthy, including:

 

"Excellent" for Radiation Health during ORSE

100% Competitive Exercises

 

Medical Department Personnel

 

Senior Medical Officer

CDR R. J. Adams

TEMAD Medical Officer

CDR T. E. Eckstein

CVW-11 Flight Surgeons

LCDR D. A. Bailey / LT J. H. Healey

Nurse

LCDR R. A. Yakshaw

General Medical Officer

LT J. H. Tarver

Medical Admin Officer

LT M. J. Mathews

Physicians Assistant

LTJG J. K. Ryan

Leading Chief Petty 0fficer

HMCS P. A. Broadhead

Preventive Medicine Chief

HMC J. Revels

Ship's Company

27 Corpsmen

CVW-11 Personnel

9 Corpsmen

 

During 1990, Dental Department continued to excel by rendering the highest quality treatment to both CVW-11 and USS Enterprise (CVN-65) personnel. Throughout the cruise, dental personnel participated in community relations programs. LCDR Curran organized the "Partners in Education Program" for the ship, and CAPT Judkins, Senior Dental Officer, was in charge producing a very high quality Cruisebook.

 

The versatility of the Dental Department continued throughout the year as dental technicians assisted the Medical Department with immunizations and shipwide blood draws for HIV testing. Additionally, dental personnel were cited repeatedly for excellence in casualty treatment during General Quarters drills. DTC (SW) Bruce organized a highly successful CPR training program utilizing a team concept. By year's end, nearly 300 personnel had been trained in two-rescuer CPR and obstructed airway management.

 

The versatility of the Dental Department continued throughout the year as dental technicians assisted the Medical Department with immunizations and shipwide blood draws for HIV testing. LT Worm was appointed as chairman for the command's Combined Federal Campaign, and LT Carrier was appointed as the assistant chairman. The campaign resulted in Enterprise achieving 143 percent of its goal, and Dental Department received the "Super Department" recognition for its total contribution and highest percentage over its goal. Another highlight of 1990 was the courtesy Administration Inspection conducted by the COMNAVAIRLANT Dental Officer.

 

The department received an overall grade of "Outstanding" and maintained the highest level of operational dental readiness of any carrier in the Atlantic Fleet, and second in the Pacific Fleet. In preparation for SCOOP, LT Carrier organized the model system for ensuring the smooth transition of the dental department from the ship to the Floating Accommodation Facility. CDR Bowers relieved CAPT Judkins as Senior Dental Officer in September. CAPT Judkins was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal upon his departure.

 

After steaming 33,302.3 nautical miles, moving from California to Virginia, and offloading an entire aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) crew members enjoyed a well deserved leave, taking Christmas and New Years off. On Christmas morning, the crew of Enterprise was informed that they had won the 1990 Golden Anchor award for retention programs. The month of December 1990, was a very quiet month for Deck Department” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) shifted berths from Norfolk, Virginia, moving over to and moored at Pier 2, Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, for her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted from 12 October to 31 December 1990” (Ref. 329B-1990).

 

On 17 March 1991, Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) where most of the crew was berthed, was moved to Slipway 10, positioned next to USS Enterprise (CVN-65) “in support of her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)”” (Ref. 362G).

 

Captain Daniel C. Roper assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65) on 7 August 1991, relieving Captain Harry T. Rittenour, 12th Commanding Officer, serving from 28 October 1988 to 7 August 1991” (Ref. 329A).

 

During 1992, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) sent men from the air department to operational carriers, where “senior personnel honed their ABH skills,” and undesignated airmen were introduced to the “challenges” of working on a dangerous flight deck. Two detachments went to USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) in March and May, three to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) in June, September and November, and one each to USS George Washington (CVN-73) and USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) in October 1991” (Ref. 362G).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was transferred to AirLant on 1 October 1992” (Ref. 362G).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was towed from Dry Dock No. 11 to Pier 2, both at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., on 14 December 1992.

 

The Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) shifted berths from Dry Dock No. 10 to Pier 2, across from the carrier on 17 December 1992” (Ref. 362G).

 

During the overhaul, V-1 and V-3 Divisions of Air Department were combined until August 1993, when the hangar bay division was re-activated aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65)” (Ref. 362G).

 

Captain Richard J. Naughton assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) on 27 August 1993, relieving Captain Daniel C. Roper, 13th Commanding Officer, serving from 7 August 1991 to 27 August 1993” (Ref. 329A).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) sent some men to other ships for ongoing training in 1993, including 18 members of the air department to USS America (CV-66), USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS George Washington (CVN-73), members of the communications department to George Washington, and sailors of the Deck Department to George Washington, Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) and USS Merrimac (AO-179)” (Ref. 362G).

 

“In 1993, Combat Systems Fire Control Division was re-activated as an Operations Division. The AN/SPN-46 ACLS Radar, “the new final approach radar,” was installed, and additional systems overhauled were the AN/SPS-64 Navigation, AN/SPS-67 Surface Search, AN/SPS-49 Air Search, AN/SPS-43 Marshalling and AN/SPS-48C 3D Radars. These were the principal radar systems with which she operated into the 21st Century” (Ref. 362G).

 

“Following the collapse of the East Bloc and the corresponding lessoning of Cold War tensions, however, Congress issued a mandate for the Navy to “drawdown,” or reduces its force. In 1994, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) offered “Early Out,” a fleet-wide program allowing service members to terminate their active duty commitment, nearly 20% of the crew taking advantage of the program, with approving authority given by the commanding officer” (Ref. 362G).

 

A valve barge was moored near USS Enterprise (CVN-65), playing “a vital role in the overhaul.” The crew made a “herculean effort” to complete the ship’s third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted on 23 September 1994 at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia; shifted berths from Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, moving over to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia for her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest RCOH ever attempted, 18 days ahead of schedule to avoid Hurricane Lili, on 12 October  1990” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76 & 362G).

 

The eighth Enterprise (CVN-65), former CVA(N)-65 – RCOH (12/10/90 to 23/09/94) - additional updates required through 1995 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia. Departed Norfolk, Virginia, and moved to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia for her third refueling and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted (RCOH).

 

Enterprise completed her Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted 23 September 1994 at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia; shifted berths from Norfolk, Virginia, moving over to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia for her third refueling, 18 days ahead of schedule to avoid Hurricane Lili, on 12 October 1990, commencing RCOH the same day. One of the most important changes to Enterprise’s capabilities since commissioning was the installation of a Local Area Network (LAN), involving the running of “thousands of feet” of cable, both coaxial and fiber optic. A “very labor intensive project,” departments relocated from Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) to the ship, then moved from space to space within her.

 

New CIWS Block 1 “low-profile” gun mounts 23 and 24 were installed aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65) and both MK 57 Mod 3 NATO Sea Sparrow systems were refurbished by Raytheon Co., Virginia Beach, Va. In 1993, Combat Systems Fire Control Division was re-activated as an Operations Division. The AN/SPN-46 ACLS Radar, “the new final approach radar,” was installed, and additional systems overhauled were the AN/SPS-64 Navigation, AN/SPS-67 Surface Search, AN/SPS-49 Air Search, AN/SPS-43 Marshalling and AN/SPS-48C 3D Radars. These were the principal radar systems with which she operated into the 21st Century.

 

To better enable the OI division to prepare for returning Enterprise to her natural element, the open sea, sailors of that division combined with those of the navigation department for two small cruises with the Naval Academy’s self-propeller patrol craft (YPs), building shiphandling, radar and visual navigation skills.

 

During one such trip in March 1993, the craft was navigated from Annapolis harbor down Chesapeake Bay to NB Norfolk, making daily trips from there out to sea. One of the most important changes to Enterprise’s capabilities since commissioning was the installation of a Local Area Network (LAN), involving the running of “thousands of feet” of cable, both coaxial and fiber optic.

 

A “very labor intensive project,” departments relocated from Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF) to the ship, and then moved from space to space within her.  In addition, SITE 501 CCTV cable was distributed throughout the ship, and the Navy Standard Teletype (NST) was installed in the main Communications Center. Installing the CCTV system included over 50,000 feet of cable and more than 1,000 television cable “drops,” as well as 450 new television sets, enhancing the ship’s ability to hold training. Also overhauled was the AN/UQC-1 Underwater Telephone System” (Ref. 362G).

 

All four catapults were overhauled aboard USS Enterprise (CVN-65), while improvements made to the flight deck included the fabrication and installation of all 194 flight deck safety nets, as well as the application of non-skid, covering 194,332 square feet of the flight deck, the latter from May to September 1994. Her crew performed an “overhaul and replacement” of the flight deck and hangar bay aircraft engine starting stations in four months, eight months less than the shipyard estimate, saving over $200,000. They also “rewired and overhauled” the flight deck lighting system on their own, saving over $70,000 when compared to the shipyard bid” (Ref. 362G).

 

Following the collapse of the East Bloc and the corresponding lessoning of Cold War tensions, however, Congress issued a mandate for the Navy to “drawdown,” or reduce its force. In 1994, USS Enterprise (CVN-65) offered “Early Out,” a fleet-wide program allowing service members to terminate their active duty commitment, nearly 20% of the crew taking advantage of the program, with approving authority given by the commanding officer” (Ref. 362G).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) departed Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia on 27 September 1994, for Sea Trials, completing her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted on 23 September 1994 at Newport News Shipbuilding Company; shifted berths from Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia, moving over to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, for her third complex overhaul, 18 days ahead of schedule to avoid Hurricane Lili, on 12 October 1990 (12 October 1990 to 27 September 1994)” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76 & 362G).

 

USS Enterprise (CVN-65) returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 30 September 1994, conducting Sea Trials, including a four-hour full power run as fast as when it was new, over the succeeding three days, from 27 to 30 September 1994, completing her third Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and the Navy's largest complex overhaul ever attempted on 23 September 1994 at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia; shifted berths from Norfolk, Virginia, moving over to Newport News Shipbuilding Company, for her third RCOH, 18 days ahead of schedule to avoid Hurricane Lili, on 12 October 1990 (12 October 1990 to 27 September 1994). Her crew performed an “overhaul and replacement” of the flight deck and hangar bay aircraft engine starting stations in four months, eight months less than the shipyard estimate, saving over $200,000. They also “rewired and overhauled” the flight deck lighting system on their own, saving over $70,000 when compared to the shipyard bid” (Ref. 1-Enterprise, 72, 76 & 362G).

 

USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65)

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

EAST COAST

Secretary of the Navy Letter of Commendation

1 January 1991 to 30 September 1994

Stateside

armed forces service ribbon

Armed Forces Service Medal (FS)

1 January 1991 to 30 September 1994

Stateside

Ref. 1271 & 1271A

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68), former CVA(N)-68 RCOH

 

“As the lead ship in its class, the USS Nimitz (CVN-68), former CVA(N)-68 was the second CVN to conduct a Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) (Enterprise made three ROH & one RCOH), requiring the ship to return to its birthplace of Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, commencing 26 May 1998 and scheduled for three years, Nimitz made a deadstick move to Drydock No. 11 at Newport News to commence her 33 month refueling complex overhaul on 26 May 1998; conducted a 3-year complex mid-life and transited the James River, returning to Norfolk, Va., conducting her first RCOH and third ROH from 26 May 1998 to 28 June 2001. Newport News announced the redelivery of Nimitz to the Navy. The carrier moored to Pier 11N at NS Norfolk, and the crew began onloading “Safe for Sea” ordnance, such as small arms ammunition on 28 June 2001. CAPT Steven F. Firks, her CO, noted that the cost of approximately $1.3 billion as nearly twice her original price of $692 million.

 

The ship originally went to sea with two nuclear reactors, which, due to technological improvements, provided her with the some propulsive power as the eight installed in Enterprise. After years of steaming, however, they required considerable work. The crew transferred most support equipment to the Naval Air Systems Command Southeast Rework facility, Solomons Island, Md., and to the Naval Air Depot, NAS Jacksonville, Fla. While in the yard a number of sailors completed afloat training on board other ships at varying periods, including Carl Vinson, John F. Kennedy and guided missile cruiser Normandy (CG-60). The crew also accomplished the “Y2K rollover,” ensuring that all computer networks complied with 21st Century time-keeping without interrupting end users and without hardware applications failures.

 

Sailors provided “critical” HH-60 parts to aircraft carrier John C. Stennis (CVN-74). Relatively relaxed watchstanding provided sailors the opportunity to transition from eight duty sections to 10 (five during holiday standdown with a primary and standby “alternate” sections). Most crewmembers transferred to Floating Accommodation Facility, a $20 million, 300 foot barge with berthing, galleys, office space and medical facilities. The shipyard provided the “floating hotel” to accommodate crucial crew needed to oversee vital work, though over 1,900 bachelor sailors berthed ashore. Steelworkers struck, however, from 5 April–30 July 1999, delaying progress, though the crew continued the overhaul as well as they could. Nimitz made a deadstick move to Drydock No. 11 at Newport News to commence her 33 month refueling complex overhaul on 26 May 1998. RADM Daniel R. Bowler (and his relief RADM Peter W. Marzluff), Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group-5 assumed operational control of Nimitz on 15 July 1998. The crew of Nimitz held a memorial service for GMSN Brian E. Hubert, who died when he accidentally fell five decks through an open hatch on 22 January 1999. VADM Michael L. Bowman, Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific Fleet, visited Nimitz on 17 March 1999.

 

The crew of Nimitz offloaded their remaining test equipment and shipped it to Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) Seal Beach, Calif. on 27 April 1999. VADM Michael L. Bowman, Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific Fleet, again inspected Nimitz on 23 June 1999. The crew of Nimitz performed their first baptism in the ship’s bell. The honor went to Blair A. Thomas, son of ICC Mary M. Thomas of the ships company on 9 July 1999. The crew of Nimitz and shipyard workers completed their final hull inspections and flooded Drydock No. 11 to 23 feet of water on the hull1 November 1999. Nimitz shifted berths from Drydock No. 11 to Outfitting Berth No. on 16 November 1999. VADM Michael L. Bowman, Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific Fleet, again inspected Nimitz on 22 November 1999. Nimitz began the New Year moored to Pier 2 at Newport News Shipbuilding on 1 January 2001. Nimitz completed her first test catapult shots (27) following overhaul on 2 March 2001. Nimitz turned around to face bow in at Pier 2 at Newport News. This is vital to preserve ships from the corrosion of the elements, to prepare them for sea and in this case, to also facilitate her propulsion plant dock trials on 19 March 2001.

 

RCOH Installations: RIM-116A Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) System, a lightweight quick-reaction “fire-and-forget” missile designed to counter anti-ship missiles attacking in waves or streams, on her starboard bow; Integrated Communications and Advanced Networks (ICAN), which combined previously separate communications and navigation systems for greater efficiency; local area network comprising over 300 workstations serving seven geographical sites. Among the improvements to her electronic connectivity was the installation of a T-1 line; Global Command and Control System-Maritime; SEATEL satellite television system. On 28 June 2001, Nimitz arrived Pier 11N at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. conducting Sea Trials from 25 to 27 June 2001upon departure from Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, temporary berthed at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., en route to the Virginia Capes operating area. Newport News announced the redelivery of Nimitz to the Navy. The carrier moored to Pier 11N at NS Norfolk, and the crew began onloading “Safe for Sea” ordnance, such as small arms ammunition” (Ref. 72, 371 & 372A).

 

“RADM Daniel R. Bowler (and his relief RADM Peter W. Marzluff), Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group-5 assumed operational control of USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on 15 July 1998” (Ref. 372A).

 

“The crew of USS Nimitz (CVN-68) held a memorial service for GMSN Brian E. Hubert, who died when he accidentally fell five decks through an open hatch on 22 January 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

“VADM Michael L. Bowman, Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific Fleet, visited USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on 17 March 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

“The crew of USS Nimitz (CVN-68) offloaded their remaining test equipment and shipped it to Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) Seal Beach, Calif. on 27 April 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

“VADM Michael L. Bowman, Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific Fleet, again inspected USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on 23 June 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

“The crew of USS Nimitz (CVN-68) performed their first baptism in the ship’s bell. The honor went to Blair A. Thomas, son of ICC Mary M. Thomas of the ships company on 9 July 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

“The crew of USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and shipyard workers completed their final hull inspections and flooded Drydock No. 11 to 23 feet of water on the hull1 November 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) shifted berths from Drydock No. 11 to Outfitting Berth No. on 16 November 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

“VADM Michael L. Bowman, Commander, Naval Air Forces, Pacific Fleet, again inspected USS Nimitz (CVN-68) on 22 November 1999” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) began the New Year moored to Pier 2 at Newport News Shipbuilding on 1 January 2001” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) completed her first test catapult shots (27) following overhaul on 2 March 2001” (Ref. 372A).

 

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) turned around to face bow in at Pier 2 at Newport News. This is vital to preserve ships from the corrosion of the elements, to prepare them for sea and in this case, to also facilitate her propulsion plant dock trials on 19 March 2001” (Ref. 372A).

 

“On 25 June 2001, USS Nimitz (CVN-68) departed Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia for a temporary berth at Naval Base Norfolk, Va. en route to the Virginia Capes operating area for Sea Trials” (Ref. 72, 371 & 372A).

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-69 RCOH

 

Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), former CVA(N)-6922/05/01 to 25/03/05 – In early 2001, Dwight D. Eisenhower underwent the Ship's Coordinated Offload and Outfitting Plan (SCOOP) in preparation for the mid-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). Beginning on 5 March 2001, Captain Mark T. McNally declared all crew berthing and workspaces, with the exception of Engineering and Reactor, “uninhabitable,” and began moving the crew ashore.

 

On 22 May 2001, Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to its birthplace of Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp., Newport News, Virginia, for a 36-month $2.5 billion RCOH, deadsticking over to the yard during the morning of the 22nd, entering Drydock No. 11 two days later. The yard period will account for more than half the Dwight D. Eisenhower lifetime budget as nearly every space and system onboard is upgraded and overhauled. The complex renovations and major technological upgrades during its scheduled half-life are expected to extend the ship's service life well beyond 2025.

 

The shipyard provided Floating Accommodation Facility (FAF), a $20 million, 300 foot barge fitted with berthing, galleys, office space and medical facilities. In addition, the crew required seven other facilities, nine contracted apartment complexes and four barracks for accommodations. The ship also established a support equipment storage facility at the Cheatham Annex at Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, near Williamsburg, Va.

 

Even with these additions the crew experienced housing congestion, but as Precommissioning Unit Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) proceeded toward their ship’s completion they vacated Huntington Hall and some contracted apartments in December 2002, enabling 175 crewmembers to relocate from Ft. Eustis to the hall. Dwight D. Eisenhower shifted from Drydock No. 11 to Outfitting Pier No. 1, commencing the flooding of the drydock on 9 December 2002, and shifting berths on the 15th.

 

The Department of Defense announced that it awarded Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp. contract to extend the end date for the overhaul of Dwight D. Eisenhower by another 11 weeks to 6 November 2004, on 15 December 2003. Dwight D. Eisenhower reported that “nearly every space and system on board was upgraded and overhauled” during this massive project. The carrier unveiled her uniquely redesigned antenna mast during 2003. The crew installed two additional rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs) for security, as they patrolled the James River.

 

This proved to be fortuitous on 7 July 2004, when a RHIB crew saved 11 people in four different private boats in distress out on the river due to rough weather. The men and women of the ship completed crew certification and began moving back on board a few days later on the 12th, when they finished returning from FAF. Additional delays later extended her completion beyond that date, and her cost to approximately $2.5 billion, collectively generating heated debate among the media and in the Congress. 

 

After spending 44 months in Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard for a major mid-life Refueling and Complex Overhaul, Dwight D. Eisenhower was redelivered to the fleet on 25 March 2005, after a four-year, approximately $2.5 billion dollar RCOH that brought state-of-the-art equipment and technology to one of America’s premier fighting platforms; extended 11 weeks for contract modification; successfully completed Crew Certification Phase II on 16 November 2004 and certified ready for sea  The crew was inspected by Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMNAVAIRLANT) and Afloat Training Group (ATG) staff.

 

Dwight D. Eisenhower moved to a different pier at Norfolk, Virginia on 8 February 2005; simulating an underway replenishment (UNREP) on 18 March 2005 with the Military Sealift Command ship USNS John Lenthall (T-AO 189) while pierside at Naval Station Norfolk; returned to her homeport Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia on 25 March 2005 upon completion of post-Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) shipyard Sea Trials in the Western Atlantic from 23 to 24 March 2005, departing on 22 March 2005; returned to homeport Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia upon completion of shipyard sea trials in the Western Atlantic on 25 January 2005, commencing on 21 January 2005; extended 11 weeks for contract modification.

 

Dwight D. Eisenhower successfully completed Crew Certification Phase II on 16 November 2004, certified ready for sea, deadsticked over to the yard for RCOH on 22 May 2001 during the morning of the 22nd, entering Drydock No. 11 two days later.

At various times during the overhaul, her sailors served on board aircraft carriers USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) and USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71), amphibious assault ships USS Bataan (LHD-5), USS Kearsarge (LHD-3) and USS Saipan (LHA-2), guided missile cruiser Leyte Gulf (CG-55), dock landing ship Carter Hall (LSD-50), guided missile destroyer USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81), combat stores ship Saturn (AFS-8) and fast combat support ship USS Seattle (AOE-3), as well as ashore at stations across the U.S. and in Afghanistan, Bahrain, Columbia, England, Guantánamo Bay, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Tugs towed the ship over to Norfolk on 25 January 2005” (Ref. 76, 383B, 692, 693, 694 & 695).  

 

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Redelivered to the Fleet

 

“The RCOH included the reconstruction of the ship’s island, the installation of a new antenna mast, the installation of a new radar tower, an upgrade and modernization of combat and communication systems, overhaul of the ship's hull, mechanical and electrical systems, and the refueling of her two nuclear reactors. “I’m extremely proud of my crew.

 

They have put their hearts and souls into bringing life back into this warship,” said Captain Charles Smith, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower’s (CVN 69) (Ike) commanding officer. “It was truly a team effort, and my crew is excited to be underway. This is the start of Ike’s second life in serving our great nation.” One of the great successes of the overhaul was the ability of Ike’s Sailors to step up to the plate and augment the work performed by shipyard workers and contractors.

 

“The crew logged more than 5.9 million man-hours in support of the RCOH,” said Lieutant Commander Brian Lepine, Ike’s maintenance manager. “Ike’s crew took on a ship’s force work package that, using conservative estimates, was $375 million worth of work. That’s money that we, as a crew, saved the American taxpayer.” Though life in the shipyard isn’t one seagoing Sailors are used to, the hard work paid off with the ship’s return to sea and the successful completion of Sea Trials, marking another milestone for Ike’s crew.

 

“The purpose of Sea Trials was to test the various components that were worked on,” said Lieutant Commander John Stewart, Ike’s Sea Trials coordinator. “We took Ike out and put her through all the processes that are required of her in the defense of freedom.” While Ike’s crew operated their warship for the first time at sea following the RCOH, testing went on around the clock. Ike conducted various evolutions, such as high-speed runs and turns, communications system checks, countermeasure wash downs and helicopter operations.

 

Manned with more than 3,300 Sailors and more than 490 Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard and Naval Sea Systems Command employees and contractors, Ike was the second Nimitz class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to complete an RCOH, following USS Nimitz (CVN-68).

 

The improvements made on Ike over the last four years have prepared the carrier to serve for another 25 years. Ike’s next major milestones are to certify the flight deck and begin to conduct routine carrier operations at sea in preparation to participate in the U.S. Navy’s Fleet Response Plan” (Ref. 692 & Story Number: NNS050329-10 - Release Date: 3/29/2005 1:01:00 PM - From USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Public Affairs - NORFOLK, Va. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=17687

 

Mid-Life Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) transitioned: LAN to metropolitan area network (MAN); message processing from NavMacs II to Personal Message Computer Terminal (PCMT); installations: RIM-116A Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) System, a lightweight quick-reaction “fire-and-forget” missile designed to counter anti-ship missiles attacking in waves or streams; rearchitectured NATO Sea Sparrow missile system; Radio Communications Suite (RCS), providing external afloat communications in support of “real world missions;” AN/SMQ-11; UMQ-12 Mini-Rawinsonde System; Integrated Communications Advanced Network (ICAN), which could distribute all navigation, communication and machinery controls” (Ref. 383B).

 

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS participating in SLEP, COH/RCOH (1964 to 9 May 2017) at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), an American Fortune 500 shipbuilding company formed on March 31, 2011 as a spin-off of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Newport News (NGSB-NN) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Selected Restricted Availability (SRA); Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (EDSRA); Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) and Docked-DPIA

(1998 to 2016)

Volume IV, Chapter I

Vol. IV Chapter I Part I of II

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4