Chapter XIII (1 January 2000 to 12 February 2001) and

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2000 YEAR END REPORT

 Chapter XIII

Appendix I

 

 

Stateside Operations ranged from her first stint of CVW-14 CQ’s; COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) CompTuEx 00-2A off the SOCAL OPREA; a second stint of CVW-14 CQ’s; Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) near Hawaii, prior to her Fifth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fifth Indian Ocean deployment, on her fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 4thOperation Southern Watch (OSW), enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and 2nd Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 (17 August to 12 February 2001).

1 January 2000 to 12 February 2001

Chapter XIII

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2000 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship Ferves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 22 January 2000,  with Captain J. J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, for COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) - CompTuEx 00-2A off the southern California coast on 27 January 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked conducted COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) - CompTuEx 00-2A off the southern California coast from 22 to 31 January 2000. Alaska Airlines Flight No. 261, a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 airliner (Serial No. N963AS) crashed into the Pacific Ocean about 2.7 miles north of Anacapa Island, California, at about 1621, 31 January 2000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The accident killed all of the people on board (the pilot, co-pilot, three cabin crewmembers and 83 passengers). Flight 261 lifted off from Lic Gustavo Diaz Ordaz International Airport at Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, en route to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington, when the aircraft lost pitch control that resulted from an in-flight failure of the horizontal stabilizer trim system jackscrew assembly’s acme nut threads.

 

Excessive wear caused the thread failure, due to insufficient lubrication of the jackscrew assembly. Abraham Lincoln supported rescuers as they responded to the tragedy, for which the ship uniquely later received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation with Operational Distinguishing Service. The Navy also mapped the accident area with underwater side scanning sonar and video, which enabled searchers to recover pieces of wreckage to investigate the loss. Some of the naval vessels that participated in recovery operations into the New Year included amphibious transport dock ship USS Cleveland (LPD-7), submarine support vessel Kellie Chouest, which utilized Scorpio, a tethered, unmanned remote vehicle, and MSC-operated fleet ocean tug Sioux (T-ATF-171)” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced operations in the Eastern Pacific on 1 February 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

“A Hornet crashed with a sheared main mount on 9 February 2000. Sailors removed the aircraft from the landing area, salvaged and subsequently craned the F/A-18 off USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) offloaded an F-14 Tomcat aircraft crash and salvage dud (utilized for training to familiarize sailors in accident response procedures) to NAS North Island, Coronado, San Deigo, California on 15 February 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated in the Eastern Pacific from 1 to 16 February 2000 and then pulled in for a port call at Santa Barbara, Ca. from 16 to 22 February 2000, where she hosted a reception for approximately 400 dignitaries and then headed for Everett, Washington, arriving by months end.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington shortly after 22 February 2000, with Captain J. J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, conducting COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) - CompTuEx 00-2A off the southern California coast from 22 to 31 January 2000. Alaska Airlines Flight No. 261, a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 airliner (Serial No. N963AS) crashed into the Pacific Ocean about 2.7 miles north of Anacapa Island, California, at about 1621, 31 January 2000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The accident killed all of the people on board (the pilot, co-pilot, three cabin crewmembers and 83 passengers). Flight 261 lifted off from Lic Gustavo Diaz Ordaz International Airport at Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, en route to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington, when the aircraft lost pitch control that resulted from an in-flight failure of the horizontal stabilizer trim system jackscrew assembly’s acme nut threads. Excessive wear caused the thread failure, due to insufficient lubrication of the jackscrew assembly. Abraham Lincoln supported rescuers as they responded to the tragedy, for which the ship uniquely later received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation with Operational Distinguishing Service. The Navy also mapped the accident area with underwater side scanning sonar and video, which enabled searchers to recover pieces of wreckage to investigate the loss. Some of the naval vessels that participated in recovery operations into the New Year included amphibious transport dock ship USS Cleveland (LPD-7), submarine support vessel Kellie Chouest, which utilized Scorpio, a tethered, unmanned remote vehicle, and MSC-operated fleet ocean tug Sioux (T-ATF-171). Abraham Lincoln commenced operations in the Eastern Pacific on 1 February 2000. A Hornet crashed with a sheared main mount on 9 February 2000. Sailors removed the aircraft from the landing area, salvaged and subsequently craned the F/A-18 off Abraham Lincoln and in another incident, offloaded an F-14 Tomcat aircraft crash and salvage dud (utilized for training to familiarize sailors in accident response procedures) to NAS North Island, Coronado, San Deigo, California on 15 February 2000. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Santa Barbara, Ca. from 16 to 22 February 2000, where she hosted a reception for approximately 400 dignitaries and then headed for Everett, Washington, arriving by months end. Abraham Lincoln tested the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet program, and collected data on carrier Precision Aided Landing System operations with the upgraded aircraft. Sailors of the Air Department accomplished 1,099 aircraft launches and 1,111 recoveries. Crash and Salvage teams responded to nine flight deck emergencies. In addition, the ship anchored off Santa Barbara, California, where she hosted a reception for approximately 400 dignitaries (22 January to shortly after 22 February 2000)” (Ref. 76 & 378A). 

 

“Raytheon Company technicians and sailors from Ship’s Company began the installion the IT21 local area network modification, a massive project which involved the installation of cables, breakers, transformers, power panels and receptacles throughout USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 26 March 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington ion 3 April 2000, with Captain James J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, embarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station, Lemoore, California, to conduct Carrier Qualifications (CQs) for FA-18E/F of VFA-122” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington shortly after 22 February 2000, with Captain J. J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, conducting COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) - CompTuEx 00-2A off the southern California coast from 22 to 31 January 2000. Alaska Airlines Flight No. 261, a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 airliner (Serial No. N963AS) crashed into the Pacific Ocean about 2.7 miles north of Anacapa Island, California, at about 1621, 31 January 2000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The accident killed all of the people on board (the pilot, co-pilot, three cabin crewmembers and 83 passengers). Flight 261 lifted off from Lic Gustavo Diaz Ordaz International Airport at Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, en route to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington, when the aircraft lost pitch control that resulted from an in-flight failure of the horizontal stabilizer trim system jackscrew assembly’s acme nut threads. Excessive wear caused the thread failure, due to insufficient lubrication of the jackscrew assembly. Abraham Lincoln supported rescuers as they responded to the tragedy, for which the ship uniquely later received the Coast Guard Unit Commendation with Operational Distinguishing Service. The Navy also mapped the accident area with underwater side scanning sonar and video, which enabled searchers to recover pieces of wreckage to investigate the loss. Some of the naval vessels that participated in recovery operations into the New Year included amphibious transport dock ship USS Cleveland (LPD-7), submarine support vessel Kellie Chouest, which utilized Scorpio, a tethered, unmanned remote vehicle, and MSC-operated fleet ocean tug Sioux (T-ATF-171). Abraham Lincoln commenced operations in the Eastern Pacific on 1 February 2000. A Hornet crashed with a sheared main mount on 9 February 2000. Sailors removed the aircraft from the landing area, salvaged and subsequently craned the F/A-18 off Abraham Lincoln and in another incident, offloaded an F-14 Tomcat aircraft crash and salvage dud (utilized for training to familiarize sailors in accident response procedures) to NAS North Island, Coronado, San Deigo, California on 15 February 2000. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Santa Barbara, Ca. from 16 to 22 February 2000, where she hosted a reception for approximately 400 dignitaries and then headed for Everett, Washington, arriving by months end. Abraham Lincoln tested the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet program, and collected data on carrier Precision Aided Landing System operations with the upgraded aircraft. Sailors of the Air Department accomplished 1,099 aircraft launches and 1,111 recoveries. Crash and Salvage teams responded to nine flight deck emergencies. In addition, the ship anchored off Santa Barbara, California, where she hosted a reception for approximately 400 dignitaries (22 January to shortly after 22 February 2000)” (Ref. 76 & 378A). 

 

“Raytheon Company technicians and sailors from Ship’s Company began the installion the IT21 local area network modification, a massive project which involved the installation of cables, breakers, transformers, power panels and receptacles throughout USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 26 March 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington ion 3 April 2000, with Captain James J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, embarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station, Lemoore, California, to conduct Carrier Qualifications (CQs) for FA-18E/F of VFA-122” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 (NK)

(3 to 17 April 2000)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) - Pacific Fleet & 7th

EastPac

CVW-14

NK

3 Apr 2000

17 Apr 2000

Eastern Pacific

15-days

Carrier Qualifications (CQs) for FA-18E/F of VFA-122.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-31

Tomcatters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NK100

F-14D

VFA-115

Eagles - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK200

FA-18C

VFA-113

Stingers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK300

FA-18C (N)

VFA-25

Fist of the Fleet -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK400

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-139

Cougars - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NK500

EA-6B

VAW-113

Black Eagles -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-4

Black Knights - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -         Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VS-35

Blue Wolves - Sea

Control Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VRC-30 Det. 1

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

xx

C-2A

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated off the coast of Southern California, conducting Carrier Qualifications for FA-18E/F of VFA-122 from 3 to 6 April 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) area of operations from 7 to 8 April 2000 was not reported.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 10 April 2000, with departure date unknown and headed to Victoria, British Columbia” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Victoria, British Columbia, Canada from 13 to 17 April 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

“On 17 April 2000, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington, with Captain James J. Quinn as a Commanding Officer, disembarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station, Lemoore, California, with Captain J. J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, hosting a family cruise for about 1,900 people as she steamed from Esquimalt to Everett, Washington, conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQs) for FA-18E/F of VFA-122 from 3 to 6 April 2000. Prowlers from VAQ-139 and F/A-18E/F Super Hornets completed 47 carrier qualification launches and recoveries. Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) area of operations from 7 to 8 April 2000 was not reported, but made a  port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 10 April 2000, with departure date unknown and headed to Victoria, British Columbia, pulling in for a port call at Victoria, British Columbia, Canada from 13 to 17 April 2000. Squadrons: VF-31, F-14D; VFA-115, FA-18C; VFA-113, FA-18C (N); VFA-25, FA-18C (N); VAQ-139, EA-6B; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-35, S-3B and VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A” (Ref. 76). 

 

Captain Douglas K. Dupouy assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 15 May 2000, relieving Admiral James J. Quinn, seventh Commanding Officer, serving from 18 February 1998 to 15 May 2000. Following the change of command ceremony, the crew held a reception for about 500 guests and 200 Ship’s Company in Hanger Bay 2” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington 15 May 2000, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, to conduct a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) near the Hawaii Is. She will under go her sixth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 (NK)

(15 May to 1 July 2000)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) -Pacific Fleet & 7th

1st EastPac

CVW-14

NK

15 May 2000

1 July 2000

Training

Eastern Pacific

6th FWFD

48-days

Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) near the Hawaii Is.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-31

Tomcatters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NK100

F-14D

VFA-115

Eagles - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK200

FA-18C

VFA-113

Stingers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK300

FA-18C (N)

VFA-25

Fist of the Fleet -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK400

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-139

Cougars - Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NK500

EA-6B

VAW-113

Black Eagles -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-4

Black Knights - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -         Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VS-35

Blue Wolves - Sea

Control Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VRC-30 Det. 1

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

xx

C-2A

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE (COMCRUDESGRU THREE), Commander Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, RDML Philip M. Balisle; Commander, Carrier Air Wing FOURTEEN, CAPT Richard L. Thayer; and Commodore, Destroyer Squadron THIRTY-ONE; CAPT Mark H. Buzby consisting of the guided-missile cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile frigate USS Paul Hamilton (DD-60); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigates USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and replenishment ship USS Camden (AOE-2) and attack submarine USS Tuscon (SSN-770) and USS Cheyenne (SSN-773). Amphibious Squadron 5 was assigned in 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific, transiting to a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 near Hawaii from 15 to 20 May 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 24 to 29 May 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 30 May to 5 June 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced further training and a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 near Hawaii on 5 June 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway for a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 (RimPac 2000) in Hawaiian waters from 5 to 15 June 2000, supporting an amphibious ready group, and executed 261 aircraft launches and 263 recoveries. Since 1998 the Navy began to develop a prototype Area Air Defense Commander (AADC) Capability program to address existing and emerging ballistic and air-breathing threats, and both Abraham Lincoln and USS Shiloh (CG-67) tested AADC performance during RimPac 2000. According to Vice Adm. Phillip M. Balisle, Commander Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, the AADC system “showed outstanding value as a force enabler that will allow a battle group commander to enter a troubled area and gain control of it quickly”” (Ref. 378A).

 

 

Off Hawaii, June 18, 2000 — The ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group steam alongside one another for a Battle Group photo during RIMPAC 2000. Ships involved are USS Cheyenne (SSN-773), USS Tucson (SSN-770), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), USS Shiloh (CG-67), USS Bunker Hill (CG-52), USS Fletcher (DD-992), USS Paul Hamilton (DDG-60), USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and USS Camden (AOE-2). U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Gabriel Wilson (photo # 000618-N-0147W-001). USN. NS027239.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027239.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 15 to 19 June 2000, commencing Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) near the Hawaii Is. from 19 to 26 June 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

“On 1 July 2000, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, conducting a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) near Hawaii. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Pacific, transiting to a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 near Hawaii from 15 to 20 May 2000, underway in the Pacific from 24 to 29 May 2000. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 30 May to 5 June 2000 and then got underway for a RimPac 2000 in Hawaiian waters from 5 to 15 June 2000, supporting an amphibious ready group, and executed 261 aircraft launches and 263 recoveries. Since 1998 the Navy began to develop a prototype Area Air Defense Commander (AADC) Capability program to address existing and emerging ballistic and air-breathing threats, and both Abraham Lincoln and USS Shiloh (CG-67) tested AADC performance during RimPac 2000. According to Vice Adm. Phillip M. Balisle, Commander Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, the AADC system “showed outstanding value as a force enabler that will allow a battle group commander to enter a troubled area and gain control of it quickly.” Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Pacific from 15 to 19 June 2000, conducting JTFEX near the Hawaii Is. from 19 to 26 June 2000. The ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group steam alongside one another for a Battle Group photo during RIMPAC 2000. RIMPAC 2000. Ships involved are USS Cheyenne (SSN-773), USS Tucson (SSN-770), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), USS Shiloh (CG-67), USS Bunker Hill (CG-52), USS Fletcher (DD-992), USS Paul Hamilton (DDG-60), USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and USS Camden (AOE-2). U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Gabriel Wilson (photo # 000618-N-0147W-001). USN. NS027239. Squadrons: VF-31, F-14D; VFA-115, FA-18C; VFA-113, FA-18C (N); VFA-25, FA-18C (N); VAQ-139, EA-6B; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-35, S-3B and VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A. Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE (COMCRUDESGRU THREE), Commander Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, RDML Philip M. Balisle; Commander, Carrier Air Wing FOURTEEN, CAPT Richard L. Thayer; and Commodore, Destroyer Squadron THIRTY-ONE; CAPT Mark H. Buzby consisting of the guided-missile cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile frigate USS Paul Hamilton (DD-60); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigates USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and replenishment ship USS Camden (AOE-2) and attack submarine USS Tuscon (SSN-770) and USS Cheyenne (SSN-773). Amphibious Squadron 5 was assigned in 2000. Her sixth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (15 May to 1 July 2000)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A).

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027239.jpg

 

“Raytheon Company technicians and sailors from Ship’s Company installed the IT21 local area network modification, a massive project which involved the installation of cables, breakers, transformers, power panels and receptacles throughout USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 26 March to 14 August 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Raytheon Company technicians and sailors from Ship’s Company installed the IT21 local area network modification, a massive project which involved the installation of cables, breakers, transformers, power panels and receptacles throughout USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 26 March to 14 August 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked departed Everett, Washington 17 August 2000, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, on her fifth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fifth Indian Ocean deployment, on her fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 4thOperation Southern Watch (OSW), enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and 2nd Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet in July 1995 reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992 (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet's area of responsibility encompasses about 7.5 million square miles and includes the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman and parts of the Indian Ocean. This expanse, comprised of 25 countries, includes three critical chokepoints at the Suez Canal, the Straits of Hormuz, and the Straits of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen. She will under go her seventh Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 (NK)

(17 August to 12 February 2001)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) - Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command       (5th Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)

5th Westpac 5th IO

4th OSW

CVW-14

NK

17 Aug 2000

12 Feb 2001

Western Pacific

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

7th FWFD

180-days

4thOperation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and 2nd Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-31

Tomcatters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NK100

F-14D

VFA-115

Eagles - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK200

FA-18C

VFA-113

Stingers -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK300

FA-18C (N)

VFA-25

Fist of the Fleet -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK400

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-139

Cougars -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

NK500

EA-6B

VAW-113

Black Eagles -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-4

Black Knights - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk  Anti-submarine -            Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VS-35

Blue Wolves - Sea

Control Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VRC-30 Det. 1

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

xx

C-2A

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

“USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Strike group is comprised Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE (COMCRUDESGRU THREE), Commander Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, RDML Philip M. Balisle; Commander, Carrier Air Wing FOURTEEN, CAPT Richard L. Thayer and Commodore, Destroyer Squadron THIRTY-ONE; CAPT Mark H. Buzby, consisting of the guided-missile cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile frigate USS Jpaul Hamilton (DD-60); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigates USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and replenishment ship USS Camden (AOE-2) and attack submarine USS Tuscon (SSN-770) and USS Cheyenne (SSN-773). Amphibious Squadron 5 was assigned in 2000” (Ref. 377 & 681E).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 17 to 18 August 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 19 August 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 19 to 20 August 2000 and got underway for operations off the coast of Southern California for Carrier Qualifications on 21 August 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 22 to 25 August 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted an anti-submarine exercise at Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaii from 26 to 28 August 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Pacific from 29 August to 6 September 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific from 7 to 10 September 2000 (Southeast of Philippines) on 11 September 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific from 12 to 13 September 2000 (off the eastern coast of Malaysia) Singapore on 14 September 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific and South China Sea from 15 to 17 September 2000, transiting the Strait of Malacca to the northern passage on 18 September 2000; underway in the Indian Ocean on 19 September 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Indian Ocean from 19 to 21 September 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Arabian Sea from 22 to 23 September 2000, steaming through the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz en route to the Persian Gulf, entering the Persian Gulf and relieved USS George Washington (CVN-73) in support of Operation Southern Watch on 24 September 2000. As the ship passed through the Strait of Hormuz, Vice Adm. Charles W. Moore, Jr., Commander Fifth Fleet, made an overnight visit to the carrier to meet her leadership and to explain firsthand to the crew the purpose of their mission in the Gulf” (Ref. 76).

 

“Fist 411 , an F/A-18C (BuNo 164681), Lt. Bruce J. Donald, a 27-year-old pilot from Poughkeepsie, N.Y., assigned to VFA-25, crashed shortly after taking off from Abraham Lincoln for a routine test on carrier landings (at 1030 on 29 September 2000)” (Ref. 84A & 378A).


After sunset an airman fell overboard from the flight deck of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) into the dark water below in September 2000. BM3 David Duvall, on watch on the fantail, spotted two blinks of a strobe light and alerted shipmates, who rescued the sailor. “I pretty much saved his life,” Duvall remembered.

 

“That’s something that I can take back to my family as something good that came out of the deployment. I felt good about myself. If I hadn’t really been paying attention, he probably would have been long gone.” The victim suffered a ruptured spleen; however, a surgical team from the Medical Department performed an emergency procedure and stabilized him” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 24 September to 3 October 2000, relieving aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) and participated in Operation Southern Watch and MIOs. As the ship passed through the Strait of Hormuz, Vice Adm. Charles W. Moore, Jr., Commander Fifth Fleet, made an overnight visit to the carrier to meet her leadership and to explain firsthand to the crew the purpose of their mission in the Gulf. During this period Abraham Lincoln recorded 557 aircraft launches and 598 recoveries, and crash and salvage crews responded to nine flight deck emergencies.

 

Donald perished in the accident, though searchers recovered his body, which enabled his family to intern the pilot in Arlington National Cemetery (17 October). Helos and four ships sought for the wreckage; however, although they discovered small fragments of debris in the water, they could not locate the bulk of the aircraft. Richard Cochrane, a 27-year-old naval flight officer and classmate from the 1995 class of the Naval Academy, ran the 25th Marine Corps Marathon in tribute to his friend. And at one point during these operations, the carrier received her initial Guided Bomb Unit modified Command Rack and Launcher Test set upgrades for modified F-14D Tomcat weapons rails” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Jebel Ali, UAE on 8 October 2000, visiting from 4 to 7 October 2000 and headed to the Persian Gulf. Some sailors visited an area of shops, beverage stands and vendors that they dubbed “The Sand Box” due to the lack of amenities and liberty options ashore. Nonetheless, they played softball and basketball, and participated in go-kart races and rode camels” (Ref. 76 & 378A).  

 

“Terrorists struck at guided missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67) as she refueled in Aden, Yemen, en route to Bahrain with the George Washington Carrier Battle Group, on 12 October 2000. A pair of suicide bombers brought their small inflatable Zodiac-type boat alongside the anchored ship and detonated their lethal cargo, killing 17 Americans and wounding 39 more. The blast flooded engineering spaces but gallant damage control efforts by the crew saved the ship, and she later returned to the U.S. for repairs” (Ref. 378A).

 

 

The Persian Gulf, October 13, 2000 — Known as the "shooter," a catapult officer aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) indicates to the pilot of an F/A-18 Hornet to brake as the aircraft approaches the shuttle for a catapult launch during flight operations. The carrier was on a routine six-month deployment in the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone over Iraq. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class David Rush (photo # 001013-N-0879R-001). NS027251. Alex Tatchin.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027251.jpg

 

“The Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 16 November 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 8 October to 22 December 2000. V-2 Division maintained an astounding 99 percent equipment availability rate during the last two months of an Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific deployment” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a second port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 23 to 26 December 2000. Distributed 5,127 pounds of Project Handclasp materials to the following agencies in Dubai and United Arab Emirates: Dubai Center for Special Needs, a school for physically and mentally handicapped children; and United International School, which specialized in training children from poor and single parent homes” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2001).

 

CVW-14 embarked onboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made their last flight operations in support of Operation Southern Watch in the Persian Gulf on 29 December 2000, accomplishing 4,643 aircraft launches and 4,643 recoveries, while crash and salvage sailors responded to 57 flight deck emergencies from 8 October 2000 to 1 January 2001. During the year, aircraft flew 1,468 combat sorties from the ship and dropped more than 4.7 million pounds of ordnance on Iraqi troops during Operation Southern Watch missions, including 18 Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAMs) and 16 Paveway II guided bomb units, in response option strikes. This also became the first time that the carrier deployed with GPS guided JDAMs and JSOWs as part of ammunition allowances. With superb support, the air wing enjoyed mission capable/fully mission capable rating of 86 and 82 percent respectively, well above Pacific Fleet averages. When Abraham Lincoln later received the Meritorious Unit Commendation for these battles, the citation noted that her pilots and aircrew did so while “in the face of live enemy fire,” and that the sailors of the battle group used a policy of “continuous presence and deterrence,” and demonstrated “extraordinary dedication to duty, aggressively enforced United Nations sanctions.” As Abraham Lincoln completed these operations, terrorists struck at guided missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67) as she refueled in Aden, Yemen, en route to Bahrain with the George Washington Carrier Battle Group, on 12 October 2000. A pair of suicide bombers brought their small inflatable Zodiac-type boat alongside the anchored ship and detonated their lethal cargo, killing 17 Americans and wounding 39 more. The blast flooded engineering spaces but gallant damage control efforts by the crew saved the ship, and she later returned to the U.S. for repairs. Due to enhanced force protection training and preparations, the G-2 Division provided small arms protection for the ship during crucial transits, such as the Strait of Hormuz. Over 85 sailors of the Weapons Department qualified in the employment and use of Browning M2 .50 caliber and M60 machine guns, to defend against attacks by small boats and low-slow flying aircraft, threats that sailors of the battle group did not normally train for. Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen visited the carrier (16 November). “I’m here because I want to meet you and thank you for the service that you provide to our country…I know that I’m sending you out to a dangerous area,” he said. “I speak of danger because [the attack on] the [USS] Cole is most recent on my mind, and probably most recent in yours.” At one point during operations in the hot and arid Middle East, No. 6 Air Conditioning Unit overheated, which caused significant damage to electrical components which supplied it power, and which the system usually cooled, but EMs from the Power Shop repaired the system within a day. At another point, sailors noted unusual noise and vibration on No. 9 sliding padeye, and completed depot level repair and testing that kept the crucial underway replenishment equipment operational, and ensured that maximum stores and ammunition transfers allowed the carrier to remain on station. In addition, the ship’s historian noted that sailors maintained damage control training at an “obscene pace” through the deployment. A nurse anesthetist embarked during the first three months of the deployment, and an anesthetist joined the ship during the final three months.

 

The ship spent part of the holidays in port at Jebel Ali. The heightened terrorist threat, however, required sailors to man additional security positions, and gunners manned M60s even over Christmas, but the ship’s historian referred to their service as “the cornerstone of Abraham Lincoln’s force protection measures 24 hours a day, every day...”” (Ref. 378A).

 

 

The Gulf of Oman, Dec. 30, 2000 — USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and her battle group sail in the waters of the Gulf of Oman after spending three months in the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch. U.S Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Gabriel Wilson (photo # 001230-N-0147W-002). USN.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027237.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2001 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship Ferves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2001).

 

“After spending more than 100 days on station in the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was relieved by USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) on 2 January 2001, completing operational requirements in the North Arabian Sea just prior to the New Year and began a long journey home. Although the fast pace of supporting Operation Southern Watch slowed considerably for most of the crew, the Navigation Department was kept busy preparing charts and supervising the safe navigation of the ship. The department was further challenged with having to coordinate and man watch stations for an arduous three-day underway replenishment (UNREP), where more than 1500 pallets of supplies were offloaded to be used by other ships in the theater. Operation Department OA Division provided aviation and target area environmental briefs for 1,251 events in support of Operation Southern Watch; prepared and briefed 255 staff environmental briefs in support of ALBG Commander and DESRON-3 1 Commander during Arabian Gulf IWestPacDeployment; expertly forecasted and provided safe navigation through 5 OTSR divert situations including “WestPac” transit covering 3 typhoons; provided Electromagnetic and Communication (AREPS) analysis products in direct support of the Air Defense Commander, Information Warfare Commander, and DESRON-31 Commander; provided Electro-Optical (TAWS and NOWS) analysis products in direct support of CVW-14 and DESRON-31; provided ASW sensor (IMAT) analysis products in direct support of DESRON-31 and had 80 percent advancement rate. Operation Department OX Division provided environmental predictions, tactical support, and USW command and control support to DESRON-31. Calendar year 2001 was marked with tremendous success for Abraham Lincoln’s Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD). The year began while on “WestPac2000-2001, where AIMD sustained total organic intermediate level maintenance support for Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW-14) aircraft and the ships and other aircraft of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group. AIMD's superior support enabled CVW-14 to accomplish more than 6,591 sorties attaining 2,859 flight hours with a sortie completion rate of 96.1 percent. The overall key to the Battle Group's success was AIMD's involvement as the Battle Force Integrated Maintenance Activity (BFIMA). This composite organization allowed for ships within the Battle Group to support each other's needs and reduced cost and maintenance delays associated with bringing in outside assistance and materials. BFIMA completed 585 support actions, saving nearly $30,000.00 in repair and replacement costs and contributed directly to the combat readiness of 21 ships and aviation units deployed to the Arabian Gulf AOR. Deck Department consists of three divisions under the leadership of the First Lieutenant, LCDR Ricky Holt. His primary assistants are the Assistant First Lieutenant, LT Mike Chaparro; Ship's Boatswain, CW03 Steve Hagle; and departmental Leading Chief Petty Officer BMCS (SW) Ziemer. There are 93 assigned personnel who are responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of the ship's sides and over 100 spaces. The department maintains and operates 8 underway replenishment stations, ship's boats, the Boat and Airplane Crane, and two anchor systems. Deck Department re-organized the ship's crane program and re-certified the Boat and Airplane Crane for operation. Formerly unqualified crews received extensive training and underwent a rigorous qualification process to ensure safe and proper crane operations. These efforts provided the ship with a fully certified crane and crew that allowed for the deployment and recovery of small boats, as well as assisted in stores onloads while anchored in Perth, Australia and Hobart, Tasmania. Many hours of maintenance and repair were required to receive full certification. The crane remains fully operational and in the highest state of readiness. Deck Department conducted more than 30 replenishment-at-sea evolutions that transferred more than 4,000 pallets of stores and ammunition and over 4 million gallons of fuel. This ensured the sustainability of the ship and air wing as well as maintaining fully stocked magazines, all in support of Operation Southern Watch. All operations were completed without personal iujury or serious damage to equipment. Noting unusual noise and vibration No. 9 sliding padeye, Deck Department engineers undertook depot level repair and testing. The repairs kept crucial UNREP equipment fully operational and allowed maximum stores and ammunition transfer capability while on station in support of Operation Southern Watch. Personnel identified a discrepancy in the design of the worm gear set screw and initiated a departure from specifications to correct the problem while on deployment to the Arabian Gulf. Subsequently, the sliding padeye operated flawlessly and aided the transfer of more than 2,000 pallets of ammunition and stores” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 26 December to 2 January 2001 V-2 Division maintained an astounding 99 percent equipment availability rate during the last two months of an Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific deployment. Calendar year 2001 was marked with tremendous success for Abraham Lincoln’s Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Strait of Hormuz and the Gulf of Oman en route to the Indian Ocean via the Arabian Sea from 2 to 3 January 2000” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Arabian Sea and or the Indian Ocean from 3 to 7 January 2001; underway in the Indian Ocean (off the west coast of Australia) on 8 January 2001” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Fremantle, Australia on 16 January 2001, visiting from 12 to 16 January 2001. The Food Service Divisions (S-2, S-5, and S-11) initiated an innovative partnership with the Rendezvous Hotel in Perth. Mess Specialists from Abraham Lincoln spent two days working in the hotel restaurants while the ship was anchored off shore. As the ship got underway, two chefs joined the crew for the transit to Hobart, Tasmania and a chance to experience the life of a chef onboard a warship, operating 24 hours a day and preparing nearly 18,000 meals daily. The chefs were duly impressed and ended their visit with an Australian fare five-course meal in the Commanding Officer's Mess. Participants enjoyed crocodile, emu and kangaroo cooked to perfection and served with an Australian flair. Supply Department then enjoyed a second liberty port in Hobart, Tasmania. During the visit, the ship hosted nearly 400 Hobart area civic and military dignitaries to a reception in hangar bay 2” (Ref. 378A & 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway off the south coast of Australia from 17 to 20 January 2001” (Ref. 76).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Hobart, Tasmania on 20 January 2001. En route from Perth, the quartermasters and signalmen were able to exercise all the requirements associated with anchoring in foreign ports as in the case of Perth. The crew was very well received and all hands look forward to another visit during future deployments. As the ship got underway from Perth, two chefs joined the crew for the transit to Hobart, Tasmania and a chance to experience the life of a chef onboard a warship, operating 24 hours a day and preparing nearly 18,000 meals daily. The chefs were duly impressed and ended their visit with an Australian fare five-course meal in the Commanding Officer's Mess. Participants enjoyed crocodile, emu and kangaroo cooked to perfection and served with an Australian flair and then the Supply Department and ship/wing crew enjoyed a second liberty port in Hobart, Tasmania. During the visit, the ship hosted nearly 400 Hobart area civic and military dignitaries to a reception in hangar bay 2” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Hobart, Tasmania from 21 to 24 January 2001, where she hosted a reception for 400 guests and dignitaries in Hanger Bay 2. Crewmembers spoke about the wonderful reception that the Australians gave them, and agreed that they looked forward to future visits Conducted two community relations' projects in Perth, Australia and two in Hobart, Tasmania. More than 130 Abraham Lincoln Sailors volunteered their time and talent during community relations' projects in Perth, Australia and in Hobart, Tasmania. These teams of volunteers went to three hospitals, one youth center, and provided assistance in the restoration of a historical cemetery” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western and Eastern Pacific from 26 January to 8 February 2001. In January, Weapons Department conducted a Missile Pre-sentencing Inspection (MPI) and major weapons off-load after our port visits in Perth, Australia, and Hobart, Tasmania. These were accomplished at the tail end of the Arabian Gulf Deployment. In February 2001, Reactor Department completed a very successful Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE). This was especially noteworthy due to the limited drill time, as a result of remaining on station for so long in the Arabian Sea” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 8 February 2001” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 9 February 2001, conducting a "Tiger Cruise" from NASNI to Everett, Washington in the Eastern Pacific from 8 to 9 February 2001. The Abraham Lincoln started 2001 by completing a safe and successful Western Pacific and Arabian/Persian Gulf Deployment. During the transit from San Diego to Washington, the Safety Department coordinated the embarkation of two Washington State Troopers to conduct a face-to-face driver's safety training refresher for more than 3,000 Sailors. It was also during this time that the department prepared for the ship's upcoming Planned Incremental Availability (PIA)” (Ref. 76 & 378B-2001)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a "Tiger Cruise" from Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California to Everett, Washington in the Eastern Pacific from 9 to 12 February 2001. During transit to San Diego, without helicopter support, the MWB and crew were called upon to recover a crewmember that had fallen over the side. Due to superb upkeep and maintenance of the boat, as well as personnel adhering to strict training requirements, an actual man overboard was subsequently recovered and returned to safety using the ship's ready lifeboat and crew (Ref. & 378B-2001).

 

“On 12 February 2001, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington, disembarking CVW-14 at San Diego, California, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, ending her fifth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fifth Indian Ocean deployment, on her fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 4thOperation Southern Watch (OSW), enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and 2nd Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, moving ashore in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet, reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch. The crew was greeted on the pier by a throng of dependents and friends. The brow was lowered as quickly as possible and the Command Master Chiefs announcement of "Liberty Call" signaled a leisurely month-long stand down that enabled many Sailors to take leave and get reacquainted with their families. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 17 to 18 August 2000, pulling in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 19 to 20 August 2000 and got underway for operations off the coast of Southern California for Carrier Qualifications on 21 August 2000, underway in the Pacific from 22 to 25 August 2000, conducting an anti-submarine exercise at Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaii from 26 to 28 August 2000, underway in the Pacific from 29 August to 6 September 2000, Western Pacific from 7 to 10 September 2000, Western Pacific (Southeast of Philippines) on 11 September 2000, Western Pacific from 12 to 13 September 2000, Western Pacific (off the eastern coast of Malaysia) Singapore on 14 September 2000, Western Pacific and South China Sea from 15 to 17 September 2000, transiting the Strait of Malacca to the northern passage on 18 September 2000, underway in the Indian Ocean from 19 to 21 September 2000 and the Arabian Sea from 22 to 23 September 2000, steaming through the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz en route to the Persian Gulf, entering the Persian Gulf and relieved USS George Washington (CVN-73) in support of OSW on 24 September 2000. As the ship passed through the Strait of Hormuz, Vice Adm. Charles W. Moore, Jr., Commander Fifth Fleet, made an overnight visit to the carrier to meet her leadership and to explain firsthand to the crew the purpose of their mission in the Gulf. Fist 411 , an F/A-18C (BuNo. 164681), Lt. Bruce J. Donald, a 27-year-old pilot from Poughkeepsie, N.Y., assigned to VFA-25, crashed shortly after taking off from Abraham Lincoln for a routine test on carrier landings (at 1030 on 29 September 2000). After sunset an airman fell overboard from the flight deck of Abraham Lincoln into the dark water below in September 2000. BM3 David Duvall, on watch on the fantail, spotted two blinks of a strobe light and alerted shipmates, who rescued the sailor. “I pretty much saved his life,” Duvall remembered. “That’s something that I can take back to my family as something good that came out of the deployment. I felt good about myself. If I hadn’t really been paying attention, he probably would have been long gone.” The victim suffered a ruptured spleen; however, a surgical team from the Medical Department performed an emergency procedure and stabilized him. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Persian Gulf from 24 September to 3 October 2000, relieving aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN-73) and participated in OSW and MIOs. During this period Abraham Lincoln recorded 557 aircraft launches and 598 recoveries, and crash and salvage crews responded to nine flight deck emergencies. Donald perished in the accident, though searchers recovered his body, which enabled his family to intern the pilot in Arlington National Cemetery (17 October). Helos and four ships sought for the wreckage; however, although they discovered small fragments of debris in the water, they could not locate the bulk of the aircraft. Richard Cochrane, a 27-year-old naval flight officer and classmate from the 1995 class of the Naval Academy, ran the 25th Marine Corps Marathon in tribute to his friend. And at one point during these operations, the carrier received her initial Guided Bomb Unit modified Command Rack and Launcher Test set upgrades for modified F-14D Tomcat weapons rails. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 4 to 7 October 2000, departing Jebel Ali, UAE on 8 October 2000 and headed to the Persian Gulf. Some sailors visited an area of shops, beverage stands and vendors that they dubbed “The Sand Box” due to the lack of amenities and liberty options ashore. Nonetheless, they played softball and basketball, and participated in go-kart races and rode camels. Terrorists struck at guided missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67) as she refueled in Aden, Yemen, en route to Bahrain with the George Washington Carrier Battle Group, on 12 October 2000. A pair of suicide bombers brought their small inflatable Zodiac-type boat alongside the anchored ship and detonated their lethal cargo, killing 17 Americans and wounding 39 more. The blast flooded engineering spaces but gallant damage control efforts by the crew saved the ship, and she later returned to the U.S. for repairs. The Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen visited the carrier on 16 November 2000. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Persian Gulf from 8 October to 22 December 2000. V-2 Division maintained an astounding 99 percent equipment availability rate during the last two months of an Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific deployment. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a second port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 23 to 26 December 2000. Distributed 5,127 pounds of Project Handclasp materials to the following agencies in Dubai and United Arab Emirates: Dubai Center for Special Needs, a school for physically and mentally handicapped children; and United International School, which specialized in training children from poor and single parent homes. CVW-14 embarked onboard made their last flight operations in support of OSW in the Persian Gulf on 29 December 2000, accomplishing 4,643 aircraft launches and 4,643 recoveries, while crash and salvage sailors responded to 57 flight deck emergencies from 8 October 2000 to 1 January 2001. During the year, aircraft flew 1,468 combat sorties from the ship and dropped more than 4.7 million pounds of ordnance on Iraqi troops during Operation Southern Watch missions, including 18 Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAMs) and 16 Paveway II guided bomb units, in response option strikes. This also became the first time that the carrier deployed with GPS guided JDAMs and JSOWs as part of ammunition allowances. With superb support, the air wing enjoyed mission capable/fully mission capable rating of 86 and 82 percent respectively, well above Pacific Fleet averages. When Abraham Lincoln later received the Meritorious Unit Commendation for these battles, the citation noted that her pilots and aircrew did so while “in the face of live enemy fire,” and that the sailors of the battle group used a policy of “continuous presence and deterrence,” and demonstrated “extraordinary dedication to duty, aggressively enforced United Nations sanctions.” As Abraham Lincoln completed these operations, terrorists struck at guided missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG-67) as she refueled in Aden, Yemen, en route to Bahrain with the George Washington Carrier Battle Group, on 12 October 2000. A pair of suicide bombers brought their small inflatable Zodiac-type boat alongside the anchored ship and detonated their lethal cargo, killing 17 Americans and wounding 39 more. The blast flooded engineering spaces but gallant damage control efforts by the crew saved the ship, and she later returned to the U.S. for repairs. Due to enhanced force protection training and preparations, the G-2 Division provided small arms protection for the ship during crucial transits, such as the Strait of Hormuz. Over 85 sailors of the Weapons Department qualified in the employment and use of Browning M2 .50 caliber and M60 machine guns, to defend against attacks by small boats and low-slow flying aircraft, threats that sailors of the battle group did not normally train for. Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen visited the carrier (16 November). “I’m here because I want to meet you and thank you for the service that you provide to our country…I know that I’m sending you out to a dangerous area,” he said. “I speak of danger because [the attack on] the [USS] Cole is most recent on my mind, and probably most recent in yours.” At one point during operations in the hot and arid Middle East, No. 6 Air Conditioning Unit overheated, which caused significant damage to electrical components which supplied it power, and which the system usually cooled, but EMs from the Power Shop repaired the system within a day. At another point, sailors noted unusual noise and vibration on No. 9 sliding padeye, and completed depot level repair and testing that kept the crucial underway replenishment equipment operational, and ensured that maximum stores and ammunition transfers allowed the carrier to remain on station. In addition, the ship’s historian noted that sailors maintained damage control training at an “obscene pace” through the deployment. A nurse anesthetist embarked during the first three months of the deployment, and an anesthetist joined the ship during the final three months. The ship spent part of the holidays in port at Jebel Ali. The heightened terrorist threat, however, required sailors to man additional security positions, and gunners manned M60s even over Christmas, but the ship’s historian referred to their service as “the cornerstone of Abraham Lincoln’s force protection measures 24 hours a day, every day...”  Organization. Captain Douglas K. Dupouy assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 15 May 2000, relieving Admiral James J. Quinn, seventh Commanding Officer, serving from 18 February 1998 to 15 May 2000. Following the change of command ceremony, the crew held a reception for about 500 guests and 200 Ship’s Company in Hanger Bay 2. After spending more than 100 days on station in the Persian Gulf in support of OSW, Abraham Lincoln was relieved by USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) on 2 January 2001, completing operational requirements in the North Arabian Sea just prior to the New Year and began a long journey home. Although the fast pace of supporting OSW slowed considerably for most of the crew, the Navigation Department was kept busy preparing charts and supervising the safe navigation of the ship. The department was further challenged with having to coordinate and man watch stations for an arduous three-day underway replenishment (UNREP), where more than 1500 pallets of supplies were offloaded to be used by other ships in the theater. Operation Department OA Division provided aviation and target area environmental briefs for 1,251 events in support of OSW; prepared and briefed 255 staff environmental briefs in support of ALBG Commander and DESRON-31 Commander during Arabian Gulf IWestPacDeployment; expertly forecasted and provided safe navigation through 5 OTSR divert situations including “WestPac” transit covering 3 typhoons; provided Electromagnetic and Communication (AREPS) analysis products in direct support of the Air Defense Commander, Information Warfare Commander, and DESRON-31 Commander; provided Electro-Optical (TAWS and NOWS) analysis products in direct support of CVW-14 and DESRON-31; provided ASW sensor (IMAT) analysis products in direct support of DESRON-31 and had 80 percent advancement rate. Operation Department OX Division provided environmental predictions, tactical support, and USW command and control support to DESRON-31. Calendar year 2001 was marked with tremendous success for Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD). The year began while on “WestPac2000-2001, where AIMD sustained total organic intermediate level maintenance support for Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW-14) aircraft and the ships and other aircraft of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group. AIMD's superior support enabled CVW-14 to accomplish more than 6,591 sorties attaining 2,859 flight hours with a sortie completion rate of 96.1 percent. The overall key to the Battle Group's success was AIMD's involvement as the Battle Force Integrated Maintenance Activity (BFIMA). This composite organization allowed for ships within the Battle Group to support each other's needs and reduced cost and maintenance delays associated with bringing in outside assistance and materials. BFIMA completed 585 support actions, saving nearly $30,000.00 in repair and replacement costs and contributed directly to the combat readiness of 21 ships and aviation units deployed to the Arabian Gulf AOR. Deck Department consists of three divisions under the leadership of the First Lieutenant, LCDR Ricky Holt. His primary assistants are the Assistant First Lieutenant, LT Mike Chaparro; Ship's Boatswain, CW03 Steve Hagle; and departmental Leading Chief Petty Officer BMCS (SW) Ziemer. There are 93 assigned personnel who are responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of the ship's sides and over 100 spaces. The department maintains and operates 8 underway replenishment stations, ship's boats, the Boat and Airplane Crane, and two anchor systems. Deck Department re-organized the ship's crane program and re-certified the Boat and Airplane Crane for operation. Formerly unqualified crews received extensive training and underwent a rigorous qualification process to ensure safe and proper crane operations. These efforts provided the ship with a fully certified crane and crew that allowed for the deployment and recovery of small boats, as well as assisted in stores onloads while anchored in Perth, Australia and Hobart, Tasmania. Many hours of maintenance and repair were required to receive full certification. The crane remains fully operational and in the highest state of readiness. Deck Department conducted more than 30 replenishment-at-sea evolutions that transferred more than 4,000 pallets of stores and ammunition and over 4 million gallons of fuel. This ensured the sustainability of the ship and air wing as well as maintaining fully stocked magazines, all in support of Abraham Lincoln. All operations were completed without personal iujury or serious damage to equipment. Noting unusual noise and vibration No. 9 sliding padeye, Deck Department engineers undertook depot level repair and testing. The repairs kept crucial UNREP equipment fully operational and allowed maximum stores and ammunition transfer capability while on station in support of OSW. Personnel identified a discrepancy in the design of the worm gear set screw and initiated a departure from specifications to correct the problem while on deployment to the Arabian Gulf. Subsequently, the sliding padeye operated flawlessly and aided the transfer of more than 2,000 pallets of ammunition and stores. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Persian Gulf from 26 December to 2 January 2001 V-2 Division maintained an astounding 99 percent equipment availability rate during the last two months of an Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific deployment. Calendar year 2001 was marked with tremendous success for AIMD. Abraham Lincoln steamed through the Strait of Hormuz and the Gulf of Oman en route to the Indian Ocean via the Arabian Sea from 2 to 3 January 2000, underway in the Arabian Sea and or the Indian Ocean from 3 to 7 January 2001 and  the Indian Ocean (off the west coast of Australia) on 8 January 2001. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Fremantle, Australia 12 to 16 January 2001, departing Fremantle, Australia on 16 January 2001. The Food Service Divisions (S-2, S-5, and S-11) initiated an innovative partnership with the Rendezvous Hotel in Perth. Mess Specialists from Abraham Lincoln spent two days working in the hotel restaurants while the ship was anchored off shore. As the ship got underway, two chefs joined the crew for the transit to Hobart, Tasmania and a chance to experience the life of a chef onboard a warship, operating 24 hours a day and preparing nearly 18,000 meals daily. The chefs were duly impressed and ended their visit with an Australian fare five-course meal in the Commanding Officer's Mess. Participants enjoyed crocodile, emu and kangaroo cooked to perfection and served with an Australian flair. Supply Department then enjoyed a second liberty port in Hobart, Tasmania. During the visit, the ship hosted nearly 400 Hobart area civic and military dignitaries to a reception in hangar bay 2. Abraham Lincoln was underway off the south coast of Australia from 17 to 20 January 2001, pulling in for a port call at Hobart, Tasmania from 21 to 24 January 2001. En route from Perth, the quartermasters and signalmen were able to exercise all the requirements associated with anchoring in foreign ports as in the case of Perth. The crew was very well received and all hands look forward to another visit during future deployments. As the ship got underway from Perth, two chefs joined the crew for the transit to Hobart, Tasmania and a chance to experience the life of a chef onboard a warship, operating 24 hours a day and preparing nearly 18,000 meals daily. The chefs were duly impressed and ended their visit with an Australian fare five-course meal in the Commanding Officer's Mess. Participants enjoyed crocodile, emu and kangaroo cooked to perfection and served with an Australian flair and then the Supply Department and ship/wing crew enjoyed a second liberty port in Hobart, Tasmania. During the visit, the ship hosted nearly 400 Hobart area civic and military dignitaries to a reception in hangar bay 2. Crewmembers spoke about the wonderful reception that the Australians gave them, and agreed that they looked forward to future visits Conducted two community relations' projects in Perth, Australia and two in Hobart, Tasmania. More than 130 Abraham Lincoln Sailors volunteered their time and talent during community relations' projects in Perth, Australia and in Hobart, Tasmania. These teams of volunteers went to three hospitals, one youth center, and provided assistance in the restoration of a historical cemetery. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Western and Eastern Pacific from 26 January to 8 February 2001. In January, Weapons Department conducted a Missile Pre-sentencing Inspection (MPI) and major weapons off-load after our port visits in Perth, Australia, and Hobart, Tasmania. These were accomplished at the tail end of the Arabian Gulf Deployment. In February 2001, Reactor Department completed a very successful Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE). This was especially noteworthy due to the limited drill time, as a result of remaining on station for so long in the Arabian SeaAbraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at NASNI on 8 February 2001, departing NASNI on 9 February 2001, conducting a "Tiger Cruise" from NASNI to Everett, Washington in the Eastern Pacific from 8 to 9 February 2001. The Abraham Lincoln started 2001 by completing a safe and successful Western Pacific and Arabian/Persian Gulf Deployment. During the transit from San Diego to Washington, the Safety Department coordinated the embarkation of two Washington State Troopers to conduct a face-to-face driver's safety training refresher for more than 3,000 Sailors. It was also during this time that the department prepared for the ship's upcoming Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Abraham Lincoln conducted a "Tiger Cruise" from NASNI to Everett, Washington in the Eastern Pacific from 9 to 12 February 2001. During transit to San Diego, without helicopter support, the MWB and crew were called upon to recover a crewmember that had fallen over the side. Due to superb upkeep and maintenance of the boat, as well as personnel adhering to strict training requirements, an actual man overboard was subsequently recovered and returned to safety using the ship's ready lifeboat and crew. OA Division provided aviation and target area environmental briefs for 1, 251 events in support of OSW; prepared and briefed 255 staff environmental briefs in support of ALBG Commander and DESRON-31 Commander during Arabian Gulf IWestPac” Deployment; expertly forecasted and provided safe navigation through 5 OTSR divert situations including “WestPac” transit covering 3 typhoons; provided Electromagnetic and Communication (AREPS) analysis products in direct support of the Air Defense Commander, Information Warfare Commander, and DESRON-31 Commander; provided Electro-Optical (TAWS and NOWS) analysis products in direct support of CVW-14 and DESRON-31; provided ASW sensor (IMAT) analysis products in direct support of DESRON-31 and had 80 percent advancement rate. OX Division provided environmental predictions, tactical support, and USW command and control support to DESRON-31. Abraham Lincoln returned from an extremely rigorous Western Pacific Deployment in February 2001 operating at peak performance and efficiency. The Dental Department, a small yet critically important department, also enjoyed similar success. The deployment ended at more than 98 percent dental ready for the combined air wing/ship's company and improved dental health by more than 10 percent. During “WestPac2000 - 2001, Training was the command expert in the movement of personnel throughout the world. More than 600 personnel were smoothly transported back and forth from the ship to points throughout the US, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Australia. Training Department kept track of all PCS/emergency leave/beach detachment TAD personnel off the ship during deployment ensuring everyone was taken care of and accounted for. With a Temporary Additional Duty (TADTAR) budget of more than $700,000.00, Training Department sent more than 620 personnel to 50 different schools throughout the country, thereby enabling each of the 17 departments onboard the ship to properly train and maintain Inter- Deployment Training requirements, with the culmination of an extended “WestPac2000 - 2001 deployment. Supply Department had a busy and challenging year. The department ended 2000 with a change of department heads. CDR Bill Munson relieved CDR Walt Jacunski, meeting the ship as it prepared for the return transit to CONUS. The Supply Department's performance throughout deployment was superb. Despite events such as the bombing of Cole and increased threat conditions imposing significant logistics challenges, the department provided exemplary support to the ship and air wing team that resulted in outstanding readiness and mission accomplishment. Squadrons: VF-31, F-14D; VFA-115, FA-18C; VFA-113, FA-18C (N); VFA-25, FA-18C (N); VAQ-139, EA-6B; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-35, S-3B; VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A. Ports of call: Jebel Ali, UAE three times; Fremantle, Australia; Hobart, Tasmania and NASNI twice. Strike group is comprised Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE (COMCRUDESGRU THREE), Commander Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, RADM Philip M. Balisle; Commander, Carrier Air Wing FOURTEEN, CAPT Richard L. Thayer and Commodore, Destroyer Squadron THIRTY-ONE; CAPT Mark H. Buzby, consisting of the guided-missile cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile frigate USS Jpaul Hamilton (DD-60); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigates USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and replenishment ship USS Camden (AOE-2) and attack submarine USS Tuscon (SSN-770) and USS Cheyenne (SSN-773). Amphibious Squadron 5 was assigned in 2000. Her seventh Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (17 August to 12 February 2001)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-2001).

 

17/08/01 to 12/02/02

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  WEST COAST

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (AE)

22 Sep 2000–2 Jan 2001

5th “WestPac”

meritorious Unit Commendation

Meritorious Unit Commendation (MU)

1 Jan 1999–10 Sep 2001

same

Ref. 378A & 378B-2000 to 2004

 

“After returning to home port, Naval Station, Everett, Washington, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) accomplished a safe and efficient offload of 2,434 items of Aircraft Armament Equipment (AAE), 49 ALQ-99 POD assets, 589 support equipment items and 12 ALQ-167 PODS. These critical assets were provided to support the deployment of two fully mission capable AIMD aboard the USS Constellation (CV-64) and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70)” (Ref. 378B-2001).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2000 YEAR END REPORT

 Chapter XIII

Appendix I

 

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2000 (Ref. 378B-1999).

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 2000 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President William Jefferson Clinton, 1993-2001 - 42nd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable William S. Cohen - 20th
24 Jan 1997 - 20 Jan 2001

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Richard Danzig - 68th

16 Nov 1998 - 20 Jan 2001

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Jay L. Johnson (1996 - 2000) - 26th

CINCPACFLT

ADM Thomas B. Fargo

8 Oct 1999 - 4 May  2002 - 55th

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM Michael L. Bowman - 27th

Jan 1998 - Aug 2000

VADM John B. Nathman - 28th

Aug 2000 - August 2002

Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE (COMCRUDESGRU THREE), Commander Abraham Lincoln Battle Group

RDML Philip M. Balisle

 

Chief of Staff, COMCRUDESGRU THREE

CAPT Nicholas A. Trongale

Battle Group Command Master Chief, COMCRUDESGRU THREE

ITCM((SW) H. A. Haglund

Commander, Destroyer Squadron THIRTY-ONE

CAPT Peter  H. Daly / CAPT Mark H. Buzby

 

 

 

 

 

Organization. Captain Douglas K. Dupouy assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 15 May 2000, relieving Admiral James J. Quinn, seventh Commanding Officer, serving from 18 February 1998 to 15 May 2000. Following the change of command ceremony, the crew held a reception for about 500 guests and 200 Ship’s Company in Hanger Bay 2” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Persian Gulf Cruise Book 2000-01

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 2000 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT Douglas K. Dupouy

Executive Officer - XO

CAPT Dan Cloyd

Administrative Officer

CDR Ed Burdick

Air Officer

CDR Brian Wild

Mini Boss

CDR Mike Gnozzzio

AIMD Officer

CDR Avgi Ioannidis

Combat Systems Officer

LCRD Ronald E. Center

Religiious Ministries Department - RMD - Command Chaplain

CDR Douglas J. Waite

Dental Officer

CDR David K. White

Engineering Officer

CDR Mark Powell

Deck - First Lieutenant

LCDR Nick Gianacakos /

LCDR Rick Holt

Legal Officer - Command Judge Advocate

LCDR David E. Dow

Communications Officer

 

Maintenance Officer

 

Navigator

CDR Kenneth Buell

Senior Medical Officer

CDR Louise E. Valbracht /

CDR Kirk Noce

Operations Officer

CRD E. M. Storrs / CDR R. L. Dawe

Public Affairs - PAO

 

Reactor Officer

CDR Michael J. Turner

Safety Officer

CDR Mark Cochran / CDR Ronald Imhof

Supply Officer

CDR Walt Jacunski / CDR Bill Munson

Training Officer

LCDR Kelly Valencia

Weapons Officer - Gun Boss

CDR Richard J. Finegan

Commander, Carrier Air Wing FOURTEEN

CRD Marc L. Purcell

Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing FOURTEEN

CDR Neil May

Command Master Chief, Carrier Air Wing FOURTEEN

CMDMC(AW) Brian S. Branch

 

 

 

“The following accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 2000:

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked conducted COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) - CompTuEx 00-2A off the southern California coast from 22 to 31 January 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) operated in the Eastern Pacific from 1 to 16 February 2000 and then pulled in for a port call at Santa Barbara, Ca. from 16 to 22 February 2000, where she hosted a reception for approximately 400 dignitaries and then headed for Everett, Washington, arriving by months end” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington ion 3 April 2000, with Captain James J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, embarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station, Lemoore, California, to conduct Carrier Qualifications (CQs) for FA-18E/F of VFA-122” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A).

 

“On 17 April 2000, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 hosted a family cruise for about 1,900 people as she steamed from Esquimalt to Everett, Washington, conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQs) for FA-18E/F of VFA-122 from 3 to 6 April 2000. Squadrons: VF-31, F-14D; VFA-115, FA-18C; VFA-113, FA-18C (N); VFA-25, FA-18C (N); VAQ-139, EA-6B; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-35, S-3B and VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A” (Ref. 76). 

 

Captain Douglas K. Dupouy assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 15 May 2000, relieving Admiral James J. Quinn, seventh Commanding Officer, serving from 18 February 1998 to 15 May 2000. Following the change of command ceremony, the crew held a reception for about 500 guests and 200 Ship’s Company in Hanger Bay 2” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway for a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 (RimPac 2000) in Hawaiian waters from 5 to 15 June 2000, supporting an amphibious ready group, and executed 261 aircraft launches and 263 recoveries. Since 1998 the Navy began to develop a prototype Area Air Defense Commander (AADC) Capability program to address existing and emerging ballistic and air-breathing threats, and both Abraham Lincoln and USS Shiloh (CG-67) tested AADC performance during RimPac 2000. According to Vice Adm. Phillip M. Balisle, Commander Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, the AADC system “showed outstanding value as a force enabler that will allow a battle group commander to enter a troubled area and gain control of it quickly”” (Ref. 378A).

 

“On 1 July 2000, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, conducting a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 and JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) near Hawaii from 19 to 26 June 2000. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Pacific, transiting to a Multinational Exercise RIMPAC 2000 near Hawaii from 15 to 20 May 2000. The ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group steam alongside one another for a Battle Group photo during RIMPAC 2000. RIMPAC 2000. Ships involved are USS Cheyenne (SSN-773), USS Tucson (SSN-770), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), USS Shiloh (CG-67), USS Bunker Hill (CG-52), USS Fletcher (DD-992), USS Paul Hamilton (DDG-60), USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and USS Camden (AOE-2). U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Gabriel Wilson (photo # 000618-N-0147W-001). USN. NS027239. Squadrons: VF-31, F-14D; VFA-115, FA-18C; VFA-113, FA-18C (N); VFA-25, FA-18C (N); VAQ-139, EA-6B; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-35, S-3B and VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A. Her sixth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (15 May to 1 July 2000)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A). http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027239.jpg

 

“Raytheon Company technicians and sailors from Ship’s Company installed the IT21 local area network modification, a massive project which involved the installation of cables, breakers, transformers, power panels and receptacles throughout USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from 26 March to 14 August 2000” (Ref. 378A).

 

 “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Strike group is comprised of Carrier Air Wing 14; Cruiser Destroyer Group 3 and Destroyer Squadron 31 consisting of the guided-missile cruisers USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and USS Shiloh (CG-67); guided-missile frigate USS Jpaul Hamilton (DD-60); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigates USS Crommelin (FFG-37) and replenishment ship USS Camden (AOE-2) and attack submarine USS Tuscon (SSN-770) and USS Cheyenne (SSN-773). Amphibious Squadron 5 was assigned in 2000” (Ref. 377 & 681E).

 

“On 12 February 2001, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 and COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Philip Balisle embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington, disembarking CVW-14 at San Diego, California, with Captain Douglas K. Dupouy as the Commanding Officer, ending her fifth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fifth Indian Ocean deployment, on her fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 4thOperation Southern Watch (OSW), enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and 2nd Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990. Squadrons: VF-31, F-14D; VFA-115, FA-18C; VFA-113, FA-18C (N); VFA-25, FA-18C (N); VAQ-139, EA-6B; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-35, S-3B; VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A. Ports of call: Jebel Ali, UAE three times; Fremantle, Australia; Hobart, Tasmania and NASNI twice. Her seventh Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (17 August to 12 February 2001)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-2001).

 

“After returning to home port, Naval Station, Everett, Washington, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) accomplished a safe and efficient offload of 2,434 items of Aircraft Armament Equipment (AAE), 49 ALQ-99 POD assets, 589 support equipment items and 12 ALQ-167 PODS. These critical assets were provided to support the deployment of two fully mission capable AIMD aboard the USS Constellation (CV-64) and USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70)” (Ref. 378B-2001).

 

 

 

Chapter XIII (1 January 2000 to 12 February 2001) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2000 YEAR END REPORT,  Chapter XIII, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

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978-1-365-26038-4