Chapter XI (1 January to 31 December 1998) and

 

PCU Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1998 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XI

Appendix I

 

Began the year with a port call at Esquimalt near Victoria on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada; followed by FLEETEX; JTFEX; Resurfacing Flight Deck and Combat Systems Module Renovation and Pre Overseas Movement Period; Fourth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fourth Indian Ocean deployment, on her fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, becoming the first carrier to avoid targeting by subsurface units during the transit Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise conducted in the Hawaiian operational area, assuming as air warfare commander in the Gulf to support the redeployment of battle group sailors and marines to accomplish the tasking for Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC in support of 3rd Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, followed by Beacon Flash 98-2, including the opening phases while still in port at Jebel Ali, UAE, followed by Tactical Evolution Exercise 98, Exercise Red Reef 98 and Operational Reactor Safe Guards Exam (11 June to 11 December 1998) and Christmas Stand Down.

1 January to 31 December 1998

Chapter XI

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), JANUARY 1 1998 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-1998).     

 

Captain James J. Quinn assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 18 February 1998, relieving Captain Robert F. Willard, sixth Commanding Officer, serving from 22 August 1995 to 18 February 1998” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).     

 

CVW- 14 Carrier Qualifications ammo on load onboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was conducted from 20 to 26 February 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Everett, Washington 26 February 1998, with Captain J. J. Quinn as Commanding Officer, pulling in for a port call at Esquimalt near Victoria on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada the same day” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Everett, Washington 26 February 1998, with Captain J. J. Quinn as Commanding Officer, pulling in for a port call at Esquimalt near Victoria on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada the same day (26 February to 2 March 1998)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) moved Public Affairs from the Administrative Department and established the office as a separate department on 12 April 1998” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Operating out of Everett, Washington, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted and accomplished FLEETEX, JTFEX, Resurfacing Flight Deck and Combat Systems Module Renovation from 24 March to 10 May 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Pre Overseas Movement Period from 11 May to 10 June 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).     

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Everett, Washington 11 June 1998, embarking, COMCKUDESGRU THREE , RADM Kevin Green and CVW-14 at San Diego, California, with Captain James J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, on her fourth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fourth Indian Ocean deployment, on her fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, becoming the first carrier to avoid targeting by subsurface units during the transit Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise conducted in the Hawaiian operational area, assuming as air warfare commander in the Gulf to support the redeployment of battle group sailors and marines to accomplish the tasking for Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC in support of 3rd Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, followed by Beacon Flash 98-2, including the opening phases while still in port at Jebel Ali, UAE, followed by Tactical Evolution Exercise 98, Exercise Red Reef 98 and Operational Reactor Safe Guards Exam, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet in July 1995 reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992 (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet's area of responsibility encompasses about 7.5 million square miles and includes the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman and parts of the Indian Ocean. This expanse, comprised of 25 countries, includes three critical chokepoints at the Suez Canal, the Straits of Hormuz, and the Straits of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen. This became the first deployment where the ship embarked an aviation optometrist for the entire cruise, who provided 1,200 eye exams as well as treatment to ship’s company. Abraham Lincoln also embarked en enhanced mobile explosive ordnance disposal detachment. She will under go her fifth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377 & 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 (NK)

(11 June to 11 December 1998)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command       (4th Arabian

/ Persian Gulf dep.)

4th WestP;ac 4th IO

3rd OSW

CVW-14

NK

11 Jun 1998

11 Dec 1998

Western Pacific

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

5th FWFD

184-days

The first carrier to avoid targeting by subsurface units during the transit Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise conducted in the Hawaiian operational area, assuming as air warfare commander in the Gulf to support the redeployment of battle group sailors and marines to accomplish the tasking for Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC in support of 3rd Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, followed by Beacon Flash 98-2, including the opening phases while still in port at Jebel Ali, UAE, followed by Tactical Evolution Exercise 98, Exercise Red Reef 98 and Operational Reactor Safe Guards Exam from 22 to 25 November 1998, receiving an overall grade of Average with one Excellent grade for cleanliness and preservation.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-31

Tomcatters -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NK100

F-14D

VFA-115

Eagles - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK200

FA-18C

VFA-113

Stingers - Strike

Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK300

FA-18C (N)

VFA-25

Fist of the Fleet -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NK400

FA-18C (N)

VAQ-139

Cougars -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -      Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620-500

EA-6B

 VAW-113

Black Eagles -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-4

Black Knights - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk - Anti-submarine -             Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VS-35

Blue Wolves - Sea

Control Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VQ-5 Det. B

Sea Shadows - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -  Special electronic installation

720

ES-3A

VRC-30 Det. 1

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound

24, 34

C-2A

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Strike group is comprised of COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Putnam; Carrier Air Wing 14, CAPT Kilcline, CAG; EOD Detachment; DESRON TWENTY ONE, CAPT Stavridis; the guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67) and USS Valley Forge (CG-50); guided-missile frigate USS Elliot (DD-967); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigate USS Jarrett (FFG-33); and replenishment ship; HCMS Ottawa (FFH-341); and attack submarines USS Jefferson City (SSN-759) and USS Columbia (SSN-771)” (Ref. 84A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, conducting training operations from 11 to 16 June 1998” (Ref. 76, 377, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

“En route to the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, conducting training operations from 11 to 16 June 1998, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) moored at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, to load aircraft, stores and sailors, principally for her embarked air wing” (Ref. 76, 377, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, embarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore from 16 to 17 June 1998, loading aircraft, stores and sailors, principally for her embarked air wing, CVW-14 (16-17 June), and headed to to Hong Kong via the Hawaii Is.” (Ref. 76, 377, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

“En route to Hong Kong via the Hawaii Is., USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted training operations from 11 to 22 June 1998, arriving north of Hawaii Is. on 22 June 1998. The first carrier to avoid targeting by subsurface units during the transit, conducting Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise in the Hawaiian operational area” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered the Seventh Fleet area of operations on 25 June 1998” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Western Pacific and South China Sea from 25 June to 3 July 1998 while en route to Hong Kong” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Hong Kong from 4 to 8 July 1998. The ship celebrated Independence Day in Hong Kong, hosting 200 dignitaries. Sailors noted that the Chinese communists conducted extensive surveillance of the carrier. Upon conclusion of the port period, Abraham Lincoln headed for the South China Sea on 9 July 1998” (Ref. 76, 377, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea from 9 to 12 July 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Singapore from 13 to 17 July 1998, hosting a state dinner for 40 dignitaries and ambassadors and upon departure headed for the Indian Ocean” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the South China Sea and passed through the Malacca Strait from 18 to 19 July 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman from 20 to 24 July 1998, transiting the Strait of Hormuz and entered the Arabian/Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, entering the Fifth Fleet AOR on 24 July 1998, while assuming duties as the Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC would not be until 9 August 1998, which to this author, suggests two aircraft carriers operated on station” (Ref. 76 & 378B-1998).

 

“Terrorist threats and clashes between rival Muslim extremists made the Indian Ocean littoral a tinder box for much of this period, and al-Qāidah terrorists detonated bombs at the U.S. Embassies at Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, that killed at least 224 people including 12 Americans on 7 August 1998. Tensions in the region escalated and the ship had to be ready to retaliate against the perpetrators of the crimes” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 24 July to 9 August 1998, assuming as air warfare commander in the Gulf to support the redeployment of battle group sailors and marines to accomplish the tasking - Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC in support of Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq on 9 August 1998, entering the Fifth Fleet AOR on 24 July 1998. Abraham Lincoln superbly assumed the duties of Air Warfare Commander in the Persian Gulf operational area to support the redeployment of Battle Group assets for NCA tasking” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 10 to 14 August 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 16 to 17 August 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) historian noted that the carrier served as the “cornerstone” of a national command authority directed contingency strike operation on 20 August 1998. The ship’s command, control, communications, computers and information (C4I) suite became pivotal to mission planning, execution and dissemination of initial battle damage assessments of two simultaneous operations on separate continents” (Ref. 378A). 

 

“Ongoing concerns over Iraqi smuggling forced USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to surge on 23 August 1998 to participate in Maritime Interception Operations (MIOs). The United Nations began MIOs as coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990. The organization prohibited cargo originating from Iraq and imports not accompanied by UN authorization letters, though the food-for-oil agreement permitted the Iraqis to sell limited amounts of oil to pay for food and medicine. Iraqi criminals and on occasion, terrorists (including a highly lucrative drug trade that specialized in heroin and methamphetamines to finance terrorist crimes), became so brazen in their smuggling efforts that the coalition consistently refined MIOs. The Iraqis, however, sold oil below market value to entice smugglers, and provided naval officers to assist thieves” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Ongoing concerns over Iraqi smuggling forced the ship to surge from 23 to 30 August 1998 to participate in Maritime Interception Operations (MIOs)” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call and anchored at Bahrain Bell from 31 August to 2 September 1998. Sailors piped Gen. Henry H. Shelton, USA, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on board for a visit (1 September)” (Ref. 378A).

 

 

The Persian Gulf, Sep. 5, 1998 — USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sees the end of another long day in the Persian Gulf. U.S. Navy photo by PH2 Daniel Quinajon. USN. NS027236. http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027236.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a second port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 18 to 22 September 1998, participating in Beacon Flash 98-2, including the opening phases while still in port beginning on the 19th” (Ref. 378A). 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf on 23 September 1998, participating in Beacon Flash 98-2, including the opening phases while still in port (19-23 September). The heat index on the flight deck rose during these days until at times the temperature often approached at least 140°F. Even the waters of the Arabian/ Persian Gulf could reach a scorching 95°F. “You forget about the heat until you open a hatch to go outside,” 19-year-old ICFN Angela Nostrand explained, “and then it takes your breath away”” (Ref. 378A). 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in Tactical Evolution Exercise 98 from 19 to 25 August 1998” (Ref. 378A). 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 23 September to 1 October 1998, serving as the area air defense commander from 9 to 31 August 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

 

S-3 Vikings assigned to Air Anti-Submarine Squadron Three Five (VS-35), "Blue Wolves," conduct performance flight drills over USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), October 1, 1998. The aircraft carrier was deployed to the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch. US Navy photo by PHAN Michael B.W. Watkins (# 981001-N-6346W-001). NS027257. Alex Tatchin.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027257.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a third port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 2 to 5 October 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in exercise Red Reef 98 from 3 to 14 October 1998” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 6 to 16 October 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a fourth port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 17 to 20 October 1998” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed the Persian Gulf and headed through the Strait of Hormuz outbound and Gulf of Oman to the Arabian Sea on 21 October 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Persian Gulf from 24 July to 21 October 1998, making four port of calls to Jebel Ali, UAE, while CVW-14 logged 1,855 sorties in the of Operation Southern Watch enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, spending three months in the Arabian Gulf during the hottest summer on record. Apparent temperatures on the flight deck at midday sometimes reached 150 degrees Fahrenheit (Ref. 76, 371, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

“During Abraham Lincoln total time in the area during this deployment, the ship used comprehensive, all-source intelligence to support coalition efforts to shut down illegal gas and oil shipments from embargoed Iraqi ports and facilities. The carrier supported UN Resolutions 661 and 665 for some 89 days and two MIO surges. Extensive intelligence exchange between on-scene commanders led to 625 merchant ship queries, 196 cooperative boardings, 17 non-compliant boardings and eight diverts.

 

Masterfully conducted numerous high visibility public relations visits and events, hosting Congressman John Murtha of Pennsylvania, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of the Navy, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Commander Fifth Fleet and Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet while operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch. Air Resources Element Coordinator, attained an impressive Operation Southern Watch sortie completion rate of 99.8 percent (flew 3,592 hours and completed 1,855 of 1,860 sorties in 52 fly days). During 23 scheduled Operation Southern Watch tactical reconnaissance missions, the ship processed more than 18,000 feet of aerial film covering over 100 separate Iraqi targets.

 

CVW-14 aircraft logged 12,304 landings (1 1,961 arrested landings: 8,161 day, 3,800 nights and 343 touch-and-go), 1,006 helo sorties (728 day, 278 night), and 17,095 total flight hours, all mishap-free. Abraham Lincoln served as the cornerstone of a National Command Authority (NCA) directed contingency strike operation. The Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Information suite was pivotal to the successful mission planning, execution, and dissemination of the initial battle damage assessment of two simultaneous operations on separate continents. Abraham Lincoln superbly assumed the duties of Air Warfare Commander in the Arabian Gulf operational area to support the redeployment of Battle Group assets for NCA tasking.

 

Abraham Lincoln provided superlative support to embarked staffs who executed the first of two Arabian Gulf Maritime Interdiction Surge Operations. These operations required the coordinated effort of naval forces from six nations and netted almost $500,000.00 of United Nations' profit while interdicting $1 million worth of illegal oil exports. As Air Resources Element Coordinator, Abraham Lincoln attained an impressive Operation Southern Watch sortie completion rate of 99.8 percent (flew 3,592 hours and completed 1,855 of 1,860 sorties in 52 fly days). The total cruise sortie completion rate was 97.2 percent. Photographers from the ship also cross-decked to guided missile cruisers USS Cowpens (CG-63) and USS Valley Forge (CG-50), guided missile frigates USS Jarrett (FFG-33) and USS Thach (FFG-43), fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE-2) and HMCS Ottawa to cover operations, and delivered more than 25,000 images to support the battle group” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Arabian Sea from 22 to 26 October 1998, reaching the Seventh Fleet on the 26th” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Indian Ocean from 27 October to 2 November 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Perth, Australia from 3 to 8 November 1998” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway southern ocean of Australia from 9 to 11 November 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

“After continuing around the southern portion of Australia, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) put into Hobart, Tasmana from 12 to 17 November 1998. Throughout her Australian visits, the ship hosted 250 dignitaries and distinguished guests” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway eastern ocean of Australia from 18 to 19 November 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South Pacific from 20 to 22 November 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crossed equator at the international date line on 23 November 1998, underway south of Johnston Is. on 24 November 1998 and entered the Third Fleet” (Ref. 76, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway near Johnston Is. on 25 November 1998, conducting ammo off load from 24 to 25 November 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her Operational Reactor Safe Guards Exam from 22 to 25 November 1998, receiving an overall grade of Average with one Excellent grade for cleanliness and preservation. Simultaneously prepared for the offload of 2,540 tons of ammunition to support the subsequent crossdeck of this ordnance to the USS Constellation (CV-64)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway southwest of Hawaii Is. on 26 November 1998, conducting Ney Inspection and observing Thanks Giving” (Ref. 76 & 378B-1998).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 27 November 1998” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) completed CVW-14 Carrier Qualifications, and accomplished 798 fixed-wing aircraft launches and traps from 22 to 29 November 1997” (Ref. 76 & 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 27 November to 30 November 1998” (Ref. 76).

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her 1st Tiger Cruise in the Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, from 1 to 6 December 1998” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, disembarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore at San Diego, Calif. from 7 to 8 December 1998, during which time CCDG-3 change of command was held onboard” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted her 2nd Tiger Cruise in the Eastern Pacific en route to Everett, Washington from 8 to 10 December 1998” (Ref. 76 & 378B-1998).

 

“On 11 December 1998, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-14 embarked arrived Everett, Washington, disembarking COMCKUDESGRU THREE, RADM Kevin Green and CVW-14 at San Diego, California, with Captain James J. Quinn as the Commanding Officer, ending her fourth “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her fourth Indian Ocean deployment, on her fourth Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment, becoming the first carrier to avoid targeting by subsurface units during the transit Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise conducted in the Hawaiian operational area, assuming as air warfare commander in the Gulf to support the redeployment of battle group sailors and marines to accomplish the tasking for Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC in support of 3rd Operation Southern Watch (OSW), enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Maritime Interception Operations (MIO) in support of the United Nations and coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990, followed by Beacon Flash 98-2, including the opening phases while still in port at Jebel Ali, UAE, followed by Tactical Evolution Exercise 98, Exercise Red Reef 98 and Operational Reactor Safe Guards Exam from 22 to 25 November 1998, receiving an overall grade of Average with one Excellent grade for cleanliness and preservation, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, moving ashore in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet, reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, conducting training operations from 11 to 16 June 1998. En route to the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, conducting training operations from 11 to 16 June 1998, Abraham Lincoln moored at NASNI to load aircraft, loading aircraft, stores and sailors, principally for her embarked air wing, CVW-14, and then headed to to Hong Kong via the Hawaii Is., conducting training operations from 11 to 22 June 1998 en route, arriving north of Hawaii Is. on 22 June 1998. The first carrier to avoid targeting by subsurface units during the transit, conducting Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise in the Hawaiian operational area entered the Seventh Fleet area of operations on 25 June 1998. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Western Pacific and South China Sea from 25 June to 3 July 1998 while en route to Hong Kong, pulling in for a port call at Hong Kong from 4 to 8 July 1998. The ship celebrated Independence Day in Hong Kong, hosting 200 dignitaries. Sailors noted that the Chinese communists conducted extensive surveillance of the carrier. Upon conclusion of the port period, Abraham Lincoln headed for the South China Sea in that body of water from 9 to 12 July 1998, then made a port call at Singapore from 13 to 17 July 1998, hosting a state dinner for 40 dignitaries and ambassadors and upon departure headed for the Indian Ocean, steaming through the South China Sea and passed through the Malacca Strait from 18 to 19 July 1998, underway in the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman from 20 to 24 July 1998. Abraham Lincoln transited the Strait of Hormuz and entered the Arabian/Persian Gulf in support of OSW, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, entering the Fifth Fleet AOR on 24 July 1998, while assuming duties as the Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC would not be until 9 August 1998, which to this author, suggests two aircraft carriers operated on station. Terrorist threats and clashes between rival Muslim extremists made the Indian Ocean littoral a tinder box for much of this period, and al-Qāidah terrorists detonated bombs at the U.S. Embassies at Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, that killed at least 224 people including 12 Americans on 7 August 1998. Tensions in the region escalated and the ship had to be ready to retaliate against the perpetrators of the crimes. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Persian Gulf from 24 July to 9 August 1998, assuming as air warfare commander in the Gulf to support the redeployment of battle group sailors and marines to accomplish the tasking - Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC in support of OSW, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq on 9 August 1998, entering the Fifth Fleet AOR on 24 July 1998. Abraham Lincoln superbly assumed the duties of Air Warfare Commander in the Persian Gulf operational area to support the redeployment of Battle Group assets for NCA tasking. Abraham Lincoln operated in the Persian Gulf from 24 July to 9 August 1998, assuming air warfare commander in the Gulf to support the redeployment of battle group sailors and marines to accomplish the tasking - Arabian Gulf RADC/AADC in support of OSW enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq on 9 August 1998, which to this author, suggests two aircraft carriers operated on station from 25 July to 9 August 1998. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 10 to 14 August 1998, underway in the Persian Gulf from 16 to 17 August 1998. Abraham Lincoln historian noted that the carrier served as the “cornerstone” of a national command authority directed contingency strike operation on 20 August 1998. The ship’s command, control, communications, computers and information (C4I) suite became pivotal to mission planning, execution and dissemination of initial battle damage assessments of two simultaneous operations on separate continents. Ongoing concerns over Iraqi smuggling forced Abraham Lincoln to surge on 23 August 1998 to participate in MIOs. The United Nations began MIOs as coalition efforts to enforce United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolutions imposed against the Iraqis following their invasion of Kuwait in August 1990. The organization prohibited cargo originating from Iraq and imports not accompanied by UN authorization letters, though the food-for-oil agreement permitted the Iraqis to sell limited amounts of oil to pay for food and medicine. Iraqi criminals and on occasion, terrorists (including a highly lucrative drug trade that specialized in heroin and methamphetamines to finance terrorist crimes), became so brazen in their smuggling efforts that the coalition consistently refined MIOs. The Iraqis, however, sold oil below market value to entice smugglers, and provided naval officers to assist thieves. Ongoing concerns over Iraqi smuggling forced the ship to surge from 23 to 30 August 1998 to participate in MIOs. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call and anchored at Bahrain from 31 August to 2 September 1998. Sailors piped Gen. Henry H. Shelton, USA, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on board for a visit (1 September) and made a second port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 18 to 22 September 1998, participating in Beacon Flash 98-2, including the opening phases while still in port beginning on the 19th. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Persian Gulf on 23 September 1998, participating in Beacon Flash 98-2. The heat index on the flight deck rose during these days until at times the temperature often approached at least 140°F. Even the waters of the Arabian/ Persian Gulf could reach a scorching 95°F. “You forget about the heat until you open a hatch to go outside,” 19-year-old ICFN Angela Nostrand explained, “and then it takes your breath away.” Abraham Lincoln participated in Tactical Evolution Exercise 98 from 19 to 25 August 1998, underway in the Persian Gulf from 23 September to 1 October 1998, serving as the area air defense commander from 9 to 31 August 1998. Abraham Lincoln made a third port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 2 to 5 October 1998, before participating in exercise Red Reef 98 from 3 to 14 October 1998, underway in the Persian Gulf from 6 to 16 October 1998 before making a fourth port call at Jebel Ali, UAE from 17 to 20 October 1998. Abraham Lincoln departed the Persian Gulf and headed through the Strait of Hormuz outbound and Gulf of Oman to the Arabian Sea on 21 October 1998, underway in the Persian Gulf from 24 July to 21 October 1998, making four port of calls to Jebel Ali, UAE. CVW-14 logged 1,855 sorties in support of Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, spending three months in the Arabian Gulf during the hottest summer on record. Apparent temperatures on the flight deck at midday sometimes reached 150 degrees Fahrenheit. During Abraham Lincoln total time in the area during this deployment, the ship used comprehensive, all-source intelligence to support coalition efforts to shut down illegal gas and oil shipments from embargoed Iraqi ports and facilities. The carrier supported UN Resolutions 661 and 665 for some 89 days and two MIO surges. Extensive intelligence exchange between on-scene commanders led to 625 merchant ship queries, 196 cooperative boardings, 17 non-compliant boardings and eight diverts. Masterfully conducted numerous high visibility public relations visits and events, hosting Congressman John Murtha of Pennsylvania, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of the Navy, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Commander Fifth Fleet and Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet while operating in the Arabian/Persian Gulf in support of OSW. Air Resources Element Coordinator, attained an impressive OSW sortie completion rate of 99.8 percent (flew 3,592 hours and completed 1,855 of 1,860 sorties in 52 fly days). During 23 scheduled OSW tactical reconnaissance missions, the ship processed more than 18,000 feet of aerial film covering over 100 separate Iraqi targets. CVW-14 aircraft logged 12,304 landings (1 1,961 arrested landings: 8,161 day, 3,800 nights and 343 touch-and-go), 1,006 helo sorties (728 day, 278 night), and 17,095 total flight hours, all mishap-free. Abraham Lincoln served as the cornerstone of a National Command Authority (NCA) directed contingency strike operation. The Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Information suite was pivotal to the successful mission planning, execution, and dissemination of the initial battle damage assessment of two simultaneous operations on separate continents. Abraham Lincoln superbly assumed the duties of Air Warfare Commander in the Arabian Gulf operational area to support the redeployment of Battle Group assets for NCA tasking. Abraham Lincoln provided superlative support to embarked staffs who executed the first of two Arabian Gulf Maritime Interdiction Operations surge operations. These operations required the coordinated effort of naval forces from six nations and netted almost $500,000.00 of United Nations' profit while interdicting $1 million worth of illegal oil exports. As Air Resources Element Coordinator, Abraham Lincoln attained an impressive OSW sortie completion rate of 99.8 percent (flew 3,592 hours and completed 1,855 of 1,860 sorties in 52 fly days). The total cruise sortie completion rate was 97.2 percent. Photographers from the ship also cross-decked to guided missile cruisers USS Cowpens (CG-63) and USS Valley Forge (CG-50), guided missile frigates USS Jarrett (FFG-33) and USS Thach (FFG-43), fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE-2) and HMCS Ottawa to cover operations, and delivered more than 25,000 images to support the battle group. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Arabian Sea from 22 to 26 October 1998, reaching the Seventh Fleet on the 26th and in the Indian Ocean from 27 October to 2 November 1998. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Perth, Australia from 3 to 8 November 1998, underway southern ocean of Australia from 9 to 11 November 1998. After continuing around the southern portion of Australia, Abraham Lincoln put into Hobart, Tasmana on 12 November 1998. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Hobart, Australia from 12 to 17 November 1998. Throughout her Australian visits, the ship hosted 250 dignitaries and distinguished guests. Abraham Lincoln was underway eastern ocean of Australia from 18 to 19 November 1998 and the South Pacific from 20 to 22 November 1998, crossing the equator at the international date line on 23 November 1998, underway south of Johnston Is. on 24 November 1998 and entered the Third Fleet and near Johnston Is. on 25 November 1998, conducting ammo off load from 24 to 25 November 1998 and Operational Reactor Safe Guards Exam from 22 to 25 November 1998, receiving an overall grade of Average with one Excellent grade for cleanliness and preservation. Abraham Lincoln simultaneously prepared for the offload of 2,540 tons of ammunition to support the subsequent crossdeck of this ordnance to the USS Constellation (CV-64). Abraham Lincoln was underway southwest of Hawaii Is. on 26 November 1998, conducting Ney Inspection and observing Thanks Giving.  Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 27 November to 30 November 1998 from 27 November to 30 November 1998. Abraham Lincoln completed CVW-14 carrier qualifications, and accomplished 798 fixed-wing aircraft launches and traps from 22 to 29 November 1997 and conduced her 1st Tiger Cruise in the Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, from 1 to 6 December 1998, making a port call at NASNI, disembarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore at San Diego, Calif. from 7 to 8 December 1998, during which time CCDG-3 change of command was held onboard, conducting her 2nd Tiger Cruise in the Eastern Pacific en route to Everett, Washington from 8 to 10 December 1998. Completing 100 percent of all required competitive exercises with an overall average score of 98.8 percent prior to deployment, departing San Diego, California Casualty Report (CASREP)-free and six months later with zero active CASREPs or Broad Arrows, conducting a highly successful deployment transit, completing the highest number of traps for any transiting carrier (1,320 day and 582 night). The total cruise sortie completion rate was 97.2 percent, serving as the cornerstone of a National Command Authority (NCA) directed contingency strike operation. Tlie Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Information suite was pivotal to the successful mission planning, execution, and dissemination of the initial battle damage assessment of two simultaneous operations on separate continents. Superbly assumed the duties of Air Warfare Commander in the Arabian/Persian Gulf operational area to support the redeployment of Battle Group assets for NCA tasking. Provided superlative support to embarked staffs who executed the first of two Arabian/Persian Gulf Maritime MIO surge operations. These operations required the coordinated effort of naval forces from six nations and netted almost $500,000 of United Nations' profit while interdicting $1 million worth of illegal oil exports. At one point during the deployment the ship rescued two sailors who fell overboard during a rapid transit of the Pacific, and stabilized and medically evacuated them, while during another case she responded to a call for emergency assistance from a civilian tanker in the Gulf and supplied advanced cardiac life support to a victim. The ship safely completed 11,870 aircraft launches and recoveries and 317 touch and-go landings in support of four CVW carrier qualifications periods, FLEETEX, JTFEX, and Operation Southern Watch. Abraham Lincoln departments provided support in the following ways as of 31 December 1998

 

REACTOR DEPARTMENT

 

Ship's force set plant conditions and tagged out both reactor plant control consoles to support several key ship alterations and switch replacements. Reactor Electrical Division, assisted by Combat Systems' Micro-miniature Repair Shop, repaired a failed voltage regulator in the Number Three emergency diesel generator.

 

Following a loss of lube oil to the number 4B line shaft bearing, Machinery Division, assisted by the Repair Division and the Airframes Shop of Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department, repaired damage to the Number Four shaft and replaced the wiped bearing and failed aft oil seal while underway. This job is normally performed only with depot level assistance. Reactor Electrical and Machinery Divisions conducted repeated repairs to all four main engine throttle control systems. These included: replacement of the Number Four main engine ahead throttle synchro transmitter and receiver, a rebuild of the Number Four Main Engine ahead throttle poppet cam shaft assembly, a rebuild of a three-way gearbox in the Number Four Main Engine ahead throttle linkage, and several grooms to all four hydraulic power units. This concerted effort maximized the availability of all main engines throughout the Inter Deployment Training Cycle and deployment.

 

DECK DEPARTMENT

 

Deck Department completed 24 underway replenishments, receiving 13.4 million gallons of fuel (JP5), delivering 5,000 gallons of fuel (JP5), receiving 60 pallets of general cargo and ammunition, and offloaded 944 pallets of ammunition. The ship anchored nine times, including the port visits to Victoria, Hong Kong; Perth and Hobart.

 

AIRCRAFT INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT (AIMD)

 

Through an aggressive maintenance program, AIMD increased capability and improved processes of 65 production work centers. Over 40,000 maintenance actions were completed without major material damage or personnel injury. Over 10,000 aviation-related weapons replaceable assemblies (WRAs) were processed, with a 74 percent ready-for-issue rate while supporting Carrier Air Wing Fourteen and the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group during JTFEX/FLEETEX and in support of Operation Southern Watch. The total Aviation Depot Level Repairable (AVDLR) net value of the WRAs processed was in excess of $90 million dollars. By fulfilling its commitment to "retail readiness," AIMD returned more than $75 million dollars of these assets to service and avoided the expenditure of precious operations and maintenance' funds. AIMD managed over 5,000 line items of support equipment valued at over $170 million while they transferred and received a total of 2,55 1 items with a value of over $20 million and maintained 100 percent accuracy between local and centralized IMRL inventory records. Fleet Calibration Activity (FCA) was responsible for the production efforts of 160 shipboard and Air Wing Calibration Petty Officers and Calibration Program management of over 35,000 Abraham Lincoln Battle Group precision measurement standards. In addition, the FCA managed 700 COMNAVAIRPAC calibration standards valued at over $10 million. AIMD was the first AN/USM-636 Consolidated Automated Support System outfitted Pacific Fleet carrier to deploy without the benefit of backup legacy test benches.

 

Thirty-eight engineering investigations were initiated with the supporting fleet support teams identifying deficiencies in hardware and software that prevented this system from providing its maximum benefit. The Battle Force Intermediate Maintenance Activity (BFIMA) program was the highlight of the AIMD. Recognized at the CINCPACFLT level for its superb performance, the BFIMA program managed by AIMD provided critically needed material and services to over 22 ships, 18 deployed HSLIHCNP detachments, two successful submarine availabilities, and .the Bahrain Navy.

 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

 

Abraham Lincoln was the centerpiece of the Battle Force Intermediate Maintenance Activity (BFIMA). Over the course of the year the Battle Group logged 335 CASREPS and corrected 192. Additionally, the ship executed 1,460 maintenance actions as part of the BFIMA during the final phases of the Inter Deployment Training Cycle and Western Pacific. This amounted to a 255 percent increase over previous Battle Group accomplishment rates. Abraham Lincoln was the first carrier to extend the concept of BFIMA to provide maintenance availabilities to submarines deployed with the battle group. Availabilities were executed for both USS Columbia (SSN-771) and USS Jefferson City (SSN-759) while forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf. Catapults operated without a steam side casualty through the Inter Deployment Training Cycle and the deployment due in large part to the extensive and comprehensive valve maintenance program, which included over 500 valves.

 

WEAPONS DEPARTMENT

 

100 percent of competitive exercises were completed with an average score of 97.6 percent. The Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise/Integrated Training Assessment found the ship "Fully Ready for Battle Group Operations." The Magazine Sprinkler System was validated as Fully Operational with no major discrepancies. Shipboard Explosive Safety Inspection (SESI) was evaluated as Outstanding with no major or repeat discrepancies. The Ammunition Requisition Location Accountability was Outstanding - 100 percent in stock or on order for both ship and mission accounts and 100 percent accuracy in inventory and location. The department provided outstanding support during Operation Southern Watch. It moved 76,500 pounds of ordnance to and from the flight deck each fly day, with no missed sorties due to ordnance. It completed ship fill ordnance assets by safely cross decking 390 tons from USS Mounnt Hood (AE-29). It also safely off loaded entire mission and ship fill ordnance assets (2,540 tons) worth over $1.2 billion during an intense, two day underway replenishment. Weapons Department completed four ASU- 18lSF graded surface engagement exercises, receiving 100 percent on each exercise. It deployed two ordnance flyaway teams to conduct critical readiness inspections on 568 guided bomb units.

 

These inspections resulted in the completion of the directed action and a mission ready status of all guided bomb units aboard USS Caamden (AOE 2). It also completed 13 explosive ordnance disposal exercises with EOD DET 3 1 and EOD DET 33 onboard. Embarked the Pacific Fleet's first-ever EOD Enhanced Mobile Detachment during the six month Western Pacific deployment. The Security Division coordinated a ship's Self Defense Force to replace the disestablished Marine Detachment.

 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT

 

An April Supply Management Assessment conducted by COMNAVAIRPAC resulted in eight grades of Excellent and six grades of Outstanding, and placed the command in control for the "Blue E" Award for Supply Excellence.  Over 20,000 demands were processed for aviation consumable requirements, 800 off-ship Not Mission Capable Supply/Partially Mission Capable Supply requirements were expedited, and 550 aviation repairable items were crossdecked to other deployed and deploying carriers. Over 8,100 items were received, and 14,500 items were issued. Over 800,000 pounds of air cargo and mail were processed through Carrier Onboard- Delivery flights. The Food Service Division, S-2, was again nominated for the coveted Captain Edward F. Ney Memorial Award for food service excellence. The D-3 Sales and Services Division received the prestigious Best Sales and Services Award on their first nomination. S-3 Division set command records for sales totals of over $2.6 million during the year. The Supply Department supported such events as the Commanding Officer's change of command reception, the change of command for Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE, and luncheons, receptions and formal dinners for distinguished groups from Victoria, Hong Kong, Perth and Hobart. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation Office became S-14 Division, and a selfservice laundry was established.

 

COMBAT SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT

 

The year began with the completion of the 1998 Combat Systems Readiness Review (CSRR). A minimum of discrepancies were noted. An Electronic Charting and Display System was installed on the bridge. The installation of six monitors, six amplifiers and approximately 800 feet of cable required approximately 450 man-hours. Major refurbishment of the Commanding Officer's import and at sea cabin, the Admiral's cabin and office, CCDG3 N6 office, the Navigator's stateroom, Navigation, Bridge and Flag Bridge was required to provide state of the art computer access through installation of IT-21 and shipboard local area network drops. Improvement in the location of all communications circuits and display monitors in these spaces was also accomplished. This work consumed approximately 4,200 ship's force man-hours and saved an estimated $300,000.00 in contractor costs. Ship's force initiated and completed work on the first operational Aircraft Carrier Joint Air Operations Center and Guidance, Apportionment and Targeting Cell.

 

Renovation of the Tactical Flag Command Center and War Room were made. Communications (CSl) Division earned its fourth consecutive Green "C". The Completed Comprehensive Communications Assessment, was graded an unprecedented 100 percent by Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group THREE, and earned Outstanding on the annual CMS inspection. Communications Maintenance (CS2) Division conducted maintenance on 3,300 pieces of communication equipment, which involved 6,800 hours of corrective maintenance, 1 1,000 hours of preventive maintenance, and response to over 2,650 trouble calls. Automated Information Systems (CS3) Division maintained the shipwide local area network consisting of 600 unclassified and 160 classified workstations. Division technicians supervised the installation and testing of the prototype IT-21lJMCISlGCCSM. Their aggressive day-to-day liaison with Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command engineers ensured that this mission critical system performed reliably throughout the year up to and including deployment. During the course of the year ship's force installed an additional 7,000 feet of fiber-optic cable, installed 50 new workstations, and installed three new e-mail servers allowing system expansion to 2,000 new user accounts. Interior Communications (CS5) Division technicians maintained over 7,000 items of navigation, telephone exchange, secure, SITE-TV, and interior communication system equipment. During the Board of Inspection and Survey technical assessment, no major discrepancies or restrictives were noted. Radar Maintenance (CS6) Division fabricated a replacement for a one-of-a-kind turnbuckle required to calibrate the ANISPN-41 Instrument Landing System; this restored a system vital to flight safety and contributed directly to achieving over 14,500 incident-free aircraft traps. The department was recognized by COMNAVAIRPAC as the top Micro-miniature Repair Shop (2M) on the West Coast, CS76 conducted repairs on 80 pieces of electronic equipment, avoided 16 CASREPS, and saved the Navy over $289,900.00 on the Western Pacific Deployment. Yearly totals are a staggering 172 electronic components repaired, 43 CASREPS averted, and $577,885.00 in cost avoidance.

 

NAVIGATION DEPARTMENT

 

Navigation Department spent its pre-deployment period conducting a major overhaul of the Bridge and Flag Bridge installing numerous electronic upgrades including the RaytheodECDIS navigation system. A renovation project which included replacing tile, painting, installing window shades and the restoration of brass equipment was also accomplished. During work-ups and an arduous deployment, Navigation Department qualified 23 Command Duty Officers (underway), 13 Officers of the Deck, 1 Conning Alongside Officer, 27 Command Duty Officers (in port), 18 Assistant Command Duty Officers (in port) and 27 Boat Officers. Three Master Helmsmen, four Quartermasters of the Watch, two Signalman Watch Supervisors, and two Enlisted Air War Specialists were also qualified. Operationally, the department conducted 13 precision anchorages and navigated into 11 ports and over 40,000 nautical miles trouble free.

 

Competitively, Navigation Department completed 100 percent of required exercises scoring an impressive 99.9 percent and completed two navigation check rides with a grade of Outstanding from Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group THREE. Signal Division's newly established Honor Guard performed six burials at sea, one retirement ceremony, and two change of commands. They also flew 36 flags for retiring personnel. Navigation Division received the White Wheel Award for Navigation Excellence and Signal Division was awarded the Green "C" for Outstanding Performance in Visual.

 

TRAINING DEPARTMENT

 

The Training Department conducted 13 Senior and 31 Junior Basic Indoctrination Courses to approximately 1,100 new crew members. The 15 personnel of the entirely temporary assigned duty-supported Training Department also initiated and processed over 1,000 sets of cost and 2,500 sets of no-cost temporary additional duty orders that sent personnel to professional schools in preparation for deployment. Approximately 2.500 sailors were given school quotas ranging from General Shipboard Firefighting and Navy Leadership to nuclear propulsion subjects.

 

MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT

 

Maintenance Department established a habitability team to enhance crew comfort and improve deck tile preservation. 133 composite vinyl deck tile renovations and 33 lagging tasks were accomplished. The team, made up of 10 sailors, ripped out and replaced approximately 23,800 square feet of tile, saving approximately $613,400.00. 3M Division established an internal 3M Training Team to conduct monthly departmental 3M assessments to maintain the integrity of the ship's 3M system. Assessments were performed on 12 of the ship's 18 departments, yielding a Preventive Maintenance Schedule performance rate of 97.16 percent, a Maintenance Data Systems performance rate of 91.6 percent, and an overall 3M effectiveness rate of 94.16 percent.

 

CHAPLAIN DEPARTMENT

 

The Chaplain Department implemented a Command Religious Program with more than 70 religious programs per week totaling 1,750 Worship/Religious Education Services with 14,720 attendees, and arranged visits by the Battle Group Chaplain to the COs/XOs/Chaplains to all surface ships in the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, including Canadian HMCS Oti'awa (FFI-1-341). The Protestant program had over 50 worship services with a combined attendance of over 3,500,60 lay lead services with a combined attendance of more than 2,300, and more than 20 Bible studies and support group ministries per week with attendance of over 3,400, with 13 lay leaders.

 

The department provided over $12,000.00 in support equipment and materials for programs throughout the deployment. The Christian discipleship program educated over 50 sailors in an in depth course of study resulting in 20 new professions of faith and baptisms. The department participated in and assisted with support functions in a combined Easter Sunrise Service on board USS Constellation (CV-64) with over 600 people in attendance, and performed more than 3,000 counseling sessions. The department staff taught over 60 classes on GMT, command indoctrination, stress management, suicide awareness, critical incident stress, grief recovery, and spiritual formation, as well as contributing to the Navy Rights and Responsibilities Course and the Career Information Training Course. Project Handclasp/community relations: The department coordinated 16 community relations projects in Singapore, Hong Kong, Dubai and Australia involving over 400 crew members resulting in a greatly improved ship's morale and positive foreign relations in all ports visited. Coordinated and participated in a highly successful Habitat for -Humanity of Seattle home building project with more than 20 crew members as participants. The department also processed more than 1,061 American Red Cross messages, operated the ship's library which served up to 160 crewmembers per day, and implemented and operated an eight computer station Learning Multimedia Resource Center.

 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT

 

Public Affairs was established as a department 12 April, moving from the Administrative Department. Crew morale was impacted dramatically by the SITE-TV system, an award winning newspaper (recipient of the Chief of Information Merit Award), and a news program featuring Abraham Lincoln sailors that was chosen as the best ship board produced Newscast in the Navy (1st place SITE Television Newscast, Chief of Information Merit Awards). Maintained an aggressive news release program, resulting in weekly news stories appearing in newspapers across the country that included front page headline stories in more than six major newspapers. Created a 1,300-form file which resulted in more than 34,000 releases from the Fleet Hometown News Center and hundreds of feature stories released through the Navy Office of Information field activities. Established the ship's web site, considered one of the best in the Navy, and garnered approximately 75,000 hits in the first six months. The Public Affairs Officer hosted the ship's distinguished visitors, as well as coordinating social events for several high-level visits during port visits. These included hangar bay receptions for 200 dignitaries in Hong Kong and 250 guests in Australia, a state dinner for 40 dignitaries and ambassadors in Singapore, and general public tours.

 

LEGAL DEPARTMENT

 

The Legal Department provided advice to the Commanding Officer, embarked Air Wing Staff, and 10 embarked squadrons on a myriad of command legal matters. It also provided over 1,600 wills and nearly 2,000 powers of attorney to ship's company and squadron personnel. The Legal Department coordinated the Liberty Risk Program Overseas for the ship and embarked staff and squadrons, averaging 72 persons per port visit on deployment. Additionally, Legal adjudicated Foreign Claims, and coordinated clearing of customs upon return from deployment with no discrepancies, ensuring the ship moored on time with all duty paid. The Legal Department processed 27 Summary Courts-Martial, 21 Special Courts-Martial, four General Courts-Martial, one Article 32, 633 nonjudicial punishments cases and 143 administrative separations

 

SAFETY DEPARTMENT

 

Three distinct phases of operation characterized Abraham Lincoln’s Safety Teani mishap prevention efforts. From January through June, the ship was engaged in predeployment workups; from July through the beginning of December, the ship deployed to the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean, and Arabian/Persian Gulf; and in December, the crew returned to Everett and a holiday schedule. Transitions between phases of operation are typically periods of increased risk of mishap, and emphasis was placed on increasing safety awareness and training prior to each phase. Safety Standdowns employing workcenter lectures, SITE-TV video presentations, 1 mc reminders, and hangar bay static displays and training sessions were held prior to each change of operations, and at the deployment midpoint. As a result of this preparation, the ship and its crew suffered no serious injuries or material damage during the entire year. The overall ship's minor injury rate was an extremely low 1.25 per 100,000 hours worked. Over 1,000 material and practice hazards were reported through the Safety Hazard Abatement Program with an overall discrepancy correction rate of 98 percent.

 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT

 

Use of the Navy's Phased Dentistry guidelines helped to maintain ship's Operational Dental Readiness level at 95-97 percent. Dental records were updated with the new dental record jackets.

 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

 

Medical Department saw a total of 12,584 sick call visits, 127 patients were admitted to the ward, and 24 surgeries were performed during the calendar year. During the deployment 16 patients were transferred off the ship for more specialized care, and 30 patients were transferred aboard the Abraham Lincoln for care. Psychological and Physical therapy services were permanently added to the Abraham Lincoln and greatly improved the medical readiness of the crew. The psychologist saw an average of ten new patients a week during deployment which greatly reduced the need for medical evacuations and saved thousands of dollars for the command. The physical therapist saw over 1,200 patients and assisted with injury prevention initiatives by conducting separate back and knee injury prevention classes. An optometrist was embarked for the first time ever on an aircraft carrier for an entire deployment, providing over 1,000 eye exams and treatments. The department flawlessly executed the anthrax immunization series to all embarked crew and civilians, administering over 14,366 immunizations. The Medical Department rapidly and efficiently responded to the call of Man Overboard as two sailors were swept into the water; with outstanding medical expertise, the sailors were stabilized and transferred for more specialized treatment. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Strike group is comprised of COMCRUDESGRU THREE, RADM Putnam; Carrier Air Wing 14, CAPT Kilcline, CAG; EOD Detachment; DESRON TWENTY ONE, CAPT Stavridis; the guided-missile cruisers USS Shiloh (CG-67) and USS Valley Forge (CG-50); guided-missile frigate USS Elliot (DD-967); destroyer USS Fletcher (DD-992); guided-missile frigate USS Jarrett (FFG-33); and replenishment ship; HCMS Ottawa (FFH-341); and attack submarines USS Jefferson City (SSN-759) and USS Columbia (SSN-771). Ports of call: Hong Kong; Singapore; Bahrain; five at Jebel Ali, UAE; Perth, Australia; Hobart, Tasmana; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California twice. Squadrons: VF-31, F-14D; VFA-115, FA-18C; VFA-113, FA-18C (N); VFA-25, FA-18C (N); VAQ-139, EA-6B; VAW-113, E-2C; HS-4, SH-60F / HH-60H; VS-35, S-3B; VQ-5 Det. B, ES-3A; VRC-30 Det. 1, C-2A. Her fifth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (11 June to 11 December 1998)” (Ref. 72, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1998).

 

11/06/98 to 11/12/98

AWARD OR CITATION

 AWARD DATES

  WEST COAST

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (AE)

24 Jul–14 Oct 1998

4th “WestPac”

meritorious Unit Commendation

Meritorious Unit Commendation (MU)

11 Jun–11 Dec 1998

same

Navy Unit Commendation

Navy Unit Commendation (NU)

1 Aug 1998

 

same

Ref. 378A & 378B-1998 to 2004

 

PCU Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1998 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XI

Appendix I

 

 

“During the year of 1998, CVW-14 Logged 12,304 landings (1 1,961 arrested landings: 8,161 day, 3,800 nights and 343 touch-and-go), 1,006 helo sorties (728 day, 278 night), and 17,095 total flight hours, all mishap-free. Abraham Lincoln led the Pacific Fleet in retention with a second consecutive Golden Anchor award and was underway from homeport a total of 242 days in 1998” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

Abraham Lincoln also extended the concept of the Battle Force Intermediate Maintenance Activity to provide maintenance availabilities not only to ships deployed with the battle group in the Arabian Gulf, but uniquely for a carrier, also to attack submarines USS Columbia (SSN-771) and USS Jefferson City (SSN-759). In addition, civilian technicians from the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division at NAS Lakehurst, New Jersey, and crewmembers, tested and evaluated a titanium piston assembly in Catapults 1 and 3” (Ref. 378A).

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1998 (Ref. 378B-1998):

 

The ship operated under the following chain of command as of 31 December 1998:

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 1998 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President William Jefferson Clinton, 1993-2001 - 42nd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable William J. Perry - 19th
3 Feb 1994 - 23 Jan 1997

The Honorable William S. Cohen - 20th
24 Jan 1997 -  20 Jan 2001

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable John H. Dalton - 67th

22 Jul 1993 - 16 Nov 1998

The Honorable Richard Danzig - 68th

16 Nov 1998 - 20 Jan 2001

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Jay L. Johnson (1996 - 2000) - 26th

CINCPACFLT

ADM Archie Clemins - 54th

7 Nov 1996 - 8 Oct 1999

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM Michael L. Bowman

Jan 1996 - Jan 1998 - 26th

VADM John B. Nathman - 27th

Jan 1998 - Aug 2000

Commander, COMCRUDESGRU THREE

RADM Kevin Green / RADM Putnam

Chief of Staff, COMCRUDESGRU THREE

CAPT Galdorisi

Battlegroup Command Master Chief

YNCM (SW/AW) Callan

DESRON TWENTY ONE

CAPT Stavridis

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1998 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT Robert F. Willard - 22 August 1995 - 18 February 1998 /

CAPT J. J. Quinn

Executive Officer - XO

CAPT James A. McDonell August 1998 /

CDR Kendall L. Card

Administrative Officer

LT Don Carr

Public Affairs Officer

LCDR Scott Harris

Air Officer

CDR S. S. Ross

Air Department Mini Boss

CDR Gary B. Hicks

AIMD Officer

CDR Kenneth Reynolds

Combat Systems Officer

CDR Susan Jannuzi

Religious Ministries Officer - RMD - Command Chaplain

CDR Doug Waite / CAPT Pope

Dental Officer

CDR Jimmy Saiku

Engineering Officer

CDR Brian Miller

Deck - First Lieutenant

LCDR Steven Lundholm

Legal Officer - Command Judge Advocate

LCDR Keith C. Celebrezze

Communications Officer

 

Maintenance Officer

LCDR James Sullivan

Navigator

CDR Gary Leaman

Senior Medical Officer

CDR Bruce Christen

Operations Officer

CDR Aldo Kuntz

Reactor Officer

CAPT Andrew Sevald

Safety Officer

CDR Mark Cochran

Supply Officer

CDR Loren Heckelman

Public Affairs was moved from the Administrative Department and established the office as a separate department on 12 April 1998.

Training Officer

LCDR Melissa Andrews / CDR Anderson

Weapons Officer

CDR Ricardo Perez

EOD Detachment

LT J. S. Coffey

Commander, Carrier Air Wing 14

CAPT Kilcline, CAG

Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing 14

CAPT McDonald, DCAG/CAG

Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing 14

CAPT Purcell, DCAG

 Command Master Chief, Carrier Air Wing 14

PHCM(AW / NAC) Aswegan

 

Organizational Structure. Captain Robert F. Willard served as Commanding Officer until relieved by Captain J. J. Quinn on 18 February. Captain J. A. McDonell served as Executive Officer until relieved by Commander Kendall L. Card on 1 September. EMCM (SW) Gary Weir served as Command Master Chief until relieved by YNCM (AW/SW/SS) William Nissen on 30 October 1998.

 

“The following major accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 1998:

 

*Completed 100 percent of all required competitive exercises with an overall average score of 98.8 percent.

 

*Departed San Diego, with CVW-14 embarked, Casualty Report (CASREP)-free and returned six months later with zero active CASREPs or Broad Arrows.

 

*Conducted a highly successful deployment transit. Completed the highest number of traps for any transiting carrier (1,320 day and 582 night). The first carrier to avoid targeting by subsurface units during the transit Anti-Submarine Warfare Exercise conducted in the Hawaiian operational area.

 

*Masterfully conducted numerous high visibility public relations visits and events.

 

*Hosted Congressman John Murtha of Pennsylvania, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of the Navy, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Commander Fifth Fleet, and Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet while deployed to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch.

 

*Logged 12,304 landings (1 1,961 arrested landings: 8,161 day, 3,800 nights and 343 touch-and-go), 1,006 helo sorties (728 day, 278 night), and 17,095 total flight hours, all mishap-free.

 

*Served as the cornerstone of a National Command Authority (NCA) directed contingency strike operation. The Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Information suite was pivotal to the successful mission planning, execution, and dissemination of the initial battle damage assessment of two simultaneous operations on separate continents.

 

*Superbly assumed the duties of Air Warfare Commander in the Arabian Gulf operational area to support the redeployment of Battle Group assets for NCA tasking.

 

*Provided superlative support to embarked staffs who executed the first of two Arabian Gulf Maritime Interdiction Operations surge operations. These operations required the coordinated effort of naval forces from six nations and netted almost $500,000.00 of United Nations' profit while interdicting $1 million worth of illegal oil exports.

 

*As Air Resources Element Coordinator, attained an impressive Operation Southern Watch sortie completion rate of 99.8 percent (flew 3,592 hours and completed 1,855 of 1,860 sorties in 52 fly days). The total cruise sortie completion rate was 97.2 percent.

 

*Received an overall grade of Average with one Excellent grade for cleanliness and preservation on the Operational Reactor Safeguards Exam. Simultaneously repaired for the offload of 2,540 tons of ammunition to support the subsequent crossdeck of this ordnance to the USS Constellation (CV-64).

 

*Led the Pacific Fleet in retention with a second consecutive Golden Anchor award.

 

*Underway from homeport a total of 242 days in 1998.

 

Abraham Lincoln departments provided support in the following ways as of 31 December 1998:

 

AIR DEPARTMENT

 

The ship safely completed 11,870 aircraft launches and recoveries and 317 touch and-go landings in support of four CVW carrier qualifications periods, FLEETEX, JTFEX, and Operation Southern Watch.

 

V-1 and V-3 Divisions conducted over 29,328 aircraft moves on the flight and hangar decks, and executed over 1,500 elevator runs. Crash and salvage teams responded to 223 actual emergencies and manned mobile fire vehicles for over 15,360 hours.

 

V-2 Division replaced the Number Three catapult retraction engine and rebuilt the Number Three arresting gear engine while maintaining the ship's catapults, arresting gear, and visual landing aids with an impressive 98 percent availability throughout deployment.

 

V-4 Division expeditiously handled over 31,462 mishap-free aircraft refueling evolutions resulting in the safe, efficient delivery of 15,378,205 gallons of aviation fuel. It received 15,774,830 gallons of aviation fuel during 14 incident-free underway replenishment evolutions.

 

REACTOR DEPARTMENT

 

Ship's force set plant conditions and tagged out both reactor plant control consoles to support several key ship alterations and switch replacements. Reactor Electrical Division, assisted by Combat Systems' Micro-miniature Repair Shop, repaired a failed voltage regulator in the Number Three emergency diesel generator. Following a loss of lube oil to the number 4B line shaft bearing, Machinery Division, assisted by the Repair Division and the Airframes Shop of Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department, repaired damage to the Number Four shaft and replaced the wiped bearing and failed aft oil seal while underway. This job is normally performed only with depot level assistance. Reactor Electrical and Machinery Divisions conducted repeated repairs to all four main engine throttle control systems. These included: replacement of the Number Four main engine ahead throttle synchro transmitter and receiver, a rebuild of the Number Four Main Engine ahead throttle poppet cam shaft assembly, a rebuild of a three-way gearbox in the Number Four Main Engine ahead throttle linkage, and several grooms to all four hydraulic power units. This concerted effort maximized the availability of all main engines throughout the Inter Deployment Training Cycle and deployment.

 

AIRCRAFT INTERMEDIATE MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT (AIMD)

 

Through an aggressive maintenance program, AIMD increased capability and improved processes of 65 production work centers.

 

Over 40,000 maintenance actions were completed without major material damage or personnel injury. Over 10,000 aviation-related weapons replaceable assemblies (WRAs) were processed, with a 74 percent ready-for-issue rate while supporting Carrier Air Wing Fourteen and the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group during JTFEX/FLEETEX and in support of Operation Southern Watch. The total Aviation Depot Level Repairable (AVDLR) net value of the WRAs processed was in excess of $90 million dollars. By fulfilling its commitment to "retail readiness," AIMD returned more than $75 million dollars of these assets to service and avoided the expenditure of precious operations and maintenance' funds.

 

AIMD managed over 5,000 line items of support equipment valued at over $170 million while they transferred and received a total of 2,55 1 items with a value of over $20 million and maintained 100 percent accuracy between local and centralized IMRL inventory records.

 

Fleet Calibration Activity (FCA) was responsible for the production efforts of 160 shipboard and Air Wing Calibration Petty Officers and Calibration Program management of over 35,000 Abraham Lincoln Battle Group precision measurement standards. In addition, the FCA managed 700 COMNAVAIRPAC calibration standards valued at over $10 million.

 

AIMD was the first AN/USM-636 Consolidated Automated Support System outfitted Pacific Fleet carrier to deploy without the benefit of backup legacy test benches. Thirty-eight engineering investigations were initiated with the supporting fleet support teams identifying deficiencies in hardware and software that prevented this system from providing its maximum benefit.

 

The Battle Force Intermediate Maintenance Activity (BFIMA) program was the highlight of the AIMD. Recognized at the CINCPACFLT level for its superb performance, the BFIMA program managed by AIMD provided critically needed material and services to over 22 ships, 18 deployed HSLIHCNP detachments, two successful submarine availabilities, and .the Bahrain Navy.

 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

 

Abraham Lincoln was the centerpiece of the Battle Force Intermediate Maintenance Activity (BFIMA). Over the course of the year the Battle Group logged 335 CASREPS and corrected 192. Additionally, the ship executed 1,460 maintenance actions as part of the BFIMA during the final phases of the Inter Deployment Training Cycle and Western Pacific. This amounted to a 255 percent increase over previous Battle Group accomplishment rates.

 

Abraham Lincoln was the first carrier to extend the concept of BFIMA to provide maintenance availabilities to submarines deployed with the battle group. Availabilities were executed for both USS Columbia (SSN-771) and USS Jefferson City (SSN 759) while forward deployed to the Arabian Gulf.

 

Catapults operated without a steam side casualty through the Inter Deployment Training Cycle and the deployment due in large part to the extensive and comprehensive valve maintenance program, which included over 500 valves.

 

WEAPONS DEPARTMENT

 

100 percent of competitive exercises were completed with an average score of 97.6 percent. The Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise/Integrated Training Assessment found the ship "Fully Ready for Battle Group Operations." The Magazine Sprinkler System was validated as Fully Operational with no major discrepancies. Shipboard Explosive Safety Inspection (SESI) was evaluated as Outstanding with no major or repeat discrepancies. The Ammunition Requisition Location Accountability was Outstanding - 100 percent in stock or on order for both ship and mission accounts and 100 percent accuracy in inventory and location. The department provided outstanding support during Operation Southern Watch. It moved 76,500 pounds of ordnance to and from the flight deck each fly day, with no missed sorties due to ordnance. It completed ship fill ordnance assets by safely cross decking 390 tons from USS Mounnt Hood (AE-29). It also safely off loaded entire mission and ship fill ordnance assets (2,540 tons) worth over $1.2 billion during an intense, two day underway replenishment.

 

Weapons Department completed four ASU- 18lSF graded surface engagement exercises, receiving 100 percent on each exercise. It deployed two ordnance flyaway teams to conduct critical readiness inspections on 568 guided bomb units. These inspections resulted in the completion of the directed action and a mission ready status of all guided bomb units aboard USS Caamden (AOE 2). It also completed 13 explosive ordnance disposal exercises with EOD DET 3 1 and EOD DET 33 onboard. Embarked the Pacific Fleet's first-ever EOD Enhanced Mobile Detachment during the six month Western Pacific deployment.

 

The Security Division coordinated a ship's Self Defense Force to replace the disestablished Marine Detachment.

 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT

 

An April Supply Management Assessment conducted by COMNAVAIRPAC resulted in eight grades of Excellent and six grades of Outstanding, and placed the command in control for the "Blue E" Award for Supply Excellence. Over 20,000 demands were processed for aviation consumable requirements, 800 off-ship Not Mission Capable Supply/Partially Mission Capable Supply requirements were expedited, and 550 aviation repairable items were crossdecked to other deployed and deploying carriers. Over 8,100 items were received, and 14,500 items were issued. Over 800,000 pounds of air cargo and mail were processed through Carrier Onboard- Delivery flights.

 

The Food Service Division, S-2, was again nominated for the coveted Captain Edward F. Ney Memorial Award for food service excellence. The D-3 Sales and Services Division received the prestigious Best Sales and Services Award on their first nomination. S-3 Division set command records for sales totals of over $2.6 million during the year.

 

The Supply Department supported such events as the Commanding Officer's change of command reception, the change of command for Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group THREE, and luncheons, receptions and formal dinners for distinguished groups from Victoria, Hong Kong, Perth and Hobart.

 

The Morale, Welfare and Recreation Office became S-14 Division, and a self service laundry was established.

 

COMBAT SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT

 

The year began with the completion of the 1998 Combat Systems Readiness Review (CSRR). A minimum of discrepancies were noted.

 

An Electronic Charting and Display System was installed on the bridge. The installation of six monitors, six amplifiers and approximately 800 feet of cable required approximately 450 man-hours. Major refurbishment of the Commanding Officer's import and at sea cabin, the Admiral's cabin and office, CCDG3 N6 office, the Navigator's stateroom, Navigation, Bridge and Flag Bridge was required to provide state of the art computer access through installation of IT-21 and shipboard local area network drops. Improvement in the location of all communications circuits and display monitors in these spaces was also accomplished. This work consumed approximately 4,200 ship's force man-hours and saved an estimated $300,000 in contractor costs.

 

Ship's force initiated and completed work on the first operational Aircraft Carrier Joint Air Operations Center and Guidance, Apportionment and Targeting Cell. Renovation of the Tactical Flag Command Center and War Room were made. Communications (CSl) Division earned its fourth consecutive Green "C".

 

The Completed Comprehensive Communications Assessment, was graded an unprecedented 100 percent by Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group THREE, and earned Outstanding on the annual CMS inspection. Communications Maintenance (CS2) Division conducted maintenance on 3,300 pieces of communication equipment, which involved 6,800 hours of corrective maintenance, 1 1,000 hours of preventive maintenance, and response to over 2,650 trouble calls.

 

Automated Information Systems (CS3) Division maintained the shipwide local area network consisting of 600 unclassified and 160 classified workstations. Division technicians supervised the installation and testing of the prototype IT-21lJMCISlGCCSM. Their aggressive day-to-day liaison with Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command engineers ensured that this mission critical system performed reliably throughout the year up to and including deployment. During the course of the year ship's force installed an additional 7,000 feet of fiber-optic cable, installed 50 new workstations, and installed three new e-mail servers allowing system expansion to 2,000 new user accounts.

 

Interior Communications (CS5) Division technicians maintained over 7,000 items of navigation, telephone exchange, secure, SITE-TV, and interior communication system equipment. During the Board of Inspection and Survey technical assessment, no major discrepancies or restrictives were noted. Radar Maintenance (CS6) Division fabricated a replacement for a one-of-a-kind turnbuckle required to calibrate the ANISPN-41 Instrument Landing System; this restored a system vital to flight safety and contributed directly to achieving over 14,500 incident-free aircraft traps. The department was recognized by COMNAVAIRPAC as the top Micro-miniature Repair Shop (2M) on the West Coast, CS76 conducted repairs on 80 pieces of electronic equipment, avoided 16 CASREPS, and saved the Navy over $289,900.00 on the Western Pacific Deployment. Yearly totals are a staggering 172 electronic components repaired, 43 CASREPS averted, and $577,885.00 in cost avoidance.

 

DECK DEPARTMENT

 

Deck Department completed 24 underway replenishments, receiving 13.4 million gallons of fuel (JP5), delivering 5,000 gallons of fuel (JP5), receiving 60 pallets of general cargo and ammunition, and offloaded 944 pallets of ammunition. The ship anchored nine times, including the port visits to Victoria, Hong Kong; Perth and Hobart.

 

NAVIGATION DEPARTMENT

 

Navigation Department spent its pre-deployment period conducting a major overhaul of the Bridge and Flag Bridge installing numerous electronic upgrades including the Raytheon/ECDIS navigation system. A renovation project which included replacing tile, painting, installing window shades and the restoration of brass equipment was also accomplished. During work-ups and an arduous deployment, Navigation Department qualified 23 Command Duty Officers (underway), 13 Officers of the Deck, 1 Conning Alongside Officer, 27 Command Duty Officers (in port), 18 Assistant Command Duty Officers (in port) and 27 Boat Officers. Three Master Helmsmen, four Quartermasters of the Watch, two Signalman Watch Supervisors, and two Enlisted Air War Specialists were also qualified.

 

Operationally, the department conducted 13 precision anchorages and navigated into 11 ports and over 40,000 nautical miles trouble free. Competitively, Navigation Department completed 100 percent of required exercises scoring an impressive 99.9 percent and completed two navigation check rides with a grade of Outstanding from Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group THREE. Signal Division's newly established Honor Guard performed six burials at sea, one retirement ceremony, and two change of commands. They also flew 36 flags for retiring personnel.

 

Navigation Division received the White Wheel Award for Navigation Excellence and Signal Division was awarded the Green "C" for Outstanding Performance in Visual

 

TRAINING DEPARTMENT

 

The Training Department conducted 13 Senior and 31 Junior Basic Indoctrination Courses to approximately 1,100 new crew members. The 15 personnel of the entirely temporary assigned duty-supported Training Department also initiated and processed over 1,000 sets of cost and 2,500 sets of no-cost temporary additional duty orders that sent personnel to professional schools in preparation for deployment. Approximately 2.500 sailors were given school quotas ranging from General Shipboard Firefighting and Navy Leadership to nuclear propulsion subjects.

 

MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT

 

Maintenance Department established a habitability team to enhance crew comfort and improve deck tile preservation. 133 composite vinyl deck tile renovations and 33 lagging tasks were accomplished. The team, made up of 10 sailors, ripped out and replaced approximately 23,800 square feet of tile, saving approximately $613,400. 3M Division established an internal 3M Training Team to conduct monthly departmental 3M assessments to maintain the integrity of the ship's 3M system.

 

Assessments were performed on 12 of the ship's 18 departments, yielding a Preventive Maintenance Schedule performance rate of 97.16 percent, a Maintenance Data Systems performance rate of 91.6 percent, and an overall 3M effectiveness rate of 94.16 percent.

 

CHAPLAIN DEPARTMENT

 

The Chaplain Department implemented a Command Religious Program with more than 70 religious programs per week totaling 1,750 Worship/Religious Education Services with 14,720 attendees, and arranged visits by the Battle Group Chaplain to the COs/XOs/Chaplains to all surface ships in the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, including Canadian HMCS Oti'awa (FFI-1-341).

 

The Protestant program had over 50 worship services with a combined attendance of over 3,500,60 lay lead services with a combined attendance of more than 2,300, and more than 20 Bible studies and support group ministries per week with attendance of over 3,400, with 13 lay leaders. The department provided over $12,000.00 support equipment and materials for programs throughout the deployment.

 

The Christian discipleship program educated over 50 sailors in an in depth course of study resulting in 20 new professions of faith and baptisms. The department participated in and assisted with support functions in a combined Easter Sunrise Service on board USS Constellation (CV-64) with over 600 people in attendance, and performed more than 3,000 counseling sessions. The department staff taught over 60 classes on GMT, command indoctrination, stress management, suicide awareness, critical incident stress, grief recovery, and spiritual formation, as well as contributing to the Navy Rights and Responsibilities Course and the Career Information Training Course.

 

Project Handclasp/community relations: The department coordinated 16 community relations projects in Singapore, Hong Kong, Dubai and Australia involving over 400 crew members resulting in a greatly improved ship's morale and positive foreign relations in all ports visited. Coordinated and participated in a highly successful Habitat for -Humanity of Seattle home building project with more than 20 crew members as participants.

 

The department also processed more than 1,061 American Red Cross messages, operated the ship's library which served up to 160 crewmembers per day, and implemented and operated an eight computer station Learning Multimedia Resource Center.

 

PUBLIC AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT

 

Public Affairs was established as a department 12 April, moving from the Administrative Department.

 

Crew morale was impacted dramatically by the SITE-TV system, an award winning newspaper (recipient of the Chief of Information Merit Award), and a news program featuring Abraham Lincoln sailors that was chosen as the best ship board produced Newscast in the Navy (1st place SITE Television Newscast, Chief of Information Merit Awards).

 

Maintained an aggressive news release program, resulting in weekly news stories appearing in newspapers across the country that included front page headline stories in more than six major newspapers. Created a 1,300-form file which resulted in more than 34,000 releases from the Fleet Hometown News Center and hundreds of feature stories released through the Navy Office of Information field activities.

 

Established the ship's web site, considered one of the best in the Navy, and garnered approximately 75,000 hits in the first six months.

 

The Public Affairs Officer hosted the ship's distinguished visitors, as well as coordinating social events for several high-level visits during port visits. These included hangar bay receptions for 200 dignitaries in Hong Kong and 250 guests in Australia, a state dinner for 40 dignitaries and ambassadors in Singapore, and general public tours.

 

LEGAL DEPARTMENT

 

The Legal Department provided advice to the Commanding Officer, embarked Air Wing Staff, and 10 embarked squadrons on a myriad of command legal matters. It also provided over 1,600 wills and nearly 2,000 powers of attorney to ship's company and squadron personnel.

 

The Legal Department coordinated the Liberty Risk Program Overseas for the ship and embarked staff and squadrons, averaging 72 persons per port visit on deployment. Additionally, Legal adjudicated Foreign Claims, and coordinated clearing of customs upon return from deployment with no discrepancies, ensuring the ship moored on time with all duty paid.

 

The Legal Department processed 27 Summary Courts-Martial, 21 Special Courts-Martial, four General Courts-Martial, one Article 32, 633 nonjudicial punishments cases and 143 administrative separations

 

SAFETY DEPARTMENT

 

Three distinct phases of operation characterized Abraham Lincoln’s Safety Team mishap prevention efforts. From January through June, the ship was engaged in predeployment workups; from July through the beginning of December, the ship deployed to the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean, and Arabian/Persian Gulf; and in December, the crew returned to Everett and a holiday schedule. Transitions between phases of operation are typically periods of increased risk of mishap, and emphasis was placed on increasing safety awareness and training prior to each phase. Safety Standdowns employing workcenter lectures, SITE-TV video presentations, 1 mc reminders, and hangar bay static displays and training sessions were held prior to each change of operations, and at the deployment midpoint. As a result of this preparation, the ship and its crew suffered no serious injuries or material damage during the entire year. The overall ship's minor injury rate was an extremely low 1.25 per 100,000 hours worked. Over 1,000 material and practice hazards were reported through the Safety Hazard Abatement Program with an overall discrepancy correction rate of 98 percent.

 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT

 

Use of the Navy's Phased Dentistry guidelines helped to maintain ship's Operational Dental Readiness level at 95-97 percent. Dental records were updated with the new dental record jackets.

 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

 

Medical Department saw a total of 12,584 sick call visits, 127 patients were admitted to the ward, and 24 surgeries were performed during the calendar year. During the deployment 16 patients were transferred off the ship for more specialized care, and 30 patients were transferred aboard the Abraham Lincoln for care. Psychological and Physical therapy services were permanently added to the Abraham Lincoln and greatly improved the medical readiness of the crew. The psychologist saw an average of ten new patients a week during deployment which greatly reduced the need for medical evacuations and saved thousands of dollars for the command. The physical therapist saw over 1,200 patients and assisted with injury prevention initiatives by conducting separate back and knee injury prevention classes. An optometrist was embarked for the first time ever on an aircraft carrier for an entire deployment, providing over 1,000 eye exams and treatments. The department flawlessly executed the anthrax immunization series to all embarked crew and civilians, administering over 14,366 immunizations. The Medical Department rapidly and efficiently responded to the call of Man Overboard as two sailors were swept into the water; with outstanding medical expertise, the sailors were stabilized and transferred for more specialized treatment” (Ref. 378B-1998).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XI (1 January to 31 December 1998) and PCU Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1998 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter XI, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4