Chapter VIII (1 January to 31 December 1995) and

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1995 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter VIII

Appendix I

 

 

Stateside Operations ranging from Fleet Exercise in SOCAL OPAREA; Joint Task Force Exercise 1995 in SOCAL OPAREA and Ordnance Onload prior to her Third “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, conducting UNION 95-2, an anti-submarine warfare exercise, during the "WestPac" transit against a Tactical Air Launched Decoy, achieving perfect skin-to-skin kill from 17 to 20 April 1995, on her third Indian Ocean deployment, on her third Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 2nd Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Operation Vigilant Sentinel / Operation Vigilant Warrior in response to Hussein testing U.S. resolve by moving another significant military force close to his country's border with Kuwait, Marines from Abraham Lincoln practiced Visit, Board, Search and Seizure procedures with two HH-60Hs from HS-6 onto fast combat support ship USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 12 May 1995 and participated in exercise Beacon Flash and Inspired Alert, an exercise with the Pakistanis and exercise Nautical Artist with the Saudis (11 April to 9 October 1995); Ordnance Offload and Dry-docking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington.

1 January to 31 December 1995

Chapter VIII

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 1995 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval tactical and support aircraft at sea, maintain open sea lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group operations. Wherever it goes, Abraham Lincoln serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, providing a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

“1 January 1995 found Abraham Lincoln in her homeport of Naval Air Station, Alameda, Calif., preparing for her last underway period before departing on her third cruise, "WestPac" 1995. These preparations included a multi-faceted pre-deployment fair for crew members and their families. Services from legal (wills and powers of attorney, personnel (identification cards and service record updates), disbursing (setting up allotments and opening bank accounts) and other aspects helped prepare the crew prepare for the upcoming six-month separation” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Supply's Postal Division received an outstanding grade with zero discrepancies during a COMNAVSURFPAC Postal Assist Visit on 1 January 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Supply Department coordinated pre-deployment benefits fair in hangar bay for crew members and their dependents from 17 to 18 January 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Pier 3 South, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 30 November to 23 January 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, Calif. on 23 January 1995, Southern California, for Fleet Exercise in Southern California operating area” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Marine Detachment conducted practice Visit, Board, Search and Seizure aboard HMCS Provider on 27 January 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

“FA-18 from VFA-22 crashed immediately after launching. The pilot was killed on 28 January 1995 and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Weapons Department received outstanding grade during Mine Readiness Certification Inspection from 29 to 31 January 1995. Weapons Department coordinated ordnance onload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l) for 101 lifts on 29 January 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Weapons Department coordinated an Air Wing 11 shoot from 1 to 2 February 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Pier 3 South, Naval Air Station, Alameda, Calif. on 6 February 1995, Southern California, conducting Fleet Exercise in Southern California operating area from 23 January to 3 February 1995. Marine Detachment conducted practice Visit, Board, Search and Seizure aboard HMCS Provider on 27 January 1995. FA-18 from VFA-22 crashed immediately after launching. The pilot was killed on 28 January 1995 and Weapons Department coordinated ordnance onload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l) for 101 lifts on 29 January 1995. Weapons Department received outstanding grade during Mine Readiness Certification Inspection from 29 to 31 January 1995. Weapons Department coordinated ordnance onload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l) for 101 lifts on 29 January 1995. In January 1995, Air Department's V-1 division completed 2,478 mishap-free aircraft moves, V-2 recorded 736 launches and 799 recoveries, V-3 refurbished 85,000 square feet of hangar bay non-skid and V-4 issued 1,479,613 gallons of JP-5 (received 987,950 gallons), servicing 955 aircraft. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department's IM-4 division successfully passed the Mine Warfare Readiness Certification Inspection. Weapons Department coordinated an Air Wing 11 shoot from 1 to 2 February 1995 (23 January to 6 February 1995)” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) berthed at Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego,  Calif. Battle Group Training Team availability from 6 to 13 February 1995. Supply's Disbursing Office named winner of COMNAVAIRPAC Disbursing Excellence Award 1994 on 13 February 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, Calif. on 13 February 1995, for Joint Task Force Exercise 1995, designed to enable all commands of the battle group to train together one last time, while being observed and graded” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

Aircraft No. 500, an A-6E Intruder (BuNo 155586) from VA-95, attached to CVW-11, caught fire while at tension on a catapult on 15 February 1995. The crew escaped from the conflagration unharmed” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Pier 3 South, Naval Air Station, Alameda, Calif. on 24 February 1995, conducting Joint Task Force Exercise 1995 in Southern California operating area from 13 to 24 February 1995, designed to enable all commands of the battle group to train together one last time, while being observed and graded. Aircraft No. 500, an A-6E Intruder (BuNo 155586) from VA-95, attached to CVW-11, caught fire while at tension on a catapult on 15 February 1995. The crew escaped from the conflagration unharmed. Marines from Abraham Lincoln practiced Visit, Board, Search and Seizure procedures on board Canadian replenishment oiler HMCS Provider (AOR-508) on 27 January 1995. An F/A-18 Hornet from VFA-22 attached to CVW-11, crashed immediately after launching off Abraham Lincoln, killing the pilot on 28 January 1995. Communications Department sailors installed and activated the ship’s first MCI prepaid card system in February 1995. The system proved a tremendous boost to morale, as it enabled sailors to better keep in touch with loved ones, via telephone calls. Air Department's V-1 division refurbished 110,000 square feet of flight deck non-skid and completed 5,528 mishap-free aircraft moves. V-2 recorded 1,283 launches and 1,225 recoveries, V-3 completed 715 safe aircraft moves and V-4 issued 2,310,960 gallons of JP-5 (received 1,286,022 gallons), servicing 1,640 aircraft. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department's treated and preserved 43 A-6E components immersed in AFFF, resulting in 100 percent recovery at a savings of more than $100,000.00. Communication's Department completed Telemedicine Video Conference with John Hopkins Medical Center supporting Xray transfers and surgical procedure consultations. Communications installed and activated Sailor Phones, the first MCI prepaid card system in the Pacific AOR. Facilitated MWR phone calls from deployed crew members to families (13 to 24 February 1995)” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Weapons Dept. coordinated ordnance onload (40 lifts) on 10 March 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload -- 63 lifts from 20 to 21 March 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload -- 10 lifts on 22 March 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload -- 50 lifts on 30 March 1995. Air Department's V-2 Division replaced catapult 3 Low Loss Launch Valves and V-3 painted more than 45 departmental logos on hangar bay ballistic doors” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload -- 15 lifts on 4 April 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload -- 28 lifts on 6 April 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Pier 3 South, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 24 February to 11 April 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California 11 April 1995, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in Washington to NAS North Island in Southern California and Rear Adm. Robert M. Nutwell, Commander Carrier Group 3, broke his flag from the carrier on this cruise, with Captain Richard J. Nibe as the Commanding Officer, on her third “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, UNION 95-2, an anti-submarine warfare exercise , during the "WestPac" transit against a Tactical Air Launched Decoy, achieving perfect skin-to-skin kill from 17 to 20 April 1995, on her third Indian Ocean deployment, on her third Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 2nd Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Operation Vigilant Sentinel / Operation Vigilant Warrior in response to Hussein testing U.S. resolve by moving another significant military force close to his country's border with Kuwait, Marines from Abraham Lincoln practiced Visit, Board, Search and Seizure procedures with two HH-60Hs from HS-6 onto fast combat support ship USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 12 May 1995 and participated in exercise Beacon Flash and Inspired Alert, an exercise with the Pakistanis and exercise Nautical Artist with the Saudis, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet in July 1995 reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch commencing 26 August 1992 (when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet's area of responsibility encompasses about 7.5 million square miles and includes the Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman and parts of the Indian Ocean. This expanse, comprised of 25 countries, includes three critical chokepoints at the Suez Canal, the Straits of Hormuz, and the Straits of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen. She will under go her fourth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(11 April to 9 October 1995)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command       (3rd Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)

3rd WestPac 3rd IO

2nd OSW

OVW

CVW-11

NH

11 Apr 1995

9 Oct 1995

Western Pacific

Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

4th FWFD

182-days

UNION 95-2, an anti-submarine warfare exercise , during the "WestPac" transit against a Tactical Air Launched Decoy, achieving perfect skin-to-skin kill from 17 to 20 April 1995, 2nd Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Operation Vigilant Sentinel / Operation Vigilant Warrior in response to Hussein testing U.S. resolve by moving another significant military force close to his country's border with Kuwait, Marines from Abraham Lincoln practiced Visit, Board, Search and Seizure procedures with two HH-60Hs from HS-6 onto fast combat support ship USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 12 May 1995 and participated in exercise Beacon Flash and Inspired Alert, an exercise with the Pakistanis and exercise Nautical Artist with the Saudis.

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VFA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH300

FA-18C (N)

VFA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH400

FA-18C (N)

VA-95 (*1)

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -   Jet Attack Bomber

NH500

A-6E

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -      Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler -     Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Dragonfires - Sea

Control Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VQ-5 Det. B

Sea Shadows - Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron

Lockheed -Viking -  Special electronic installation

720

ES-3A

VRC-30 Det. 3

Providers - Fleet Logistics Support Squadron

 

Grumman - Greyhound

xx

C-2A

(*1) disestablished on Nov.18, 1995

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Battle Group is commanded by Rear Adm. Robert M. Nutwell, Commander Carrier Group 3, DESRON 21, CAPT C. I. Lundquist, the staff of Destroyer Squadron TWO ONE (DESRON 21), commanded by Captain Carl Lundquist. Ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group participating in workups and the deployment included USS Princeton (CG-59), USS Sacranmento (AOE-1), USS Merrill (DD-976), USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53), USS New York City (SSN-696) and USS Pasadena (SSN-752). Battlegroup ships based in San Diego, Ca. included: Princeton, a Ticonderoga Class Cruiser with the AEGIS weapons system, commanded by CAPT Dallas Wilfong; John Paul Jones, a guided missile destroyer, commanded by CDR Peter Opsal; the destroyer Merril, commanded by CDR Richard Arnold; and attack submarine Pasadena, commanded by CDR Steve Connors. Replenishment ship Sacranmento, commanded by CAPT Steve Hinson, was based in Bremerton, Wa., and attack submarine New York City, commanded by CDR Greg Vaughn, was based in Pearl Harbor, Hi. The 80 aircraft of Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CW-11), commanded by CAPT Dennis Gillespie and based at Naval Air Station Miramar, Ca., embarked aboard Abraham Lincoln during at sea periods, conducting workups in preparation for the six-month deployment in April. The eight aircraft squadrons and two detachments from air stations all over the West Coast included: Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE FIVE (VAQ 135), flying the Grumman EA-6B "Prowler" from their home base of NAS Whidbey Island, WA; Attack Squadron NINE FIVE (VA 95), flying the Grumman A-6E "Intruder" aircraft, also from Whidbey Island; Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron SIX (HS 6), flying the Sikorsky SH- 60F and HH-6OH "Seahawk" helicopter from NAS North Island, San Diego, CA; Sea Control Squadron TWO NINE (VS 29), flying the Lockheed S-3B "Viking" aircraft, also from NAS North Island; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SEVEN (VAW 117), flying the Grumman E-2C Plus "Hawkeye" on their base at NAS Miramar, San Diego, Ca; also from NAS Miramar, Fighter Squadron TWO ONE THREE (VF 213), flying the Grumman F- 14A "Tomcat" Strike Fighter Squadron TWO TWO (VFA 22) and Strike FIGHTER SQUADRON NINE FOUR (VFA 94), flying the McDonnell Douglas FA- 18C "Hornet" aircraft, out of NAS Lemoore, CA. The two detachments, both based at NAS North Island, include (VRC 30), flying the Grumman C-2A"Greyhound"and Electronic Surveillance Squadron FIVE (VQ-5), flying Lockheed1s ES-3A” (Ref. 84A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and air wing spent several days off the coast of Southern California conducting carrier qualifications for the embarked air wing before heading west from 11 to 15 April 1995. Union 95-1, a live fire NATO Sea Sparrow exercise, where she achieved a “perfect skin-to-skin kill” against a tactical air launched decoy” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

“En route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Eastern and Western Pacific to the South China and Indian Ocean. The Anti-Submarine Warfare module conducted a simulated choke point exercise during the Lincoln Battle Group PASSEX with a Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force diesel submarine. ASW Air Controller’s logged more than 1,500 hours controlling ASW/ASUW aircraft” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) took part in UNION 95-2, an anti-submarine warfare exercise , during the "WestPac" transit against a Tactical Air Launched Decoy, achieving perfect skin-to-skin kill from 17 to 20 April 1995. Area Air Defense Warfare completed a follow on operational test and evaluation test firing of two RIM-7P missiles, evaluated by inspectors as "the most successful test yet"” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload from USS Sacramento (AOE-l) – 60 lifts on 21 April 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered the Seventh Fleet as she steamed into the Western Pacific on 27 April 1995. A Tomcat from VF-213 crashed during routine training. The pilot and radar intercept officer were safely recovered and conducted ordnance onload from USS Sacramento (AOE-l) – 112 lifts on 28 April 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Exercise Force DieselEx with the Japanese Maritime Self Defense from 29 to 30 April 1995. In April, Air Department's V-1 division completed 3,423 mishap-free aircraft moves, V-2 recorded 1,152 launches and 1,037 recoveries and V-4 issues 1,740,618 gallons of JP-5 (received 2,602,203 gallons), servicing 1,445 aircraft. Communications Department installed and activated Battle Group Cellular Phone System. Provided access to commercial landline telephone assets to battle group ships with cellular range from Lincoln. Communications Department sailors installed and activated a battle group cellular telephone system, which provided commanders’ access to commercial landline phones to battle group ships within range of Abraham Lincoln in April 1995. Rear Adm. Robert M. Nutwell, Commander Carrier Group 3, broke his flag from the carrier on this cruise. During her deployment the ship also provided a wide variety of on board repair capabilities and technical experts to 17 American and allied ships that operated in the Middle East with limited or non-existent tender services. In addition, the Communications Department completed a telemedicine video conference with Johns Hopkins Medical Center during this deployment, which supported X-ray transfers and surgical procedure consultations. And at one point during the western transit, Abraham Lincoln completed Union 95-1, a live fire NATO Sea Sparrow exercise, where she achieved a “perfect skin-to-skin kill” against a tactical air launched decoy” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Hong Kong from 5 to 9 May 1995 and then steaamed through the South China Sea, en route to Singapore” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

“Marines from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) practiced Visit, Board, Search and Seizure procedures with two HH-60Hs from HS-6 onto fast combat support ship USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 12 May 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) underway in the South Pacific during her 1995 Western Pacific deployment (10 April–9 October). Original print carries a date of 12 May 1995, which may be a release date. Photographer: PH2 Jason L. Cooper. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command (# NH 106558-KN). NS027240. Alex Tatchin.

http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/027240.jpg

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) anchored at Singapore on 14 May 1995, steaming from Hong Kong on the 9th. In addition, Area Air Defense conducted Joint Link 11 exercises with the Singapore, French and British navies and with the U.S. Air Force and Army” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Sunset Review, Singapore on 15 May 1995” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) anchored at Singapore from 14 to 19 May 1995. Sunset Review, Singapore on the 15th. Port visits to Hong Kong and Singapore were welcome after the three-week transit across the Pacific. These visits also enabled hundreds of those cities' citizens to tour Lincoln and for crew members to participate in community relations projects and tours in the host cities” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced participation in Exercise Beacon Flash on 20 May 1995” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

“Naval Sea Sparrow Missile System Upload onboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during Operation Southern Watch underway in the Arabian Gulf on 21 May 1995” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload from USS Sacramento (AOE-1) -- 230 lifts on 23 May 1995” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the South China Sea conducting operations en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf via the Strait of Malacca eastbound, to the Indian Ocean, participating in Exercise Beacon Flash from 20 to 23 May 1995. The transit across the Indian Ocean then afforded the opportunity for several exercises before entering the Arabian Gulf in early June” (Ref 72, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed from the Indian Ocean to the North Arabian Sea on 24 May 1995, entering the Fifth Fleet on 26 May 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Inspired Alert, an exercise with the Pakistanis from 26 to 31 May 1995, en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

“During an underway replenishment with USS Sacramento (AOE-1), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and the fast combat support ship collided on 5 June 1995. One Sacramento sailor suffered minor bruises after jumping between levels on board his ship as collision alarms began to sound. The impact damaged Sacramento’s port side amidships, including underway replenishment rigging, portside bridge wings, ladders, and the executive officer’s stateroom. The collision also bent her CIWS, although the system remained intact and capable of defending the ship. Sailors did not observe damage below decks.

 

“There is bad damage in the superstructure area,” Comdr. Terry L. McCleary, a spokesman for Naval Forces Central Command, explained, “The whole port side, including unreps [underway replenishment] wings, the bridge area, is damaged along the central part of the ship.”

 

Abraham Lincoln continued her mission with only lesser damage to life rafts and life lines. The crew of the carrier affected repairs without requiring extended time in port, however, Sacramento spent several weeks at Jebel Ali to complete what McCleary announced as “frenetic repairs,” which required her crew to work six days a week in three-duty sections to accomplish the back-breaking labor. “You can do what you need to make her mission capable and forget about the cosmetics,” McCleary elaborated, “Or you can fix everything at one fell swoop.” The Navy estimated the total cost of damage resulting from the accident at approximately $500,000.00 for the carrier and from $1 to $2 million for Sacramento. Meanwhile, two MSC-operated ships, oiler USS John Ericsson (T-AO-194) and combat store ship USS San Jose (T-AFS-7), relieved Sacramento to maintain ships operating in the area during the ensuing period” (Ref. 378A).

 

“In the Arabian/Persian Gulf, the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group lent support to Operation Southern Watch in response to renewed Iraqi military posturing from 1 to 11 June 1995 during which time USS Sacramento (AOE-l) collided during an underway replenishment. Lincoln continued with her mission; Sacramento spent several weeks in port Jebel Ali for repairs on 5 June 1995” (Ref 72, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was steaming en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf via the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz from 19 May to 12 June 1995, arriving in the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 12 June 1995 in support of Operation Southern Watch in response to renewed Iraqi military posturing, making a port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) on 12 June 1995. In May 19995. Department's V-1 Division completed 1,743 mishap-free aircraft moves, V-2 recorded 1,345 launches and 1,037 recoveries and V-3 completed 404 safe aircraft moves. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department manufactured battle group information exchange interconnection cables, permitting ship to submarine communications in the battle group. Communications Department upgraded HDR UHF LOS to provide full VTC capability. Utilized system to broadcast Abe TV to other ships in Lincoln Battle Group” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) from 12 to 17 June 1995, commencing Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian/Persian Gulf on the 17th” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) supported Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 17 June to 1 July 1995, making a second port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) on the 1st. Air Department's V-1 division completed 4,110 mishap-free aircraft moves; V-2 recorded 1,319 launches and 1,317 recoveries, and received arresting gear 3; V-3 completed 1,053 safe aircraft moves; and V-4 issued 2,418,906 gallons of JP-5, received 2,691,710 gallons of J-5, serviced 2,000 aircraft and delivered 500 gallons of JP-5 to USS Merrill (DD-976). Through Communications efforts, Lincoln became first ship to activate SHF system with total band width aggregate of 512kbps. Conducted first successful battle group e-mail test from Lincoln (deployed to Arabian Gulf) to CNO at Pentagon” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited a second time at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) from 1 to 6 July 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

“The 5th Fleet of the United States Navy maintains a visible deterrent force in the Arabian [Persian] Gulf area” (Ref. 313A).

 

“By July 1995, the course of events made a new numbered fleet necessary. After a 48-year hiatus, the US 5th Fleet was reactivated and it now cruises the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea. Its headquarters are in Manama, Bahrain” (Ref. 313A).

 

“Since naval forces routinely make up over 70 percent of all US military presence in theater, NAVCENT’s location on the scene is an integral part of USCENTCOM's ability to successfully execute a theater strategy. From major exercises to day-to-day real world operations such as enforcement of UN sanctions, NAVCENT plays a major role in maintaining stability and deterring aggression in the region. The vast majority of NAVCENT’s operating forces are rotationally deployed to the region from either the Pacific Fleet or the Atlantic Fleet” (Ref. 313A).

 

“For the early years of its existence, its forces normally consisted of an Aircraft Carrier Battle Group (CVBG), an Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), surface combatants, submarines, maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, and logistics ships. However, with the War on Terrorism, the naval strategy of the US has changed. The regular deployments of the Cold War are now a thing of the past. Consequently, the policy of always maintaining a certain number of ships in various parts of the world is also over” (Ref. 313A).

 

“The 5th Fleet was initially established 26 April 1944 from Central Pacific Force, and disbanded after the war. In the era of the first Gulf War, the region was patrolled by ships from the East and West Coasts, but no defined fleet existed” (Ref. 313A).

 

“Through the 1980s several frigate- and destroyer-type ships and minesweepers were assigned to the Middle East Force as well as support ships. After the 1990 Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, the largest armada since World War II assembled in the Gulf in support of Operation Desert Shield, and ultimately Operation Desert Storm in 1991. The Middle East Force found itself operating under operational control of U.S. Naval Forces Central Command where it remained following the war. During Desert Storm in 1991, the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command. Since the Gulf War, NAVCENT fulfilled the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command. Ships from the East and West Coasts comprised the fleet, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number” (Ref. 313).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Exercise Nautical Artist with Saudi Arabia during on 8 July 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance onload/offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 26 lifts on 16 July 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a third port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) from 22 to 26 July 1995, supporting Operation Southern Watch, and launched aircraft for patrols over the southern no-fly zone from 6 to 22 July 1995. She also worked with the Saudis during exercise Nautical Artist (8-12 July). In addition, crewmembers relayed message traffic received from Canadian ships via the battle group cellular system when the Canadian broadcasting system suffered an outage and conducted ordnance onload/offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 26 lifts on 16 July 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

“As a blazing sun rose over the horizon on 29 July 1995, 14 Intruders from VA-95, attached to CVW-11, launched from Abraham Lincoln and flew a long range strike familiarization mission into the Iraqi heartland in support of Operation Southern Watch. The crew worked for days preceding the strike to prepare for the raid, and organized the flight deck into what the squadron referred to as an “Intruder configuration.” Sailors had all 14 of the squadron’s bombers airborne within 10 minutes. The A-6Es rendezvoused 100 miles to the north of the ship over the Gulf, and then headed into the teeth of Iraqi air defenses. The Intruders made simulated attack runs on 14 different target areas using AGM-88 High Speed Antiradiation Missiles (HARMs) and bombs, before they came about and returned to the carrier. The squadron approached Abraham Lincoln through a scorching haze from astern and flew over the ship at 500 feet above the waves. Squadron members proudly referred to the strike as “The Lizards’ Last Romp” [after their nickname: Green Lizards; VA-95 disestablished at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, on 18 November 1995]” (Ref. 378A).

 

“In July 1995, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Air Department's V-1 division completed 5,173 mishap-free aircraft moves; V-2 recorded 1,534 launches and 1,535 recoveries and received arresting gear 4; V-3 completed 1,005 safe aircraft moves; and V-4 issued 2,971,650 gallons of JP-5 (received 2,687,618 gallons), servicing 2,607 aircraft. Communications Department relayed message traffic received from Canadian ships via battle group cellular system during outage of Canadian broadcast system” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 3 lifts on 27 July 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

Operation Vigilant Sentinel / Operation Vigilant Warrior II

 

In August 1995, Hussein chose to test U.S. resolve by moving another significant military force close to his country's border with Kuwait. Nearly 70 people from the 74th Air Control Squadron deployed 24-25 August to Kuwait. The specific battle management functions the 74th ACS and its counterparts performed included surveillance, data link management and weapons control. The deploying units were part of a ground theater air control system, consisting of a control reporting element and an air support operations center. The CRE is a mobile tactical unit which provides surveillance and command and control capability. The ASOC plans, directs and controls the air effort in support of ground forces. The deployment of 3,500 American soldiers to Kuwait in October 1996 following the expansion of the no-fly zone in Iraq provided a deterrent to further hostile Iraqi acts. Navy and Marine Corps combat forces and active and reserve Military Sealift Command forces responded to Iraqi threats against Jordan and Kuwait. Maritime Pre-positioning Ship Squadron Two sortied from Diego Garcia with equipment for a 17,300-Marine combat force and remained on-station to provide rapid response capability” (Ref 518).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in Operation Southern Watch and a supporting operation, Vigilant Sentinel, in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 26 July to 20 August 1995, making a fourth port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) on the 22nd” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

Captain Robert F. Willard assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 22 August 1995, relieving Captain Richard J. Nibe, fifth Commanding Officer, serving from 9 September 1993 to 22 August 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) a fourth time from 20 to 25 August 1995. When political tensions rose in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, Abraham Lincoln scheduled departure from the Middle East was delayed to ensure a face-to-face carrier battle group turnover, when the USS Independence (CV-62) battle group arrived in early September to continue Operation Southern Watch. This delay cut out the scheduled port visits to Australia and Tasmania, but the crew would be able to spend some extra days in Pearl Harbor, Hi. in order to continue Operation Southern Watch and Vigilant Sentinel in the Arabian/Persian Gulf. During June and August 1995, confronting temperature problems on FLIR systems, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department personnel performed on-aircraft trouble shooting to repair 40 Cryogenic Cooling System components and provide continued infrared” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 111 lifts on 28 August 1995” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a fifth port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) on the 4th, participating in Operation Southern Watch and Vigilant Sentinel in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 25 August to 4 September 1995. In August, the Air Department's V-1 Division completed 5,604 mishap-free aircraft moves; V-2 recorded 1,354 launches and 1,354 recoveries and received arresting gear 3; V-3 completed 1,102 safe aircraft moves; and V-4 issued 2,650,809 gallons of JP-5 (received 2,868,276 gallons), serviced 2,440 aircraft and delivered 80,122 gallons of JP-5 to USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53). Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department repaired and operationally tested the mission essential SLQ-32 Radar Evaluation and Monitoring Test Set for USS Princeton (CG-59), without available publications or technical data, saving more than $18,000.00 in replacement costs and restoring ship's capabilities in August as well as  Communications Department activating it’s first commercial link at 768kbps in Pacific AOR. Link established with NRAD, San Diego, providing full VTC capability and access to local phone switch. Weapons Dept. received "excellent" grade during .50 caliber gunnery training” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a fifth port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) for her final visit to the port during this deployment from 4 to 7 September 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

“USS Independence (CV-62) Battle Group relieved USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Battle Group from 7 to 8 September 1995. The Navy delayed Abraham Lincoln scheduled departure from the area to allow her to conduct a ‘face-to-face turnover’ with her relief. This entailed cancelling planned visits to Australian ports, however, a heavy blow to her crew, who anticipated traditional Australian hospitality. The Navy tried to compensate by extending the carrier’s visit to NS Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, by several days while returning home” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced transit from the Arabian/Persian Gulf, through the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman, through the North Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean, via the Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific, en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 9 September 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered the Seventh Fleet on 11 September 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crossed the equator on 18 September 1995” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

“An F-14A Tomcat from VF-213, attached to CVW-11, crashed on 20 September 1995. The pilot and radar intercept officer were safely recovered” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance offload, USS Kiska (AE-35); 1,451 lifts, 2,229 tons from 26 to 27 September 1995” (Ref 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed from the Arabian/Persian Gulf, through the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman through the North Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean, via the Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 7 to 29 September 1995, arriving Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on the 29th. Between April and September, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department's Field Calibration Activity completed more than 2,300 repair and calibration actions for Lincoln and its battle group, and Air Wing ELEVEN, surpassing "WestPac" 93 by more than 1,400 items to achieve an unprecedented 60 percent production increase for "WestPac" 95. In September, Air Department's V-1 Division completed 3,503 mishap-free aircraft moves, V-2 recorded 796 launches and 796 recoveries, V-3 completed 753 safe aircraft moves and V-4 issued 2,228,737 gallons of JP-5 and serviced 2,679 aircraft. V-4 also delivered 953,477 gallons of JP-5 to USS Paul Jones (DDG-53) and 599,600 gallons to USS Sacramento (AOE-l). Also in September, Communications Department facilitated first successful VTC in Pacific AOR using STU III. VTC broadcasted the Chief of Naval Operations to a1 Lincoln Battle Group ships via commercial satellite and HDR UHF LOS” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 29 September to 3 October 1995, and with Tiger Cruise embarked set a course through the Pacific and Eastern Pacific, for her home port of Naval Air Station, Alameda, California” (Ref 378A & 378B-1995).

 

“On 9 October 1995, two days ahead of Schedule, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Pier 3 South, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of assigned home bases of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in Washington to NAS North Island in Southern California and Rear Adm. Robert M. Nutwell, Commander Carrier Group 3, aboard for this cruise, conducting Tiger Cruise for approximately 1,200 family and friends of crew members from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Events included two sunset reviews, tours throughout the ship, an Air Wing demonstration, live fire exercises, and more, with Captain Robert F. Willard, relieving, Captain Richard J. Nibe, fifth Commanding Officer, serving from 9 September 1993 to 22 August 1995, ending her third “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, UNION 95-2, an anti-submarine warfare exercise , during the "WestPac" transit against a Tactical Air Launched Decoy, achieving perfect skin-to-skin kill from 17 to 20 April 1995. Area Air Defense Warfare completed a follow on operational test and evaluation test firing of two RIM-7P missiles, evaluated by inspectors as "the most successful test yet, on her third Indian Ocean deployment, on her third Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of her 2nd Operation Southern Watch (OSW), enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Operation Vigilant Sentinel / Operation Vigilant Warrior in response to Hussein testing U.S. resolve by moving another significant military force close to his country's border with Kuwait, Marines from Abraham Lincoln practiced Visit, Board, Search and Seizure procedures with two HH-60Hs from HS-6 onto fast combat support ship USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 12 May 1995 and participated in exercise Beacon Flash and Inspired Alert, an exercise with the Pakistanis and exercise Nautical Artist with the Saudis, operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, moving ashore in Bahrain in 1993, while their former head quarters, USS LA SALLE departed for overhaul and reassignment, and the 5th Fleet in July 1995 reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and Arabian Sea, while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command, with the beginning of Operation Southern Watch. Abraham Lincoln and air wing spent several days off the coast of Southern California conducting carrier qualifications for the embarked air wing before heading west from 11 to 15 April 1995. Union 95-1, a live fire NATO Sea Sparrow exercise, where she achieved a “perfect skin-to-skin kill” against a tactical air launched decoy. En route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the Eastern and Western Pacific to the South China and Indian Ocean. The Anti-Submarine Warfare module conducted a simulated choke point exercise during the Lincoln Battle Group PASSEX with a Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force diesel submarine. ASW Air Controller’s logged more than 1,500 hours controlling ASW/ASUW aircraft. Abraham Lincoln took part in UNION 95-2, an anti-submarine warfare exercise , during the "WestPac" transit against a Tactical Air Launched Decoy, achieving perfect skin-to-skin kill from 17 to 20 April 1995. Area Air Defense Warfare completed a follow on operational test and evaluation test firing of two RIM-7P missiles, evaluated by inspectors as "the most successful test yet." Abraham Lincoln conducted ordnance onload from USS Sacramento (AOE-l) – 60 lifts on 21 April 1995, entering the Seventh Fleet as she steamed into the Western Pacific on 27 April 1995. A Tomcat from VF-213 crashed during routine training. The pilot and radar intercept officer were safely recovered. Abraham Lincoln conducted ordnance onload from USS Sacramento (AOE-l) – 112 lifts on 28 April 1995; conducting Exercise Force DieselEx with the Japanese Maritime Self Defense from 29 to 30 April 1995. In April, Air Department's V-1 Division completed 3,423 mishap-free aircraft moves, V-2 recorded 1,152 launches and 1,037 recoveries and V-4 issues 1,740,618 gallons of JP-5 (received 2,602,203 gallons), servicing 1,445 aircraft. Communications Department installed and activated Battle Group Cellular Phone System. Provided access to commercial landline telephone assets to battle group ships with cellular range from Lincoln. Communications Department sailors installed and activated a battle group cellular telephone system, which provided commanders’ access to commercial landline phones to battle group ships within range of Abraham Lincoln in April 1995. Rear Adm. Robert M. Nutwell, Commander Carrier Group 3, broke his flag from the carrier on this cruise. During her deployment the ship also provided a wide variety of on board repair capabilities and technical experts to 17 American and allied ships that operated in the Middle East with limited or non-existent tender services. In addition, the Communications Department completed a telemedicine video conference with Johns Hopkins Medical Center during this deployment, which supported X-ray transfers and surgical procedure consultations. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Hong Kong on 5 May 1995, transiting the Eastern Pacific en route Hong Kong from 15 April to 5 May 1995, and then steamed through the South China Sea, en route to Singapore. Abraham Lincoln practiced Visit, Board, Search and Seizure procedures with two HH-60Hs from HS-6 onto fast combat support ship USS Sacramento (AOE-1) on 12 May 1995. Abraham Lincoln anchored at Singapore on 14 May 1995, steaming from Hong Kong on the 9th. In addition, Area Air Defense conducted Joint Link 11 exercises with the Singapore, French and British navies and with the U.S. Air Force and Army. Abraham Lincoln conducted Sunset Review, Singapore on 15 May 1995. Port visits to Hong Kong from 5 to 9 May 1995 and anchoring at Singapore from 14 to 19 May 1995 were welcome after the three-week transit across the Pacific. These visits also enabled hundreds of those cities' citizens to tour Lincoln and for crew members to participate in community relations projects and tours in the host cities. Abraham Lincoln commenced participation in Exercise Beacon Flash on 20 May 1995. Naval Sea Sparrow Missile System Upload onboard Abraham Lincoln during OSW underway in the Arabian Gulf on 21 May 1995, conducting ordnance onload from USS Sacramento (AOE-1) -- 230 lifts on 23 May 1995, steaming through the South China Sea conducting operations en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf via the Strait of Malacca eastbound, to the Indian Ocean, participating in Exercise Beacon Flash from 20 to 23 May 1995. The transit across the Indian Ocean then afforded the opportunity for several exercises before entering the Arabian Gulf in early June, steaming from the Indian Ocean to the North Arabian Sea on 24 May 1995, entering the Fifth Fleet on 26 May 1995. Abraham Lincoln conducted Inspired Alert, an exercise with the Pakistanis from 26 to 31 May 1995, en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf. During an underway replenishment with USS Sacramento (AOE-1), the carrier and the fast combat support ship collided on 5 June 1995. One Sacramento sailor suffered minor bruises after jumping between levels on board his ship as collision alarms began to sound. The impact damaged Sacramento’s port side amidships, including underway replenishment rigging, portside bridge wings, ladders, and the executive officer’s stateroom. The collision also bent her CIWS, although the system remained intact and capable of defending the ship. Sailors did not observe damage below decks. There is bad damage in the superstructure area,” Comdr. Terry L. McCleary, a spokesman for Naval Forces Central Command, explained, “The whole port side, including unreps [underway replenishment] wings, the bridge area, is damaged along the central part of the ship.” Abraham Lincoln continued her mission with only lesser damage to life rafts and life lines. The crew of the carrier affected repairs without requiring extended time in port, however, Sacramento spent several weeks at Jebel Ali to complete what McCleary announced as “frenetic repairs,” which required her crew to work six days a week in three-duty sections to accomplish the back-breaking labor. “You can do what you need to make her mission capable and forget about the cosmetics,” McCleary elaborated, “Or you can fix everything at one fell swoop.” The Navy estimated the total cost of damage resulting from the accident at approximately $500,000.00 for the carrier and from $1 to $2 million for Sacramento. Meanwhile, two MSC-operated ships, oiler USS John Ericsson (T-AO-194) and combat store ship USS San Jose (T-AFS-7), relieved Sacramento to maintain ships operating in the area during the ensuing period. In the Arabian/Persian Gulf, the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group lent support to Operation Southern Watch in response to renewed Iraqi military posturing from 1 to 11 June 1995 during which time USS Sacramento (AOE-l) collided during an underway replenishment. Lincoln continued with her mission; Sacramento spent several weeks in port Jebel Ali for repairs on 5 June 1995. Abraham Lincoln was steaming en route to the Arabian/Persian Gulf via the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz from 19 May to 12 June 1995, arriving in the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 12 June 1995 in support of Operation Southern Watch in response to renewed Iraqi military posturing, making a port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) on 12 June 1995. In May 19995. Department's V-1 Division completed 1,743 mishap-free aircraft moves, V-2 recorded 1,345 launches and 1,037 recoveries and V-3 completed 404 safe aircraft moves. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department manufactured battle group information exchange interconnection cables, permitting ship to submarine communications in the battle group. Communications Department upgraded HDR UHF LOS to provide full VTC capability. Utilized system to broadcast Abe TV to other ships in Lincoln Battle Group. Abraham Lincoln visited Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) from 12 to 17 June 1995, commencing OSW in the Arabian/Persian Gulf on the 17th. Abraham Lincoln supported OSW in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 17 June to 1 July 1995, making a second port call at UAE on the 1st. Air Department's V-1 Division completed 4,110 mishap-free aircraft moves; V-2 recorded 1,319 launches and 1,317 recoveries, and received arresting gear 3; V-3 completed 1,053 safe aircraft moves; and V-4 issued 2,418,906 gallons of JP-5, received 2,691,710 gallons of J-5, serviced 2,000 aircraft and delivered 500 gallons of JP-5 to USS Merrill (DD-976). Through Communications efforts, Lincoln became first ship to activate SHF system with total band width aggregate of 512kbps. Conducted first successful battle group e-mail test from Lincoln (deployed to Arabian Gulf) to CNO at Pentagon. Abraham Lincoln visited UAE a second time from 1 to 6 July 1995, conducting Exercise Nautical Artist with Saudi Arabia from 8 to 12 July 1995, followed by ordnance onload/offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 26 lifts on 16 July 1995, making a third port call at UAE on 22 July 1995, supporting OSW, and launched aircraft for patrols over the southern no-fly zone from 6 to 22 July 1995. In addition, crewmembers relayed message traffic received from Canadian ships via the battle group cellular system when the Canadian broadcasting system suffered an outage and conducted ordnance onload/offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 26 lifts on 16 July 1995. Abraham Lincoln made a third port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) from 22 to 26 July 1995, departing to continue support for OSW and a supporting operation, Vigilant Sentinel, in the Arabian/Persian Gulf. As a blazing sun rose over the horizon on 29 July 1995, 14 Intruders from VA-95, attached to CVW-11, launched from Abraham Lincoln and flew a long range strike familiarization mission into the Iraqi heartland in support of OSW. The crew worked for days preceding the strike to prepare for the raid, and organized the flight deck into what the squadron referred to as an “Intruder configuration.” Sailors had all 14 of the squadron’s bombers airborne within 10 minutes. The A-6Es rendezvoused 100 miles to the north of the ship over the Gulf, and then headed into the teeth of Iraqi air defenses. The Intruders made simulated attack runs on 14 different target areas using AGM-88 High Speed Antiradiation Missiles (HARMs) and bombs, before they came about and returned to the carrier. The squadron approached Abraham Lincoln through a scorching haze from astern and flew over the ship at 500 feet above the waves. Squadron members proudly referred to the strike as “The Lizards’ Last Romp” [after their nickname: Green Lizards; VA-95 disestablished at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, on 18 November 1995]. In July 1995, Air Department's V-1 Division completed 5,173 mishap-free aircraft moves; V-2 recorded 1,534 launches and 1,535 recoveries and received arresting gear 4; V-3 completed 1,005 safe aircraft moves; and V-4 issued 2,971,650 gallons of JP-5 (received 2,687,618 gallons), servicing 2,607 aircraft. Communications Department relayed message traffic received from Canadian ships via battle group cellular system during outage of Canadian broadcast system. Abraham Lincoln conducted ordnance offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 3 lifts on 27 July 1995. In August 1995, Hussein chose to test U.S. resolve by moving another significant military force close to his country's border with Kuwait. Nearly 70 people from the 74th Air Control Squadron deployed 24-25 August to Kuwait. The specific battle management functions the 74th ACS and its counterparts performed included surveillance, data link management and weapons control. The deploying units were part of a ground theater air control system, consisting of a control reporting element and an air support operations center. The CRE is a mobile tactical unit which provides surveillance and command and control capability. The ASOC plans, directs and controls the air effort in support of ground forces. The deployment of 3,500 American soldiers to Kuwait in October 1996 following the expansion of the no-fly zone in Iraq provided a deterrent to further hostile Iraqi acts. Navy and Marine Corps combat forces and active and reserve Military Sealift Command forces responded to Iraqi threats against Jordan and Kuwait. Maritime Pre-positioning Ship Squadron Two sortied from Diego Garcia with equipment for a 17,300-Marine combat force and remained on-station to provide rapid response capability. Abraham Lincoln participated in OSW and a supporting operation, Operation Vigilant Sentinel / Operation Vigilant Warrior, in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 26 July to 20 August 1995, making a fourth port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) from 20 to 25 August 1995. Captain Robert F. Willard assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 22 August 1995, relieving Captain Richard J. Nibe, fifth Commanding Officer, serving from 9 September 1993 to 22 August 1995. When political tensions rose in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, Abraham Lincoln scheduled departure from the Middle East was delayed to ensure a face-to-face carrier battle group turnover, when the USS Independence (CV-62) battle group arrived in early September to continue OSW. This delay cut out the scheduled port visits to Australia and Tasmania, but the crew would be able to spend some extra days in Pearl Harbor, Hi. in order to continue OSW and Vigilant Sentinel in the Arabian/Persian Gulf. During June and August 1995, confronting temperature problems on FLIR systems, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department personnel performed on-aircraft trouble shooting to repair 40 Cryogenic Cooling System components and provide continued infrared. Abraham Lincoln conducted ordnance offload with USS Sacramento (AOE-l); 111 lifts on 28 August 1995. Abraham Lincoln made a fifth port call at UAE from 4 to 7 September 1995, participating in OSW and Operation Vigilant Sentinel / Operation Vigilant Warrior in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 25 August to 4 September 1995. In August, the Air Department's V-1 division completed 5,604 mishap-free aircraft moves; V-2 recorded 1,354 launches and 1,354 recoveries and received arresting gear 3; V-3 completed 1,102 safe aircraft moves; and V-4 issued 2,650,809 gallons of JP-5 (received 2,868,276 gallons), serviced 2,440 aircraft and delivered 80,122 gallons of JP-5 to USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53). Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department repaired and operationally tested the mission essential SLQ-32 Radar Evaluation and Monitoring Test Set for USS Princeton (CG-59), without available publications or technical data, saving more than $18,000.00 in replacement costs and restoring ship's capabilities. Communications Department activated first commercial link at 768kbps in Pacific AOR. Link established with NRAD, San Diego, providing full VTC capability and access to local phone switch. Weapons Dept. received "excellent" grade during .50 caliber gunnery training. USS Independence (CV-62) Battle Group relieved USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Battle Group from 7 to 8 September 1995. The Navy delayed Abraham Lincoln scheduled departure from the area to allow her to conduct a ‘face-to-face turnover’ with her relief. This entailed cancelling planned visits to Australian ports, however, a heavy blow to her crew, who anticipated traditional Australian hospitality. The Navy tried to compensate by extending the carrier’s visit to NS Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, by several days while returning home. Abraham Lincoln commenced transit from the Arabian/Persian Gulf, through the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman, through the North Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean, via the Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific, en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 9 September 1995, entering the Seventh Fleet on 11 September 1995 and crossed the equator on 18 September 1995. An F-14A Tomcat from VF-213, attached to CVW-11, crashed on 20 September 1995. The pilot and radar intercept officer were safely recovered. Abraham Lincoln conducted ordnance offload, USS Kiska (AE-35); 1,451 lifts, 2,229 tons from 26 to 27 September 1995, steaming from the Arabian/Persian Gulf, through the Strait of Hormuz and Gulf of Oman through the North Arabian Sea to the Indian Ocean, via the Strait of Malacca, South China Sea, Western and Eastern Pacific en route to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California via Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 7 to 29 September 1995, arriving Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.on the 29th. Between April and September, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department's Field Calibration Activity completed more than 2,300 repair and calibration actions for Lincoln and its battle group, and Air Wing ELEVEN, surpassing "WestPac" 93 by more than 1,400 items to achieve an unprecedented 60 percent production increase for "WestPac" 95. In September, Air Department's V-1 Division completed 3,503 mishap-free aircraft moves, V-2 recorded 796 launches and 796 recoveries, V-3 completed 753 safe aircraft moves and V-4 issued 2,228,737 gallons of JP-5 and serviced 2,679 aircraft. V-4 also delivered 953,477 gallons of JP-5 to USS Paul Jones (DDG-53) and 599,600 gallons to USS Sacramento (AOE-l). Also in September, Communications Department facilitated first successful VTC in Pacific AOR using STU III. VTC broadcasted the Chief of Naval Operations to a1 Lincoln Battle Group ships via commercial satellite and HDR UHF LOS. Supply Department established high standards in Aviation Supply Support Best deployment ever by Abraham Lincoln as evidenced by following statistics on 9 October 1995. Between April and October, without tender services in theater, Abraham Lincoln provided 99 percent of onboard repair capability and technical experts, assisting 17 ships (battle group, U.S. and allied). Maintained a mean BGIMA turnaround time of less than three days, expediting ship-to-ship repair and return without significant impact to aircraft readiness throughout the battle group. Also between April and October, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department performed Naval Calibration Lab Type III B & Repair/calibration actions, saving more than $200,000.00 and totally eliminating the need for off ship report. Depot level trouble shooting saved $1,360,900.00 and improved mission readiness through significant system/component repairs (F-14 camera magazine assemblies, Combat Systems RADAR test set, and many more. Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department maintained a 95 percent Support Equipment and 100 percent Material Handling Equipment Availability, satisfying every aircraft move, supply and weapons replenishment evolution throughout an intense deployment schedule to support the Lincoln battle group. Supply Department established high standards in Aviation Supply Support Best deployment ever by Abraham Lincoln as evidenced by following statistics on : Offship NMCS/PMCS: 13.6; On ship NMCS/PMCS: 6.3; Shipping time: 7 days and MC/FMC Rates: 91%/88%” The Anti-Surface Warfare module planned, coordinated and executed 50 Sledgehammer (ASUW quick reaction strike) exercises, 14 War-At-Sea exercises and 13 ASUW engagement exercises with multi-national forces in the Western Pacific and Arabian Gulf. Intelligence systems conducted the first underway test and evaluation of Digital Imagery Capture and Exploitation to develop initial procedures. Abraham Lincoln became the first carrier to fully test the concept of intelligence self-sufficiency afloat in a deployed environment. All Warfare Commanders, battle group ships and embarked detachments were provided a full range of intelligence products and services. The Photo Lab completed more than 4,300 jobs (including 24,243 8Itx1Otptrints, 665 rolls of film and thousands of feet of film). Hard work in the meteorology office enabled Abraham Lincoln to become the first carrier to establish the capability to download Navy Oceanographic data Distribution System environmental data directly from the Meteorological office using local area network linked to Shipboard Personal Computer Information Transfer System. Installing new technology enabled several improvements to quality of life and service to crew members. The Communications Department completed Telemedicine Video Conference with John Hopkins Medical Center supporting Xray transfers and surgical procedure consultations. This system was used numerous times during the deployment to enable Lincoln’s medical department to discuss treatments and procedures on patients from the battle group with medical experts in the United States, as well as for some new fathers to visit with their newborns during the middle of deployment. Communications also installed and activated Sailor Phones, the first MCI prepaid card system in the Pacific AOR. This enabled crew members to make MWR phone calls to family members and friends. The 80 aircraft of Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CW-11), commanded by CAPT Dennis Gillespie and based at Naval Air Station Miramar, Ca., embarked aboard Abraham Lincoln during at sea periods, conducting workups in preparation for the six-month deployment in April. The eight aircraft squadrons and two detachments from air stations all over the West Coast included: Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE FIVE (VAQ 135), flying the Grumman EA-6B "Prowler" from their home base of NAS Whidbey Island, WA; Attack Squadron NINE FIVE (VA 95), flying the Grumman A-6E "Intruder" aircraft, also from Whidbey Island; Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron SIX (HS 6), flying the Sikorsky SH- 60F and HH-6OH "Seahawk" helicopter from NAS North Island, San Diego, CA; Sea Control Squadron TWO NINE (VS 29), flying the Lockheed S-3B "Viking" aircraft, also from NAS North Island; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SEVEN (VAW 117), flying the Grumman E-2C Plus "Hawkeye" on their base at NAS Miramar, San Diego, Ca; also from NAS Miramar, Fighter Squadron TWO ONE THREE (VF 213), flying the Grumman F- 14A "Tomcat" Strike Fighter Squadron TWO TWO (VFA 22) and Strike FIGHTER SQUADRON NINE FOUR (VFA 94), flying the McDonnell Douglas FA- 18C "Hornet" aircraft, out of NAS Lemoore, CA. The two detachments, both based at NAS North Island, include (VRC 30), flying the Grumman C-2A"Greyhound"and Electronic Surveillance Squadron FIVE (VQ-5), flying Lockheed1s ES-3A. Squadrons: VF-213, F-14A; VFA-22, FA-18C (N); VFA-94, FA-18C (N); VA-95 (*1), A-6E; VAW-117, E-2C; HS-6, SH-60F / HH-60H; VAQ-135, EA-6B; VS-29, S-3B; VQ-5 Det. B, ES-3A and VRC-30 Det. 3, C-2A. (*1) disestablished on Nov.18, 1995. Abraham Lincoln Battle Group is commanded by Rear Adm. Robert M. Nutwell, Commander Carrier Group 3, DESRON 21, CAPT C. I. Lundquist, the staff of Destroyer Squadron TWO ONE (DESRON 21), commanded by Captain Carl Lundquist. Ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group participating in workups and the deployment included USS Princeton (CG-59), USS Sacranmento (AOE-1), USS Merrill (DD-976), USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53), USS New York City (SSN-696) and USS Pasadena (SSN-752). Battlegroup ships based in San Diego, Ca. included: Princeton, a Ticonderoga Class Cruiser with the AEGIS weapons system, commanded by CAPT Dallas Wilfong; John Paul Jones, a guided missile destroyer, commanded by CDR Peter Opsal; the destroyer Merril, commanded by CDR Richard Arnold; and attack submarine Pasadena, commanded by CDR Steve Connors. Replenishment ship Sacranmento, commanded by CAPT Steve Hinson, was based in Bremerton, Wa., and attack submarine New York City, commanded by CDR Greg Vaughn, was based in Pearl Harbor, Hi. A small city, Abraham Lincoln provided many services to embarked crew members, as well as the entire battle group, from laundry and food to medical, legal and educational services. The Educational Services Office provided ongoing training opportunities for battle group crew members. More than 760 participated in PACE I, PACE II and Basic Skills classes during deployment. And hundreds of crew members participated in the Navy-wide advancement exams in March and September. During deployment, the Supply Department served/used 3,600,000 meals; 360,000 hamburgers; 135,000 dozen eggs; 99,000 gallons of milk, 27,000 pounds of coffee; 115,200 pounds of sugar; and 216,000 pounds of flour. The bakeshop made 155,185 loaves of bread; 3,852,000 dinner rolls; and 43,200 hamburger buns. On the technology side, the data systems division of Supply received 4,228 messages through the Streamlined Automated Logistics Transmission System (SALTS) and sent 5,296 messages. Reservists completed their annual Active Duty Training aboard Lincoln, and 42 midshipmen completed their summer training cruise while Lincoln was deployed to the Arabian Gulf. Ceremonies (awards, retirements, changes of command) were held in the ship's forecastle during the deployment. During 1995, Abraham Lincoln and her crew spent 208 days underway at sea, and many of those days involved operations for the ship and Carrier Air Wing Eleven. In 1995, there were 10,190 total landings (including 9,439 arrested landings -- 5,511 day and 3,928 night – and 751 touch and go landings); 1,048 total helicopter sorties (621 day, 427 night); and 4,643 total carrier controlled approaches. The Chaplain's Department conducted approximately 60 religious services a week and made 46 "Holy Helo" visits throughout the battle group during deployment. The ship's library saw a daily average visit of 192 crew members, and more than 650 Sailors and Marines participated in a three level stress management course. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 29 September to 3 October 1995, and with Tiger Cruise embarked set a course through the Pacific and Eastern Pacific, for her home port of Naval Air Station, Alameda, California. The Chaplains headed up 11 community relations projects in three host countries (Hong Kong, Singapore, Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates (UAE) five times and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.), involving almost 200 battle group Sailors and Marines. Her fourth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (11 April to 9 October 1995)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1995).

 

“A one-month standdown allowed crew members of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to reunite with family and friends and prepare for a change of homeport to Bremerton, Washington” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance offload, Pier 3 South, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, 36 lifts on 31 October 1995. In October, Air Department's V-1 Division completed 340 mishap-free aircraft moves; V-2 recorded 100 launches and 30 recoveries; V-3 rehabilitated round-downs of elevators one, two and three; and V-4 issued 69,689 gallons of JP-5, servicing 76 aircraft. Also in October, Weapon's Security Division implemented a comprehensive Western Pacific Deployment physical security plan, encompassing physical security access control measures for port visits to Hong Kong, Singapore and Jebel Ali, UAE. The division also trained more than 75 division personnel in basic law enforcement/physical security courses” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Marine Detachment observed the 220th Birthday Ball with the MARDET from USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) on 10 November 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ordnance offload, Pier 3 South, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, 2 lifts on 13 November 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 9 October to 14 November 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).  

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 14 November 1995, for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash. in November 1995, for the ship’s first Dry-docking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, in what her historian called a “Noah’s Ark Cruise” brought approximately 80 family members and Air Department's V-3 division loaded, transported and off-loaded more than 600 personal vehicles of crew members to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard during the three-day transit” (Ref. 72, 377, 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Pier Bravo, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash. 17 November 1995, after a three-day transit, to begin the ship’s first Dry-docking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, in what her historian called a “Noah’s Ark Cruise,” bringing approximately 80 family members and Air Department's V-3 Division loaded, transported and off-loaded more than 600 personal vehicles of crew members to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard during the three-day transit” (Ref. 72, 377, 378A & 378B-1995).  

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) offloaded ordnance at Port Hadlock, Wash.; 3 lifts on 13 December 1995, and finished the year moored to Pier Bravo, before entering drydock” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Supply Department held special holiday dinner for crew members and families aboard Abraham Lincoln on 25 December 1995” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Pier Bravo, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, from 17 November 1995 and finished the year 31 December 1995, moored to Pier Bravo, before entering drydock during the ship’s first Dry-docking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA)” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1995).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1995 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter VIII

Appendix I

 

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1995 (Ref. 378B-1995):

 

The ship operated under the following chain of command as of 31 December 1995:

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 1995 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President William Jefferson Clinton, 1993-2001 - 42nd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable William J. Perry - 19th
3 Feb 1994 - 23 Jan 1997

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable John H. Dalton - 67th

22 Jul 1993 - 16 Nov 1998

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Frank B. Kelso (1990–1994) - 24th

ADM James M. Boorda, USN - 25th

1 Jan 1995 - 16 May 1996

CINCPACFLT

ADM Ronald J. Zlatoper - 53rd

6 Aug 1994 - 7 Nov 1996

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM Robert J. Spane - 25th

Oct 1993 - Jan 1996

Commander, COMCARGRU 3

RADM Jay B. Yakeley / RADM Robert Nutwell

Chief of Staff, COMCARGRU 3

CAPT Peter J. Gaskin

DESRON 21

CAPT C. I. Lundquist

 

Organizational Structure. During calendar year 1995, Abraham Lincoln changed homeports from Alameda, Calif., to Bremerton, Wash. CAPT Richard J. Nibe was relieved by CAPT Robert F. Willard as Commanding Officer, and CDR Gregory R. Peairs was relieved by CDR Bruce W. Clingan as Executive Officer. ABCM (AW) James A. Shipman was Command Master Chief.

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1995 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT Richard J. Nibe - 9 Sep 1993 - 22 Aug 1995

CAPT Robert F. Willard

Executive Officer - XO

CDR Gregory R. Peairs / CDR Bruce W. Clingan

Administrative Officer

CDR Michael Loeber

Air Officer

CDR George Wood

AIMD Officer

CDR Ron Allen

Combat Systems Officer

LCDR George Karabinos

Religious Ministries Officer / Command Chaplain

CDR Robert F. Milewski

Dental Officer

CAPT Kevin Sturdy

Engineering Officer

CDR Joseph W. Heery

Deck - First Lieutenant

LCDR Craig Creighton /LCDR Robert C. Morales

Communications Officer

LT Craig Bacon / CDR Todd R. Marx

Maintenance Officer

 

Legal Officer - Command Judge Advocate

LCDR Martin J. Evans

3-M Officer

(gapped)

Navigator

CDR Edward J. Quirk

Senior Medical Officer

CAPT Louis E. Antosek

Operations Officer

CDR Rivers Cleveland / CAPT Stephen L. Drake

Reactor Officer

CDR Conway Halsall

Safety Officer

CDR Rebecca Beener / CDR Timothy J. Heath

Supply Officer

CDR Paul M. Bland

Training Officer

LCDR Kathryn A. Cullen

Weapons Officer

CDR Michael S. Whitty

Marine Security Detachment

Capt Paul J. Cyr (USMC)

Commander, Carrier Air Wing 11

CAPT Dennis M. Gillespie

Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing 11

CAPT Robert J. Taylor

 

“The following major accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 1995:

 

The Fleet Exercise and Joint Task Force Exercise in January and February was the last training period for the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, enabling all units to train together one last time, while being observed and graded, before deployment.

 

Operation Southern Watch added a new facet to the 1995 deployment -- Operation Vigilant Sentinel -- when political tensions rose in the Gulf. Abraham Lincoln’s scheduled departure from the Middle East was delayed to ensure a face-to-face carrier battle group turnover, when the Independence Battle Group arrived in early September. This delay cut out the scheduled port visits to Australia and Tasmania, but the crew was able to spend some extra days in Pearl Harbor, Hi.

 

During 1995, Abraham Lincoln and her crew spent 208 days underway at sea, and many of those days involved operations for the ship and Carrier Air Wing Eleven. In 1995, there were 10,190 total landings (including 9,439 arrested landings -- 5,511 day and 3,928 night – and 751 touch and go landings); 1,048 total helicopter sorties (621 day, 427 night); and 4,643 total carrier controlled approaches” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1995).

 

Intelligence systems conducted the first underway test and evaluation of Digital Imagery Capture and Exploitation to develop initial procedures. Abraham Lincoln became the first carrier to fully test the concept of intelligence self-sufficiency afloat in a deployed environment. All Warfare Commanders, battle group ships and embarked detachments were provided a full range of intelligence products and services.

 

The Legal Department prepared 173 wills and 3,800 powers of attorney during the year, while the Dental Department maintained a dental readiness level of 97 percent.

 

Training Department completed 23 basic indoctrination classes for E-5 and below, instructing 741 personnel in general ship's familiarization and specialized subjects, including sexual harassment, damage control, health maintenance and Navy Rights and Responsibilities. More than 200 E-6 and above completed advanced indoctrination classes. Training also procured school quotas for approximately 1,000 personnel in subjects ranging from shipboard firefighting to nuclear propulsion. More than 210 reservists completed their annual Active Duty Training aboard Lincoln, and 42 midshipmen completed their summer training cruise while Lincoln was deployed to the Arabian Gulf.

 

More than 420 ceremonies (awards, retirements, changes of command) were held in the ship's forecastle during the year. The ship's library saw a daily average visit of 192 crew members, and more than 650 Sailors and Marines participated in a three level stress management course. Deck Department used 720 gallons of paint for continued maintenance during the year and participated in eight connected replenishments, 10 fuelings at sea (receive) and one fueling to send to another ship.” (Ref. 378B-1995).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter VIII (1 January to 31 December 1995) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1995 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter VIII, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4