Chapter VI

(1 January to 31 December 1993) and

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1993 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter VI

Appendix I

 

 

Stateside Operations ranging from CompTuEx 93-9A/ITA and CQ’s and RT with the ship's air wing, CVW-11 in the SOCAL OPAREA; followed by a second stint of CQ’s and RT with CVW-11; FleetEx 93-2A/B/C in the SOCAL OPAREA with CVW-11, followed by a third stint of CQ’s and RT with CVW-11, Second “WestPac” 93’ deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her second Indian Ocean deployment, on her second Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, and in what would turn out to be Operation Restore Hope and Operation Continue Hope off the coast of Somalia to assist U.N. humanitarian operations flying patrols over the city of Mogadishu and surrounding areas, backing American ground troops, establishing a secure environment for humanitarian relief operations by providing personnel, logistical, communications, intelligence support, a quick reaction force, and other elements as required to support of the UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM II) (15 June to 15 December 1993) and Christmas Stand down.

1 January to 31 December 1993

Chapter VI

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 1993 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate Naval tactical and support aircraft at sea, maintain open sea lanes for maritime traffic, project power both at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group operations. Wherever it goes, Abraham Lincoln serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve to provide a sea-based deterrent to threats of national interest” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“The 1st of January 1993 found Abraham Lincoln in her homeport of Alameda, California, busily preparing for the ship's second major overseas deployment” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Ship-wide Safety Survey conducted by the Naval Safety Center from 4 to 5 January 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted "Back in the Saddle" Safety Standdown on 6 January 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) merged her Weapons Elevator Maintenance Division with the Weapons Support Equipment Division on 11 January 1993” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained in port at from 16 December to 12 January 1993” (Ref. 378B-1992/1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 13 January 1993, for CompTuEx 93-9A/ITA and Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with the ship's air wing, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA). NAVSEA Pre-deployment Electrical Power Survey (PEPSI) completed on the 13th” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(13 January to 12 February 1993)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet

EastPac

CVW-11

NH

13 Jan  1993

12 Feb 1993

Training Operations

31-days

CompTuEx 93-9A/ITA, Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with the ship's air wing, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter -

NH200

F-14A

VMFA-314

Black Knights - Marine Fighter Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH200

FA-18A

VFA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH300

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VFA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH400

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine &  Search and Rescue

610

SH-3H / HH-60A

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Dragonfires - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron or

Lockheed -Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted training for 30 personnel on .50 cal machine gun in preparation for "WestPac" '93 on 15 January 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Service on 15 January 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) inaugurated the Navy Super High Frequency Personal (SHF) Personal Computer transmission system for the first time on board (18 January 1993)” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Mine Warfare Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI) assist visit from 25 to 28 January 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) embarked pulled in to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, in port from 30 to 31 January 1993, conducting CompTuEx 93-9A/ITA and Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with the ship's air wing, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA) from  13 January to 30 January 1993, conducting training for 30 personnel on .50 cal machine gun in preparation for "WestPac" '93 on 15 January 1993, held D r. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Service on 15 January 1993, inaugurating the Navy Super High Frequency (SHF) Personal Computer transmission system for the first time on board (18 January 1993) and conducted Mine Warfare Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI) assist visit from 25 to 28 January 1993. NAVSEA Pre-deployment Electrical Power Survey (PEPSI) completed on the 13th” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) underwent COMNAVAIRPAC (ITA) Weapons Assessment from 1 to 4 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) underwent COMNAVAIRPAC/COMCARGRU ONE Comprehensive Communications Assessment Exercise. Scored first-ever 100% on 10 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA) from 1 to 12 February 1993. In February, Abraham Lincoln logs her 30,000th arrested landing, celebrated Black History Month with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Service on 15 January 1993 and COMNAVAIRPAC Dental Readiness Inspection; rated as #1 Dental Department of all Pacific Fleet carriers” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) activated first Navy direct at sea connectivity to Navy Communications Message Processing and Routing System (NAVCOMPARS) at 600 bits per second with Communications Area Master Station, Honolulu on 12 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 12 February 1993, conducting CompTuEx 93-9A/ITA from 13 January to 12 February 1993 and Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with the ship's air wing, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA) from 13 to 29 January and from 1 to 12 February 1993, making a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California, in port from 30 to 31 January 1993. In February, Abraham Lincoln logs her 30,000th arrested landing; celebrated Black History Month with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Service on 15 January 1993; COMNAVAIRPAC Dental Readiness Inspection; rated as #1 Dental Department of all Pacific Fleet carriers and also conducted training for 30 personnel on .50 cal machine gun in preparation for "WestPac" '93 on 15 January 1993; COMNAVAIRPAC/COMCARGRU ONE Comprehensive Communications Assessment Exercise. Scored first-ever 100% on 10 February 1993; inaugurated the Navy Super High Frequency (SHF) Personal Computer transmission system for the first time on board on 18 January 1993 and conducted Mine Warfare Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI) assist visit from 25 to 28 January 1993. NAVSEA Pre-deployment Electrical Power Survey (PEPSI) completed (13 January 1993 to 12 February 1993)” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) activated first Navy direct at sea connectivity to Navy Communications Message Processing and Routing System (NAVCOMPARS) at 600 bits per second with Communications Area Master Station, Honolulu on 12 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a Command Birthday Party/Ball at the Oakland convention Center on 16 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Pre-Deployment Combat System Review (PCSR) on 17 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Command Inspection on 22 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Shipboard Explosives Safety Inspection; 3-M Inspection from 22 to 25 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) ammunition on/offload at NAS Alameda from 22 to 26 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“Routing System (NAVCOMPARS) at 600 bits per Second with USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Communications Area Master Station, Honolulu from 13 to 28 February 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was import Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 13 February to 1 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began offering Islamic and Quaker religious services on 1 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 2 March 1993, for FleetEx 93-2A/B/C in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA) with CVW-11” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(2 to 29 March 1993)

 

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet

EastPac

CVW-11

NH

2 Mar 1993

29 Mar 1993

Training Operations

27-days

FleetEx 93-2A/B/C in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter -

NH200

F-14A

VMFA-314

Black Knights - Marine Fighter Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH200

FA-18A

VFA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH300

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VFA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH400

FA-18C / NFA-18C

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder - Jet Attack Bomber - Tanker

NH500

A-6E / KA-6D

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Sea King - Anti-submarine &  Search and Rescue

610

SH-3H / HH-60A

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Dragonfires - Air Anti-Submarine Squadron or

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking and E-2C Hawkeye

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Mine Warfare Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI) on 4 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted operations in the SOCAL OPAREA from 2 to 9 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted First Navy activation of Battle Group Information Exchange System (BGIXS) on 9 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 10 to 15 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“Supply Management Assessment for the Supply Department of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commenced by COMNAVAIRPAC on 25 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“Alameda "FOD Walkdown" volunteers from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) clean up trash along Atlantic Blvd. and Webster St. on 27 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993 – must have been on a off shore duty party or incorrect date.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted operations in the SOCAL OPAREA from 15 to 28 March 1993, during which time the Supply Management Assessment for the Supply Department was conducted by COMNAVAIRPAC. Received eight outstanding and five excellent functional area grades from 25 to 28 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 29 March 1993, participating in FleetEx 93-2A/B/C in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA) with CVW-11 from 2 to 28 March 1993, briefly interrupted for a second 1993 port visit to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 10 to 15 March 1993, conducting operations in the SOCAL OPAREA from 1 to 9 March 1993, during which time the first Navy activation of Battle Group Information Exchange System (BGIXS) occurred on 9 March 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted Mine Warfare Readiness Certification Inspection (MRCI) on 4 March 1993. The entire underway schedule in March was devoted to FleetEx in preparation for overseas deployment and included a unique exercise combining the Abraham Lincoln carrier battle group with an Amphibious Readiness Group. The Supply Management Assessment for the Supply Department was conducted by COMNAVAIRPAC. Received eight outstanding and five excellent functional area grades from 25 to 28 March 1993. Alameda "FOD Walkdown" volunteers from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) clean up trash along Atlantic Blvd. and Webster St. on 27 March 1993 (must have been on a off shore duty party or incorect date). In March the Environmental Health Survey conducted by Oakland Naval Hospital on Food Service and Retail Operations Divisions; received highest grade possible, Conducted qualification training for 80 MAA personnel on the .45 cal pistol and 12 gage shotgun, as well as 20 boat officers on the M14 rifle; recertified 33 ship's magazine sprinkler systems with zero discrepancies discovered and completely consolidated all ship calibration facilities under AIMD IM-3 Division; installed METCAL Surface Mount Technology into microminiature repair and first afloat AIMD to support FIA-18's with the 91C Operational Flight Program (OFP)” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ammunition on/offload at NAS Alameda, Ca. on 30 March 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“The Post Office transfers from Administration Department to Supply Department of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 1 April 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“The Ecumenical Easter Sunrise Service was conducted on the flight deck of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 11 April 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crewmembers volunteer to assist at the Alameda Food Bank on 13 April  1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crewmembers volunteer to assist with Alameda Special Olympics on 17 April 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crewmembers volunteers paint pews at the Open Door Mission on 26 April 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“HTFA Aaron Ahearn, claiming that USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) violation of environmental laws had driven him to his disobedience, returned from about 75 days of unauthorized absence on 27 April 1993. Ahearn’s actions generated media attention and controversy, but the resulting investigation revealed no substance to his allegations. The Navy court-martialed Ahearn and separated him from the service. Ongoing media assertions of disciplinary abuses during the incident convinced Adm. Robert J. Kelly, Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet, to personally inspect the ship’s brig shortly after Ahearn’s return. The admiral did not identify discrepancies in the design or operation of the brig” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“The US Army participated in Operation Restore Hope in Somalia from 3 December 1992 to 4 May 1993” (Ref. 515).

“On 4 May 1993, the UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM II) assumed responsibility for operations, but the transition was badly managed. Basic U.N. deficiencies in planning, C3I, and political acumen were compounded by an expanded and intrusive mandate; greatly diminished military capabilities; more aggressive Somali opposition; uncertain support from the United States; differences within the coalition; and uncertainty by the Security Council, the Secretariat, and others. Operation Continue Hope provided support of UNOSOM II to establish a secure environment for humanitarian relief operations by providing personnel, logistical, communications, intelligence support, a quick reaction force, and other elements as required. UNOSOM II became a badly flawed peace, with military forces, which came to be seen by parties to the local conflict as co-belligerents rather than impartial peacekeepers. In Somalia, peace enforcement was only an implicit element of the original U.N. mandate, which focused on peace building (disarmament, political reconciliation, and economic rehabilitation).

 

However, after a confrontation between the Somali National Alliance (SNA) and the U.N. led to the killing of twenty-five Pakistani peacekeepers, the Security Council made the operation's peace-enforcement mission explicit. It was executed by both U.N. forces and a 1,000-man U.S. rapid-reaction force under U.S. operational control, with the authority of the United Nations. There was also a 3,000-man U.S. logistics unit under U.N. operational control. A lack of decisiveness, cohesion, and command and control by the undermanned U.N. mission (half the strength of UNITAF, with some 20,000 personnel) and a series of armed clashes between U.S./U.N. forces and the SNA created a virtual state of war and undermined the effectiveness of the U.N. operation. Confusion over the dual-command relationship between the U.S. and UNOSOM II was another complicating factor, with a U.S. general officer serving as both the U.N. deputy forces commander and commander of U.S. forces” (Ref. 516).

 

“New HAZMAT trailer for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrives from COMNAVAIRPAC to receive, control, and store hazardous material for issue and reutilization on 11 May 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was import Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 29 March to 11 May 93” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 12 May 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted a Burial at Sea (deceased: SM1 Ronald Blue) on 16 May 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Air Station, Alameda, California on 17 May 1993, conducting Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with CVW-11 in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA) from 12 to 17 May 1993.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was import Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 18 May to 14 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosts dinner for 60 members of Oakland Chamber of Commerce "Leadership Oakland" Committee on 18 May 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Pre-Deployment Family workshop for spouses at DOD Housing Facility in Novato on 19 May 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“RADM Natter (Asst. Chief of Naval Personnel for Distribution) visits USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) for presentation to crew on SITE-TV on 20 May 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Pre-Deployment Family Workshop for spouses held in Alameda, Ca. on 26 May 1993. In May, the Brig inspected by CINCPACFLT, rated the best brig afloat in the Pacific Fleet” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) trained 30 ship's company personnel on the .50 cal machine gun for upcoming "WestPac" '93 mine watches from 1 to 14 May 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained at Naval Air Station, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California from 18 May through 14 June 1993 was devoted to loading stores and making final preparations for the upcoming deployment. In preparation for deployment, 30 sailors completed unique training on Browning M2 .50 caliber machine guns for mine watches from 1 to 14 June 1993. The ship's pre-overseas movement period, designed to give crewmembers a chance to take leave before departure for deployment, began when the ship returned to Alameda once again at the end of March and lasted until the ship conducted more carrier qualifications and refresher training with CVW-11 from 12-17 May” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“A second HAZMAT HAZMAT trailer for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrives from COMNAVAIRPAC to receive, control, and store hazardous material for issue and reutilization on 1 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Pre-Deployment Family Workshop for children held in Alameda, Ca. on 2 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“The Oakland City Council issues a resolution honoring the officers, crewmembers, and families of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) for distinguished service to Bay Area communities on 8 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosts luncheon and awards ceremony for the Lincoln Scholars from Manzanita Elementary School (the ship's adopted school) on 10 June 1993. In May, AIMD established Elastomeric Bearing repair capability with the addition of locally fabricated tools” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, Naval Air Station, Alameda, California 15 June 1993, embarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in Washington to NAS North Island in Southern California, with Captain James O. Ellis, Jr. as the Commanding Officer, while Rear Adm. Joseph J. Dantone, Jr., Commander Carrier Group Three, and Capt. David M. Lee, Commander Destroyer Squadron 21, broke their flags, on her second “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her second Indian Ocean deployment, on her second Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, and in what would turn out to be Operation Restore Hope and Operation Continue Hope off the coast of Somalia to assist U.N. humanitarian operations flying patrols over the city of Mogadishu and surrounding areas, backing American ground troops, establishing a secure environment for humanitarian relief operations by providing personnel, logistical, communications, intelligence support, a quick reaction force, and other elements as required to support of the UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM II), operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), fulfilling the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number, while the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command, at the beginning of Operation Southern Watch (commencing 26 August 1992, when President George H. W. Bush announced that the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until 27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing 2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). She will under go her third Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-11 (NH)

(15 June to 15 December 1993)

Hull No. /

Fleet

Foreign Water Fleet

Deployment

 Air Wing

Tail

Code

Depart

Return

Days at Sea

Fleet D. No.

USS Abraham Lincoln       (CVN-72) Pacific Fleet, 7th, 5th & Central Command       (2nd Arabian / Persian Gulf dep.)

2nd WestPac 2nd IO

1st OSW

ORH

OCH

CVW-11

NH

15 Jun 1993

15 Dec 1993

Western Pacific

UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM II)  Middle East

Iraq no Fly Zone

Persian Gulf

3rd FWFD

184-days

1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, and in what would turn out to be Operation Restore Hope and Operation Continue Hope off the coast of Somalia to assist U.N. humanitarian operations flying patrols over the city of Mogadishu and surrounding areas, backing American ground troops, establishing a secure environment for humanitarian relief operations by providing personnel, logistical, communications, intelligence support, a quick reaction force, and other elements as required to support of the UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM II).

SQUADRON

SQUADRON NICK NAME & PRIMARY

ROLE

AIRCRAFT DESIGN

NICK NAME &

PRIMARY ROLE

TAIL

CODE

Modex

AIRCRAFT

DESIGNATION

VF-213

Black Lions -

Fighter Squadron

Grumman - Tomcat -    Jet Fighter

NH100

F-14A

VMFA-314

Black Knights - Marine Fighter Attack Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH200

FA-18A

VFA-22

Fighting Redcocks -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH300

FA-18C (N)

VFA-94

Mighty Shrikes -

Strike Fighter Squadron

McDonnell-Douglas - Hornet -

Jet Strike Fighter

NH400

FA-18C (N)

VA-95

Green Lizards -

Attack Squadron

Grumman - Intruder -   Jet Attack Bomber

NH500

A-6E

VAW-117

Wallbangers -

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron

Grumman - Hawkeye - Electronics

600

E-2C

HS-6

Indians - Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

Sikorsky - Seahawk -Anti-submarine -      Search and Rescue

610

SH-60F / HH-60H

VAQ-135

Black Ravens -

Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron

Grumman - Prowler - Jet Attack Bomber - Special electronic installation

620

EA-6B

VS-29

Screaming Dragonfires -Sea Control Squadron

Lockheed - Viking -

Anti-Submarine

700

S-3B

VRC-50 Det.

Foo Dogs - Fleet

Logistics Support Squadron

Grumman - Greyhound Lockheed - Viking - Utility

(RG) 42x
(RG)  71x

C-2A
US-3A

VS = Air Anti-Submarine Squadron - 1950-1993

VMFA 314's deployment marked the first time in six years that a Marine Corps squadron had served for a full deployment aboard a West Coast aircraft carrier.

F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A Greyhound

 

“The 80 aircraft of Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) embarked aboard Lincoln during "WestPac" '93 were commanded by Captain Gabriel and his relief, Captain McArthur. CVW-11, based at Naval Air Station Miramar, California, included nine aircraft squadrons from air stations all over the West Coast. The Navy squadrons were:

 

Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE FIVE (VAQ 135), flying the Grumman EA-6B "Prowler" aircraft from their home base of NAS Whidbey Island, Washington; Attack Squadron NINE FIVE (VA 95) flying the Grumman A-6E "Intruder" aircraft also from Whidbey Island; Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron SIX (HS 6) flying the Sikorsky SH-60F and HH-6OH "Seahawk" helicopter from NAS North Island, San Diego, California; Sea Control Squadron TWO NINE (VS 29), flying the Lockheed S-3B "Viking" aircraft also from NAS North Island; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SEVEN (VAW 117), flying the Grumman E-2C Plus "Hawkeye" from their base at NAS Miramar, San Diego, California; also from NAS Miramar, Fighter Squadron TWO ONE THREE (VF 213), flying the Grumman F-14A "Tomcat;" Strike Fighter Squadron TWO TWO (VFA 22) and Strike Fighter Squadron NINE FOUR (VFA 94), flying the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 "Hornet" aircraft, out of NAS Lemoore, California. Also flying the F/A-18 "Hornet," Marine Fighter Attack Squadron THREE ONE FOUR (VMFA 314), home based at MCAS El Toro, California. VMFA 314's deployment marked the first time in six years that a Marine Corps squadron had served for a full deployment aboard a West Coast aircraft carrier” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“Over 8,000 sailors and marines in seven ships and a sub of the group, comprising USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), guided missile cruisers USS Fox (CG-33) and USS Princeton (CG-59), guided missile frigate USS Ingraham (FFG-61), were both based out of Long Beach, California; attack submarine Pasadena (SSN-752), USS Mount Hood, combat store ship USS White Plains (AFS-4) and oiler USS Willamette (AO-180) as part of her task force, deploying for the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf. Rear Adm. Joseph J. Dantone, Jr., Commander Carrier Group Three, and Capt. David M. Lee, Commander Destroyer Squadron 21, broke their flags from Abraham Lincoln. Rear Adm. Dantone, who also commanded the carrier battle group, returned to a familiar ship, as he had taken Abraham Lincoln to sea as her first commanding officer. Also embarked in Abraham Lincoln was the staff of Destroyer Squadron TWO ONE (DESRON 21), commanded by Captain David M. Lee. To summarize the other ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, The cruiser USS Fox (CG-33) was based out of San Diego. USS Willamette (AO-180), was based out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; the ammunition ship USS Mount Hood (AE-29), was homeported in Concord, California; the combat stores ship USS White Plains (AFS-4) was based in Guam; and the attack submarine USS Pasadena (SSN-752) was homeported in San Diego. The F/A-18A Hornets of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA)-314 also embarked on board. In addition, the ship carried AIM-120A Advanced Medium-Range, Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAMs) for the first time during a deployment” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) performed a burial at sea for SM1 Ronald Blue on 16 May 1993 during an at sea period operating out of Naval Air Station, Alameda, California The same day, fueling at sea with USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO-199) (receive) was conducted on 16 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USS Princeton (CG-59) and USS Ingraham (FFG-61) (deliver) on 22 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crossed the International Dateline; this date is skipped for Abraham Lincoln on 25 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USS Princeton (CG-59) (deliver) on 26 June 1993 and ammunition on/offload with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) and conducted Safety Standdown on 27 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993). 

 

“En route to Hong Kong from 15 to 28 June 1993, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted frst major Underway Replenishment (UNREP) for stores during deployment. Receive 184 pallets of provisions and general stores from USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 28 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

RADM Bennitt (CTF-70) visits USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 29 June 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

VADM Wright (COMSEVENTHFLT) visits USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 1 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USNS Andrew J. Higgins (TAO-190) (receive) on 2 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

Following a short period of fly-on and carrier qualifications with CVW-11 off the coast of Southern California, Abraham Lincoln transited the Pacific from 15 June to 4 July 1993, during which time maintainers established plastic welding capabilities to repair A-6E Intruder bombardier radar scope hoods, and inflated first time support of AAS-38A laser transceiver sets. COMNAVAIRPAC Aviation Maintenance Management Team inspectors judge the powerplant shop as "the best jet shop seen ashore or afloat” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong, along with several other ships of the Battle Group on 5 July 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Conduct "Sunset Review" and host a reception for 450 foreign and American dignitaries while inport Hong Kong on 6 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sponsored Project Handclasp efforts in Hong Kong: painted/cleaned Mother's Choice Home for unwed mothers, the Hong Kong Sea School, and Hong Kong Society for the Protection of Children; delivered medical & hygienic supplies to Hang Fook Camp Young Adult Drug Rehab Center from 6 to 8 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong on 9 July 1993, visiting Hong Kong from the 5th, she introduced a bar code system on ID cards to track numbers of sailors leaving the ship, the first time that she did so during a deployment. Conducted "Sunset Review" and host a reception for 450 foreign and American dignitaries while inport Hong Kong on 6 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sponsored Project Handclasp efforts in Hong Kong: painted/cleaned Mother's Choice Home for unwed mothers, the Hong Kong Sea School, and Hong Kong Society for the Protection of Children; delivered medical & hygienic supplies to Hang Fook Camp Young Adult Drug Rehab Center from 6 to 8 July 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) steamed through the South China Sea to the Strait of Malacca beginning on the 10th, conducting a turnover with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) Battle Group in NAVCENT on 11 July 1993. Crewmembers also activated the Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System from the ship to Maj. Gen. George B. Harrison, USAF, Commander Air Warfare Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, who conferred with planners concerning operations as the former Commander Joint Task Force – Southwest Asia, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) tether in NAVCENT and turnover with Nimitz Battle Group on 11 July 1993, during which time the first successful activation of Joint Deployable intelligence Support System (JDISS) from and aircraft carrier to Commander Joint Task Force, Southwest Asia in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and conducted fueling at sea with USNS Pecos (TAO-197) (receive)” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USNS Pecos (TAO-197) (receive) on 11 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ammunition on/offload with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) on 13 July 1993 and Indonesian distinguished visitors embark on 14 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the South China Sea transit from 10 to 15 July 1993, commencing her eastbound transit of the Strait of Malacca the same day” (Ref. 378A).

 

“Malaysian distinguished visitors embark USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 16 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) passed through the Strait of Malacca eastbound from 15 to 17 July 1993. Malaysian distinguished visitors embark on 16 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993.

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) entered the Indian Ocean on 18 July 1993, providing via vertical replenishment 17 pallets of chill and dry provisions to USS Princeton (CG-59) and USS Ingraham (FFG-61) and conducted fueling at sea with USS Princeton (CG-59) (deliver) the same day” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted CBR Drill on 19 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

F-14 from squadron VF-213 crashes on the flight deck of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) while ship underway in Indian Ocean on 20 July 1993. Aircraft skids across flight deck, with majority of plane ending up in the water. Crash is fatal to the pilot; the Radar Intercept Officer is rescued with relatively minor injuries. Damage to the ship is minimal” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

Aircraft No. 111, an F-14 from VF-213, Lt. Matthew T. Claar and Lt. Dean A. Fuller, crashed on the flight deck as the ship sailed in the Indian Ocean on 20 July 1993. The Tomcat skidded across the deck and most of the aircraft ended up in the water. The accident killed Lt. Claar, the pilot, but sailors rescued Lt. Fuller, the Radar Intercept Officer, who had suffered minor injuries in the mishap. Abraham Lincoln sustained minimal damage but did not report additional casualties” (Ref. 378A).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) inchoped the Central Command (CentCom or CENTCOM) area of responsibility on 22 July 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) (receive) on 23 July 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made her North Arabian Sea transit from 23 to 24 July 1993 to the Persian Gulf, conducting fueling at sea with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) (receive) on 23 July 1993, steaming via the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz on the 24th. Abraham Lincoln Battle Group entered the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 25 July 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made her North Arabian/Persian Gulf transit from 24 to 26 July 1993, anchoring Bahrain, Dubai, U.A.E.on 26 July 1993. During the postwar period, Air Wing ELEVEN established bonds of friendship and military interoperability with the Gulf Coast nations and multinational coalitions which will stabilize this critical region and benefit the United States interest for years to come” (Ref. 444, 72, 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) (receive) on 3 August 1993 and underway replenishment with USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 4 August 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) (receive) on 8 August 1993 and MGEN George B. Harrison (CJTF-SWA) visits on 9 August 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“Prince Saud bin Naif of Saudi Arabia visits USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 11 August 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in Operation Southern Watch in the North Arabian/Persian Gulf from 26 July to 13 August 1993. The United Nations established two no-fly zones over Iraq after Gulf I. The southern zone extended along the 32nd parallel, in August 1992. The allies, after the Iraqis renewed attacks against Shi later extended the southern zone from the 32nd to 33rd parallels to enhance tactical options. Two days before she came about, Saudi Prince Saud bin Naif visited the ship (11 August). Resurf aced over 8,000 square feet on the flight deck during Arabian/Persian Gulf operations” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Bello Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, U.A.E. from 14 to 19 August 1993. Meanwhile, Tomcats from VF-213 flew in Iron Agate, dissimilar air combat maneuvering exercises with Mirage 2000s from that country between 14 to 19 August 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USS Willamette (AO-180) on 25 August 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted underway replenishment with USS White Plains (AFS-4) and BGEN John B. Hall (Commander, 4404th Composite Wing) visits ship. In August the crew reesurfaced over 8,000 square feet on the flight deck during Arabian Gulf operations” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

MGEN William A. Studer (J-3, USCENTCOM) visits USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 4 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USS Willamette (AO-180) on 6 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“Two A-6 aircraft from squadron VA-95 are lost after a mid-air collision over the Northern Arabian Gulf while returning to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) from a routine patrol mission on 8 September 1993. All four crewmembers are rescued from the waters of the Gulf in good condition” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

Aircraft flying from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) patrolled the southern no-fly zone for Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 20 August to 9 September 1993. Brig. Gen. John B. Hall, USAF, Commander, 4404th Composite Wing, visited the carrier (30 August). Two Intruders from VA-95 (BuNos 161682 and 164385) collided in mid-air over the northern Arabian Gulf while returning to the ship, the day before she came about (8 September). Rescuers pulled all four crewmembers from the water in good condition. Captain Richard J. Nibe assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 9 September 1993, relieving Captain James O. Ellis, Jr., fourth Commanding Officer, serving from 16 June 1991 to 9 September 1993. In the same ceremony, Captain James D. McArthur, Jr., relieved Captain Daniel W. Gabriel as Commander, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a port call at Bello Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, U.A.E. from 10 to 15 September 1993. US0 comedy show held on the pier while at Jebel Ali on 10 September 1993 and sponsored Project Handclasp that involved painting inside of the Asseef School for Handicapped Children on 12 September 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

RADM Robert Moore (Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command) and RADM Vance Fry (Commander Naval Reserve Cargo Handling Battalions) visit USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 18 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) on 20 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) activated first fleet support broadcast via UHF Satellite to support Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, and Indian Ocean ships during two week outage at Communications Station, Guam and conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) on 20 September 1993, followed by a Safety Standdown on 21 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Safety Standdown on 25 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted underway replenishment with USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 27 September 1993 and conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) on 28 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) coordinated and promulgated all communications plans and support for surge operations off Somalia and Ambassador Edward Gnehm (U.S. ambassador to Kuwait) plus 22 other U.S. embassy personnel and Kuwaiti guests visit USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 29 September 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) first-ever transmission of photos via SHF PC information terminal; photos transmitted to CONUS for use at Joint Chiefs of Staff briefing on 30 September 1993 and MGEN Ronald Spivey (CJTF-SWA) visits from 30 September to 1 October 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) activated second 600 bits per second SHF NAVCOMPARS circuit to support USS America Battle Group and USS New Orleans (LPH-11) and USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) ARG'S off Somalia on 4 October 1993. The same day, fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) took place” (Ref. 378B-1993).


“BGEN Saber al-Suwaidan (Commander, Kuwaiti air force) visits
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 5 October 1993 and Abraham Lincoln provided interface and coordination with Defense Communications Station, Landstuhl, Germany, for activation of SHF terminations aboard USS New Orleans (LPH-11) and USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) on 6 October 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

Aircraft operating from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) again patrolled the southern no-fly zone for Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 16 September to 7 October 1993. The communications station at Guam suffered a two-week outage and the crew activated their first fleet support broadcast via UHF satellite to support ships and submarines sailing in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, Indian Ocean and Red Sea (beginning on 20 September). In addition, tasking instructed the ship to prepare for contingencies concerning the crisis in Somalia. Severe draught destroyed local crops in that African country, and famine resulted when marauding gangs seized food and blocked distribution of humanitarian supplies.

 

During this period Abraham Lincoln also sent her first transmission of photos via an SHF personal computer information terminal, which went to the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the United States for a briefing. In addition, the ship logged her 40,000th trap during the busy flight operations at that time in October. Tragedy struck; however, when the Army’s Task Force Ranger became embroiled in a fierce firefight against clansmen in Mogadishu, the Somali capital and principal port, overnight (3-4 October).

 

The Somalis killed 18 Americans and wounded 84 more during the bloody battle, and claimed that they lost 312 dead and 814 wounded. To assist shipmates as they supported troops struggling ashore, crewmembers activated a 600 bit per second SHF naval automated message processing system for the USS America (CV-66) Carrier Battle Group, and amphibious forces led by amphibious assault ships USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) and USS New Orleans (LPH-11), the next day (4 October). Meanwhile, operations continued in the Arabian Gulf and Brig. Gen. Saber al-Suwaidan, the commander of the Kuwaiti Air Force, visited the ship (5 October). The Navy ordered Abraham Lincoln to Somali waters two days later. Most of the other vessels in her group, however, remained in the Gulf to support Southern Watch” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN flew thousands of missions into Iraq in support of Operation Southern Watch. Upon departure from the Gulf, it conducted a 24-hour notice high speed transit to the coast of Somalia and provided air support to the United Nations during Operation Restore Hope and Operation Continue Hope” (Ref. 444, 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“Ongoing relief efforts to help the people of Somalia culminated in Operation Restore Hope, United Nations directed humanitarian aid toward the embattled Somalis. On the 7th of October 1992, Abraham Lincoln was ordered to the coast of Somalia in support of United Nations efforts in that country and the associated U. S. humanitarian mission known as Operation Continue Hope. Crewmembers coordinated and promulgated communications plans and support for surge operations in Somali waters” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) made a high-speed transit through the Strait of Hormuz eastbound on 8 October 1992 and steamed through the Gulf of Oman and North Arabian Sea, en route to the Indian Ocean, destination Mogadishu, Somalia. Meanwhile, most of the other ships in the Battle Group remained in the Arabian Gulf to continue support of Operation Southern Watch. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) (receive) the same day” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transited the Strait of Hormuz eastbound on 8 October 1992 and steamed through the Gulf of Oman and North Arabian Sea through to the Indian Ocean from 8 to 11 October 1993, arriving off the coast of Mogadishu, Somalia on 12 October 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“To reinforce international troops attempting to re-establish order ashore, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) disembarked marines of her detachment to provide security on 15 October 1993 and conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USS Willamette (AO-180) on 16 October 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted underway replenishment with USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 18 October 1993 and Brig. Gen. Norman E. Williams, USA, Commander, United Nations Logistics Force, visited on 19 October 1993” (Ref. 378A).

 

“The demanding pace of the relief effort forced USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crew to accomplish their largest underway replenishment UNREP of the deployment when they exchanged 554 pallets of provisions, general and retrograde stores with USS White Plains (AFS-4) in Somali waters on 21 October 1993. The following day Abraham Lincoln crossed the equator, which enabled ‘pollywogs’ to become ‘shellbacks’ (22 October). To reinforce international troops attempting to re-establish order ashore, Abraham Lincoln disembarked marines of her detachment to provide security in Somalia as security force from 15 to 22 October 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“Turkish Lt. Gen. Cevik Bir, who commanded United Nations forces in Somalia, visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 24 October 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted underway replenishment with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) and MGEN Montgomery (Commander, U.S. forces in Somalia) visits ship on 26 October 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USS Willamette (AO-180) on 27 October 1993 and MGEN Montgomery (Commander, U.S. forces in Somalia) visits a second time the same day. Abraham Lincoln conducted ammunition off load with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) on 28 October 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Steel Beach picnic on flight deck. Served over 5,500 portions of BBQ ribs, chicken and steaks on 31 October 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“Additional distinguished visitors arrived on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on several subsequent occasions, among them Pakistani Brigadier Generals Ikram ul Hassan and Saulat Abaas of the Pakistani army on 31 October 1993, conducting a Steel Beach picnic on flight deck the same day. Served over 5,500 portions of BBQ ribs, chicken and steaks on 31 October 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with USS Ingraham (FFG-61) (deliver) on 1 November 1993” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted underway replenishment with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) and BGEN Pace (Deputy CJTF-Somalia) visits ship on 2 November 1993 and conducted Vertical Replenishment COMPEX (MOB-S-8-SF) during last UNREP with USS White Plains (CVE-66). Scored 100% on 3 November 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) sailed in Somali waters, off the coast of Mogadishu, Somalia, participating directly in Operation Restore Hope from 12 October to 3 November 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted Vertical Replenishment COMPEX (MOB-S-8-SF) during last UNREP with USS White Plains (CVE-66). Scored 100% on 3 November 1993, operating off the coast of Mogadishu, Somalia until the 4th of November 1993, when the ship headed east for a five-day port visit to Perth, Australia, scheduled in mid-November, along with USS Pasadena (SSN-752), USS Fox (CG-33) and USS Willamette (AO-180). USS Princeton (CG-59) also made Western Australia port calls in Bunbury. At this same time, USS Ingraham (FFG-61) visited Singapore and USS Mount Hood (AE-29) visited Thailand” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USS Princeton (CG-59) (deliver) on 6 November 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is awarded Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal on 8 November 1993 and conducted fueling at sea with USS Princeton (CG-59) (deliver) on 9 November 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Marine Detachment and VMFA-314 celebrate the 218th Marine Corps Birthday with a cake cutting ceremony on 10 November 1993. Rear Admiral Joseph J. Dantone, Jr., Commander Carrier Group THREE, is guest of honor. Abraham Lincoln also conducted underway replenishment with USS Mars (AFS-1) on 10 November 1993, transiting the Indian Ocean to Perth, Australia from 4 to 11 November 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Perth, Australia on 16 November 1993, which most crewmembers celebrated as their favorite of the deployment, due to the traditionally warm reception which the Australians gave them from 12 to 16 November 1993. USS Pasadena (SSN-752), USS Fox (CG-33) and USS Willamette (AO-180). USS Princeton (CG-59) also made Western Australia port calls in Bunbury. At this same time, USS Ingraham (FFG-61) visited Singapore and USS Mount Hood (AE-29) visited Thailand. After this well-deserved rest from two months at sea, Abraham Lincoln steamed northeast to reunite with the Battle Group and pay a visit to Hawaii” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) transited from Perth to Lombok Straits from 17 to 20 November 1993, commencing a northbound passage through Selat Lombok (Lombok Strait) on 20 November 1993 en route to the Celebes Sea” (Ref. 378A). 

 

“After sailing across the Celebes Sea from 21 to 22 November 1993, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) crossed the equator for the second time of the deployment on 21 November 1993. Crossing the Line ceremony Held to convert all "pollywogs" to "shellbacks," transiting the Balabac and Surigao Straits on 22 November 1993 and tethered out NAVCENT on 22 November 1993 (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“The crew of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) are served Thanksgiving meal underway on 25 November 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted ammunition offload with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) on 27 November 1993 and passed from the Seventh to Third Fleets AOR on 28 November 1993. The crew also performed a burial at sea for PR1 Stanley Kraft” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

“Afloat Training Group (ATG) embarks USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to verify ship's ability to train effectively on 29 November 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“On 1 December 1993, the Secretary of the Navy, John H. Dalton announced that pending notification of Congress and the repeal of the Combat Exclusion Law (Section 6015, Title 10, U.S. code), the Navy would begin to open all classes of ships to women as crew-members, as well as several enlisted ratings hitherto denied to them, including Aviation Boatswain’s Mate-Launch and Recovery Equipment (ABE), Gunner’s Mate (GM), Gunner’s Mate-Guns (GMG), Gunner’s Mate-Missiles (GMM) and Sonar Technician-Surface (STG). Planners scheduled female sailors to begin reporting to eight ships, including USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), in June 1994, and to have 400 or 500 women on board the two carriers by the end of that year. More than 200 commissioned and enlisted female sailors actually reported on board Abraham Lincoln by the New Year” (Ref. 378A & 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) recrossed the International Date Line eastbound, which gave people on board the unique experience of repeating the day on 2 December 1993 and conducted a ammunition offload with USS Mauna Kea (AE-22) (the 2nd to 3rd Dec.; two days only)” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 8 December 1993, visiting 5 to 8 December 1993. While in Hawaii, the ship participated in several events commemorating Pearl Harbor Day and embarked over 700 friends and family members of the crew for a Tiger Cruise back to Alameda. Conducted Pearl Harbor Day "Sunset Review" and host reception for 500 guests (mainly Tigers). Lieutenant General Stackpole, Commander, Marine Forces Pacific (COMMARFORPAC) is senior guest for ceremony on 7 December 1993.” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted fueling at sea with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) (Tiger Cruise demo) on 9 December 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) held a Driving Safety Standdown with California Highway Patrol officer on 13 December 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) conducted Tiger Cruise while in transit from Pearl Harbor to Alameda, Ca. from 8 to 14 December 1993. Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN flew-off USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 14 December 1993” (Ref. 378B-1993).

 

“On 15 December 1993, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Naval Air Station, Alameda, disembarking CVW-11 operating out of her assigned home base in Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in Washington to NAS North Island in Southern California Lemoore, with Captain Richard J. Nibe as Commanding Officer, relieving Captain James O. Ellis, Jr., fourth Commanding Officer, seving from 16 June 1991 to 9 September 1993, while Rear Adm. Joseph J. Dantone, Jr., Commander Carrier Group Three, and Capt. David M. Lee, Commander Destroyer Squadron 21,were embarked, ending her second “WestPac” deployment operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet, her second Indian Ocean, on her second Arabian/Persian Gulf deployment in support of 1st Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, and in what would turn out to be Operation Restore Hope and Operation Continue Hope off the coast of Somalia to assist U.N. humanitarian operations flying patrols over the city of Mogadishu and surrounding areas, backing American ground troops, establishing a secure environment for humanitarian relief operations by providing personnel, logistical, communications, intelligence support, a quick reaction force, and other elements as required to support of the UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM II), operating under operational control of the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT), an Echelon II command, that supports all naval operations in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR), fulfilling the roles of both a naval component command and as the fleet command, but it operated without a traditionally understood structure or number, while the Commander, Seventh Fleet served as naval component commander for Central Command, at the beginning of Operation Southern Watch. Return to Alameda from "WestPac" 93; VADM Spane (COMNAVAIRPAC) boarded Abraham Lincoln during morning transit; Horne coming reception for approximately 60 officers and VIP guests held in Wardroom 3. Abraham Lincoln performed a burial at sea for SM1 Ronald Blue on 16 May 1993 during an at sea period operating out of Naval Air Station, Alameda, California. The same day, fueling at sea with USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO-199) (receive) was conducted on 16 June 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with USS Princeton (CG-59) and USS Ingraham (FFG-61) (deliver) on 22 June 1993. Abraham Lincoln crossed the International Dateline; this date is skipped for Abraham Lincoln on 25 June 1993, conducting fueling at sea with USS Princeton (CG-59) (deliver) on 26 June 1993 and ammunition on/offload with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) and conducted Safety Standdown on 27 June 1993. En route to Hong Kong from 15 to 28 June 1993, Abraham Lincoln conducted frst major Underway Replenishment (UNREP) for stores during deployment. Receive 184 pallets of provisions and general stores from USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 28 June 1993. USNS Andrew J. Higgins (TAO-190) (receive) on 2 July 1993. Following a short period of fly-on and carrier qualifications with CVW-11 off the coast of Southern California, Abraham Lincoln transited the Pacific from 15 June to 4 July 1993, during which time maintainers established plastic welding capabilities to repair A-6E Intruder bombardier radar scope hoods, and inflated first time support of AAS-38A laser transceiver sets. COMNAVAIRPAC Aviation Maintenance Management Team inspectors judge the powerplant shop as "the best jet shop seen ashore or afloat. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong, along with several other ships of the Battle Group on 5 July 1993. Abraham Lincoln Conduct "Sunset Review" and host a reception for 450 foreign and American dignitaries while inport Hong Kong on 6 July 1993. Abraham Lincoln sponsored Project Handclasp efforts in Hong Kong: painted/cleaned Mother's Choice Home for unwed mothers, the Hong Kong Sea School, and Hong Kong Society for the Protection of Children; delivered medical & hygienic supplies to Hang Fook Camp Young Adult Drug Rehab Center from 6 to 8 July 1993. Abraham Lincoln departed Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong on 9 July 1993, visiting Hong Kong from the 5th, she introduced a bar code system on ID cards to track numbers of sailors leaving the ship, the first time that she did so during a deployment. Conducted "Sunset Review" and host a reception for 450 foreign and American dignitaries while inport Hong Kong on 6 July 1993. Abraham Lincoln sponsored Project Handclasp efforts in Hong Kong: painted/cleaned Mother's Choice Home for unwed mothers, the Hong Kong Sea School, and Hong Kong Society for the Protection of Children; delivered medical & hygienic supplies to Hang Fook Camp Young Adult Drug Rehab Center from 6 to 8 July 1993. Abraham Lincoln steamed through the South China Sea to the Strait of Malacca beginning on the 10th, conducting a turnover with USS Nimitz (CVN-68) Battle Group in NAVCENT on 11 July 1993. Crewmembers also activated the Joint Deployable Intelligence Support System from the ship to Maj. Gen. George B. Harrison, USAF, Commander Air Warfare Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, who conferred with planners concerning operations as the former Commander Joint Task Force – Southwest Asia, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Abraham Lincoln tether in NAVCENT and turnover with Nimitz Battle Group on 11 July 1993, during which time the first successful activation of Joint Deployable intelligence Support System (JDISS) from and aircraft carrier to Commander Joint Task Force, Southwest Asia in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and conducted fueling at sea with USNS Pecos (TAO-197) (receive). Abraham Lincoln conducted ammunition on/offload with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) on 13 July 1993 and Indonesian distinguished visitors embark on 14 July 1993, was underway in the South China Sea from 10 to 15 July 1993, commencing her eastbound transit of the Strait of Malacca the same day. Malaysian distinguished visitors embark Abraham Lincoln on 16 July 1993, passing through the Strait of Malacca eastbound from 15 to 17 July 1993. Malaysian distinguished visitors embark on 16 July 1993. Abraham Lincoln entered the Indian Ocean on 18 July 1993, providing via vertical replenishment 17 pallets of chill and dry provisions to USS Princeton (CG-59) and USS Ingraham (FFG-61) and conducted fueling at sea with Princeton (deliver) the same day, followed by CBR Drill on 19 July 1993. F-14 from squadron VF-213 crashes on the flight deck of U Abraham Lincoln while ship underway in Indian Ocean on 20 July 1993. Aircraft skids across flight deck, with majority of plane ending up in the water. Crash is fatal to the pilot; the Radar Intercept Officer is rescued with relatively minor injuries. Damage to the ship is minimal. Aircraft No. 111, an F-14 from VF-213, Lt. Matthew T. Claar and Lt. Dean A. Fuller, crashed on the flight deck as the ship sailed in the Indian Ocean on 20 July 1993. The Tomcat skidded across the deck and most of the aircraft ended up in the water. The accident killed Lt. Claar, the pilot, but sailors rescued Lt. Fuller, the Radar Intercept Officer, who had suffered minor injuries in the mishap. Abraham Lincoln sustained minimal damage but did not report additional casualties. Abraham Lincoln inchoped the Central Command (CentCom or CENTCOM) area of responsibility on 22 July 1993, steaming through the Indian Ocean from 18 to 23 July 1993, entering the North Arabian Sea on the 23rd, conducting fueling at sea with USNS Walter S. Diehl (TAO-193) (receive) on 23 July 1993. Abraham Lincoln made her North Arabian Sea transit from 23 to 24 July 1993 to the Persian Gulf, conducting fueling at sea with Walter S. Diehl (receive) on 23 July 1993, steaming via the Gulf of Oman and Strait of Hormuz on the 24th. Abraham Lincoln Battle Group entered the Arabian/Persian Gulf on 25 July 1993 and made her North Arabian/Persian Gulf transit from 24 to 26 July 1993, anchoring at Bahrain, Dubai, U.A.E. on 26 July 1993. During the postwar period, Air Wing ELEVEN established bonds of friendship and military interoperability with the Gulf Coast nations and multinational coalitions which will stabilize this critical region and benefit the United States interest for years to come. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with Walter S. Diehl (receive) on 3 August 1993, conducted underway replenishment with USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 4 August 1993, conducted fueling at sea with Walter S. Diehl (receive) on 8 August 1993 and MGEN George B. Harrison (CJTF-SWA) visits on 9 August 1993. Prince Saud bin Naif of Saudi Arabia visits Abraham Lincoln on 11 August 1993. Abraham Lincoln participated in Operation Southern Watch in the North Arabian/Persian Gulf from 26 July to 13 August 1993. The United Nations established two no-fly zones over Iraq after Gulf I. The southern zone extended along the 32nd parallel, in August 1992. The allies, after the Iraqis renewed attacks against Shi later extended the southern zone from the 32nd to 33rd parallels to enhance tactical options. Two days before she came about, Saudi Prince Saud bin Naif visited the ship (11 August). Resurf aced over 8,000 square feet on the flight deck during Arabian/Persian Gulf operations. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, U.A.E. from 14 to 19 August 1993. Meanwhile, Tomcats from VF-213 flew in Iron Agate, dissimilar air combat maneuvering exercises with Mirage 2000s from that country between 14 to 19 August 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with USS Willamette (AO-180) on 25 August 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted underway replenishment with White Plains and BGEN John B. Hall (Commander, 4404th Composite Wing) visits ship. In August the crew resurfaced over 8,000 square feet on the flight deck during Arabian Gulf operations. MGEN William A. Studer (J-3, USCENTCOM) visits Abraham Lincoln on 4 September 1993, conducting fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with Willamette on 6 September 1993. Two A-6 aircraft from squadron VA-95 are lost after a mid-air collision over the Northern Arabian Gulf while returning to Abraham Lincoln from a routine patrol mission on 8 September 1993. All four crewmembers are rescued from the waters of the Gulf in good condition. Aircraft flying from Abraham Lincoln patrolled the southern no-fly zone for Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 20 August to 9 September 1993. Brig. Gen. John B. Hall, USAF, Commander, 4404th Composite Wing, visited the carrier (30 August). Two Intruders from VA-95 (BuNos 161682 and 164385) collided in mid-air over the northern Arabian Gulf while returning to the ship, the day before she came about (8 September). Rescuers pulled all four crewmembers from the water in good condition. Captain Richard J. Nibe assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard Abraham Lincoln on 9 September 1993, relieving Captain James O. Ellis, Jr., fourth Commanding Officer, serving from 16 June 1991 to 9 September 1993. In the same ceremony, Captain James D. McArthur, Jr., relieved Captain Daniel W. Gabriel as Commander, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN. Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, U.A.E. from 10 to 15 September 1993. US0 comedy show held on the pier while at Jebel Ali on 10 September 199 and sponsored Project Handclasp that involved painting inside of the Asseef School for Handicapped Children on 12 September 1993. RADM Robert Moore (Commander, Naval Supply Systems Command) and RADM Vance Fry (Commander Naval Reserve Cargo Handling Battalions) visit Abraham Lincoln on 18 September 1993 and conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with Walter S. Diehl on 20 September 1993. Abraham Lincoln activated first fleet support broadcast via UHF Satellite to support Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, and Indian Ocean ships during two week outage at Communications Station, Guam and conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with Walter S. Diehl on 20 September 1993, followed by a Safety Standdown on 21 September 1993 and on 25 September 1993, conducting underway replenishment with White Plains on 27 September 1993 and conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with Walter S. Diehl on 28 September 1993. Abraham Lincoln coordinated and promulgated all communications plans and support for surge operations off Somalia and Ambassador Edward Gnehm (U.S. ambassador to Kuwait) plus 22 other U.S. embassy personnel and Kuwaiti guests visit Abraham Lincoln on 29 September 1993 and conducted first-ever transmission of photos via SHF PC information terminal; photos transmitted to CONUS for use at Joint Chiefs of Staff briefing on 30 September 1993 and MGEN Ronald Spivey (CJTF-SWA) visits from 30 September to 1 October 1993. Abraham Lincoln activated second 600 bits per second SHF NAVCOMPARS circuit to support USS America Battle Group and USS New Orleans (LPH-11) and USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) ARG'S off Somalia on 4 October 1993. The same day, fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with Walter S. Diehl took place. BGEN Saber al-Suwaidan (Commander, Kuwaiti air force) visits Abraham Lincoln on 5 October 1993 and Abraham Lincoln provided interface and coordination with Defense Communications Station, Landstuhl, Germany, for activation of SHF terminations aboard USS New Orleans (LPH-11) and Guadalcanal on 6 October 1993. Aircraft operating from Abraham Lincoln again patrolled the southern no-fly zone for Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian/Persian Gulf from 16 September to 7 October 1993. The communications station at Guam suffered a two-week outage and the crew activated their first fleet support broadcast via UHF satellite to support ships and submarines sailing in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, Indian Ocean and Red Sea (beginning on 20 September). In addition, tasking instructed the ship to prepare for contingencies concerning the crisis in Somalia. Severe draught destroyed local crops in that African country, and famine resulted when marauding gangs seized food and blocked distribution of humanitarian supplies. During this period Abraham Lincoln also sent her first transmission of photos via an SHF personal computer information terminal, which went to the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the United States for a briefing. In addition, the ship logged her 40,000th trap during the busy flight operations at that time in October. Tragedy struck; however, when the Army’s Task Force Ranger became embroiled in a fierce firefight against clansmen in Mogadishu, the Somali capital and principal port, overnight (3-4 October). The Somalis killed 18 Americans and wounded 84 more during the bloody battle, and claimed that they lost 312 dead and 814 wounded. To assist shipmates as they supported troops struggling ashore, crewmembers activated a 600 bit per second SHF naval automated message processing system for the USS America (CV-66) Carrier Battle Group, and amphibious forces led by amphibious assault ships Guadalcanal and New Orleans, the next day (4 October). Meanwhile, operations continued in the Arabian Gulf and Brig. Gen. Saber al-Suwaidan, the commander of the Kuwaiti Air Force, visited the ship (5 October). The Navy ordered Abraham Lincoln to Somali waters two days later. Most of the other vessels in her group, however, remained in the Gulf to support Southern Watch. Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN flew thousands of missions into Iraq in support of Operation Southern Watch. Upon departure from the Gulf, it conducted a 24-hour notice high speed transit to the coast of Somalia and provided air support to the United Nations during Operation Restore Hope and Operation Continue Hope. Ongoing relief efforts to help the people of Somalia culminated in Operation Restore Hope, United Nations directed humanitarian aid toward the embattled Somalis. On the 7th of October 1992, Abraham Lincoln was ordered to the coast of Somalia in support of United Nations efforts in that country and the associated U. S. humanitarian mission known as Operation Continue Hope. Crewmembers coordinated and promulgated communications plans and support for surge operations in Somali waters. Abraham Lincoln made a high-speed transit through the Strait of Hormuz eastbound on 8 October 1992 and steamed through the Gulf of Oman and North Arabian Sea, en route to the Indian Ocean, destination Mogadishu, Somalia. Meanwhile, most of the other ships in the Battle Group remained in the Arabian Gulf to continue support of Operation Southern Watch. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with Walter S. Diehl (receive) the same day. Abraham Lincoln transited the Strait of Hormuz eastbound on 8 October 1992 and steamed through the Gulf of Oman and North Arabian Sea through to the Indian Ocean from 8 to 11 October 1993, arriving off the coast of Mogadishu, Somalia on 12 October 1993. To reinforce international troops attempting to re-establish order ashore, Abraham Lincoln disembarked marines of her detachment to provide security on 15 October 1993 and conducted fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with Willamette on 16 October 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted underway replenishment with USS White Plains (AFS-4) on 18 October 1993 and Brig. Gen. Norman E. Williams, USA, Commander, United Nations Logistics Force, visited on 19 October 1993. The demanding pace of the relief effort forced Abraham Lincoln crew to accomplish their largest underway replenishment UNREP of the deployment when they exchanged 554 pallets of provisions, general and retrograde stores with White Plains in Somali waters on 21 October 1993. The following day Abraham Lincoln crossed the equator, which enabled ‘pollywogs’ to become ‘shellbacks’ (22 October). To reinforce international troops attempting to re-establish order ashore, Abraham Lincoln disembarked marines of her detachment to provide security in Somalia as security force from 15 to 22 October 1993. Turkish Lt. Gen. Cevik Bir, who commanded United Nations forces in Somalia, visited Abraham Lincoln on 24 October 1993 and conducted underway replenishment with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) and MGEN Montgomery (Commander, U.S. forces in Somalia) visits ship on 26 October 1993, followed by a fueling at sea (receive) and underway replenishment with Willamette on 27 October 1993 and MGEN Montgomery (Commander, U.S. forces in Somalia) visits a second time the same day. Abraham Lincoln conducted ammunition off load with Mount Hood on 28 October 1993 before conducting a Steel Beach picnic on flight deck. Served over 5,500 portions of BBQ ribs, chicken and steaks on 31 October 1993. Additional distinguished visitors arrived on board Abraham Lincoln on several subsequent occasions, among them Pakistani Brigadier Generals Ikram ul Hassan and Saulat Abaas of the Pakistani army on 31 October 1993, conducting a Steel Beach picnic on flight deck the same day. Served over 5,500 portions of BBQ ribs, chicken and steaks on 31 October 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with USS Ingraham (FFG-61) (deliver) on 1 November 1993, conducted underway replenishment with Mount Hood, BGEN Pace (Deputy CJTF-Somalia) visits ship on 2 November 1993 and conducted Vertical Replenishment COMPEX (MOB-S-8-SF) during last UNREP with USS White Plains (CVE-66). Scored 100% on 3 November 1993. Abraham Lincoln sailed in Somali waters, off the coast of Mogadishu, Somalia, participating directly in Operation Restore Hope from 12 October to 3 November 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted Vertical Replenishment COMPEX (MOB-S-8-SF) during last UNREP with White Plains. Scored 100% on 3 November 1993, operating off the coast of Mogadishu, Somalia until the 4th of November 1993, when the ship headed east for a five-day port visit to Perth, Australia, scheduled in mid-November, along with USS Pasadena (SSN-752), USS Fox (CG-33) and WillametteUSS Princeton (CG-59) also made Western Australia port calls in Bunbury. At this same time, Ingraham visited Singapore and Mount Hood visited Thailand. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with Princeton (deliver) on 6 November 1993. Abraham Lincoln is awarded Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal on 8 November 1993 and conducted fueling at sea with Princeton (deliver) on 9 November 1993 and conducted Marine Detachment and VMFA-314 celebrate the 218th Marine Corps Birthday with a cake cutting ceremony on 10 November 1993. Rear Admiral Joseph J. Dantone, Jr., Commander Carrier Group THREE, is guest of honor. Abraham Lincoln also conducted underway replenishment with USS Mars (AFS-1) on 10 November 1993, transiting the Indian Ocean to Perth, Australia from 4 to 11 November 1993. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port call at Perth, Australia from 12 to 16 November 1992, which most crewmembers celebrated as their favorite of the deployment, due to the traditionally warm reception which the Australians gave them from 12 to 16 November 1993. Pasadena, Fox and WillamettePrinceton also made Western Australia port calls in Bunbury. At this same time, Ingraham visited Singapore and Mount Hood visited Thailand. After this well-deserved rest from two months at sea, Abraham Lincoln steamed northeast to reunite with the Battle Group and pay a visit to Hawaii. Catapult No. 1 logged its 20,000th launch, and No. 3 its 10,000th shot in November 1993. Abraham Lincoln transited from Perth to Lombok Straits from 17 to 20 November 1993, commencing a northbound passage through Selat Lombok (Lombok Strait) on 20 November 1993 en route to the Celebes Sea. After sailing across the Celebes Sea from 21 to 22 November 1993, Abraham Lincoln crossed the equator for the second time of the deployment on 21 November 1993. Crossing the Line ceremony Held to convert all "pollywogs" to "shellbacks," transiting the Balabac and Surigao Straits on 22 November 1993 and tethered out NAVCENT on 22 November 1993. The crew of Abraham Lincoln are served Thanksgiving meal underway on 25 November 1993, conducting ammunition offload with Mount Hood on 27 November 1993 and passed from the Seventh to Third Fleets AOR on 28 November 1993. The crew also performed a burial at sea for PR1 Stanley Kraft. Afloat Training Group (ATG) embarks Abraham Lincoln to verify ship's ability to train effectively on 29 November 1993. On 1 December 1993, the Secretary of the Navy, John H. Dalton announced that pending notification of Congress and the repeal of the Combat Exclusion Law (Section 6015, Title 10, U.S. code), the Navy would begin to open all classes of ships to women as crewmembers, as well as several enlisted ratings hitherto denied to them, including Aviation Boatswain’s Mate-Launch and Recovery Equipment (ABE), Gunner’s Mate (GM), Gunner’s Mate-Guns (GMG), Gunner’s Mate-Missiles (GMM) and Sonar Technician-Surface (STG). Planners scheduled female sailors to begin reporting to eight ships, including Abraham Lincoln and USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), in June 1994, and to have 400 or 500 women on board the two carriers by the end of that year. More than 200 commissioned and enlisted female sailors actually reported on board Abraham Lincoln by the New Year. Abraham Lincoln recrossed the International Date Line eastbound, which gave people on board the unique experience of repeating the day on 2 December 1993 and conducted a ammunition offload with USS Mauna Kea (AE-22) (the 2nd to 3rd Dec.; two days only). Abraham Lincoln made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on the morning of December 5th to 8 December 1993. While in Hawaii, the ship participated in several events commemorating Pearl Harbor Day and conducted Pearl Harbor Day "Sunset Review" and host reception for 500 guests (mainly Tigers). Lieutenant General Stackpole, Commander, Marine Forces Pacific (COMMARFORPAC) is senior guest for ceremony on 7 December 1993, embarking over 700 friends and family members of the crew for a Tiger Cruise back to Alameda from 8 to 14 December 1993. Abraham Lincoln conducted fueling at sea with USS Mount Hood (AE-29) (Tiger Cruise demo) on 9 December 1993 and held a Driving Safety Standdown with California Highway Patrol officer on 13 December 1993. Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN flew-off Abraham Lincoln on 14 December 1993. A quick look at some of the ship's varied statistics illustrates the tremendous effort that goes into planning and executing an overseas deployment. During the deployment itself, Medical Department had to coordinate over 100 MEDEVAC’s for patients, while Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) processed over 2,300 oil samples in support of aircraft and ships in the battle group. During the entire calendar year, Air Department - one of the ship's largest departments - completed over 13,000 launches and recoveries of aircraft, made 5,751 elevator runs, and issued 24,482,963 gallons of JP-5 fuel to aircraft. Although these figures are impressive, the statistics contributed by some of the smaller departments are just as remarkable. For instance, Legal Department drafted and executed over 300 wills and 1,200 powers of attorney for crewmembers during 1993, while Training Department processed over 3600 sets of TAD orders and implemented a new indoctrination program that instructed more than 1200 newly reported personnel in ships familiarization and specialized topics including sexual harassment, 3M, damage control, and health. Perhaps nothing earns the description of a carrier as a floating city, I however, as the statistics tallied by Dental Department, which performed 11,642 dental examinations, 5,717 x-rays, 3,044 cavity fillings, 2,011teeth removals, 286 root canals, and 1,624 teeth cleanings in 1993! The 80 aircraft of Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) embarked aboard Lincoln during "WestPac" '93 were commanded by Captain Gabriel and his relief, Captain McArthur. CVW-11, based at Naval Air Station Miramar, California, included nine aircraft squadrons from air stations all over the West Coast. The Navy squadrons were: Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE FIVE (VAQ 135), flying the Grumman EA-6B "Prowler" aircraft from their home base of NAS Whidbey Island, Washington; Attack Squadron NINE FIVE (VA 95) flying the Grumman A-6E "Intruder" aircraft also from Whidbey Island; Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron SIX (HS 6) flying the Sikorsky SH-60F and HH-6OH "Seahawk" helicopter from NAS North Island, San Diego, California; Sea Control Squadron TWO NINE (VS 29), flying the Lockheed S-3B "Viking" aircraft also from NAS North Island; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE ONE SEVEN (VAW 117), flying the Grumman E-2C Plus "Hawkeye" from their base at NAS Miramar, San Diego, California; also from NAS Miramar, Fighter Squadron TWO ONE THREE (VF 213), flying the Grumman F-14A "Tomcat;" Strike Fighter Squadron TWO TWO (VFA 22) and Strike Fighter Squadron NINE FOUR (VFA 94), flying the McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 "Hornet" aircraft, out of NAS Lemoore, California. Also flying the F/A-18 "Hornet," Marine Fighter Attack Squadron THREE ONE FOUR (VMFA 314), home based at MCAS El Toro, California. VMFA 314's deployment marked the first time in six years that a Marine Corps squadron had served for a full deployment aboard a West Coast aircraft carrier. The F/A-18A Hornets of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA)-314 also embarked on board. In addition, the ship carried AIM-120A Advanced Medium-Range, Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAMs) for the first time during a deployment. Over 8,000 sailors and marines in seven ships and a sub of the group, comprising USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), guided missile cruisers USS Fox (CG-33) and USS Princeton (CG-59), guided missile frigate USS Ingraham (FFG-61), were both based out of Long Beach, California; attack submarine Pasadena (SSN-752), USS Mount Hood, combat store ship USS White Plains (AFS-4) and oiler USS Willamette (AO-180) as part of her task force, deploying for the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf. Rear Adm. Joseph J. Dantone, Jr., Commander Carrier Group Three, and Capt. David M. Lee, Commander Destroyer Squadron 21, broke their flags from Abraham Lincoln. Rear Adm. Dantone, who also commanded the carrier battle group, returned to a familiar ship, as he had taken Abraham Lincoln to sea as her first commanding officer. Also embarked in Abraham Lincoln was the staff of Destroyer Squadron TWO ONE (DESRON 21), commanded by Captain David M. Lee. To summarize the other ships of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group, The cruiser USS Fox (CG-33) was based out of San Diego. USS Willamette (AO-180), was based out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; the ammunition ship USS Mount Hood (AE-29), was homeported in Concord, California; the combat stores ship USS White Plains (AFS-4) was based in Guam; and the attack submarine USS Pasadena (SSN-752) was homeported in San Diego. Princeton, a Ticonderoga class cruiser with the AEGIS weapon system, performed Anti-Air Warfare Commander duties for the Battle Group. In addition to a port visit in Hong Kong with Abraham Lincoln, Princeton was able to enjoy three port visits while in the Arabian Gulf, two in Jebel Ali, the third in Dubai. while Abraham Lincoln performed duties off the coast of Somalia, Princeton remained in the Gulf until 31 October, and rendezvoused with Abraham Lincoln in early November for shared port visits to Western Australia and Pearl Harbor. Princeton was commanded by Captain Gerard M. Farrell. Ingraham, based out of Long Beach, California, conducted maritime intercept operations in the Gulf in support of sanctions against Iraq. She also participated in a number of exercises with nations around the Arabian Gulf. An Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate, Ingraham has two LAMPS MARK III helicopters embarked. Ingraham  was commanded by Commander Bradley J. Kaplan. Fox performed Anti-Air Warfare duties for the Battle Group while in the Gulf. Fox specifically controlled CVW-11 aircraft in support of Operation Southern Watch. Additionally, Fox conducted numerous bilateral exercises with Arabian Gulf nations during the deployment, thus helping to improve relations between the United States and its allies. Fox was commanded by Commander Robert E. McCabe III, while in the Arabian Gulf, Mount Hood conducted ammunition logistic services for the Lincoln Battle Group and other Middle East Force ships in the Gulf. Led by a new Commanding Officer, Commander Carol A. Rengstorff, Mount Hood also served off the coast of Mogadishu, where the ship provided critical logistic support for U.S. Naval forces in the area. These duties included numerous transits between Mombasa, Kenya and the Battle Group which was thus able to maintain a continuous presence in the coastal waters. Pasadena made an invaluable contribution to the group's readiness and conducted numerous anti-submarine warfare exercises, including "Sharem 102," a U.S. exercise conducted in the Gulf of Oman. She also had a port visit to stirling, Australia. Pasadena was commanded by Commander William Larson. Of special interest is the fact that the Pasadena was the first American submarine to visit the city of Wdam, located in Oman. White Plains provided critical logistic services to the Abraham Lincoln and her escorts during their tour in Arabian Gulf.  This ship also made trips to and from the Arabian Gulf, bringing many supplies to Somalia in support of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group's efforts in that area as well. Commanded by Captain Robert E. Lang, White Plains continued operations in the Indian Ocean after the departure of the remainder of the Abraham Lincoln Battle Group. White Plains was based out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Willamette provided fuel replenishment and stores for the Battle Group. The oilier stayed with the Battle Group for the length of the deployment, and served as the "gas station" for the entire carrier task force. Commander Conrad B. Divis served as the commanding Officer of Willamette. The other ships of Abraham Lincoln Battle Group made port visits to additional nations in the Arabian Gulf, including Oman, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, strengthening ties in a region of vital importance to U.S. interests. Squadrons: VS = Air Anti-Submarine Squadron - 1950-1993. VMFA 314's deployment marked the first time in six years that a Marine Corps squadron had served for a full deployment aboard a West Coast aircraft carrier. Port of calls: Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong; Bahrain; Dubai, U.A.E.; Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, U.A.E. (2); Perth, Australia and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Her third Foreign Water Fleet Deployment (FWFD) since her commission 11 November 1989; delivered to the U. S. Navy on 30 October 1989 with Captain William B. Hayden in command as the third CO (15 June to 15 December 1993)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, 377, 378A, 444 & 378B-1992/1993).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) remained in port at from 15 to 31 December 1993” (Ref. 378B-1992).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1993 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter VI

Appendix I

 

 

Command Composition and Organization of Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1993 (Ref. 378B-1993):

 

The ship operated under the following chain of command as of 31 December 1993:

 

The ship's chain of command as of 31 December 1993 was:

 

Commander in Chief

President George Herbert Walker Bush, 1989-1993 - 41st

President William Jefferson Clinton, 1993-2001 - 42nd

Secretary of Defense

The Honorable Richard B. Cheney - 17th
21 Mar 1989 - 20 Jan 1993

The Honorable Les Aspin - 18th
21 Jan 1993 - 3 Feb 1994

Secretary of the Navy

The Honorable Sean O'Keefe – 65th

2 Oct 1992 - 20 Jan 1993

The Honorable ADM Frank B. Kelso, II (acting) - 66th

2 Jan 1993 - 21 Jul 1993
The Honorable John H. Dalton - 67th

22 Jul 1993 - 16 Nov 1998

Chief of Naval Operations

ADM Frank B. Kelso (1990–1994) - 24th

CINCPACFLT

ADM Robert J. Kelly - 52nd

15 Feb 1991 - 6 Aug 1994

COMNAVAIRPAC

VADM Edwin R. Kohn, Jr. - 24th

Dec 1990 - Oct 1993

VADM Robert J. Spane - 25th

Oct 1993 - Jan 1996

COMCARGRU 3

RADM Joseph J. Dantone, Jr.

 

Organization Structure. During calendar year 1993, Abraham Lincoln was homeported in Alameda, California. Captain James 0. Ellis, Jr. served as Commanding Officer until 9 September 1993, when he was relieved by Captain Richard J. Nibe. At the beginning of 1993 the Executive Officer was Captain John T. Morris; he was relieved by Commander Gregory R. Peairs on 15 December 1993. On 1 January 1993, AFCM (AW) George H. Watson served as Command Master Chief; he was subsequently relieved by ABCM (AW) James A. Shipman.

 

Department Heads serving aboard Abraham Lincoln as of 31 December 1993 were:

 

Commanding Officer - CO

CAPT James O. Ellis, Jr. - 16 June 1991 - 9 September 1993 / CAPT Richard J. Nibe

Executive Officer - XO

CDR Gregory R. Peairs

Administrative Officer

LCDR Scott A. MacDonald

Air Officer

CDR Patrick D. O, Neil

AIMD Officer

CDR Roy D. Moore

Combat Systems Officer

LCDR Daniel F. Rustchak

Religious Ministries Officer / Command Chaplain

CDR Robert F. Milewski

Dental Officer

CDR Peter G. Seder

Engineering Officer

CDR Joseph W. Heery

Deck - First Lieutenant

LCDR Allen M. Stout

Communications Officer

LCDR Michael J. Cusick

Maintenance Officer

 

Legal Officer - Command Judge Advoacate

LCDR Leroy A. Broughton

3-M Officer

LCDR James C. Carr

Navigator

CAPT Scott T. Cantfil

Senior Medical Officer

CDR Daniel J. Callan

Operations Officer

CAPT Stephen L. Drake

Reactor Officer

CDR David M. Armitage

Safety Officer

CDR Michael B. Clay

Supply Officer

CDR Stephen H. Morris

Training Officer

LCDR David M. Welch

Weapons Officer

CDR David S. Marzola

Marine Security Detachment

CAPT Joseph A. Letoile (USMC)

Carrier Air Wing 11

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) WestPac Cruise Book 1993

 

“The following major accomplishments highlight Abraham Lincoln’s performance in CY 1993:

 

VMFA 314's deployment marked the first time in six years that a Marine Corps squadron had served for a full deployment aboard a West Coast Abraham Lincoln from 15 June to 15 December 1993 on “WestPac” .

 

Feb. 93 – Abraham Lincoln logs her 30,000th arrested landing.

 

Feb. 93 – COMNAVAIRPAC Dental Readiness Inspection; rated as #1 Dental Department of all Pacific Fleet carriers.

 

13 Jan. - 12 Feb. 93 – CompTuEx 93-9A/ITA and Carrier Qualifications and Refresher Training with the ship's air wing, Carrier Air Wing ELEVEN (CVW-11) in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA)

 

1-4 Feb. 93 – COMNAVAIRPAC (ITA) Weapons Assessment.

 

10 Feb. 93 – COMNAVAIRPAC/COMCARGRU ONE Comprehensive Communications Assessment Exercise. Scored first-ever 100%.

 

12 Feb. 93 – Activated first Navy direct at sea connectivity to Navy Communications Message Processing and Routing System (NAVCOMPARS) at 600 bits per second with Communications Area Master Station, Honolulu.

 

9 Mar. 93 – First Navy activation of Battle Group Information Exchange System (BGIXS).

 

2-28 Mar. 93 – FleetEx 93-2A/B/C in the Southern California Operating Area (SOCAL OPAREA) from 2 to 28 March 1993, briefly interrupted for a second 1993 port visit to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California from 10 to 15 March 1993. The entire underway schedule in March was devoted to FLEETEX in preparation for overseas deployment and included a unique exercise combining the Abraham Lincoln carrier battle group with an Amphibious Readiness Group.

 

May 93 – Brig inspected by CINCPACFLT, rated the best brig afloat in the Pacific Fleet.

 

11 July 93 – First successful activation of Joint Deployable intelligence Support System (JDISS) from and aircraft carrier to Commander Joint Task Force, Southwest Asia in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

 

August 93 - Resurfaced over 8,000 square feet on the flight deck during Arabian Gulf operations.

 

16 Sep. - 7 Oct. 93 - North Arabian Gulf Operations/Operation Southern Watch.

 

20 Sep. 93 - Activated first fleet support broadcast via UHF Satellite to support Arabian Gulf, Red Sea, and Indian Ocean ships during two week outage at Communications Station, Guam.

 

29 Sep. 93 - Coordinated and promulgated all communications plans and support for surge operations off Somalia.

 

29 Sep. 93 - Ambassador Edward Gnehm (U.S. ambassador to Kuwait) plus 22 other U.S. embassy personnel and Kuwaiti guests visit ship.

 

30 Sep. 93 - Ship's first-ever transmission of photos via SHF PC information terminal; photos transmitted to CONUS for use at Joint Chiefs of Staff briefing.

 

12 Oct. - 3 Nov. 93 - Somalia Operations (Operation Continue Hope).

 

15-22 Oct.  93 - Marines from Marine Detachment go ashore in Somalia as security force.

 

21 Oct. 93 - Complete largest UNREP of deployment while off the coast of Somalia. Exchanged 554 pallets of provisions, general stores, and retrograde with USS White Plains (AFS-4).

 

Nov. 93 - Catapult #1 logs its 20,000th shot; Catapult #3 logs its 10,000th shot.

 

10 Nov. 93 - Marine Detachment and VMFA-314 celebrate the 218th Marine Corps Birthday with a cake cutting ceremony. Rear Admiral Joseph J. Dantone, Jr., Commander Carrier Group THREE, is guest of honor” (Ref. -1992/1993).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter VI (1 January to 31 December 1993) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 1993 YEAR END REPORT, Chapter VI, Appendix I

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)