Flight Deck Certification with Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2 off the coast of Southern California; the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and conducted Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California for Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2; Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) and Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

14 January to 6 September 2010

Chapter XXV

Part I of II - 28 January to 14 May 2010

Part II of II - 15 May to 6 September 2010

 

 

Texas Tech Leaders Visit Navy Aircraft Carrier

 

Texas Tech University (TTU) senior leadership visited USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), to congratulate the university's alumni and visit the aircraft carrier's newest commanding officer during the ship's on 28 January 2010 change of command ceremony. TTU Chancellor Kent Hance, Vice Chancellor Dr. Kelly Overley and other senior leaders from the school congratulated TTU alumni and new Lincoln Commanding Officer Capt. John Alexander, a native of Port Neches, Texas.

Alexander was accepted into the Navy's aviation program during his second year at TTU. He graduated in 1982 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering and was commissioned in December 1982 through the Aviation Officer Candidate program.

"Assuming command is an awesome responsibility, but I know John can handle it," said Doug Hayward, the deputy director of F35 Vehicle Systems and a Texas Tech alum. "It has been a great week for Texas Tech. We are absolutely proud of what he's done."

Other Texas Tech leaders in attendance included Senior Associate Vice Chancellor, Scott Cooksey, Dean Jon C. Strauss, and Scott Self, director of Development.

Chancellor Hance, a 1965 Texas Tech graduate, was appointed to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board by Governor Bill Clements in 1987. He has served on the Governor's Energy Council and the Governor's Oil Spill Advisory Committee. Hance has served the state and his community as one of the original incorporators and founders of the Texas Boys Ranch in Lubbock, and as the Texas State vice chairman for the March of Dimes.

In April 2010, Hance will receive the Hope Award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society West Texas Chapter” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100131-13 - Release Date: 1/31/2010 11:20:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50940

 

Capt. John D. Alexander and Capt. Patrick D. Hall isten to remarks during a change of command ceremony.

 

100128-N-5386R-078 - EVERETT, Wash. (Jan. 28, 2010) - Capt. John D. Alexander, commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) right, and Capt. Patrick D. Hall, former commanding officer of Abraham Lincoln, listen to remarks during a change of command ceremony. Alexander relieved Hall during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Robert Robbins/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=81262

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Holds Change of Command

 

Captain John D. Alexander assumed command during a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 28 January 2010, relieving Captain Patrick D. Hall, 11th Commanding Officer, serving from 18 June 2007 to 28 January 2010, holding a change of command ceremony on board ship in Everett, Wash. Alexander, a native of Port Neches, Texas, is reporting to the Lincoln after serving a joint tour as executive assistant to the director of the Joint Staff and commanding the amphibious transport dock ship USS Juneau (LPD-10), forward deployed in Sasebo, Japan.

 

Alexander previously served as executive officer of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) and as head of aviation commander assignments (PERS-431) at Navy Personnel Command. Hall, who has served as commanding officer of the ship since June 2007, said his experience with the Lincoln and its crew members was one he will not soon forget. "It's the attitude and work ethic of each and every one of our shipmates that makes the Lincoln the finest aircraft carrier in the fleet," said Hall. "I am glad to have served here with such a dedicated group of Sailors."

 

Alexander said he was proud to take command of the Lincoln and follow in Hall's footsteps. "I am very humbled and excited to be on board the Lincoln," said Alexander. "The ship looks great, and the crew is highly motivated. I'm proud to take command of this extraordinary warship." During his stint as commanding officer, Hall led the carrier through more than 60,000 miles of steaming for more than 213 days at sea, including a 2008 deployment in support of the Global War on Terror.

 

Also under Hall's command, the ship successfully completed 16,104 aircraft launches and recoveries, 2,307 combat sorties, expended 255,963 pounds of ordnance, issued more than 24-million gallons of jet propellant (JP-5) and repaired approximately 7,000 aircraft components without any significant incidents and zero loss of life. Most recently, Hall saw the ship through the completion of a nearly nine-month planned incremental availability in Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash.

 

During the availability, the ship underwent a nearly $350-million overhaul including a complete modification of Hangar Bay 1, replacing all four of the ship's propellers, remodeling the media department and training spaces with advanced technology, upgrading the ship's computer systems and modernizing the entire flight deck. "By far, I think completing our shipyard period early is one of our biggest accomplishments," said Hall.

 

"This achievement alone goes to show that when we work hard as a team toward a common goal, we are an unstoppable force." In his formal remarks, Alexander congratulated the crew on their accomplishments and stressed the importance of staying focused on the ship's next hurdles of flight deck certification, an assessment by the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), and integrated training with an air wing, surface and subsurface combatants together as the Lincoln Strike Group” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100129-01 - Release Date: 1/29/2010 5:57:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Barry Riley, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50925

 

Lincoln Strike Group Changes Command

 

“Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 held a change of command ceremony aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 29 January 2010. During the ceremony, Rear Adm. Mark D. Guadagnini relieved Rear Adm. Scott Swift as Carrier Strike Group 9 commander. Swift served as commander of CSG 9 since Oct. 9, 2008. During his tour Swift was instrumental in orchestrating and leading sustained operations in support of the Navy's fleet response plan and U.S. 3rd Fleet's theater security cooperation plan. Also under Swift's leadership, Lincoln successfully completed a nine-month planned incremental availability ahead of schedule, during which the ship underwent a complete overhaul estimated at nearly $350 million.

In his farewell remarks Swift highlighted the support the people and civic leaders of the Puget Sound, Wash., area have shown the Navy, as well as the community and military leaders of nearby Canada. "We receive tremendous support here in Puget Sound and it's because of their leadership," said Swift. Before ending his remarks Swift called Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Eric Schmidt to the stage to express his gratitude for the dedication Schmidt has given the Sailors of the
Lincoln and to give away his final command coin as CSG 9 commander. Swift is scheduled to report to U.S. Pacific Command to serve as the director of operations.

Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt, commander, 3
rd Fleet, was the guest speaker and he reflected on the strong bonds Swift has forged with the local community. Hunt noted the positive relationships Swift built within the Navy, Coast Guard, community and with Canadian partners. "Trust cannot be surged, trust must be built over time," said Hunt. "I rely heavily upon [Swift] to forge relationships within the strike group and within the community. These relationships have resulted in the Puget Sound area warmly welcoming our Sailors into the community."

Guadagnini most recently hails from Chief of Naval Air Training, where he served as commander since August 2007. During the ceremony he revealed his top three guidelines: "winners have fun, take care of each other and be the best." Guadagnini said that not only does the Navy depend on the strike group, coalition maritime forces do as well. "We will be the best allies and partners to those who enjoy freedom of the seas," said Guadagnini.

Abraham Lincoln is the flagship for CSG 9, which is homeported in Everett, Wash. Lincoln Strike Group consists of Carrier Air Wing 2, Destroyer Squadron 9 and its associated ships USS Cape St. George (CG-71), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Momsem (DDG-92), USS Halsey (DDG-97), USS Sterett (DDG-104), USS Ford (FFG-54), USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG-60) and USS Ingraham (FFG-61)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100130-07 - Release Date: 1/30/2010 7:06:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50960

 

Community Leaders from Vulcan, Inc. Visit Lincoln

 

Executives from Seattle-based Vulcan, Inc. toured the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 1 February 2010, at its homeport of Everett, Wash.

Founded by Microsoft pioneer Paul Allen, Vulcan was created to help manage his charitable endeavors.

Allen's family-run foundation, The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, supports the work of non-profit organizations which focus on making positive and measurable change in the Pacific Northwest. The foundation regularly supports local arts and education programs through donations and volunteer efforts.

Tony White, Vulcan's administrative assistant for the government community affairs team, and several other leaders toured the ship's hangar bays, forecastle, bridge, mess decks and the flight deck, where they had the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to watch one of the ship's aircraft elevators lower to the hangar bay.

"It was interesting to see how Sailors are living," said White. "It was an insight into a world that most civilians won't ever have an opportunity to see."

Ruby Tarabochia, Vulcan's administrative assistant for the corporate communications team, also appreciated the opportunity to get a glimpse of Navy life.

"I loved it. The presentation was wonderful, as was the thoroughness of the tour," she said. "The variety of spaces we saw on the ship gave me a nice perspective of all the work that goes into running it” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100217-09 - Release Date: 2/17/2010 11:58:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51038

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 3 February 2010, with Captain John D. Alexander as Commanding Officer, for Flight Deck Certification off the coast of Southern California once Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2 is embarked at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California ” (Ref. 76).


USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to San Diego, California from 3 to 4 February 2010” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 5 February 2010, to embark CVW-2, for Flight Deck Certification off the coast of Southern California, underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to San Diego, California from 3 to 4 February 2010 (5 February 2010)” (Ref. 76).

 

Lincoln Underway for Flight Deck Certification

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 7 February 2010, to begin Flight Deck Certification with Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2 off the coast of Southern California, in port from 5 to 6 February 2010. Flight Deck Certification is a multiple-day evolution with a series of flight and hangar deck exercises. Evaluators from Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) will observe Lincoln's Air Department and CVW-2 as they work together to conduct flight operations. "Getting flight deck certified is a huge milestone in training to go overseas," said Lt. Kent Davis, Lincoln's air boatswain. "It's like getting your high school diploma and moving on to college." Lincoln will conduct numerous exercises such as taxiing aircraft, which is moving and parking planes, executing aircraft hook-up and break-down procedures, and spotting aircraft on catapults. Sailors in Lincoln's Air Department began training and qualifying during the shipyard period. CNAF evaluators came to Lincoln 60 days and 30 days prior to the certification to check for any discrepancies in materials and supplies and to make sure the training programs were current. Many Sailors traveled to other aircraft carriers that were underway to receive extra training. "While training extensively on the qualifications, we have raised the overall awareness and knowledge level of every individual so we can demonstrate to the inspectors we have the ability to safely and efficiently operate our ship," said Lincoln's Air Officer Cmdr. Bradley T. Jensen. Flight Deck Certification is a test of four events, including two day events and two night events. Day time events include taxi exercises and aircraft operation, launching helicopters, then recovering four fixed wing aircraft consecutively. Aircraft will also be launched off the bow and waist catapults. Evaluators inspect how the crew reacts to any mishaps. One of the events simulates a loss of nose gear steering, loss of brakes and inability to raise the tail hook. Crash and salvage crews are examined for their response and the efficiency of emergency aircraft and taxi exercises. During night events, personnel are tested on night aircraft handling and flight deck emergency procedures. All catapult watchstations must be manned and ready. Six to 12 aircraft are launched and recovered during each event. Taxi drills are conducted throughout the night, moving and parking aircraft up and down the elevators to go to and from the hangar bay and the flight deck. Flight Deck Certification also gives the air wing experience and training on launching and landing on the flight deck, as well as the experience of working with the Lincoln crew. "The flight deck is like a large puzzle," said Davis. "Everyone has their piece in it to make it successful." Davis believes Lincoln will do well during the Flight Deck Certification and Lincoln's future qualifications. "This certification will allow the ship to launch and recover aircraft from our flight deck," said Davis. "This is the baby step to get the ship ready to its full potential and meet its mission” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100207-08 - Release Date: 2/7/2010 9:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, PACIFIC OCEAN (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51157

 

Lincoln Sailor Receives Bronze Star

 

On 7 February 2010, “a USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailor was recently awarded a bronze star medal for meritorious service after returning to the ship from a nine-month individual augmentee (IA) deployment to the Middle East. During his IA tour, Lt. Thomas Amano, of the ship's air department, served as officer in charge of the Iraqi Correctional Officer Village at Theatre Interment Facility Reconciliation Center on Camp Taji, Iraq.

Bronze Star Medal is the fourth highest military decoration in the US Armed Forces, and is awarded to service members for bravery, acts of merit or meritorious service, explained Amano. "I was very taken back, and humbled when I first heard I was receiving a Bronze Star," said the Beaverton, Ore. native. "It's a huge honor to receive this award." He led a team of 45 Sailors and was directly responsible for the safety, security and transportation of more than 2,500 Iraqi correctional officers during his tour.

 

He also directed reception and convoy movement of groups of more than 650 Iraqi correctional officers from an unsecured parking lot outside the contingency operating base to the reconciliation center. Though deployment to Iraq can be stressful, Amano said the lessons he learned while working on the ship helped prepare him for his IA.


"I feel like my experiences from the flight deck helped whip me into shape for this deployment," he said. "I had to remember to always remain vigilant, keeping my head on a swivel, just like when I'm up topside.

 

I think this mentality helped keep my Sailors and I safe during our tour there." While deployed, Amano said it was difficult to communicate with his family, but said when he was honored with the award, it helped him show his family his dedication to duty. "I don't talk about my job much when I'm at home, especially while I was there, so it was a little hard at times," he said. "When my wife read the citation for the award, she was in shock. I think it offers her a sort of validation for the nine months I was gone." While Amano adjusts back into ship life, he said he will maintain the same type of work ethic he went into his IA with, and offers some advice for other crew members.

"I went into this IA with the intent of doing the best I could do with what I had, and ensuring the safety of my Sailors," he said. "It's all about playing your part. Everyone plays a key part in the Navy's mission, no matter what department, rate or rank. If we all keep that in mind, and work as a team we can reach and better yet, exceed our goals” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100207-10 - Release Date: 2/7/2010 9:10:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Barry Riley, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51159

 

X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Taking Shape On Board Lincoln

 

As reported on 13 February 2010, “Personnel from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System (N-UCAS) program team and industry partner Northrop Grumman Corporation are underway with USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to test the integration of existing ship systems with new systems that will support the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D). This effort will reduce program risk and is one of many steps toward the X-47B's first carrier arrested landing or "trap." The X-47B will be the first unmanned jet aircraft to take off and land aboard an aircraft carrier. With a 62ft wingspan and length of 38ft, the X-47B is about 87 percent the size of the F/A-18C aircraft currently operating aboard Navy aircraft carriers. The UCAS-D effort is focused on developing and demonstrating an aircraft carrier (CV) suitable, low observable (LO) unmanned air system in support of persistent, penetrating surveillance, and penetrating strike capabilities in high threat areas. The effort will evolve technologies required to conduct launch, recovery, and carrier controlled airspace (CCA) operations and autonomous air refueling (AAR) of an LO platform. By FY13, the Navy plans to achieve UCAS CV demonstration; achieve hybrid probe & drogue (USN style) and boom/receptacle (USAF style) AAR demonstration; and evaluate and identify technologies supporting future naval capability requirements. Mark Pilling, a former naval flight officer with operational unmanned aircraft experience, is the team's mission operator. He and his team are charged with verifying mission operator software between the ship and aircraft. "This is the first step in the X-47B's integration into the carrier's systems," said Pilling. The team is testing X-47B software integration by using a King Air turbo prop "surrogate" aircraft taking off and landing from shore. As the aircraft approaches the carrier, it performs the same types of procedures as manned aircraft. However, since the X-47B is unmanned, digital messages from shipboard controllers will be used to control the aircraft instead of verbal instructions. In response to the digital command and control messages, the plane's software confirms, complies and sends a "wilco" signal back to the controllers and mission operator. "Over the last two at sea periods on Lincoln, we have integrated into a number of the ship systems, from PriFly, to CATCC, to the LSO platform," said Pilling. Janice Stolzy, the Northrop Grumman project lead, is on board to verify that the prototype equipment works in a real-time operational environment. Stolzy said successful UCAS-D system testing on Lincoln will set the stage for additional developmental testing later this year, including testing the software integration using an F/A-18 surrogate aircraft to more closely emulate the X-47B's flight path. John Zander, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) lead test engineer, said a prime benefit of a UCAS concept is to reduce the risk to human pilots. "This is an important milestone for the Navy and we're making great strides on board Lincoln," said Zander. Additional UCAS-D development activities are underway at multiple NAVAIR and Northrop Grumman sites throughout the United States. First flight of the X-47B is expected later this year” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100213-02 - Release Date: 2/13/2010 5:02:00 PM - By Lt. Cmdr. William Marks, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51239

 

An artist's conception of the X-47B long-range unmanned aerial vehicle on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier.

 

100215-N-0000X-001 - WASHINGTON (Feb. 15, 2010) - An artist's conception of the X-47B long-range unmanned aerial vehicle on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier. The Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration program will demonstrate the capability of an autonomous, low-observable unmanned aircraft to perform carrier launches and recoveries. (Photo illustration courtesy Northrop Grumman/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=81899            

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked arrived Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 17 February 2010, with Captain John D. Alexander as Commanding Officer, conducting Flight Deck Certification off the coast of Southern California from 7 to 16 February 2010. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific en route to San Diego, California from 3 to 4 February 2010, arriving Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 5 February 2010. Abraham Lincoln departed NASNI on 7 February 2010, to begin Flight Deck Certification with Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2 off the coast of Southern California, in port from 5 to 6 February 2010. Flight Deck Certification is a multiple-day evolution with a series of flight and hangar deck exercises. Evaluators from Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) will observe Lincoln's air department and CVW-2 as they work together to conduct flight operations. On 7 February 2010, “a Abraham Lincoln Sailor was recently awarded a bronze star medal for meritorious service after returning to the ship from a nine-month individual augmentee (IA) deployment to the Middle East. During his IA tour, Lt. Thomas Amano, of the ship's air department, served as officer in charge of the Iraqi Correctional Officer Village at Theatre Interment Facility Reconciliation Center on Camp Taji, Iraq. As reported on 13 February 2010, “Personnel from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System (N-UCAS) program team and industry partner Northrop Grumman Corporation are underway with Abraham Lincoln to test the integration of existing ship systems with new systems that will support the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D). This effort will reduce program risk and is one of many steps toward the X-47B's first carrier arrested landing or "trap." The X-47B will be the first unmanned jet aircraft to take off and land aboard an aircraft carrier. With a 62ft wingspan and length of 38ft, the X-47B is about 87 percent the size of the F/A-18C aircraft currently operating aboard Navy aircraft carriers (7 to 17 February 2010)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100207-08 - Release Date: 2/7/2010 9:02:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, PACIFIC OCEAN (NNS), Story Number: NNS100207-10 - Release Date: 2/7/2010 9:10:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Barry Riley, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) & Story Number: NNS100213-02 - Release Date: 2/13/2010 5:02:00 PM - By Lt. Cmdr. William Marks, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51157 / http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51159

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51239

 

Lincoln Improves IT Security Through CAC Enforcement

 

As reported on 20 February 2010, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) became the first aircraft carrier and afloat unit in the Navy to achieve 100 percent common access card (CAC) enforcement across its entire unclassified local area network (LAN) by the end of 2009. After almost six months of daily use and enforcement, Abraham Lincoln is already benefitting with increased security and better user accountability. Lincoln is not only 100 percent CAC enabled, the ship is 100 percent CAC enforced throughout its nearly 900 unclassified terminals and 2,500 users. The difference between CAC enabled and CAC enforced is when a network is only CAC enabled, users can use either their CAC to log on or a user ID and password. When the network is CAC enforced, all users must use their CAC to log on.

Lincoln's Combat Systems department worked long hours and many weekends in preparation for the transition, but the hard work paid off. In 2007, the Department of Defense (DoD) issued a directive for all DoD units to increase their LAN security and reliability by becoming CAC enabled and enforced by 2009. "The transition was seamless," said Lt. Cmdr. David White, Abraham Lincoln's Combat Systems Information officer. "The key was good planning and communication well in advance, even before becoming CAC enabled. By planning ahead and getting the word out to the entire crew, we calmed peoples' fears and managed expectations."

CAC enforcement has a number of benefits that improve network security, foremost of which is improved security through a strategy known as defense-in-depth that includes two-factor authentication. Security is enhanced through cryptographic logon, where a crypto key in the CAC's chip verifies a user's identity. The stored information allows users to prove who they are by entering their six-to-eight digit pin after inserting their CAC. The logic is based on two-factor authentication. "The three keys to proper network security are controlling access through what you are, what you have, and what you know," said White. "Simple password logons only require something you know, CAC enforcement better controls access by also requiring something you have."

Systems that only require passwords lack the extra depth in security that CAC enforcement provides. A potential threat could figure out someone's username fairly easily (usually first name/last name), leaving only a password to protect the account. Now a threat must also physically possess the CAC card before attempting to mount an attack. CAC enforcement also provides benefits beyond security such as never having to change a password, fewer lost ID cards due to increased user accountability, and the ability to digitally sign and encrypt e-mail. "Being CAC enabled and enforced gives Lincoln the added depth of security that's critical protecting our network," said White” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100220-16 - Release Date: 2/20/2010 11:34:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51373

 

Lincoln Underway for INSURV

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-2 embarked left its homeport of Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 23 February 2010, in preparation for a material assessment conducted by the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and will conduct Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California once Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2, embarked at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California.

Lincoln is scheduled to begin the multiple-day evaluation in San Diego, California on 28 February 2010.

INSURV is a major inspection mandated by Congress to assess a ship's material condition, its ability to operate the weapons, radar, engineering and navigation systems, maintain its berthing spaces, and function safely. More than 150 inspectors will examine how well the crew performs preventative maintenance, and appraise the ship's overall space cleanliness and preservation.

The grading criteria is either "fit for sustained combat operations" or "not fit for sustained combat operations." Once the inspection is complete,
INSURV will report directly to the secretary of the Navy and Congress if the ship is fit in terms of being able to conduct operations.

To prepare for the inspection,
Lincoln's INSURV team was created more than a year ago. Lincoln also created an Elite Zone Inspection Team of the most talented and experienced senior chiefs, master chiefs, chief warrant officers and limited duty officers using the same concept as the Elite Spot Check Training Team, which upholds maintenance standards on the ship. The goal was to train the crew in its ability to critically self-assess.

Upon completion of
INSURV the Lincoln will continue its training cycle to prepare for a 2010 deployment in support of the nation's maritime strategy” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100223-32 - Release Date: 2/23/2010 9:06:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) (in port articles have the ship in port Everett, Washington rather then San Diego, Ca. as reported by reference 76 from 17 to 22 February 2010)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51483

 

Lincoln Ready for INSURV

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) in Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 28 February 2010, conducting operations in the Eastern Pacific from 23 to 28 February 2010.

 

INSURV is a major inspection mandated by Congress to assess a ship's material condition, its ability to operate its weapons, radar, engineering and navigation systems, maintain its berthing spaces, and function safely. More than 150 inspectors will examine how well the crew performs preventative maintenance and appraise the ship's overall space cleanliness and preservation.

INSURV was established in 1868 and reports to Congress and American taxpayers that the ships of the U.S. Navy are well-maintained and capable of fighting wars and performing their duties while deployed. "It's independent and unbiased. It's conducted to inspect the material condition of all Navy ships," said Lt. j.g. Zach Decker, the operations information division officer who has been part of the INSURV team since checking on board.

INSURV
grading criteria is either "fit for sustained combat operations" or "not fit for sustained combat operations." Once the inspection is complete, INSURV will report directly to the Secretary of the Navy and Congress if the ship is fit in terms of being able to conduct operations. In order to prepare for the inspection Master Chief Machinist's Mate Michael Gwinn, Maintenance, Material Management (3M) chief, said the first step was to form a team of personnel from around the ship that were knowledgeable on the ship's material condition. This team's sole purpose was to focus on INSURV until the inspection.

That team was known as The Elite Zone Inspection Team, made up of the most talented and experienced senior chiefs, master chiefs, chief warrant officers and limited duty officers using the same concept as the Elite Spot Check Training Team, which upholds maintenance standards on the ship. The goal was to train the crew in its ability to critically self-assess, explained Gwinn.

Lincoln has been preparing for
INSURV for more than a year, seeking out best practices from around the fleet. "We also visited the Truman during their INSURV," said Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Pierce, assistant INSURV coordinator. "Observing their inspection helped us learn what the inspectors' standards were, and what they were looking for."


Schedule of Events (SOE) practices helped the ship refine the
INSURV timeline, and were critical for completing hundreds of system checks and two sea and anchor details in 28 hours of underway time, while also providing practice for the demonstration teams. The ship opened a "store" full of maintenance and material items that are routinely replaced, and established a plan of action for each individual inspection, said Cmdr. Cedric Wilcox, the ship's combat direction center officer, and the INSURV coordinator.

"We have a pre-expended bin for high usage consumables. We also established a watch-bill triad which consists of the demonstrator, the khaki supervisor and the repair folks, all of which will be standing by during the inspections," said Wilcox. "We've also concentrated on overall ship cleanliness, especially in the bathrooms, berthings and outlying areas that typically get overlooked." The team also ran through frequent
INSURV evolutions, which Gwinn explained were basically a rehearsal.

 

By practicing in real-time, the team was able to spot discrepancies in certain procedures early and correct them. "When a Sailor is given the tool of knowledge, they are essentially equipped to execute the play," said Gwinn. "Once Sailors are educated on the proper procedures, I feel 99 percent of them will either meet or exceed that expectation." Upon completion of INSURV the Lincoln continues its training cycle to prepare for a 2010 deployment in support of the nation's maritime strategy” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100302-04 - Release Date: 3/2/2010 8:45:00 AM - By USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51638

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 29 February 2010, in port from 28 to 29 February 2010, embarking CVW-2, for Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 2 March 2010, disembarking CVW-2, conducting Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California  from 29 February to 1 March 2010 and then steamed home” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 3 March 2010, in port from 2 to 3 March 2010, embarking CVW-2, conducting Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California from 29 February to 1 March 2010” (Ref. 76).

 

Navy Knowledge Online Provides Online Training for Lincoln Sailors

 

As reported on 3 March 2010, “Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and throughout the Navy are receiving basic and advanced education through a distance learning program known as Navy eLearning (NeL) Afloat.

Distance learning is the process of transferring knowledge from instructor to student despite being separated by time and physical distance. Since
Lincoln Sailors are involved in multiple work-ups underway, distance learning through NeL Afloat becomes essential in keeping Sailors current in their training while deployed.

Sailors access NeL Afloat through the Navy eLearning link on a Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) accounts. From there, Sailors can search through more than 5,000 courses which support "A" and "C" school training as well as general military training (GMT) modules. In addition to GMT, NeL Afloat provides courses in foreign language, financial awareness, Navy advancement training and engineering and aviation training courses including engine and flight control lessons.

"It's a great learning tool, and it's easy access," said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Todd Bigelow, a
Lincoln Weapons Department Sailor who frequents NeL for job-specific training. "It all seems pretty simple and clear." Lincoln Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Richard Hsu stressed that NeL Afloat offers much more than mandatory training and Sailors should take the time to absorb the extra volumes of knowledge offered through NeL Afloat, such as financial management, personal development and other helpful courses.

A professional credential through the Navy's online credentialing system and courses for the Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript, NeL can help Sailors make thousands of dollars. "People should take a more proactive approach," said Hsu. "There's a lot of good training available, and any additional knowledge is beneficial. In short, you get out of it what you put in."

Navy eLearning Afloat has grown increasingly popular among Sailors; last year alone, more than 5 million NeL Afloat courses were completed, a number expected to be even higher in 2010 according to Capt. Hank Reeves, the Navy eLearning project director.

The numbers for courses completed in fiscal year 2010 are already higher than the previous year's numbers for the same time period. Reeves said he is optimistic the previous record for courses completed will be shattered in 2010” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100303-15 - Release Date: 3/3/2010 3:39:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary Hunt, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51639

 

Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Corey Hartley checks voltage with a multi-meter aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

100308-N-4997L-001 - PACIFIC OCEAN (March 8, 2010) - Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Corey Hartley checks voltage with a multi-meter aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)  Hartley is wearing a face shield, rubber gloves and a life-line for safety while working with electrical equipment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=84577

 

CIWS Upgrades Keep Lincoln Combat Ready

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) successfully completed a test firing of its Close In Weapons System (CIWS) on 9 March 2010, after receiving an upgrade during the ship's 2009 maintenance period.

Upgrades to the close-in self-defense weapon system included transition from block 1 baseline 0, to block 1 baseline 2, allowing the gun to fire 4,500 rounds per minute instead of 3,000 as previously capable by using compressed high pressure air instead of hydraulics to release the rounds faster.

The test fire, called a Pre-action Aim Calibration Fire or PACFIRE, lasted about an hour and resulted in the successful firing of approximately 900 rounds from the ship's three CIWS mounts. The purpose of the PACFIRE is to calibrate the aim of the system, ensuring the rounds reach exactly where the radar sees the target.

"The upgrade worked perfectly. We're a much more capable and combat-ready ship with the new software and hardware," said Fire Controlman 1st Class Ian D. Warner of the combat systems department. "One mount is brand new and two others are completely refurbished, so we're fully ready to go out execute the maritime strategy."

Prior to the live fire, Sailors from
Lincoln's combat systems and operations department first conducted a simulated detect-to-engage scenario using the ship's radars and electronic sensors. Pre-fire maintenance and safety checks are then verified before firing.

Finally, post-fire maintenance includes taking apart and inspecting the guns, verifying they're in working condition, then cleaning and lubricating the moving parts before putting the guns back together.

Pronounced "sea-whiz" throughout the fleet, the CIWS is the ship's last line of defense against an incoming missile threat. Phalanx CIWS is a fast reaction terminal defense against low and high flying, high-speed maneuvering anti-ship missile threats that have penetrated all other ships' defenses. With an effective range of one nautical mile and a 4,500 rounds-per-minute rate of fire, the CIWS is an integral element of the fleet defense in-depth concept and the ship self-defense program. The Phalanx CIWS is used on approximately 190 U.S. Navy ships and 20 foreign navies, as well as in the U.S. Army as a land-based weapon system” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100311-32 - Release Date: 3/11/2010 5:16:00 PM - By USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51820

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 11 March 2010, with Captain John D. Alexander as Commanding Officer, conducting Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California with Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2 embarked from 29 February to 2 March 2010, underway in the Eastern Pacific en route from Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California between 3 to 10 March 2010. Abraham Lincoln left its homeport of Everett, Wash. on 23 February 2010, in preparation for a material assessment conducted by the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). Lincoln began the multiple-day evaluation in San Diego, California on 28 February 2010. INSURV is a major inspection mandated by Congress to assess a ship's material condition, its ability to operate the weapons, radar, engineering and navigation systems, maintain its berthing spaces, and function safely. More than 150 inspectors examined how well the crew performs preventative maintenance, and appraised the ship's overall space cleanliness and preservation. The grading criteria is either "fit for sustained combat operations" or "not fit for sustained combat operations." Once the inspection was complete, INSURV reported directly to the secretary of the Navy and Congress if the ship is fit in terms of being able to conduct operations. To prepare for the inspection, Lincoln's INSURV team was created more than a year ago. Lincoln also created an Elite Zone Inspection Team of the most talented and experienced senior chiefs, master chiefs, chief warrant officers and limited duty officers using the same concept as the Elite Spot Check Training Team, which upholds maintenance standards on the ship. The goal was to train the crew in its ability to critically self-assess. Abraham Lincoln conducted operations in the Eastern Pacific from 23 to 28 February 2010. Upon completion of INSURV the Lincoln continued its training cycle to prepare for a 2010 deployment in support of the nation's maritime strategy, arriving NASNI on 2 March 2010, disembarking CVW-2, conducting Flight Deck Certification off the coast of Southern California from 29 February to 1 March 2010. Abraham Lincoln departed NASNI on 3 March 2010, in port from 2 to 3 March 2010 and then steamed home. As reported on 3 March 2010, “Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln and throughout the Navy are receiving basic and advanced education through a distance learning program known as Navy eLearning (NeL) Afloat. Abraham Lincoln successfully completed a test firing of its Close In Weapons System (CIWS) on 9 March 2010, after receiving an upgrade during the ship's 2009 maintenance period. Upgrades to the close-in self-defense weapon system included transition from block 1 baseline 0, to block 1 baseline 2, allowing the gun to fire 4,500 rounds per minute instead of 3,000 as previously capable by using compressed high pressure air instead of hydraulics to release the rounds faster. The test fire, called a Pre-action Aim Calibration Fire or PACFIRE, lasted about an hour and resulted in the successful firing of approximately 900 rounds from the ship's three CIWS mounts. The purpose of the PACFIRE is to calibrate the aim of the system, ensuring the rounds reach exactly where the radar sees the target (23 February to 11 March 2010)” (Ref. 76, Story Number: NNS100311-32 - Release Date: 3/11/2010 5:16:00 PM - By USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100303-15 - Release Date: 3/3/2010 3:39:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary Hunt, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100303-15 - Release Date: 3/3/2010 3:39:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary Hunt, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)  Story Number: NNS100311-32 - Release Date: 3/11/2010 5:16:00 PM - By USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) (in port articles have the ship in port Everett, Washington rather then San Diego, Ca. as reported by reference 76 from 17 to 22 February 2010)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51820

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51639

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51639

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51820

 

Financial Experts Spread Wealth of Knowledge Aboard Lincoln

 

“Three financial experts held a financial seminar "Moneywise in the Military" for Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) members of Commander Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 9 and Naval Station Everett Sailors and families on 16 March 2010 in the ship's hangar bay.

Nearly 500 Sailors, Coast Guardsmen and family members attended the multimedia seminar which began with three presentations on key financial topics for young Sailors and families, and concluded with a question and answer session.

"Start before you need to start," said Peter Bielagus, an author and certified financial planner who spoke at the seminar. Bielagus warned against confusing unimportant expenditures, such as expensive coffee, with things you truly want such as a nice home or savings for your family.

He also made it clear that even a small amount of savings will grow to thousands of dollars with minimal effort.

"I challenge you to start now. I don't care about the amount of money you save, just that you save something. Even a penny a day."

Holly Petraeus, a Better Business Bureau (BBB) advocate, spoke about fraudulent businesses and other scams aimed at service members. The BBB is the nation's oldest self-regulatory, nonprofit business which allows citizens to enter a business name, check its record or file a complaint at
www.bbb.org.

Kelvin Boston, a bestselling author and host of the "Moneywise" television program on PBS, explained the wealth building process as a game, with an important twist, "Even if you decide not to play the game, the game will still play you," said Boston.

"We care about you and your families and want you to have a sound financial plan for your future," said Lincoln's Commanding Officer Capt. John Alexander” (Ref. Story Number:
3/17/2010 4:43:00 - Release Date: 3/17/2010 4:43:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=51991

 

Shoup Sailors Groomed for Success at Port Hueneme

 

“USS Shoup (DDG-86) completed an intense period of combat system maintenance and repair at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Port Hueneme, Calif. from 22 to 25 March 2010.

Port Hueneme's engineers provided parts, training, and technical guidance to Sailors throughout the four-day visit and system groom. With their assistance,
Shoup improved both its current and future readiness.

"Port Hueneme is a rare opportunity whose value cannot be understated. The benefit to the technicians both on board and ashore is priceless," said Cmdr. Joe Nadeau,
Shoup commanding officer.

Located at Naval Base Ventura County, the Port Hueneme facilities boast some of the leading engineers and developers working on the Aegis combat system. The visit allowed
Shoup's junior technicians to work closely with the experts in their fields.

"Without the crew at Port Hueneme, we'd have to live with any faults in our equipment," said Ensign Matthew Brassart, electronic materials officer, "the technicians of Port Hueneme know actually causes those faults and can often fix them."

The port visit yielded other unique opportunities for training as well.
Shoup's Deck Division benefited from use of the underway replenishment simulator, while the wardroom and chiefs mess received briefings on a variety of tactical subjects tailored to the ship's configuration and future schedule. Several junior officers received a tour of the Navy's Self Defense Test Ship, the decommissioned USS Paul F. Foster (DD-964). It was also a chance for NSWC employees, the majority of whom are civilians, to tour Shoup and see how their work is reflected on an active platform.

"I wish we were here longer," said Lt. j.g. Michael Bassen, Shoup's systems test officer. "The ability for a crewmember to stand next to the subject matter expert is invaluable."

Shoup is homeported in Everett, Wash., as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100331-03 - Release Date: 3/31/2010 1:01:00 PM - From USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52282

 

Sheltering in Style at the Navy's Newest Berth

 

“USS Shoup (DDG-86) became the first ship to pull into the newly reopened Berth Lima at Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI), Coronado, Calif. on 1 April 2010.

The $23 million upgrade to Berth Lima, an aircraft carrier pier, took nearly a year and included changes to enhance pier security and utilities.

Barnhart Balfour Beatty, a San Diego-based construction company, completed the contract for the improvements. The ribbon-cutting for the new facility took place on 9 April 2010.

"Berth Lima was by far the nicest pier I've ever moored a ship to," said Cmdr. Joe Nadeau,
Shoup's commanding officer. "It was exciting to get to berth next to USS Nimitz (CVN-68) and USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), and the city of Coronado is very Navy-friendly."

Shoup previewed the services at the new berth while mooring at NASNI from 1 to 5 April 2010 to avoid dangerous weather conditions affecting the waters off the entire American west coast. Storm fronts frequently bring high winds and heavy seas to the Northern Pacific during the winter months. Shoup had been conducting training operations in Southern California when the inclement weather struck.

Shoup is homeported in Everett, Wash., as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100421-08 - Release Date: 4/21/2010 1:20:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52705

 

Lincoln Sailors Train for Lean Six Sigma Green Belt Certification

 

“Four Lincoln Sailors completed major sections of their Six Sigma Green Belt certification after Lean Six Sigma experts from Commander Naval Air Forces (CNAF) completed a three-week training program on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 2 April 2010.

In conducting Six Sigma Phase I implementation, CNAF trainer and Black Belt Major Paul Little, along with
Lincoln AIRSpeed officers Ens. Rich Duchnowski and Lt. j.g. Veronica Bennett, trained 14 Sailors during the three-week implementation. Ten additional Lincoln Sailors participated in the training and expect to receive their Green Belt certification later this year.

"These Sailors took a major step in reaching their Green Belt qualification. Leading two events in such a short amount of time is very impressive," said Duchnowski.

The Six Sigma training included Buffer Management Tool (BMT) Administrator training with Core Team and assigned administrators, Continuous Process Improvement Management System (CPIMS) training with Core Team and Rapid Improvement Events (RIE) participants, and Initial Time Domain and over-the-shoulder training for both the
Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) and supply departments. The team also completed Sustainability and Strategic Planning training with AIMD leadership. The training concluded with two RIE.

Future training will consist of three, two-week follow-up visits by CNAF Black Belts for advanced training and targeted events on the Process Improvement Plan.

Six Sigma is a process improvement strategy that uses quality improvement as the method for business improvement. Six Sigma is uniquely driven by close understanding of customer needs, disciplined use of facts, data, statistical analysis, and diligent attention to managing, improving, and reinventing business processes. Process improvements focus on variation reduction to produce highly-repeatable processes that create customer satisfaction. Six Sigma measures variability in relation to a total population of numbers” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100408-22 - Release Date: 4/8/2010 6:58:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52464

 

Stennis Center Honors Lincoln Sailors

 

“The Stennis Center for Public Service recognized three USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors on 2 April 20110 for exemplary leadership at Seattle's Waterfront Marriott hotel. The awards hold special significance for Lincoln Sailors as nominations can only be made by a peer or subordinate.  The award winners each exemplify the spirit and service of the late Sen. John C. Stennis, whose legacy is carried out through the Stennis Leadership Awards Program.

 

The leadership award programs for aircraft carriers recognize distinguished officers and senior-enlisted personnel who have demonstrated exceptional leadership on board their respective aircraft carriers. Lt. Cmdr. Travis Hartman of Akron, Ohio won the Statesman Award as the junior officer who exemplified the highest ideals of leadership. As the ship's assistant navigator, Hartman is responsible for the planning, briefing, and execution of shipboard navigation exercises.

 

He was also named the ship's 2009 Junior Officer Shiphandler of the Year.  The Union Award was given to Senior Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Carlos Alamo of Caguas, Puerto Rico. Alamo is the senior enlisted member of the ship's weapons department and is a graduate of the U. S. Navy Senior Enlisted Academy. He holds an associate in arts degree from Coastline Community College. Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Sean Bibby of Dunellen, N.J., received the Liberty Award. An aviation boatswain's mate specializes in aircraft handling, Bibby is qualified as an aircraft director and is earning his Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist qualification.

 

The ceremony was marked by recognition of the spouse of each award winner as a key part of the Sailors' success. Also in attendance were Rex Buffington of the Stennis Center, Mayor Dennis Kendall of the City of Marysville, Wash., and the ship's Commanding Officer John Alexander. "As commanding officer of the three exceptional Sailors we're honoring tonight, it's a privilege to recognize these individuals who representative the exceptional leadership throughout the entire command," said Alexander. "That leadership is necessary to successfully perform the complex missions of aircraft carriers.

 

They are the best of the best." As part of the Stennis Center's continuing effort to strengthen understanding and relationships between civilian leaders and the military, the award winners will travel to Washington, D.C., where they will meet with members of Congress, staff and other civilian leaders. As the award winners are honored and learn about how policy is made in Washington, the civilian leaders also get an opportunity to learn about the life, values, culture and institutions of the military through visits with the award winners and their spouses.

 

In addition, including their spouses helps further the understanding of contributions made by the family members of those who serve in the military. Stennis wrote the first Senate ethics code and was the first chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee. After working in the Armed Services Committee for more than a decade, he was honored by having a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), named after him” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100407-11 - Release Date: 4/7/2010 8:55:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, SEATTLE (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52462

 

AIMD Uses AIRSpeed Speed in Effort to Save Time, Money

 

As reported on 10 April 2010, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Detachment (AIMD) recently began implementing a system to help reduce the cost of shipboard maintenance while simultaneously decreasing the time it takes for parts to get from the shop back to the squadrons. Fourteen AIMD Sailors attended a week-long class at Naval Station Everett to learn about Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) AIRSpeed and brought back that knowledge to be implemented in their work centers.

 

Implemented in waves, or groups of work centers, Enterprise AIRSpeed was developed in 2004 from a variety of time and money-saving tactics used by Naval and Marine Corps installations. It helps supply and operations departments streamline their workloads and constantly improve maintenance processes while saving time and money, explained Jim Brown of NAVAIR. "AIRSpeed is a new way to complete goals," explained Brown. "It's a way to create a culture of continuous improvement in an effort to streamline all of a business' processes."

AIRSpeed brings the tools of continuous process improvement to Naval Aviation's non-production, transactional service environment. Using AIRSpeed tools including the Theory of Constraints, Lean and Six Sigma, employees at all levels are able to improve ways to change how NAVAIR does business at every level of the organization: headquarters, business unit, department, program office and integrated product team, according to the program's Web site.

 

Of the 14 Sailors, Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Jonathan Robles said after taking the course, he could already see where AIRSpeed will be very beneficial to the mission of the ship. "Depending on what's being worked on, AIRSpeed makes that process quicker, in turn affording Sailors more time to keep improving our other evolutions," he said. "AIRSpeed is unique because it can be applied to almost anything from aircraft maintenance, to something as simple as routing a leave chit." The Theory of Constraints, Lean and Six Sigma are the three key points that govern the AIRSpeed program.

 

Each is a written instruction that helps work centers analyze and cut away unnecessary steps to streamline their processes, saving them time, personnel, resources and money, explained Robles, of the ship's Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department. The Theory of Constraints, as with any organization's processes, is the philosophy that there is always at least one limitation. Lean focuses on the removal of wasted resources, time, or anything else that doesn't add value to a process.


Six Sigma is a strategy that improves quality of the products put out by focusing more on customer needs. "The whole program is basically a system to help corporations refine a way of identifying the weakest link in a process and working around it or cutting it out in order to feed the stronger links," said Robles.

According to Brown, many other organizations Navy-wide have already begun their AIRSpeed journey, including Intermediate Maintenance Activity (IMA), Naval Aviation Depot North Island and IMA Norfolk, which were among the first to receive their training when the program started several years ago.

"Other carriers used this process to become more efficient in the chow hall lines and with ship's laundry," he said. "Corporations like Motorola and Toyota are using this process to become more successful. We began using these tools on AIMD first, but it will soon become ship-wide." "It feels good to learn about AIRSpeed and apply it here onboard the Lincoln," said Robles.

 

"The department's leadership trusts me and relies on me to help better the ship” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100410-03 - Release Date: 4/10/2010 12:20:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Barry Riley, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) (Based on this article or on reference 76 and lack of Command History Report, the ship was either out at sea or not on the 10th)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52413

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 19 April 2010, with Captain John D. Alexander as Commanding Officer, for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of Southern California in the Eastern Pacific (Based on Story Number: NNS100410-03 or on reference 76 and lack of Command History Report, the ship was either out at sea or not on the 10th, suggesting possibly an earlier departure date))” (Ref. 76).

 

Environmental Professionals Spend Earth Day Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted 2010 guests from various environmental agencies on 21April 2010 to share a day-in-the-life at sea and discuss the future of environmental protection and the Navy mission. The visitors arrived on board the ship via a C-2 Greyhound aircraft and were greeted by the ship's commanding officer, air wing commander and command master chief before being whisked away to a full day of tours, discussion forums, a personal briefing with Carrier Strike Group 9 Commander, Rear Adm. Mark Guadagnini, and interaction with the ship's company.

 

During the visitors' stay, the ship not only demonstrated its capabilities as one of the mightiest warships on the seas, but also showed how far the Navy has come with their environmental programs. One stop on the tour was the ship's trash compactor and waste disposal room, where ship's company removes recyclables from wet and dry trash.

"Our Sailors work very hard to ensure that all paper and plastics are separated and that no hazardous material is discharged overboard," said Lt. Bernardino Rodriguez,
Lincoln's industrial hygiene officer and assistant safety officer. "We are able to compact 30 large plastic bags into one pizza-pie sized disc.

 

These discs are maintained on board until we can properly recycle them in port." Additional highlights of the tour included a briefing on the Navy's Protective Measures Assessment Protocol, marine mammal protective measures and appropriate hazardous material disposal. The visitors left the ship on Earth Day, April 22nd, and will return to their home towns to share their recent experiences aboard the ship.

Abraham Lincoln is currently underway off the coast of southern California conducting tailored ship training assessments in preparation for a deployment later in 2010” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100422-05 - Release Date: 4/22/2010 10:50:00 AM - By Lt. Greg D. Raelson, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52792

 

Lincoln Continues to Push Electrical Safety

 

As reported on 22 April 2010, “Sailors on board USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) have made great strides to take extra precautions and safety measures while working around electrical equipment. Lincoln completed an extensive electrical safety stand down in March 2010 to ensure all Sailors were trained, and the ship's electricians have made extra efforts to ensure all electrical equipment is properly safety checked. "If life is on the line, it doesn't hurt to take extra precautions," said Electrician's Mate Fireman Katie Krowsky, of the electrical tool issue room on board Lincoln. "If the ship provides the tools to be safe, you might as well use it rather than be sorry later." It is also mandatory for Sailors to go to the electrical tool issue room to have their personal gear such as irons, phone chargers and laptop chargers safety checked once bringing it on board the ship. If any personal gear not safety checked are found on board the ship, it can be confiscated. "Certain chargers and simple appliances are not safe for the ship's electric system," said Krowsky, of Milwaukee, Wis.

 

"Forcing something through the system can really hurt someone so we really push Sailors to check if their personal items are authorized." The electrical system of a ship is very different compared to that of a residence. The ship does not have the same grounding system as homes because there is no ground to absorb electricity, preventing electrocution. "The ship is basically a large bathtub," said Lt. Cmdr. Michael Ball, Lincoln's electrical officer, a Port Orchard, Ore. native. "We're a metal object constantly surrounded by water so we have to be more cautious with our electrical system." Besides getting personal items safety checked, the electrical department stresses to notify them if there are any electrical discrepancies around the ship such as corroded wires, dead-end cables or electrical equipment not stowed or wired properly. "We spend countless hours fixing trouble calls and repairing equipment," said Ball.

 

"But if no one tells us there is a problem, we can't fix it. It is everyone's duty to notify a discrepancy before it hurts our shipmates." From 1997 to 1999, about 33 percent of personnel injuries on Navy ships and submarines were from electrical shock mishaps. Although Lincoln hasn't had any electrical injuries recently, the electrical department cannot stress enough how important it is to be safe. "We have to be a team and watch out for each other," said Ball. "It doesn't hurt to take the extra time and steps needed to prevent bodily harm. "Some major reasons why people get hurt from electrical shock are overfusing, improper labeling of power panels, corroded or damaged electrical equipment, dead-ended cables, not safety checking personal equipment," said Ball. "We have to keep it mind it only takes 0.1 amps of electricity to kill someone” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100422-14 - Release Date: 4/22/2010 3:19:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs , At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52777

 

Lincoln Sailor Saves Day

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commanding officer awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (NAM) to a Sailor for her actions on 24 April 2010. Capt. John D. Alexander awarded Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Airman Stephanie Lopez, of Washougal, Wash., for her actions during a shipboard fire. Lopez received the medal during a ceremony on the ship's bridge the next morning. After presenting the award, Alexander commended Lopez over the 1-MC (shipboard public-announcement system), informing her shipmates of her responsiveness during the incident. At approximately 6:20 p.m., Lopez was on steam watch, making security rounds when she went into the catapult-3 launch valves space and saw what she thought were flames.

"I felt kind of scared," said Lopez. "At first, I wasn't actually sure if it was a fire or not. I thought maybe a light had burst open and that it was sparking, so that's why I got the guys to come from the lounge to verify that it was a fire." Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Corey Roudebush, of Waunakee, Wis., was one of the Sailors nearby who inspected the scene. "I checked it out, and determined that there were flames in the corner," said Roudebush. "I stayed calm and posted a watch outside while she [Lopez] activated the steam-smothering [valve] and one of the other petty officers called maintenance control and informed the chain of command. We just stayed calm and did what we were trained to do."

Lopez ran around to where the steam-smothering valve is located, and activated it, suffocating the fire. Her rapid response quickly diffused what could have been a catastrophic fire. Lopez's actions earned her the second NAM she has received in her three-year Navy career. Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Caleb Durbin, of Ozark, Mo., was posted as the watch and claimed Lopez is a hero from his point of view. "She did excellent," said Durbin. "She's my hero. I'm proud that after all the training we did, I know we can trust these guys."

When asked if she felt like a hero, Lopez said she was just doing her job. "If I'm a hero, so is Petty Officer Roudebush. I'm not the only hero here." Lopez thanked Roudebush and Durbin for the training they gave her when she learned how to stand steam watch in January. Her actions were second-nature due to the proper procedures they've taught since she checked on board. "When somebody is trying to teach you something, listen, because they're not talking for their own good," Lopez said. "They're talking for you. In the future, you're going to be put in a position where you're going to need to know what you're doing” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100504-06 - Release Date: 5/4/2010 3:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alan Gragg, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53008

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) commanding officer awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (NAM) to a Sailor for her actions on 24 April 2010. Capt. John D. Alexander awarded Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Airman Stephanie Lopez, of Washougal, Wash., for her actions during a shipboard fire. Lopez received the medal during a ceremony on the ship's bridge the next morning. After presenting the award, Alexander commended Lopez over the 1-MC (shipboard public-announcement system), informing her shipmates of her responsiveness during the incident. At approximately 6:20 p.m., Lopez was on steam watch, making security rounds when she went into the catapult-3 launch valves space and saw what she thought were flames.

"I felt kind of scared," said Lopez. "At first, I wasn't actually sure if it was a fire or not. I thought maybe a light had burst open and that it was sparking, so that's why I got the guys to come from the lounge to verify that it was a fire." Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Corey Roudebush, of Waunakee, Wis., was one of the Sailors nearby who inspected the scene. "I checked it out, and determined that there were flames in the corner," said Roudebush. "I stayed calm and posted a watch outside while she [Lopez] activated the steam-smothering [valve] and one of the other petty officers called maintenance control and informed the chain of command. We just stayed calm and did what we were trained to do."

Lopez ran around to where the steam-smothering valve is located, and activated it, suffocating the fire. Her rapid response quickly diffused what could have been a catastrophic fire. Lopez's actions earned her the second NAM she has received in her three-year Navy career. Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Caleb Durbin, of Ozark, Mo., was posted as the watch and claimed Lopez is a hero from his point of view. "She did excellent," said Durbin. "She's my hero. I'm proud that after all the training we did, I know we can trust these guys."

When asked if she felt like a hero, Lopez said she was just doing her job. "If I'm a hero, so is Petty Officer Roudebush. I'm not the only hero here." Lopez thanked Roudebush and Durbin for the training they gave her when she learned how to stand steam watch in January. Her actions were second-nature due to the proper procedures they've taught since she checked on board. "When somebody is trying to teach you something, listen, because they're not talking for their own good," Lopez said. "They're talking for you. In the future, you're going to be put in a position where you're going to need to know what you're doing” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100504-06 - Release Date: 5/4/2010 3:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alan Gragg, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53008

 

Lincoln Recognizes Sexual Assault Awareness Month with California Leader

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) recognized April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month with a special guest from the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA) on 25 April 2010. Robert Coombs, director of public affairs for CALCASA, part of an underway distinguished visitor trip aboard Lincoln, has worked with hundreds of Navy and military sexual assault awareness leaders and complimented the military for leading the way in sexual assault prevention and response. I've never seen this level of support from leadership, all the way from the top down," said Coombs. While aboard Lincoln he met with the ship's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) team and talked about the importance of the program to the crew and other guests. "The work that these folks do is some of the most important and innovative I've seen," said Coombs. "It's important for me to see the environment they work in and where they fall in the ship's culture. A lot of the work I do with policy makers is identifying those things within the culture that will sustain or impede these programs."

Lincoln's
SAPR Coordinator, Chief Information Systems Technician Jess Eisele, spoke to the group about the ship's dedication to its crew. He talked about the ship's awareness efforts, unrestricted and restricted reporting guidelines, and confidentiality considerations. "Restricted reporting allows active duty victims, on a confidential basis, to receive medical treatment and counseling without becoming involved in an investigation," said Eisele. "It also gives victims control over their personal information." The Navy's SAPR program offers prevention education, victim intervention services, and comprehensive victim advocate training. The Navy was the first service to have a dedicated, funded program for sexual assault. Established in 1994, the Navy Sexual Assault Victim Intervention program, which is now the SAPR program, offered a standardized, consistent, victim-sensitive system to prevent and respond to sexual assault Navywide. "I'm most proud of the work being done in the Navy," said Coombs.

 

"I think it's really important to be able to find the folks that have the characteristics that are necessary to do crisis advocacy work, and to be able to fit that into what happens on a ship on a day-to-day basis." The goals of the Navy's SAPR program are to promote sensitive, coordinated, and effective management of sexual assault cases; reduce the incidence of sexual assault in the Navy through awareness and prevention education; and standardize reporting of sexual assaults. With these goals in mind, the Navy's program was created with three components: awareness and prevention education, victim advocacy and intervention, and collection of reliable data on sexual assault. "The bottom line is that sexual assault is a criminal act that is absolutely incompatible with the Navy's core values, high standards of professionalism, and personal discipline," said Eisele” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100427-14 - Release Date: 4/27/2010 9:16:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52891

 

Capt. Tom Slais, commodore of Electronic Attack Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet, discusses the future of the electronic attack community with Rear Adm. Michael Lyden, commander of Naval Supply System Command.

 

100430-N-9860Y-003 - OAK HARBOR, Wash. (April 30, 2010) - Capt. Tom Slais, commodore of Electronic Attack Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet, discusses the future of the electronic attack community with Rear Adm. Michael Lyden, commander of Naval Supply System Command and the 45th chief of Supply Corps during a site visit to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tucker M. Yates/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=84905

 

Chief of Supply Corps Discusses Communication, Careers While Visiting USS Shoup

 

“The commander of Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) visited USS Shoup (DDG-86) on 30 April 2011 to emphasize Sailor readiness during a tour of naval installations in the Pacific Northwest.

The visit by Rear Adm. Michael J. Lyden, who also serves as the 45th chief of Supply Corps, was a unique chance for supply officers on the Everett, Wash. waterfront to ask questions and provide feedback to the highest ranking supply officer in the Navy.

Topics of discussion ranged from career advancement to technical supply issues to a spirited debate on nontraditional communication within the supply community. Lyden also spoke at length on the opportunities for and importance of joint tours.

"In the last eight to ten years, we've really come to appreciate that it's a joint world, especially when it comes to logistics," said Lyden.

Lyden's visit concluded with a tour of
Shoup's galley, mess decks, supply support center and ship's store. He also met junior Supply Department personnel and complimented the Sailors on their hard work and dedication.

"It was a huge benefit to see that the top supply officer in the Navy is interested in what we do," said Chief Culinary Specialist (SW) Wilson Sydenstricker, who reported to
Shoup in April as the S-2 Division leading chief petty officer. "Visits like this one let us see our work in the context of the bigger picture."

Shoup is homeported in Everett as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100509-01 - Release Date: 5/9/2010 3:43:00 PM - By Lt. j.g. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53225

 

U.S. Navy Sailors Volunteer at Canadian Community Center

 

“Sailors from guided-missile destroyers USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sterett (DDG-104) volunteered to clean and paint a community center on 2 May 2010 during a port visit to Esquimalt, British Columbia.

Crew members cleaned the grounds and facilities of the community center operated by the Burnside Gorge Community Association.

"We were able to mow the lawns, remove weeds and debris, and paint three classrooms," said Operations Specialist 1st Class Lisa Capell, community relations coordinator for
Halsey.

"After we finished, the facility looked like really nice. It looked like we accomplished a week's worth of work," said one of the volunteers, Electrician's Mate 1st Class Jessica A. Henry.

"It is an absolute privilege to be received in a foreign port and contribute to the local community in meaningful ways," said Cmdr. Jordy Harrison,
Halsey commanding officer. We have a motivated and talented crew that loves to volunteer at every opportunity."

"It is very important to have volunteers offer their services and expertise in the way the sailors did," said Simeon Goa, a custodian for Burnside Gorge. "With volunteers, positive changes are possible and can assist in creating a better working environment and a sense of connection with the community and abroad."

Halsey and Sterett are homeported in San Diego, and are scheduled to operate with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group later this year” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100509-32 - Release Date: 5/9/2010 11:03:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, VICTORIA, British Columbia (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53210

 

Commander, 3rd Fleet Presents Air Medals Aboard USS Abraham Lincoln

 

“The commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet made a special trip by helicopter to USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) on 5 May 2010 to present the Air Medal to two heroic Navy pilots.

Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt awarded Lt. Cmdr. Michael Finn, of Long Island, N.Y., and Lt. Dylan Schoo, of Grand Junction, Colo., the Air Medal for their heroic achievement during an in-flight emergency on 1 March 2010 near Naval Air Station Fallon, Nev., while flying the E-2C
Hawkeye aircraft assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (CAW) 116 Sun Kings.

The pilots experienced a sudden drop in oil pressure and ensuing engine fire, causing them to shut down one of the
Hawkeye's two engines. They immediately activated the fire extinguishing system and performed an emergency landing and escape from the aircraft.

"This demonstrates the high level of training and preparedness of our air crews," said Hunt.

As a result of their flawless efforts, Finn and Schoo were able to save the aircraft and the lives of all five crew members aboard.

"Their superb flying ability and courage in the face of danger reflect great credit upon themselves and the Navy," said Hunt. "Because of their heroic actions, five Sailors are still with us today."

Abraham Lincoln is currently underway off the coast of San Diego preparing for an upcoming deployment later in the summer of 2010” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100507-06 - Release Date: 5/7/2010 3:04:00 PM - By Lt. Greg Raelson, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53153

 

The guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG 86) is underway in the Pacific Ocean.

 

100505-N-7304M-001 - PACIFIC OCEAN (May 5, 2010) - The guided-missile destroyer USS Shoup (DDG-86) is underway in the Pacific Ocean. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Patrick L. McTavish/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=85199

 

USS Halsey Trains for Surface Dominance

 

“Navy guided missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) performed precision maneuvers, screening exercises, and numerous other tactical training evolutions during Destroyer Squadron 9's six-ship group sail on 5 May 2010 in preparation for joining USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing 2 for strike group training.


The ships conducted precision maneuvers at intervals as close as 300 yards from each other to train in positioning themselves for tactical formations and prepare for a group photo opportunity. "We don't usually get the opportunity to so closely approach that many ships," said Ensign Donald P. Northrup of Phoenix, the conning officer for the event.

 

"This gave me the opportunity to use the mental math techniques we learned to predict how the ship will move." Following the initial set of maneuvers, the six surface combatants practiced strike group level screening maneuvers designed to defend a high value unit.

 

"Our watchstanders maneuvered Halsey with confidence and precision during a unique training opportunity," said Cmdr. Jordy Harrison, of Columbia, Md., Halsey commanding officer. "We performed exceptionally well," said Chief Operations Specialist Darryl C. Patrick, of Altadena, Calif. "We rapidly cracked the signals, verified their accuracy with the bridge watchstanders, and executed the movements flawlessly." Shortly after lunch, Halsey participated in the first of a series of quick-response drills.

 

"Man overboard" sounded over the announcing system as crew members scrambled to react within the time limitations. Australian Navy Lt. Cmdr. Dave Murphy, Halsey's professional warfare officer said, "We responded well, and were ready to recover the man in less than 10 minutes." As the day progressed, Anti-Submarine Warfare Officer Ensign Jamie J. Boudreaux, anti-submarine warfare officer, led an exercise to simulate tracking a submarine and honing internal communications.

 

"We practiced building unit cohesion between ships and the warfare commander, which will prepare us for missions we may be called upon to undertake during our upcoming deployment," said Boudreaux, a native of Houma, La. The final exercise of the day was an electronic warfare exercise. Watchstanders flexed Halsey's ability to identify other ships nearby.

 

"The exercise was a good opportunity for us to evaluate how effective we are at identifying electronic emissions," said Cryptologic Technician 2nd Class Grace J. Kirkland, of Athens, Ohio. "Group sail is a critical element in preparing us for our upcoming deployment," said Harrison.

 

"I am extremely proud of the crew for their outstanding performance, and am confident we will be ready to execute any mission we are required to perform during deployment in support of our nation's maritime strategy." Halsey is homeported in San Diego and is scheduled to operate with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group later this year” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100509-31 - Release Date: 5/9/2010 11:02:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53207

 

University Educators Tour USS Abraham Lincoln

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) hosted 12 professors and senior administrators from various colleges on 6 May 2011 to share a day-in-the-life at sea and highlight the Navy's commitment to education.

The visitors, who hailed from University of Southern California, Washington State University, University of Northern Iowa, Michigan Technological University, Iowa State University, and University of Montana, arrived on a C-2
Greyhound. They were greeted by the ship's commanding officer, air wing commander and command master chief before being whisked away to a full day of tours, discussion forums, a briefing with Carrier Strike Group 9 Commander Rear Adm. Mark Guadagnini, and interaction with the ship's crew.

During their stay, the ship not only demonstrated her capabilities as one of the mightiest warships on the seas, but also showed how far the Navy has come with its educational and career programs.

One stop on their tour was a visit with one of the ship's command career counselors, Navy Counselor 1st Class Adam Cregar, of Kokomo, Ind., who explained many of the opportunities available to Sailors at sea.

"We work with each Sailor individually to fully prepare them for their journey into education," said Cregar. "Our intention is to maximize the availability of programs to give all our Sailors the opportunity to benefit from our education services."

Additional highlights of the tour included a visit to the ship's library and computer center, as well as plenty of conversation with ship's company.

"Many Sailors are involved in higher education in one form or another," said Cregar. "We have Sailors working on their associate's, bachelor's and even master's degrees."

During the ship's last deployment, 749 Sailors completed college classes in 20 different subjects. The visitors will return to their colleges and universities to share their recent experiences aboard the ship.

Abraham Lincoln is currently underway off the coast of southern California conducting Tailored Ship Training Assessment in preparation for an upcoming deployment in support of the national maritime strategy this summer” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100507-09 - Release Date: 5/7/2010 3:08:00 PM - By Lt. Greg D. Raelson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53168

 

Quick Response Drills Demonstrate USS Halsey's Combat Readiness

 

“Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) demonstrated tactical prowess and combat readiness through live gunnery fire events and casualty drills on 7 May 2010 during Destroyer Squadron 9's group sail prior to joining USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) and Carrier Air Wing 2 for strike group training. Four ships from Destroyer Squadron 9 conducted synchronized gunnery fire on a single target. The ships effectively shared targeting data to engage a common target.

"This demonstrated our seamless ability to coordinate with ships in company to perform defensive measures against realistic threats," said Cmdr. Jordy Harrison of Columbia, Md.,
Halsey commanding officer. The destroyer squadron staff also initiated two unannounced quick response drills. The first was a loss of steering drill, where crew members manually assumed control of the ship's steering equipment and maneuvered the ship from an engineering space. The crew reacted quickly, reaching their station in less than two minutes.

"We are always ready to respond to any casualty," said Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Rosanny Peralta of New York, who steered the ship from the alternate steering space. "It shows how well the crew is trained and our high level of readiness for deployment."

Watchstanders reacted to another quick response drill on the bridge to engage a threat with small caliber weapons. Quartermaster 3rd Class Courtney D. Wortham of Bradenton, Fla. loaded the machine gun on the bridge wing without hesitation and fired immediately when ordered. "I was ready to fire within seconds of receiving the threat," said Wortham. "It shows we are always prepared to defend the ship."

"I prefer the quick response events because it introduces spontaneity and represents reality," said Lt. Cmdr. Michael L. Weeldreyer,
Halsey's executive officer. The final exercise of the day was a simulated launch of a Tomahawk missile which allows Halsey to engage land targets hundreds of miles from her location.

"We proved we are well trained and ready for deployment," said Ensign David A. Youker of Randolph, N.J., strike officer. "We can be counted on to put missiles on target should the need arise." "This group sail is incredibly important for us to shift into a deployment-focused mindset and demonstrate our ability to act with disciplined aggression against any threat to the United States," said Harrison.

Halsey is homeported in San Diego and is scheduled to operate with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group later this year” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100509-13 - Release Date: 5/9/2010 7:26:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53227

 

USS Momsen (DDG 92),  USS Shoup (DDG 86) and USS Sterett (DDG 104) cruise in formation behind USS Halsey (DDG 97) firing synchronized five-inch gunfire and crew served weapons.

 

100507-N-3929G-001- PACIFIC OCEAN (May 7, 2010) - The guided-missile destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), left, USS Shoup (DDG-86) and USS Sterett (DDG-104) cruise in formation behind USS Halsey (DDG-97), firing synchronized five-inch gunfire and crew served weapons. Halsey is preparing for deployment with the Everett-based Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group. (U.S. Navy photo by Logistics Specialist 2nd Class Sheryl Gutierrez/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=85187

 

Abraham Lincoln Completes TSTA and FEP

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) received an overall grade of outstanding after successfully completing a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) from 19 April to 10 May 2010.

The Afloat Training Team (ATG) Pacific evaluated
Lincoln's crew during several complex unit level exercises, placing emphasis on the ship's Integrated Training Team (ITT)'s ability to conduct training and assess the ship's watch standing, warfighting and survival capabilities across all required warfare areas.

ITT is comprised of multiple training teams which include, combat systems, damage control, medical, seamanship, navigation and air. The training team has reached a level of proficiency that has enabled them to properly integrate and conduct advanced strike group exercises.

In particular ATG recognized the Damage Control (DC)team and the ship's air department for their level of professionalism and dedication across the board.

"All junior damage control personnel in
Lincoln's DC Division 'carried the day' on multiple occasions throughout the training cycle," wrote Chief Damage Controlman (SW/AW) Elias Robles III, ATG's damage control team leader. "By far all of these outstanding Sailors should be most recognized for their determined and dedicated efforts during this arduous command-wide evolution."

Over the course of two days
Lincoln Sailors successfully demonstrated their ability to respond to major conflagration and mass casualties, as well as conduct torpedo evasion maneuvers, underway fueling and man overboard exercises amongst a myriad of other drills throughout the ship.

With
TSTA and FEP complete, Lincoln will return to its homeport of Everett, Wash., and begin preparations for its next test: Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100512-22 - Release Date: 5/12/2010 4:44:00 PM - By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Eric Powell, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53304

 

 

 

 

Chapter XXV (14 January to 6 September 2010)

Part I of II - 28 January to 14 May 2010

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4