Flight Deck Certification with Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2 off the coast of Southern California; the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) and conducted Carrier Qualifications off the coast of Southern California for Carrier Airwing (CVW) 2; Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) and Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

14 January to 6 September 2010

Chapter XXV

Part I of II - 28 January to 14 May 2010

Part II of II - 15 May to 6 September 2010

 

 

Lincoln Celebrates Asian Pacific Culture

 

“More than 600 crew members aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) celebrated Asian Pacific heritage in a cultural extravaganza held in the ship's hangar bay on 15 May 2010.

The ceremony, narrated by Senior Chief Navy Counselor Paul Tyquiengco of Guam, was attended by Rear Adm. Mark Guadagnini, commander of the Lincoln Strike Group, as well as hundreds of senior officers and enlisted crew members from the ship and Carrier Air Wing 2.

Lincoln's ceremony was marked by several authentic song and dance performances, including a traditional haka dance, which was originally performed to welcome distinguished guests, or to acknowledge great accomplishments or events.

A martial arts demonstration by Cmdr. Thomas Webber, a fourth-degree master instructor in taekwondo and former martial arts world record holder, was also part of the celebration. Commanding Officer Capt. John Alexander opened the ceremony by emphasizing the importance of celebrating the diversity that exists in the Navy.

"We are a stronger nation and a stronger Navy because of our diversity. We become stronger by learning about our and others' cultures," said Alexander.

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month recognizes nearly 19,000 uniformed personnel and more than 29,000 civilians of Asian Pacific heritage that serve in the Navy, including six flag officers, 11 members of the senior executive service, three selected rear admirals and 137 master chiefs. The Asian Pacific region includes all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands such as New Guinea, Fiji, the Solomon Islands, Guam, New Zealand, Hawaii and American Samoa among many others.

The month of May was chosen by Congress to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants.

Over the last two years, the Navy has emphasized diversity by launching the Naval Officer Mentorship Association, the Navy's Asian-Pacific American affinity group, and creation of a facebook page to increase awareness of the Navy's diversity initiatives. The facebook page now highlights more than 60 diversity outreach events each year” (Ref. Story Number:
5/19/2010 9:02:00 AM - Release Date: 5/19/2010 9:02:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53393

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 15 May 2010, with Captain John D. Alexander as Commanding Officer, conducting Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of Southern California from 19 April to 14 May 2010. Abraham Lincoln hosted 2010 guests from various environmental agencies on 21April 2010 to share a day-in-the-life at sea and discuss the future of environmental protection and the Navy mission. The visitors arrived on board the ship via a C-2 Greyhound aircraft and were greeted by the ship's commanding officer, air wing commander and command master chief before being whisked away to a full day of tours, discussion forums, a personal briefing with Carrier Strike Group 9 Commander, Rear Adm. Mark Guadagnini, and interaction with the ship's company. During the visitors' stay, the ship not only demonstrated its capabilities as one of the mightiest warships on the seas, but also showed how far the Navy has come with their environmental programs. One stop on the tour was the ship's trash compactor and waste disposal room, where ship's company removes recyclables from wet and dry trash. As reported on 22 April 2010, “Sailors on board Abraham Lincoln have made great strides to take extra precautions and safety measures while working around electrical equipment. Abraham Lincoln commanding officer awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (NAM) to a Sailor for her actions on 24 April 2010. Capt. John D. Alexander awarded Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) Airman Stephanie Lopez, of Washougal, Wash., for her actions during a shipboard fire. Lopez received the medal during a ceremony on the ship's bridge the next morning. After presenting the award, Alexander commended Lopez over the 1-MC (shipboard public-announcement system), informing her shipmates of her responsiveness during the incident. At approximately 6:20 p.m., Lopez was on steam watch, making security rounds when she went into the catapult-3 launch valves space and saw what she thought were flames. Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln recognized April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month with a special guest from the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA) on 25 April 2010. Robert Coombs, director of public affairs for CALCASA, part of an underway distinguished visitor trip aboard Lincoln, has worked with hundreds of Navy and military sexual assault awareness leaders and complimented the military for leading the way in sexual assault prevention and response. The commander of U.S. 3rd Fleet made a special trip by helicopter to Abraham Lincoln on 5 May 2010 to present the Air Medal to two heroic Navy pilots. Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt awarded Lt. Cmdr. Michael Finn, of Long Island, N.Y., and Lt. Dylan Schoo, of Grand Junction, Colo., the Air Medal for their heroic achievement during an in-flight emergency on 1 March 2010 near Naval Air Station Fallon, Nev., while flying the E-2C Hawkeye aircraft assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (CAW) 116 Sun Kings. Navy guided missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) performed precision maneuvers, screening exercises, and numerous other tactical training evolutions during Destroyer Squadron 9's six-ship group sail on 5 May 2010 in preparation for joining Abraham Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing 2 for strike group training. Abraham Lincoln hosted 12 professors and senior administrators from various colleges on 6 May 2011 to share a day-in-the-life at sea and highlight the Navy's commitment to education. The visitors, who hailed from University of Southern California, Washington State University, University of Northern Iowa, Michigan Technological University, Iowa State University, and University of Montana, arrived on a C-2 Greyhound. They were greeted by the ship's commanding officer, air wing commander and command master chief before being whisked away to a full day of tours, discussion forums, a briefing with Carrier Strike Group 9 Commander Rear Adm. Mark Guadagnini, and interaction with the ship's crew. Navy guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) demonstrated tactical prowess and combat readiness through live gunnery fire events and casualty drills on 7 May 2010 during Destroyer Squadron 9's group sail prior to joining Abraham Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing 2 for strike group training. Four ships from Destroyer Squadron 9 conducted synchronized gunnery fire on a single target. The ships effectively shared targeting data to engage a common target. Sailors aboard Abraham Lincoln received an overall grade of outstanding after successfully completing a TSTA and FEP from 19 April to 10 May 2010. The Afloat Training Team (ATG) Pacific evaluated Lincoln's crew during several complex unit level exercises, placing emphasis on the ship's Integrated Training Team (ITT)'s ability to conduct training and assess the ship's watch standing, warfighting and survival capabilities across all required warfare areas (19 April  to 15 May 2010)” (Ref. 76, Story Number: NNS100422-05 - Release Date: 4/22/2010 10:50:00 AM - By Lt. Greg D. Raelson, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100422-14 - Release Date: 4/22/2010 3:19:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100504-06 - Release Date: 5/4/2010 3:26:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alan Gragg, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100427-14 - Release Date: 4/27/2010 9:16:00 PM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100507-06 - Release Date: 5/7/2010 3:04:00 PM - By Lt. Greg Raelson, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100509-31 - Release Date: 5/9/2010 11:02:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100507-09 - Release Date: 5/7/2010 3:08:00 PM - By Lt. Greg D. Raelson, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100509-13 - Release Date: 5/9/2010 7:26:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100512-22 - Release Date: 5/12/2010 4:44:00 PM - By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Eric Powell, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: 5/19/2010 9:02:00 AM - Release Date: 5/19/2010 9:02:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) & Story Number: 5/19/2010 9:02:00 AM - Release Date: 5/19/2010 9:02:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) (Based on Story Number: NNS100410-03 or on reference 76 and lack of Command History Report, the ship was either out at sea or not on the 10th , suggesting possibly an earlier departure date)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52792

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52777

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53008

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=52891

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53153

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53207

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53168

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53227

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53304

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53393

 

Halsey Demonstrates Anti-Submarine Warfare Prowess

 

“The guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) completed an integrated anti-submarine warfare exercise with Strike Group 9 ships on 16 May 2010 during the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group training group sail.

The three-day exercise conducted with Halsey, USS
Sterett (DDG-104), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Momson (DDG-92), and USS Cape St. George (CG-71) allowed the ships to practice complex communications, integrated tactics between ships and aircraft, and strategic employment of assets to guard a high value asset.

"We are going from finding and localizing submarines on a unit level to doing so on a battle group level," said
Halsey's Anti-Submarine Warfare Officer, Ensign Jamie J. Boudreaux, of Houma, La.

"We really enjoyed the exercise," said Boudreaux, "this was a great opportunity to practice on a larger level and bring realism to our daily operations."

The ships had the opportunity to track mobile training targets and real submarines in the area using their own sensors as well as sensors from helicopters and shore-based, fixed-wing aircraft.

"The exercise allowed us to get into a tactical mindset to train for real-world scenarios we may encounter while patrolling during our upcoming deployment," said Sonar Technician 2nd Class Laura M. Eaton of Brooklyn, N.Y.

Halsey's Executive Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Michael L. Weeldreyer said the team of ships performed above and beyond his expectations.

"Our team exemplified a level of technical and operational competency that will inevitably contribute to the strike group's mission accomplishment during deployment," said Weeldreyer. "We are not the same ship we were when we departed San Diego three weeks ago, our team of warriors has matured into a confident, professional, and tactically focused group of men and women that I will proudly take anywhere this country calls us to go."

Halsey is homeported in San Diego, and is scheduled to operate with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group later this year” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100527-24 - Release Date: 5/27/2010 3:42:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=53657

 

NAVSTA Everett Hosts First Women-at-Sea Symposium

 

Approximately 100 Northwest region Sailors attended the Pacific Northwest Women-At-Sea Symposium, sponsored by Commander Naval Surface Forces (CNSF) on 16 June 2010 in Naval Station Everett's main auditorium.

Sailors from the
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) USS Momsen (DDG-92) and USS Ingraham (FFG-61), listened to lectures and stories from female leadership about the history of women in the Navy and the future impact women will have in the Navy.

Guest speakers included Capt. Carol Hottenrott, deputy commander of Destroyer Squadron 9, Lt. Cmdr. Jean Marie Sullivan, deputy director of The Office of Women's Policies, U.S. 3
rd Fleet Command Master Chief (CMDCM) JoAnn Ortloff and Master Chief Logistics Specialist Patty Romano, the logistics specialist lead detailer, who spoke of challenges faced in the fleet and offered advice on how to maximize Sailors' careers.

"It is important to get information on current policies to our Sailors," said Hottenrott, a Poughkeepsie, N.Y., native. "The symposium provides an education exchange of facts, advice and personal stories between senior and junior Sailors."

Leadership discussed Navy policies and regulations many junior Sailors might not have heard before and how being a woman can affect them differently.

"Everything we mentioned was gender-neutral but there are many tangents to the Navy that impact women differently," said Ortloff. "We try to touch on those unique tangents so we can answer any questions."

The event supplied contact information and different programs available for women in the Navy and how it can be used to benefit their quality of life such as the Navy Women E-Mentor Leadership Program. There is also a Facebook group for female Sailors to connect and discuss issues unique to women in the Navy.

This is the first Women-At-Sea Symposium held in the northwest region. CNAF plans to continue the event yearly to send a positive message to all women in the military.

"I hope this symposium continues to develop the women who come behind us; that they continue to be strong mentors and rate-specialists, to share their success with junior Sailors," said Ortloff. "Today, women are savvy, smart, versatile and eclectic. We make up 15 percent of the Navy and serve beside our Navy brothers with pride” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100618-06 - Release Date: 6/18/2010 11:24:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54142

 

Lincoln Sailors, Wildlife Experts Team Up to Preserve Beach

 

“Sailors from USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) participated in a beach cleanup on Indian Island on 24 June 2010 as part of an effort to restore the natural habitat and curb the spread of invasive grasses on the island. Equipped with gloves, bags and shovels, Lincoln volunteers spent a full day alongside wildlife experts, combing the shores for invasive grass and washed-up sea debris. Indian Island Environmental Manager Bill Kalina oversees and monitors the ecological state of Indian Island. The volunteers helped contribute to a better habitat for indigenous wildlife, said Kalina.

"Bravo zulu to the
Lincoln crew for coming out here today; more folks showed up than we expected and it's making a big difference," said Kalina. "We're doing a two-part project here today, Spartina grass removal, which is an exotic invasive species, and also a beach cleanup, where we're removing debris off the beach that can entangle marine mammals." According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's website, Spartina grass, also known as Smooth Cordgrass, is an aggressive weed that displaces native species, destroying habitat and food sources for native fish, waterfowl and other marine life. Indian Island is home to a number of critical habitat areas for fish and game such as Bull Trout and Bald Eagles, said Kalina. Navy Region Northwest Senior Biologist George Hart sees the effect Spartina grass has on the tidal salt marshes.

 

"Spartina is a grass that's indigenous to the East Coast, and it's a very invasive species that is considered a noxious weed here on the West Coast. It will out-compete all native floras growing here and literally just wipe them out, so you have nothing but a beach full of Spartina," said Hart. Under the expert eyes of Hart and Kalina, Lincoln's Sailors filled up several trash bags of the pervasive weed. Along with Spartina removal, Lincoln's crew also scoured the beach for various debris and trash washed ashore. "We're looking for any kind of man-made objects that can be moved that are here on the beach," said Hart. Lincoln's Sailors found many items including old car tires, mooring lines, plastic bottles and rusted metal. Personnelman Seaman Allison Burns, from Omaha, Neb., said she felt a sense of pride after the clean up.

"I got to meet Sailors from other departments and had fun because I know I played my part in making a difference for our environment," said Burns. Hart said the turnout was a big help in preserving the island's coastal wetlands. "Anytime you can remove manmade objects from the shoreline it makes a difference to the environment by affording the ecosystem an opportunity to recuperate, so it's a very positive effect the Sailors are having," said Hart” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100630-20 - Release Date: 6/30/2010 4:36:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Adam Randolph, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72)  Public Affairs, INDIAN ISLAND, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54403

 

Synthetic Training Sharpens Lincoln's Warfighting Skills

 

“Abraham Lincoln Strike Group participated in a three-day fleet synthetic training exercise from 7 to 9 July 2010 in Everett, Wash., designed to challenge and refine the warfighting skills of its warfare commanders in a virtual environment.

Members from the San Diego-based Tactical Training Group, Pacific (TACTRAGRU) were on board
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) to mentor and place stimulus, or injects, into command display modules, which tested the warfare commanders and tactical watchstanders on their decision making abilities and their ability to communicate throughout the strike group.

TACTRAGRU's mission is to provide advanced training to warriors in order to improve their proficiency in warfighting and joint operations by presenting a challenging and timely curriculum designed to stimulate tactical thought and innovation.

"We are exercising the tactical decision makers in a realistic and stressful tactical training environment," said Lt. Cmdr. Mike Weber, a TACTRAGRU member on board
Lincoln for the exercise. "We are pushing the tacticians to make correct decisions within the rules of engagement."

Another aspect of the training exercise was to ensure all strike group communications systems are fine-tuned and ready for extended operations at sea.

"The greatest value in this type of training is that we can do things through simulation that cannot be done through a real-world exercise," said Weber. "An added benefit is that by stressing real-world shipboard display and communications systems, we are able to identify and fix unforeseen problems while the ships are still in their work-up cycle."

The training encompassed all aspects of naval warfighting in a full-spectrum, tactical environment, from air and sea-space management to over-the-horizon warfare, in preparations for the strike group's upcoming, scheduled deployment” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100709-03 - Release Date: 7/9/2010 11:47:00 AM - From USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Public Affairs, EVERETT, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54561

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 17 July 2010, with Captain John D. Alexander as Commanding Officer, for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX)” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 17 to 19 July 2010” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port call at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 20 July 2010, to embark CVW-2” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) visited Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California from 20 to 22 July 2010, embarking CVW-2” (Ref. 76).

 

USS Shoup's Completes Quality of Life Upgrades for Upcoming Deployment

 

“USS Shoup (DDG-86) celebrated the opening of a new media center on 22 July 2010; one of several quality of life upgrades on board in preparation for a deployment later this year.

The quality of life upgrades were chosen based on Sailors' suggestions. Some of the improvements included installation of flat-screen LCD televisions in each of the berthings, new energy drink vending machines and a facelift for the weight gym.

"Much of what we have done was a direct result of Sailors' comments, suggestions, and requests," said Cmdr. Joe Nadeau, Shoup's commanding officer. "The changes were easy to implement because they made so much sense."

The addition of an media center was part of a larger effort to improve Sailors' ability to communicate with their families during long periods at sea. The crew's satellite-connected telephone was also moved from its previous location in a busy passageway to a quiet corner with a curtain for privacy.

Shoup Sailors have been enthusiastic about the changes, especially as they were the driving source in choosing the projects.

"It makes a difference when people listen to your input," said Operations Specialist 3rd Class Zsa Zsa Alston, one of
Shoup's Morale, Welfare, and Recreation representatives. "The changes have definitely improved morale."

Shoup is homeported in Everett, Wash., as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, which is currently conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100726-08 - Release Date: 7/26/2010 2:28:00 PM - By Lt. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54891

 

Members of the visit, board, search and seizure team of the guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG 97) evaluate a suspicious vessel.

 

100723-N-3929G-002 - PACIFIC OCEAN (July 23, 2010) - Members of the visit, board, search and seizure team of the guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) evaluate a suspicious vessel. Halsey, homeported in San Diego, is preparing for a deployment with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group. The strike group is underway conducting a composite unit training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Logistics Specialist 1st Class Sheryl Gutierrez/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=89682

 

Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Hits COMPTUEX Grand Slam

 

“Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group completed four major exercises frrom 27 to 28 July 2010 as part of Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), flexing its muscles in surface, subsurface, and strike warfare simultaneously.

Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 completed a successful large force strike, simulating the targeting and destruction of critical targets on the ground while simultaneously suppressing enemy radars and anti-aircraft fire. EA-6B
Prowlers from Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131 along with F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets from Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 2, 34, 137, and 151 led the 90 minute mission over the Navy's bombing range on San Clemente Island.

USS
Cape St. George's (CG-71) air defense commander led a complex air defense exercise, linking the networks of six different Aegis platforms to establish airspace superiority greater than 100 miles from the strike group. Destroyers from Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, along with cruiser Cape St. George, helicopters from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, and P-3 Orion aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 practiced detecting and tracking enemy submarines while protecting USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) during an underway refueling. Surface units also fired 90 shells in a precision firing demonstration.

"Wherever the President needs us to go, anywhere in the world, we'll be there and we'll be ready," said Rear Adm. Mark Guadagnini, Lincoln Carrier Strike Group commander. The
COMPTUEX builds upon the strike group's combat readiness by simulating challenges the strike group may encounter on deployment. The advanced training scenarios of COMPTUEX represent the first time a carrier strike group is evaluated as an overall unit. Passing the tests of COMPTUEX certifies Lincoln and its air wing for open-ocean operations, making the force available to deploy wherever and whenever the order is given. Lincoln Carrier Strike Group consists of flagship Abraham Lincoln, embarked CVW 2, embarked DESRON 9 and the guided-missile cruiser Cape St. George.

Ships assigned to DESRON 9 include the destroyers USS
Momsen (DDG-92), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sterett (DDG-104). Squadrons from CVW 2 include the "Bounty Hunters" of VFA-2, the "Blue Blasters" of VFA-34, the "Kestrels" of VFA-37, the "Vigilantes" of VFA-151, the "Lancers" of VAQ-131, the "Sun Kings" of VAW-116, the "Saberhawks" of HSM-77 and the "Golden Falcons" of HSC-12” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100730-04 - Release Date: 7/30/2010 11:19:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alan Gragg, Abraham Lincoln Strike Group Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54986

 

Momsen Reaches Target During Combat Mission Training

 

“USS Momsen (DDG-92) fired 60 shells downrange under the pressure of a simulated combat scenario on 28 July 2010 as part of a composite unit training exercise (COMPTUEX).

Firing at the Shore Bombardment Area of San Clemente Island, the drill gave
Momsen's fire controlmen real world experience with live-fire shore bombardment using their Mark 51 five-inch gun.

Under simulated combat conditions,
Momsen's crew executed a naval surface fire support mission in response to a call-for-fire request from a ground unit. Momsen fired 30 High Explosive, Controlled Variable Time (HE-CVT) rounds and 30 full service charge rounds during the evolution.

"This is some of the most realistic training I've experienced in my career," said Cmdr. Jay D. Wylie,
Momsen's commanding officer. "These standards are much higher, and the room for error much smaller. The added rigor we've seen in this training cycle is making our crew ready to face any adversary or potential contingency."

COMPTUEX builds upon Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group's combat readiness by simulating challenges the strike group may encounter on deployment. The advanced training scenarios of COMPTUEX represent the first time a carrier strike group is evaluated as an overall unit. Passing the tests of COMPTUEX certifies Lincoln and its air wing for open-ocean operations, making the force available to deploy wherever and whenever the order is given.

The strike group consists of flagship
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and the guided-missile cruiser Cape St. George CG 71.

Ships assigned to DESRON 9 include the guided-missile destroyers
Momsen, USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sterett (DDG-104).

Squadrons of CVW 2 include the "Bounty Hunters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 2, the "Blue Blasters" of VFA-34, the "Kestrels" of VFA-37, the "Vigilantes" of VFA-151, the "Lancers" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131, the "Sun Kings" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron 116, the "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 77 and the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 12” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100802-02 - Release Date: 8/2/2010 7:35:00 AM - By Ens. Zachary Thiesse, USS Momsen Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55034

 

Senior Chief Fire Controlman Zack C. Hallman stands watch during a test of the Aegis weapons system aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG 71).

 

100729-N-5016P-001 PACIFIC OCEAN (July 29, 2010) Senior Chief Fire Controlman Zack C. Hallman stands watch during a test of the Aegis weapons system aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 2nd Class Arif Patani/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=89619

 

Ensign Angelique M. Clark stands watch as the guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG 71) tests its Aegis weapons system.

 

100729-N-5016P-002 - PACIFIC OCEAN (July 29, 2010) - Ensign Angelique M. Clark stands watch as the guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71) tests its Aegis weapons system. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arif Patani/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=89668

 

USS Cape St. George Tests Air Defense System

 

“USS Cape St. George (CG-71) tested its Aegis weapons system on 29 July 2010 as part of the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group's Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). The main objective of the Aegis evolution was to exercise the strike groups command and control, provide a common tactical picture, execute pre-planned responses, and identify potentially hostile aircraft in a timely and accurate manner.

"During the Aegis exercise we had live aircraft coming in simulating a variety of platforms, each representing a different type of missile threat," said Lt. j.g. Joshua T. McNett,
Cape St. George's fire control officer, "We assess what the threat is, know what it's capable of, and we counter it before it gets within close of range."

As a guided-missile cruiser,
Cape St. George's main mission while deployed with the strike group is to protect its carrier, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).  The Aegis System is the primary way in which they do this. "We are the air defense commander," said Fire Controlman 1st Class Chad W. Conrad, the Lead SPY Radar Aegis Weapons System (AWS) Technician on board Cape St. George, "Our job is to defend the carrier from any air strikes, and the Aegis weapons system is what does it."

The Aegis combat system is capable of simultaneous operations against a multimission threat: anti-air, anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare. The Aegis System is designed as a total weapon system, from detection to kill. "Aegis was primarily made for open-ocean conflicts," said McNett, "Out in the open ocean, it's the best thing out there. We can track contacts hundreds of miles away. So, there is a huge cone of coverage around the strike group and the carrier as a whole."

The heart of the system is the AN/SPY-1, an advanced, automatic detect and track, multifunction phased-array radar. The radar is able to perform search, track and missile guidance functions simultaneously with a track capacity of over one hundred targets.
Cape St. George is currently off the coast of Southern California with the rest of the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group taking part in COMPTUEX.

COMPTUEX is designed to train the USS Abraham Lincoln, the embarked air wing and the other units that make up the carrier strike group to function as one highly effective fighting force. The exercises will build upon the strike group's combat readiness by simulating the type of scenarios the strike group may face while deployed. The outcome will certify the strike group for open-ocean operations and moves it within the Fleet Response Plan, allowing the Navy to deploy flexible naval force capable of surging quickly” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100801-01 - Release Date: 8/1/2010 1:51:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arif Patani, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS CAPE ST. GEORGE, Pacific Ocean (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55037

 

Halsey's Boarding Teams Prepare for Action

 

“Visit, board, search and seizure teams from USS Halsey (DDG-97) completed numerous exercises from 28 to 30 July 2010 to prepare for potential maritime security operations during their 2010 deployment schedule. Nearly immediately following the guide-missile destroyer's departure for pre-deployment exercises on 23 July 2010, boarding teams accelerated into action and began rigorous events designed to assess the effectiveness of the maritime interdiction mission area.

 

"The training in boarding suspect vessels at sea offered a degree of realism unavailable during earlier training phases," said Lt. Andrew Lingg, a lead boarding officer from Hillsborough, N.J. "The boarding team feels confident following this training." The integrated, multiship maritime security exercises began immediately following Halsey's departure from San Diego Bay. The boarding teams leapt into action, preparing to deploy at any moment.

 

"This kind of readiness will be essential if we actually conduct this mission during our deployment," said Lingg. "We could be called on to board a suspect ship at any time with very little notice." Boarding Officers Ensign David Youker of Randolph, N.J., and Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collection) Andrew Krueger of Marientte, Wis., also led teams during boarding evolutions. Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 2nd Class Reece Bell from 29 Palms, Calif., was the point man while one team boarded a vessel during a high freeboard event.

 

"He had to climb more than 50 feet up the ladder of a moving ship," said Lingg. "This is not an easy feat, and the most vulnerable point of a boarding, but Bell and the team performed excellently." The boarding teams completed three boarding exercises during several days of high-alert readiness. During two intercept events, the teams boarded non-compliant vessels, which represented the highest degree of resistance Halsey's boarding teams will encounter.

"A vessel is non-compliant when it does not follow the directions of the boarding team, adding a level of complexity and uncertainty to the operation," said Lingg. "Our boarding teams performed superbly," said Cmdr. Jordy Harrison,
Halsey's commanding officer. "We may be called upon to conduct maritime security operations during our deployment, and I am confident our boarding teams will be able to successfully carry out any requirement.

 

This is a critical tool we have to protect maritime commerce and contribute to the overall capabilities and effectiveness of the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group." Halsey is homeported in San Diego and is currently operating with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group in preparation for deployment.

 

The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group consists of flagship USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) embarked Carrier Air Wing 2, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and the guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71). Ships assigned to DESRON 9 include destroyers Halsey, USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Shoup (DDG-86) and USS Sterett (DDG-104)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100803-02 - Release Date: 8/3/2010 1:37:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55046

 

The Canadian navy auxiliary oiler replenishment HMCS Protecteur (AOR 509) maneuvers into position to provide fuel to the guided-missile destroyers USS Halsey (DDG 97) and USS Shoup (DDG 86).

 

100805-N-2142S-197 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 5, 2010) - The Canadian navy auxiliary oiler replenishment HMCS Protecteur (AOR-509) maneuvers into position to provide fuel to the guided-missile destroyers USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Shoup (DDG-86). Halsey and Shoup are part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group and are conducting a composite training unit exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Steven Smith/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=90128

 

Shoup, Halsey Strengthen Partnership with Canadian Ally

 

“USS Shoup (DDG-86) and USS Halsey (DDG-97) refueled with the Canadian oiler HMCS Protecteur (AOR-509) while simultaneously receiving stores by helicopter from USNS Ranier (T-AOE-7) on 5 August 2010.

The replenishment helped
Shoup and Halsey continue with Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group's Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California.

The ability to refuel with allied naval forces provides a significant advantage while conducting sustained overseas operations. To prepare for the evolution,
Shoup conducted an extensive brief with key personnel from the refueling and navigation teams. Understanding the differences between Protecteur and the oilers Shoup usually works with helped make the event nearly seamless.

"One significant difference was how much closer we had to keep the two ships, sometimes as close as 120 feet," said Ens. Lauren McKinley, a native of Troy, N.Y., one of two conning officers who drove the ship during the replenishment. "The conning officers had to keep cool and alert to help keep everyone focused on the task at hand."

"It was a pleasure working with such skilled mariners," said Lt. j.g. Chris Crazy Bull of San Mateo, Calif.,
Shoup's other conning officer for the exercise. "We hope for the opportunity to work with Protecteur again."

Shoup is currently off the Pacific Coast participating in the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group's COMPTUEX” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100809-11 - Release Date: 8/9/2010 5:22:00 PM - By Lt. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55208

 

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman David Brown listens through a sound powered phone for information on the location of aircraft on the flight deck of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

100809-N-4997L-027 - PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 9, 2010) - Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman David Brown listens through a sound powered phone for information on the location of aircraft on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in the ship's flight deck control. Abraham Lincoln is underway for a composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX), which is designed to train the ship, embarked air wing and other units that make up the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group to function as one effective fighting force. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=90138

 

Midshipmen Set Sail With Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group

 

As reported on 12 August 2010, “more than 25 Navy Reserve Officer Training Course (ROTC) midshipmen joined the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group for a monthlong training cruise. Midshipmen from the Naval Academy and other colleges and universities were assigned to the Lincoln Strike Group from July to August to learn about life at sea from the perspective of both the officer and enlisted ranks. "The summer cruise is important to midshipmen training because it shows them what life is like underway on an aircraft carrier," said Lt. Cmdr. Jessica Parker, Lincoln's midshipmen training officer.

 

Typically, midshipmen who participate are about to begin their sophomore, junior or senior years at their respective schools. Depending on their graduation year, they will either go through an "enlisted cruise" or an "officer cruise." Each type of cruise is named after the area of concentration when it comes to training midshipmen. During these cruises they are introduced to different working environments including the flight deck, combat direction center, the bridge and the arresting gear spaces.

 

"The second class midshipmen develop an appreciation for the living and working conditions of our hard-working enlisted Sailors as well as an idea of some of their responsibilities," said Parker. "The first class midshipmen get the opportunity to see naval officers in action, leading divisions and operating warfare systems, while experiencing firsthand the military traditions and courtesies observed aboard a United States ship."

 

The Navy embarks midshipmen aboard ships to develop them as Navy leaders and prepare them for active duty before they are commissioned. Over the course of their time underway, they will interact with the officers and crew, participate in formal and informal training exercises and live in the same environment as any other Sailor or officer attached to the ship. "This program has been truly eye opening," said Midshipman Charles Calabretta, of Texas A&M University.

 

"Being able to observe every facet of a nuclear powered aircraft carrier has shown me how amazing and complex this ship truly is. The trials and tribulations of Lincoln's recent training exercises have afforded me the opportunity to witness leadership under pressure, and how hard each sailor must work to achieve a common goal." Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group consists of flagship USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and the guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71).

 

Ships assigned to DESRON 9 include the destroyers USS Halsey (DDG-97), USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Shoup (DDG-86) and USS Sterett (DDG-104). Squadrons from CVW-2 include the "Bounty Hunters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 2, the "Blue Blasters" of VFA-34, the "Kestrels" of VFA-37, the "Vigilantes" of VFA-151, the "Lancers" of Electronic Attack Squadron 131, the "Sun Kings" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron 116, the "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 77 and the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 12” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100812-08 - Release Date: 8/12/2010 1:50:00 PM - By Lt. Greg D. Raelson, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55284

 

New Cable Tensioning Technology Aboard Lincoln Could Save Navy Millions

 

As reported on 13 August 2010, “USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is testing a new cable spooling technology, which could save the Navy millions of dollars by preventing costly damage to helicopter anti-submarine warfare equipment. The new equipment, called the Cable Tensioning System (CTS), was designed by PMA-299, a program office that creates new acquisitions for the MH-60R Seahawk helicopters. CTS is operated aboard the ship to re-organize quarter-inch thick Kevlar cable on a spool used by Seahawks assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77.

The aircraft's buoy hangs down into the water from this cable and transmits sonar signals beneath the surface, helping the helicopters detect enemy submarines. When the buoy is retrieved, a spindle aboard the helicopter rolls up the incoming cable in a pre-set pattern to maximize space and keep a specific amount of tension on the cable so there will be no signal degradation, or worse, having the $8 million buoy fall into the black depths of the sea.

However, as the cable winds up, the motion and banking of the helicopter often causes slippage in the cable called "miss-wrap," which leads to costly and time-consuming cable repairs and shipping fees. CTS can perform these "re-wraps" at sea instead of having to send the spools ashore to be serviced. For now,
Lincoln has the only CTS in the fleet, but plans for other carriers and platforms to get this equipment are in the works and are expected to save the Navy millions of dollars; $1 million of it on Lincoln's upcoming deployment alone, said Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class Mel E. Loga, one of two CTS experts aboard Lincoln.

Lincoln's Maintenance Officer, Cmdr. Wesley Joshway said the new equipment is already making a difference. "Commander Naval Air Forces, Vice Adm. Allen Myers wanted his maintenance staff, working with PMA-299 and the HSM community, to develop a means to show cost savings to the Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE).

 

The development of the Cable Tensioning System does just that by eliminating a frequent Aviation Depot Level Repair charge to the NAE by an outside source and showing an immediate tangible saving," said Joshway. Prior to using CTS, Lincoln's Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD) frequently had to ship the entire 185-pound spindle back to the warehouse for re-spooling and repairs, costing tens of thousands of dollars each time.

 

During Lincoln's Tailored Ship's Training Assessment, AIMD had to send spools to the warehouse four different times, costing the Navy more than $300,000.00 in repairs in four weeks. The machine only costs $400,000.00 up-front, and it has almost paid for itself in a few weeks, said Loga. "About one in five times the helicopter pulls up the ALFS buoy and results in a miss-wrap. Every time that happened before we got the CTS, it would cost the Navy money," he added.

 

Lincoln's AIMD has two aviation electronics technicians who are the only ones capable of running and maintaining the system, Loga, from New Orleans, and Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Patrick Merker, a native of Satellite Beach, Fla. Loga and Merker spearheaded the acquisition of the CTS and even attended a special training course on how to use, repair and maintain the CTS in order to for it to operate aboard Lincoln. They are writing the technical manual which should be released Navy-wide soon.

"It was a hard trip and long hours," said Loga. "But Airman Merker and I learned what we had to in order to get the job done." The CTS will not only help with re-wrapping the cable, but can also be controlled to inspect the cable for damage. This new equipment could mean vigorous work schedules for
Lincoln's two CTS experts, but they're both proud to be pioneering the new system.

"Two months ago was the first time I actually heard about the system," said Loga. "But I can already see how this will save so much in man-hours and time that the Navy will never do without one again” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100813-09 - Release Date: 8/13/2010 2:52:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55288

 

“Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group wrapped up Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California on 13 August 2010, commencing on 23 July 2010. COMPTUEX is an 18-day exercise used to evaluate the strike group's operational readiness by assessing the integration of all units of the strike group such as air, strike, information, surface and anti-submarine warfare to certify the strike group ready for operations at sea and the upcoming deployment. The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group consists of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71). Air Wing 2 is the strike group's primary offensive striking weapon.

 

During COMPTUEX, the Lincoln and USS Nimitz (CVN-68) air wings conducted numerous large force strike drills deep into simulated enemy territory to destroy critical hostile targets. Each large force strike involved the EA-6B Prowlers assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131, E-2C Hawkeyes assigned to Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116, F/A-18 Hornets assigned to Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 2, 34, 137 and 151 conducting a simulation of targeting and destruction of critical targets while suppressing enemy radars and anti-aircraft fires. USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sterett (DDG-104) from DESRON 9 completed war at sea and surface action group exercises.

 

These drills included tracking simulated enemy subs, maritime interdiction operations, visit board search and seizure drills and also transiting through narrow straights with potential enemies nearby. Strike group 9 ships also practiced striking land targets with tomahawk missiles. USS Cape St. George (CG-71) coordinated the air defense for the strike group. While leading a combined effort for air defense of the Lincoln and Nimitz, Cape St. George incorporated all strike group units into a tactical data and communications link, which included P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, Air Force Airborne Warning and Control Aircraft and U.S. 3rd Fleet's shore-based facilities.

COMPTUEX consists of two final battle problems to verify the strike group's competency for open-ocean operations. Both battle problems were successfully completed and the strike group was praised on numerous levels. "You are sound and you executed well," said Vice Adm. Richard Hunt, commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet. "The world is changing. It's more complicated and more dangerous, but you're ready."

Areas specifically noted for their excellence were maritime security operations, ship and air wing coordination, deckplate leadership, operational risk management, crisis planning, rules of engagement, execution, accuracy in strike warfare, agility in using alternate communication paths, response to network threats and overall performance in professionalism and combat operational effectiveness” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100813-09 - Release Date: 8/13/2010 2:52:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55315

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) pulled in for a port visit at Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 13 August 2010, conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California from 23 July to 13 August 2010, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 16 to 17 August 2010” (Ref. 76 & Story Number: NNS100813-09 - Release Date: 8/13/2010 2:52:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55315

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California on 16 August 2010, conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California from 23 July to 13 August 2010, in port from 13 to 15 August 2010 and set course for home” (Ref. 76 & Story Number: NNS100813-09 - Release Date: 8/13/2010 2:52:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55315

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) returned to Naval Station, Everett, Washington on 18 August 2010, with Captain John D. Alexander as Commanding Officer, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 16 to 17 August 2010, conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California from 23 July to 13 August 2010. Abraham Lincoln was underway in the Eastern Pacific from 17 to 19 July 2010, visiting Naval Air Station, North Island (NASNI), San Diego, California, embarking CVW-2 from 20 to 22 July 2010. Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group completed four major exercises frrom 27 to 28 July 2010 as part of COMPTUEX, flexing its muscles in surface, subsurface, and strike warfare simultaneously. Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 completed a successful large force strike, simulating the targeting and destruction of critical targets on the ground while simultaneously suppressing enemy radars and anti-aircraft fire. EA-6B Prowlers from Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131 along with F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets from Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 2, 34, 137, and 151 led the 90 minute mission over the Navy's bombing range on San Clemente Island. USS Cape St. George's (CG-71) air defense commander led a complex air defense exercise, linking the networks of six different Aegis platforms to establish airspace superiority greater than 100 miles from the strike group. Destroyers from Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9, along with cruiser Cape St. George, helicopters from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, and P-3 Orion aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 practiced detecting and tracking enemy submarines while protecting Abraham Lincoln during an underway refueling. Surface units also fired 90 shells in a precision firing demonstration. "Wherever the President needs us to go, anywhere in the world, we'll be there and we'll be ready," said Rear Adm. Mark Guadagnini, Lincoln Carrier Strike Group commander. The COMPTUEX builds upon the strike group's combat readiness by simulating challenges the strike group may encounter on deployment. The advanced training scenarios of COMPTUEX represent the first time a carrier strike group is evaluated as an overall unit. Passing the tests of COMPTUEX certifies Lincoln and its air wing for open-ocean operations, making the force available to deploy wherever and whenever the order is given. USS Momsen (DDG-92) fired 60 shells downrange under the pressure of a simulated combat scenario on 28 July 2010 as part of a COMPTUEX. Firing at the Shore Bombardment Area of San Clemente Island, the drill gave Momsen's fire controlmen real world experience with live-fire shore bombardment using their Mark 51 five-inch gun. Under simulated combat conditions, Momsen's crew executed a naval surface fire support mission in response to a call-for-fire request from a ground unit. Momsen fired 30 High Explosive, Controlled Variable Time (HE-CVT) rounds and 30 full service charge rounds during the evolution. "This is some of the most realistic training I've experienced in my career," said Cmdr. Jay D. Wylie, Momsen's commanding officer. "These standards are much higher, and the room for error much smaller. The added rigor we've seen in this training cycle is making our crew ready to face any adversary or potential contingency." USS Cape St. George (CG-71) tested its Aegis weapons system on 29 July 2010 as part of the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group's COMPTUEX. The main objective of the Aegis evolution was to exercise the strike groups command and control, provide a common tactical picture, execute pre-planned responses, and identify potentially hostile aircraft in a timely and accurate manner. "During the Aegis exercise we had live aircraft coming in simulating a variety of platforms, each representing a different type of missile threat," said Lt. j.g. Joshua T. McNett, Cape St. George's fire control officer, "We assess what the threat is, know what it's capable of, and we counter it before it gets within close of range." As a guided-missile cruiser, Cape St. George's main mission while deployed with the strike group is to protect its carrier, Abraham Lincoln.  The Aegis System is the primary way in which they do this. "We are the air defense commander," said Fire Controlman 1st Class Chad W. Conrad, the Lead SPY Radar Aegis Weapons System (AWS) Technician on board Cape St. George, "Our job is to defend the carrier from any air strikes, and the Aegis weapons system is what does it." The Aegis combat system is capable of simultaneous operations against a multimission threat: anti-air, anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare. The Aegis System is designed as a total weapon system, from detection to kill. "Aegis was primarily made for open-ocean conflicts," said McNett, "Out in the open ocean, it's the best thing out there. We can track contacts hundreds of miles away. So, there is a huge cone of coverage around the strike group and the carrier as a whole." The heart of the system is the AN/SPY-1, an advanced, automatic detect and track, multifunction phased-array radar. The radar is able to perform search, track and missile guidance functions simultaneously with a track capacity of over one hundred targets. Visit, board, search and seizure teams from USS Halsey (DDG-97) completed numerous exercises from 28 to 30 July 2010 to prepare for potential maritime security operations during their 2010 deployment schedule. Nearly immediately following the guide-missile destroyer's departure for pre-deployment exercises on 23 July 2010, boarding teams accelerated into action and began rigorous events designed to assess the effectiveness of the maritime interdiction mission area. "The training in boarding suspect vessels at sea offered a degree of realism unavailable during earlier training phases," said Lt. Andrew Lingg, a lead boarding officer from Hillsborough, N.J. "The boarding team feels confident following this training." The integrated, multiship maritime security exercises began immediately following Halsey's departure from San Diego Bay. The boarding teams leapt into action, preparing to deploy at any moment. "This kind of readiness will be essential if we actually conduct this mission during our deployment," said Lingg. "We could be called on to board a suspect ship at any time with very little notice." USS Shoup (DDG-86) and USS Halsey (DDG-97) refueled with the Canadian oiler HMCS Protecteur (AOR-509) while simultaneously receiving stores by helicopter from USNS Ranier (T-AOE-7) on 5 August 2010. The replenishment helped Shoup and Halsey continue with Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group's COMPTUEX off the coast of Southern California. The ability to refuel with allied naval forces provides a significant advantage while conducting sustained overseas operations. To prepare for the evolution, Shoup conducted an extensive brief with key personnel from the refueling and navigation teams. Understanding the differences between Protecteur and the oilers Shoup usually works with helped make the event nearly seamless. "One significant difference was how much closer we had to keep the two ships, sometimes as close as 120 feet," said Ens. Lauren McKinley, a native of Troy, N.Y., one of two conning officers who drove the ship during the replenishment. "The conning officers had to keep cool and alert to help keep everyone focused on the task at hand." "It was a pleasure working with such skilled mariners," said Lt. j.g. Chris Crazy Bull of San Mateo, Calif., Shoup's other conning officer for the exercise. "We hope for the opportunity to work with Protecteur again." As reported on 12 August 2010, “more than 25 Navy Reserve Officer Training Course (ROTC) midshipmen joined the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group for a monthlong training cruise. Midshipmen from the Naval Academy and other colleges and universities were assigned to the Lincoln Strike Group from July to August to learn about life at sea from the perspective of both the officer and enlisted ranks. As reported on 13 August 2010, Abraham Lincoln tested a new cable spooling technology, which could save the Navy millions of dollars by preventing costly damage to helicopter anti-submarine warfare equipment. The new equipment, called the Cable Tensioning System (CTS), was designed by PMA-299, a program office that creates new acquisitions for the MH-60R Seahawk helicopters. CTS is operated aboard the ship to re-organize quarter-inch thick Kevlar cable on a spool used by Seahawks assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77. Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group wrapped up Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California on 13 August 2010. COMPTUEX was an 18-day exercise used to evaluate the strike group's operational readiness by assessing the integration of all units of the strike group such as air, strike, information, surface and anti-submarine warfare to certify the strike group ready for operations at sea and the upcoming deployment. The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group consists of Abraham Lincoln Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 9 and guided-missile cruiser USS Cape St. George (CG-71). Air Wing 2 is the strike group's primary offensive striking weapon. During COMPTUEX, the Lincoln and USS Nimitz (CVN-68) air wings conducted numerous large force strike drills deep into simulated enemy territory to destroy critical hostile targets. Each large force strike involved the EA-6B Prowlers assigned to Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 131, E-2C Hawkeyes assigned to Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116, F/A-18 Hornets assigned to Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 2, 34, 137 and 151 conducting a simulation of targeting and destruction of critical targets while suppressing enemy radars and anti-aircraft fires. USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sterett (DDG-104) from DESRON 9 completed war at sea and surface action group exercises. These drills included tracking simulated enemy subs, maritime interdiction operations, visit board search and seizure drills and also transiting through narrow straights with potential enemies nearby. Strike group 9 ships also practiced striking land targets with tomahawk missiles. USS Cape St. George (CG-71) coordinated the air defense for the strike group. While leading a combined effort for air defense of the Lincoln and Nimitz, Cape St. George incorporated all strike group units into a tactical data and communications link, which included P-3 Orion aircraft assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 30, Air Force Airborne Warning and Control Aircraft and U.S. 3rd Fleet's shore-based facilities. COMPTUEX consists of two final battle problems to verify the strike group's competency for open-ocean operations. Both battle problems were successfully completed and the strike group was praised on numerous levels. "You are sound and you executed well," said Vice Adm. Richard Hunt, commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet. "The world is changing. It's more complicated and more dangerous, but you're ready." Areas specifically noted for their excellence were maritime security operations, ship and air wing coordination, deckplate leadership, operational risk management, crisis planning, rules of engagement, execution, accuracy in strike warfare, agility in using alternate communication paths, response to network threats and overall performance in professionalism and combat operational effectiveness. Abraham Lincoln pulled in for a port visit at NASNI on 13 August 2010, disembarking CVW-2, conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the coast of Southern California from 23 July to 13 August 2010, in port from 13 to 15 August 2010, underway in the Eastern Pacific from 16 to 17 August 2010. Lincoln Carrier Strike Group consists of flagship Abraham Lincoln, embarked CVW 2, embarked DESRON 9 and the guided-missile cruiser Cape St. George. Ships assigned to DESRON 9 include the destroyers USS Momsen (DDG-92), USS Shoup (DDG-86), USS Halsey (DDG-97) and USS Sterett (DDG-104). Squadrons from CVW 2 include the "Bounty Hunters" of VFA-2, the "Blue Blasters" of VFA-34, the "Kestrels" of VFA-37, the "Vigilantes" of VFA-151, the "Lancers" of VAQ-131, the "Sun Kings" of VAW-116, the "Saberhawks" of HSM-77 and the "Golden Falcons" of HSC-12 (17 July to 18 August 2010)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100730-04 - Release Date: 7/30/2010 11:19:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alan Gragg, Abraham Lincoln Strike Group Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100802-02 - Release Date: 8/2/2010 7:35:00 AM - By Ens. Zachary Thiesse, USS Momsen Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100801-01 - Release Date: 8/1/2010 1:51:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Arif Patani, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, ABOARD USS CAPE ST. GEORGE, Pacific Ocean (NNS), Story Number: NNS100803-02 - Release Date: 8/3/2010 1:37:00 PM - By Ensign Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100809-11 - Release Date: 8/9/2010 5:22:00 PM - By Lt. Jacquelyn R. Bengfort, USS Shoup Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100812-08 - Release Date: 8/12/2010 1:50:00 PM - By Lt. Greg D. Raelson, Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS), Story Number: NNS100813-09 - Release Date: 8/13/2010 2:52:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS) & Story Number: NNS100813-09 - Release Date: 8/13/2010 2:52:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, At Sea (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=54986

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55034

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55037

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55046

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55208

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55284

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55288

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55315

 

Australian Naval Attaché Visits USS Halsey

 

The senior Royal Australian Navy (RAN) officer stationed in the U.S. visited the guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG-97) in San Diego on 25 August 2010.

Royal Australian Navy Commodore Stephen Woodall serves as the naval attaché in Washington, D.C., and visited RAN Lt. Cmdr. David Murphy,
Halsey's Autralian Navy exchange officer.

Murphy is a principal warfare officer studying the Aegis Weapons System, which will be included in the RAN's new Hobart-class destroyer.
Halsey is one of only a handful of ships to have an Australian officer.

"As the Combat Systems officer, I am gaining invaluable experience and knowledge in the Aegis Weapons System in preparation for commissioning the Royal Australian Navy's air warfare destroyer in 2014," said Murphy.

Aegis is the sophisticated air defense weapons system
Halsey and other U.S. cruisers and destroyers employ. Aegis uses a powerful phased array radar to track and identify multiple types of airborne threats to engage them.

"Commodore Woodall was able to gain insight into the progress of the foreign military exchange program during his visit to
Halsey and other installations in Southern California with RAN personnel," said Murphy.

Commodore Woodall indicated he appreciated the opportunity to visit a ship again, and the experience Australian Navy members obtain aboard U.S. ships is important to the success of their procurement programs.

Halsey is homeported in San Diego and is currently preparing for deployment with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group.

The Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group consists of flagship USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72), embarked Carrier Air Wing 2, embarked Destroyer Squadron 9 and the guided-missile cruiser USS
Cape St. George (CG-71)” (Ref. Story Number: NNS100830-05 - Release Date: 8/30/2010 12:23:00 PM - By Ens. Andrew Long, USS Halsey Public Affairs, SAN DIEGO (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=55640

 

 

Chapter XXV (14 January to 6 September 2010)

Part II of II - 15 May to 6 September 2010

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4