Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS & IMF), Bremerton, Washington from

16 April 2009 to 13 January 2010

Chapter XXIV

Part I of III - 16 April to 26 August 2009

Part II of III - 27 August 2009 to 12 January 2010

Part III of III - 13 January 2010 & Appendix I

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) 2009 YEAR END REPORT

Chapter XXIV, Appendix I

 

 

Lincoln Sailors win Northwest Clam Chowder Cook Off

 

As reported on 14 September 2009, “two USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) Sailors took gold in the All-Military Northwest Clam Chowder Cook-Off contest on 7 August 2009 at McChord Air Force Base, Wash.

They competed against Air Force, Army, Coast Guard and Navy contestants and were judged on presentation, quality of taste, and overall skill. The panel of judges, comprised of two chiefs and two officers, awarded Seaman Apprentice Adrian Flannery and Seaman Apprentice Jay Nguyen the gold medal for the best chowder among 11 other teams.

In addition to
Lincoln grabbing gold at the contest, Culinary Specialist 2nd Class Kenny Tello and Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Adam Walko, placed third and took home the bronze.

Lincoln's Food Services is the proven top department among Pacific Fleet aircraft carrier galleys at preparing consistently good meals to the crew. This contest offered the opportunity to showcase their efforts and talent.

Earlier this year,
Lincoln received the Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Award, a prestigious food services award for the best aircraft carrier galley in the Pacific.

"It reinforces that we're the best food service operation in the fleet," said Senior Chief Culinary Specialist Roel D. Vidal,
Lincoln's leading culinary specialist.

With the experience and knowledge acquired from the cook-off contest, Nguyen said he now has a better understanding of culinary art.

"They took away from it a lot of pride and knowledge that if they concentrate at following the recipes, combined with their experience in the galley, then they're actually able to produce consistently good, quality products," said Vidal.

"I'm very proud of our showing, extremely proud," said Supply Department Leading Chief Petty Officer, Master Chief Culinary Specialist Jason Haka. "It was our year, this year, to shine” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS090914-09 - Release Date: 9/14/2009 8:55:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Robert Robbins and Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=48238

 

Momsen Port Visit Strengthens Canadian-American Partnership

 

“USS Momsen (DDG-92) hosted a reception for a group of distinguished visitors on 27 September 2009 in Vancouver, British Columbia as an act of friendship and good will among two neighboring nations.

The reception consisted of over 80 guests, including high ranking government and military officials from the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, Canadian Navy, and the U.S. Consulate General to Canada.

"I think it's important to highlight the relationships, not just between the people of the U.S. and Canada, but their governments as well," said U.S. Consulate General Phillip Chicola. "People sometimes tend to take the relationship between our two countries for granted," Chicola added.

After the reception, USS
Momsen Sailors gave their guests tours of the ship's equipment and spaces as another way to welcome the visitors and show appreciation for the two countries' ties. The tours included visits to the bridge, combat information center, and the enlisted galley.

Chicola said that he was very impressed by the ship and its crew as a whole.

"What's not to love?" said Chicola. "The crew of this ship obviously keeps this ship up and running as one of the best warships in the fleet!"

The last U.S. warship to make a port visit in Vancouver was the USS
Preble (DDG-88) in March 2006, according to Momsen's Command Master Chief Mark A. Swab.

"Vancouver is arguably the best port visit location on either coast of our two nations. It's amazing!" said Swab. "As was the case two decades ago, when I last visited this rich and diverse city. It is definitely a port visit that should be scheduled often for other Sailors to enjoy"” *Ref. Story Number:
NNS091001-09 - Release Date: 10/1/2009 3:55:00 PM - From USS Momsen Public Affairs, VANCOUVER, British Columbia (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=48673

 

Lincoln Sailors Continue to Earn Warfare Qualifications in PIA

 

As reported on 22 October 2009, “Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) continue to earn warfare pins during the ship's Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) period. In a shipyard environment, there is a misconception among Sailors that it is impossible to earn an Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) or Enlisted Air Warfare Specialist (EAWS) pin. However, 50 Lincoln Sailors have earned their warfare pins to date.

"If you work around the production schedule, utilize off duty time, and duty days, it takes effort, but it can be done," said Senior Chief Electronics Technician (SW/AW) Darren Taylor, the ship's ESWS coordinator. "Some people just think there's not enough time, you just have to be creative in finding the time to do it."

Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (SW/AW) Ashley Snodgrass, of Raymond, Wash., is one Sailor who earned a warfare pin during
PIA. Snodgrass, a general duty corpsman with Lincoln's Health Services Department said getting her EAWS pin while Lincoln was in the yards took some extra effort. "I have a family, so I couldn't study after work. I had to get it all done during the day," she said. "During lunch, and on duty days, that's when I got a lot of the work done."

Snodgrass said she is proud of earning her warfare qualifications during
PIA. "It is more challenging, tracking people down and everything. So I am even more proud that I got the pin," she said. Some of the signatures needed for a pin require observing things that won't take place until after the ship departs the yards, such as flight operations and observing an anchoring. Taylor said Sailors should still work on the other aspects.

"If you can get 90 percent of it done while we are here, then you could finish it very soon after we leave," he said. "If you're at a sea command then your ESWS pin will be required at some point in the future," said Taylor.


"Why wait on rules to get passed to get started?"

Sailors have 18 months from the time they begin to earn a warfare qualification. Sailors have 12 months to become re-qualified. There are many resources available such as study guides and shipmates. Sailors can also meet with their department coordinator for a list of signers, Taylor said.

Earning warfare pin can help make a Sailor more competitive for promotion, according to Taylor” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS090922-16 - Release Date: 9/22/2009 1:08:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Cellini, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=48449

 

Lincoln First Carrier to Get LAN Upgrade

 

As reported on 29 October 2009, “USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) is serving as the test-bed for a new local area network (LAN) that will provide Sailors unmatched network reliability and user capacity at sea. "We were chosen to be the first for this install because [the Navy] knew we could pull it off," said Senior Chief Information Systems Technician (SW/AW) Darren Counts, automated data processing (ADP) leading chief petty officer. The new LAN replaces old hardware with a much more efficient 2007 configuration, which includes the use of blade servers. Should a server fail, these will allow Lincoln's ADP division to get the server back up in a matter of minutes. It would previously take ADP two to three hours to get an old server back online.

"On the old system, we had to restore the system from a backup," said Information Systems Technician 2nd Class Hermino Cotto, ADP server supervisor. "On the new system, we can instantaneously move the data [from the downed server] to another server and quickly get it up and running again." Aside from reliability, approximately 1,215 users will be able to log-in to
Lincoln's network making internet more feasible for Sailors on board. The previous limit was 932. One of the keys to making the new LAN work as efficiently as possible is the use of upgraded software and computers. Lincoln has received all-new personal computers to enhance the new network experience. The new PCs operate using Windows XP instead of Windows 2000, and will use Microsoft Office 2007 for productivity instead of the previously-used Office 2003.

According to Cotto, the new PCs have dual-core Intel processors instead of single-core Pentium 4 processors, and a 150 gigabyte hard drive installed. The network and computers also feature the use of common access card (CAC) cards for logging in. In addition to increased reliability and speed, the new LAN will be more secure from outside attacks and viruses, featuring numerous layers of advanced network protection.


To ensure the new LAN is in place on time and is effective for the crew, ADP has been working tirelessly since
Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) began.

 

"All hands have been working on this every day, after hours and even weekends," said Counts. "Every person in the division is involved; we have to be to be successful." Counts said that so far the LAN install is on schedule and ADP is happy with how it's working out. "Without the dedication of everyone in ADP with the help of electronic data processing (EDP), we wouldn't be on track like we are," said Counts. "The troops here have done just a fantastic job” (Ref. Story Number: NNS090929-04 - Release Date: 9/29/2009 12:44:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sean Gallagher, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=48605

 

USS Momsen Hosts Vancouver High-Ranking Officials

 

“USS Momsen (DDG-92) hosted a reception for a group of distinguished visitors on 27 September 2009 in Vancouver, British Columbia as an act of friendship and good will among two neighboring nations.

The reception consisted of over 80 guests, including high ranking government and military officials from the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, Canadian Navy, and the U.S. Consulate General to Canada.

"I think it's important to highlight the relationships, not just between the people of the U.S. and Canada, but their governments as well," said U.S. Consulate General Phillip Chicola. "People sometimes tend to take the relationship between our two countries for granted," Chicola added.

After the reception, USS
Momsen Sailors gave their guests tours of the ship's equipment and spaces as another way to welcome the visitors and show appreciation for the two countries' ties. The tours included visits to the bridge, combat information center, and the enlisted galley.

Chicola said that he was very impressed by the ship and its crew as a whole.

"What's not to love?" said Chicola. "The crew of this ship obviously keeps this ship up and running as one of the best warships in the fleet!"

The last U.S. warship to make a port visit in Vancouver was the USS
Preble (DDG- 88) in March 2006, according to Momsen's Command Master Chief Mark A. Swab.

"Vancouver is arguably the best port visit location on either coast of our two nations. It's amazing!" said Swab. "As was the case two decades ago, when I last visited this rich and diverse city. It is definitely a port visit that should be scheduled often for other Sailors to enjoy” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS091001-09 - Release Date: 10/1/2009 3:55:00 PM - From USS Momsen Public Affairs, VANCOUVER, British Columbia (NNS) & Story Number: NNS091013-04 - Release Date: 10/13/2009 7:28:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Cellini, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, VANCOUVER, British Columbia (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=48673

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=48904

 

USS Lincoln Celebrates Postal Clerk and Storekeeper Merger

 

“The USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) celebrated the postal clerk (PC), storekeeper (SK) rating merger to logistics specialist (LS) with a team building ceremony on 1 October 2009. SKs maintain the ship's supply stores. Their responsibilities include purchasing, shipping and receiving, and issuing of equipment, tools, consumable items or anything purchased through the Naval Supply System.

PCs are in charge of all postal services on the ship, including sending mail, collecting postage-due mail, preparing declarations and outgoing mail, and cancelling stamps. They also maintain a variety of record keeping and reporting duties. The merger brought both rates in the supply division as one to diversify their skills.

Senior Chief Logistics Specialist Emmanuel S. Consulta, leading chief petty officer of Receiving/Shipping, began the ceremony with a few words about the significance of the new merger.

"This merger is a win-win situation for the Navy," said Consulta. "We are combining both PC and SK skill sets and abilities to help Sailors learn a different trade. Also, because of this merger, more opportunities in future billets are available. LSs are now able to go on any ship in the Navy."

Both rates benefit from the merger. PCs will learn a broader skill set and increase their advancement opportunity. SKs will also benefit with a greater diversity in sea and shore assignments.

"It's exciting to be able to learn the PC side of the house," said Logistics Specialist 1st Class Paul T. Harper, from the ship's material department, and a legacy SK. "This will make us more diverse for jobs in the outside world."

Legacy PC and SK Sailors underwent a five-day PC/SK crash course at Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton to prepare the Sailors for the merger and advancement. The first LS advancement exam will be administered January 2010, with the majority of the exam's content covering conventional storekeeper knowledge, with 10 percent on postal training.

To end the ceremony, the oldest LS, Master Chief Logistics Specialist John D. Lowery, and the youngest LS, Logistics Specialist Seaman Apprentice Henry Huang, cut a cake together” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS091015-10 - Release Date: 10/15/2009 1:16:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jerine Lee, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=48905

 

 Sailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Ingraham (FFG 61) clear away a damaged roof during disaster recovery efforts in Pago Pago, American Samoa.

 

091003-F-3798Y-352 - PAGO PAGO (Oct. 3, 2009) - Sailors assigned to the guided-missile frigate USS Ingraham (FFG-61) clear away a damaged roof during disaster recovery efforts in Pago Pago, American Samoa. The region was struck by an earthquake and resulting tsunami. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Cohen A. Young/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=76853

 

Ingraham Crew Proud to Assist Citizens of Samoa

 

As reported on 9 October 2009, “USS Ingraham (FFG 61), homeported in Everett, Wash., is supporting Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) efforts in American Samoa with its embarked helicopters allowing Governor Tulafono and FEMA's Federal Coordinating Officer Kenneth J. Tingman to survey damage while also conducting a search and rescue mission. Sailors from Ingraham are also provided medical assistance and cleared debris ashore. In response to Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) requests, the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate Ingraham arrived on scene Wednesday at approximately 3pm local time.

 

"Our Sailors are extremely motivated for this mission, and we are assisting in number of different ways," said Cmdr. Matt Ovios, Ingraham's commanding officer. "The helicopter is providing invaluable aerial reconnaissance for the FEMA and DoD team while our Corpsmen are assisting with medical treatment. In addition, we have almost everyone else involved in working parties in the village of Pago Pago clearing debris."

 

Over the past two days, Pacific Air Forces C-17 aircraft have flown four missions, providing transport for approximately 100 Hawaii National Guard, FEMA personnel, and a variety of cargo, including vehicles, communications equipment, cots, blankets, and food in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The role of U.S. military forces during any humanitarian assistance/disaster response is to rapidly respond with critically needed supplies and support to help mitigate human suffering and prevent further loss of life.

 

As it is typical in international relief operations, U.S. military efforts are in support of the U.S. State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance. U.S. Pacific Command will continue to work closely with the Indonesian government, the U.S. Embassy and International Relief Organizations of Indonesia on humanitarian assistance operations at the request and invitation of the Indonesian government.

An 8.3 magnitude earthquake struck 120 miles south of American Samoa Tuesday afternoon, generating 15-foot waves in some of the territories' islands that wiped out entire villages. At least 100 people are reported dead in Samoa, more than 20 in American Samoa, and at least six in neighboring Tonga. The U.S. military has a history of working with international relief organizations and host nations to reach those affected by natural disasters. U.S. forces are postured to rapidly deploy around the globe in response to crises across the military spectrum from natural disasters to conflict.

 

According to Chief of Naval Operations Adm.Gary Roughead, "As we operate globally, we are delivering on the maritime strategy that we set forth about two years ago. And I am proud to say it is not just a glossy booklet. But if you look at where the Navy is today, what we are doing today, we are performing those six capabilities that we set forth in our strategy, and that we remain a global, forward-deployed Navy."

 

USS Ingraham was commissioned in 1989, has a crew of 30 officers and 182 enlisted. Joint Task Force Homeland Defense (JTF-HD), based in Hawaii, is leading U.S. military support to FEMA in American Samoa. American Samoa is the only U.S. possession in the southern hemisphere. It is slightly larger than Washington, D.C., covering 76.2 square miles, and has about 57,000 citizens” (Ref. Story Number: NNS091009-09 - Release Date: 10/9/2009 11:33:00 AM - By Ensign Todd Chen, USS Ingraham Public Affairs, AMERICAN SAMOA (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=48764

 

Lincoln Protects Sailors Ahead of Flu Season

 

USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) Health Services Department inoculated more than 2,000 Sailors from 5 to 9 October 2009 with the Flumist (live) vaccination to prevent influenza outbreaks during this flu season. Unlike traditional, needle-injected flu vaccinations, Flumist is a painless vaccine that is sprayed into a person's nostrils. It contains a live, weakened virus rather than the dead strain used in traditional flu shots. The live strain of the virus is more effective because it changes every year as the influenza virus evolves, said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Jeffery Allen of Lincoln's Health Services Department and native of Sacramento, Calif. This year the seasonal flu vaccine includes three strains of the most common circulating flu viruses.

Influenza is not the common cold, and can be a severe to life-threatening illness, which is why it is important to be immunized. An annual influenza vaccine immunization protects many people from getting the disease or become severely ill. "On average 260,000 people are hospitalized because of influenza and 30,000 of those people die," said Allen. "That's why it's important to get the vaccine to prevent the flu."
Health Services Department Sailors screened every Lincoln Sailor to ensure they were able to receive the vaccination.

 

"The Flumist can be received by most people under the age of 50 who are not pregnant," said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Latoya Goldsmith of Abe's Health Services Department and native of Stockton, Calif. "There are several medical conditions that can disqualify a person from receiving the vaccination such as kidney, heart or liver problems or sensitivity to egg products. For those disqualified from the Flumist, we have the shot available."

 

Immunization remains the primary method of reducing seasonal influenza illness and its complications, said Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Wayne Hachey, director of preventive medicine for Defense Department Health Affairs. The seasonal influenza vaccine not only helps protect vaccinated individuals, but also helps protect entire communities by preventing and reducing the spread of the virus.

In addition to their inoculations
, Lincoln Sailors were given tips to help decrease the spread of the flu this season. They were reminded to wash their hands in soapy water often and to use alcohol-based hand sanitizers when they aren't able to get to a sink. They were also told to avoid close contact with people who are sick.

 

Other tips to decrease the spread of the virus include staying at home from work, school and errands while ill, covering their mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and not touching their eyes, nose or mouth throughout the flu season. Flumist (live) only combats the seasonal influenza virus and not the H1N1 virus. Defense Department has mandated all service members receive the seasonal flue and the H1N1 vaccination this season. Lincoln's Health Services Department is ordering the vaccinations and will begin administering them as soon as they get to the ship, said Goldsmith.


Navy Medicine will be monitoring the seasonal influenza viruses carefully over the coming weeks and months and will be proactive in developing contingency plans to address any public health issues if required. Force health protection is the responsibility of every commander and servicemember and it is important for everyone to take the proper actions to protect personnel, beneficiaries, coworkers and family members against the seasonal influenza” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS091021-06 - Release Date: 10/21/2009 5:18:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kat Corona, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=49093

 

USS Abraham Lincoln Helps Sailors Kick Smoking Habit

 

As reported on 20 October 2009, “USS Abraham Lincoln's (CVN-72) recognizes the harm that smoking cigarettes can cause and offers a treatment program to Sailors who are serious about quitting tobacco.

The four-week cessation program provides Sailors the support needed to kick the habit. Health Services Department holds classes every Thursday at 8 a.m., and covers various methods of quitting, offers personalized treatment, and helps establishing a quit date.

"Tobacco use harms almost every organ in the body, and the U.S. suffers 444,000 tobacco-related deaths per year," said 2007's Surgeon General of the Navy Rear Adm. A. M. Robinson, Jr. "Quitting tobacco use is one of the best things you can do to improve health, quality of life and improve military readiness."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2007, tobacco products are the leading cause of preventable death and illness. Tobacco use in the form of smoking alone takes about half a million lives every year.

Some of the harmful chemicals in tobacco smoke include ammonia, which is used as a toilet cleaner, acetone, used in nail polish remover, carbon monoxide, found in car exhaust, formaldehyde, used in embalming fluid, and tar, which 70 percent of which is deposited in smoker's lungs.

Smoking not only harms the body, but the wallet too. As stated by the Defense Department's Health Affairs Office, the Pentagon spent an estimated $1.6 billion in 2006 to cover medical costs and loss of productivity due to tobacco-related illness in the U.S. Additionally, the Defense Department spent another $3.9 million for smoking cessation programs.

"The costs of tobacco use are staggering to the healthcare system and to the individual," said Robinson. Though the choice to start may be a relatively easy one, the choice to quit may take dedication and determination.

 

"The person has to want to quit, they have to actually try,"said Lincoln's Smoking Cessation Program Coordinator, Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (SW) Latoya M. Goldsmith, of Stockton, Calif."They need to be sure that it's what they want. They need to be committed to it."

 
Sailors wanting to kick the habit should stop by Health Services for more information. Additionally, outside the command, resources are available to further assist those wanting to live a smoke-free lifestyle” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS091020-14 - Release Date: 10/20/2009 1:05:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Robert Robbins, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=49094

 

Lincoln Fired Up To Be Test Bed for New Ovens

 

As reported on 24 October 2009, “Commander Naval Air Forces (CNAF) has chosen USS AbrahamLincoln (CVN-72) to be the test bed for brand new technologically advanced ovens that could potentially be used onboard all U. S. aircraft carriers.

Lincoln is testing three different ovens, the Boldgett Hydrovection, Rational Combi, and Alto Shaam Combi-therm. They will be tested to see which is more suitable and durable. The ovens can be programmed to cook a certain item at specific times, and will all be programmed with the Navy standard menu. Everything on the menu has an individual menu card that instructs the culinary specialists exactly how to prepare the item. Now it will all be saved in the oven's memory.

"Now the culinary specialist doesn't have to read off the card and set everything accordingly. It's as simple as pressing a few buttons," said Culinary Specialist First Class Eric Russell, the ship's oven expert. For example, the menu card for beef roast rib says to roast the meat for three to four hours at 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Since the oven knows this, the CS just has to look under the beef section for roast rib and the oven knows the exact temperature and time left to cook.

In cases like beef rib roast where the menu card instructs the CS to insert a thermometer and roast until it reaches a certain temperature in the center, the new oven has another convenient feature. There is a sensor the CS can insert in the meat so the oven can keep track of the temperature itself. It knows that according to the menu card, beef rib roast must be roasted until the center is at least 140 degrees Fahrenheit. So it adjusts the remaining time according to the temperature of the meat.

The ovens can also have menu items added along the way. Originally it will have the basic CNAF menu but the ship can add special menu items as needed. The items can also be adjusted. If
Lincoln Sailors don't like the way the ovens cook the fries, the CSs can change the time and temperature to make the fries crispier.

Another feature the new ovens have is a self-cleaning application. This will save many hours of scrubbing the grime out of the ovens and keep the ovens in the best condition possible. "Probably the best thing about these new ovens is the way it prepares food. It should increase the quality," said Russell. "Normal ovens prepare food with only heat. These new combination ovens combine steam and heat to keep moisture in the food while it is being heated at the same time."

These ovens are only one of the many upgrades the
Lincoln is receiving during its Planned Incremental Availability to increase efficiency and morale of the Sailors onboard” (Ref. Story Number: NNS091024-07 - Release Date: 10/24/2009 5:24:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jacquelyn Childs, USS Abraham Lincoln(CVN-72) Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=49203

 

Lincoln Sailor Finishes in Top Five of Marine Corps Marathon

 

“A USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailor placed fifth among the 21,379 runners who crossed the finish line in the 2009 Marine Corps Marathon (MCM) on 25 October 2009.

"This time I really just wanted to jump into it and just go for it," said Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Corey Duquette, of Pensacola, Fla., who ran the 26.2 mile race through the nation's capitol, crossing the Marine Corps War Memorial finish line with an impressive 2:27:34 time.

Duquette has placed in the top ten in all five marathons he has participated in, placing third in last year's MCM.

"One of my biggest motivations is that I have two kids at home," Duquette said. "My wife always wants me to give my best."

"He not only ran well, but also conducted himself through courage and commitment," said Navy Marathon and XC Teams Head Coach, James A. Felty, of Ypsilanti, Mich. "He ran a very smart race considering his limited training base."

According to Duquette's coach, his performance was amazing because he had been back on the training program for only seven weeks, averaging 80 miles per week, while also serving as a food service attendant on the
Lincoln's mess decks.

"I know for a fact that if I can do this, if I can train and get the job done, then I know I can accomplish anything," said Duquette. "Mentally, I knew I could do it."

Duquette says the key to athletic achievement is to take baby-steps, while taking a constructive approach to physical fitness, setting small goals, and making time for training.

"It's not fun to be out of shape. If you're young, you should start out on a healthy foot. You should really understand that you only have one body. I think it would be better for the crew, less medical, less sick-call” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS091107-04 - Release Date: 11/7/2009 7:10:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Robert Robbins, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=49498

 

Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Corey Duquette checks tagouts in the forward mess deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72).

 

091105-N-9435M-006 - BREMERTON, Wash. (Nov. 5, 2009) - Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Corey Duquette checks tagouts in the forward mess deck aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is being overhauled at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jordon J. Murzyn/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=78313

 

Lincoln's New Executive Officer Checks Aboard

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) welcomed aboard its new executive officer on 10 November 2009.

"I'm truly excited to be here," said Executive Officer Cmdr. Timothy Kuehhas. "
Abraham Lincoln Sailors have a reputation around the fleet for working hard and performing with excellence. My goal is for next year's deployment to be as successful as the last one."

Kuehhas, a native of Sayville, N.Y., graduated from the University of Dallas in 1987 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in mathematics. He received his commission through Aviation Officer Candidate School in June 1988, and was designated a naval aviator the following year.

Kuehhas praised
Lincoln's performance in the shipyard and dedication to the overhaul mission.

"I'm really proud of how the crew has performed in the shipyard. A lot of work was done and it was completed safely," he said. "Now it's important to make that final push to get underway and back to Everett and our families. It's going to be a busy first two months for us. Between now and January we'll get the ship ready for sea, continue training, run drills, and make sure we're ready to get underway."

Some of Kuehhas'previous duty assignments include serving as the requirements officer for chief of Naval Operations, and the safety and maintenance officer of VAQ-142 "Grey Wolves" where he made two deployments in support of Operation Southern Watch and Operation Northern Watch.

In August 2004, Kuehhas deployed to the
Persian Gulf aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), as the commanding officer of VAQ-132 "Scorpions," in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. While in command of VAQ-132, Kuehhas led the Scorpions through three deployments.

In addition to numerous medals for meritorious achievements in service, including the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Kuehhas was also named by the Association of Naval Aviation as the 1995 Distinguished Naval Flight Officer of the Year” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS091116-06 - Release Date: 11/16/2009 11:50:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Robert Robbins, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash (NNS)). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=49639

 

Lincoln Prepares for Underway with Training Drills

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) has began daily flying squad, general quarters (GQ) and integrated training team (ITT) drills on 1 December 2009, to prepare for its first underway after the Planned Incremental Availability that began in April.


These drills are vital for preparing the crew for all types of damage control (DC) causalities and emergencies that could arise during combat and normal underway operations. "Everyone on board is responsible for basic DC knowledge," said Lt. Cmdr. Gilbert Lara,
Lincoln's damage control assistant.

 

"We must ensure all hands are DC-focused, have knowledge in the identifying, reporting and combating of all DC casualties as they arise." In addition to these drills, the crew recently completed a basic DC level of knowledge exam. According to Lara, the exams went very well, but there is still work to be done. "Our level of knowledge exam scores are averaging about 90.5 percent," said Lara. "But our basic DC qualifications are not yet where they need to be."

 

One of the most important things the ship gains when routinely performing these drills is an assessment of where more training is needed. "Some of the areas that still need improvement are the reporting of casualties, the setting of material conditions yoke and zebra, being in battle dress and not breaking the boundaries once they are set," said Lara. "One way this can be improved is making sure everyone is listening to the 1 MC announcements, so we know when the boundaries are set."

All DC equipment must also be ready for use at all times. "DC maintenance is very important, the ship needs to be sensitive to the readiness of all DC equipment," said Chief Warrant Officer Wagner Walker, Lincoln's fire marshal. "We need everybody's eyes, so we can get the ship ready for command assessment readiness training phase II."

Once the ship gets underway, the crew can expect to run two ITT and GQ drills per week, as well as four flying squad drills. The crew should also be prepared to begin running drills they may be unfamiliar with, such as casualty power, mass conflagration, and bio-chemical attack drills.

"These drills are extremely vital to mission accomplishment," said Lara. "The ship has to be able to successfully combat DC casualties to prevent the loss of the ship, equipment, and lives” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS091222-05 - Release Date: 12/22/2009 1:54:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jimmy Cellini, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50157

 

Lincoln Sailor Recipe Featured in Cookbook

 

As reported on 7 December 2009, “everyone has their favorite foods, and for a lot of people nothing compares to some good old fashioned home cooking. There's nothing better than a dish people can remember eating their entire life. For Culinary Specialist Seaman Jeremy P. Pierre, of New Orleans, nothing compares to his family's recipe for New Orleans style ribs, which was recently been picked up by the official Navy cookbook to be used throughout the fleet. When Pierre heard the news, it took him completely by surprise. "I felt completely overwhelmed," said Pierre.

 

"I never really expected for it to get in, and I was completely surprised when FSO (Food Service Officer) told me it made it in." Growing up in New Orleans, cooking and always been a big part of his life. New Orleans has a huge reputation for mixing all kinds of different cultures and foods to come up with a style completely unique to the region. This rich tradition is not at all lost on Pierre and his family, who have continued to pass down their unique recipe down through the generations. "I basically grew up in the kitchen watching my grandmother and grandfather cook," he said.

 

"This recipe has been passed down all the way from my great-grandfather down the father and now to me," he added. Although Pierre has had an aspiration to become a professional cook for most of his life, after high school that wasn't the direction that he took. He decided instead to follow in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, and explore law enforcement. Pierre's father spent over 30 years, and his grandfather over 50, working for St. John the Baptist Sheriff's Department, this inspired Pierre to attend Dillard University and pursue a degree in criminal justice.

After two years in the school, Pierre started to think that it wasn't for him and after discussing it with his family, decided to take his life in a different direction. "My brothers suggested that I join the military," said Pierre. "I thought it over and headed down to a local recruiter and joined the Navy, and when it came to choosing my job, culinary specialist was the obvious choice," he added. Although Pierre doesn't know how long he will be in the Navy or what direction his life will take, he does know that whatever happens, food will always be a huge part of his life and will always be his dream profession.

 

"My ultimate goal would be to one day open my own restaurant," he said. "My father and I have always dreamed of opening a restaurant together," but for the time being, Sailors can enjoy Pierre's cooking and look forward to even more new recipes in the future. "I'm trying to get a good gumbo recipe down path, but it's not quite ready yet," Pierre said” (Ref. Story Number: NNS091207-08 - Release Date: 12/7/2009 3:21:00 PM - By Mass Communication Seaman Jimmy Cellini, USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50033

 

Lincoln Sailors Assemble Bikes for Less Fortunate

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) Sailors volunteered to assemble bicycles at the Annual KMPS Radio (Compass Radio) Bike Drive held for the Forgotten Children's Fund, Everett Navy League and Santa's Castle of Fort Lewis and Fort Mchord on 10 December 2009. The bike drive is held every year by KMPS radio at Fred Meyer. The station plays live from the store while the volunteers assemble the bikes. People can buy bikes or call in and send money to purchase bikes, helmets and food for a family in need.

 

This year the drive collected more than 600 bikes and raised over $40,000.00 for grocery items. This all started when Forgotten Children's Fund Event Coordinator Cindie Murphy wanted to do something for those who worked hard but just didn't have enough to go around. Adding military charities to the fundraiser broadened the reach of the event. "The Sailors are already doing so much, so it's just amazing to see them volunteer their time to help out," said Murphy. "And they are just such a big help when they're here. They work really hard."

 

Chief Machinist's Mate Timothy Means, Machinist's Mate 2nd Class John Fulmer, Machinis's Mate 2nd Class Michael Powell, Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Brian Scarberry, Yeoman Seaman David Baird and Personnel Specialist Seaman Bobby Simpson all spent the morning at Fred Meyer in Port Orchard, Wash., assembling bikes for the drive. "I volunteered because this was a good opportunity to give back to the community and represent the ship and the Navy," said Means, who jumped at the chance to attend the bike drive.

 

"It's very important for Sailors on the Lincoln to give back to the community, especially during the holidays." The other volunteers were just as eager to help at the event and enjoyed the experience of helping less fortunate children. "I would definitely come back," said Simpson. "Building bikes with local citizens was the best and it's really important to the children." Not only were these Lincoln Sailors helping their community, they were also helping out fellow service members.

 

Many of the bikes go to military children through the Everett Navy League and Santa's Castle. When the bike drive started approximately 10 years ago only the Forgotten Children's Fund was involved. Then a few years ago KMPS Radio Promotions Director Erica Hall invited the military charities to help give back to service members experiencing rough times during the holidays. "The best part is seeing the Sailors out here," said Hall. "We have such a strong military tie and seeing them out here is just great.

 

They're building the bikes that are going back to their shipmates' families." Radio talk show host at KMPS radio, Ichabod Caine feels just as strongly about helping the military. "This is a country station," he said. "Our hearts are with the country and those who defend it. The gift of freedom is the greatest. This is amazing because we have Christmas, kids, and the military. It's like a perfect trifecta” (Ref. Story Number: NNS091228-01 - Release Date: 12/28/2009 11:15:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jaqueline Childs, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, PORT ORCHARD, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50301

 

Lincoln Marks 41 Days DUI Free

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) marked 41 consecutive days without out a driving under the influence (DUI) influence on 18 December 2009. The standard for Lincoln Sailors, as set by Commanding Officer Capt. Patrick Hall, is always zero DUIs, however the streak of 41 days remains noteworthy because of the team effort of the entire crew. Not only have DUIs decreased by 53 percent, overall alcohol related incidents have also decreased by 50 percent in comparison to the ship's last Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) from September 2006 to June 2007.

 

"A huge part of our success is better communication this time around,"Lincoln's Drug and Alcohol Prevention Advisor, Chief Fire Controlman Curtis Foster. "We get the message out to our Sailors about being smart and having a plan when you drink. We then give them the tools to make good decisions." According to Foster the DUIs that occur aren't from lack of a plan, but making poor decisions while under the influence. Every Sailor received information on responsible alcohol use, the effects of alcoholic "mega" energy drinks, and how different amounts of alcohol affect a person's blood alcohol content by weight.

 

The message of responsible alcohol use is reinforced by the 0-0-1-3 standard of zero driving while drinking, zero underage drinking, and a guideline of one drink per hour and a max of three drinks per night. The ship has given out individualized wallet cards so that each Sailor can write down their plan ahead of time. The cards include space for their leading petty officer, chief and division officer's phone number in case of emergency, along with a special taxi cab number for the Sailor who has been drinking to call for a "safe ride" home without needing to pay at the time of the call.

 

The ship, during this PIA, has also had many events and programs available to Sailors through the ship's Morale Welfare and Recreation. Even with all of the information and programs available to Sailors, the most effective way the ship has been preventing DUIs may be the communication that's taking place at the deck plate level. "When I talk to my Sailors about the dangers of driving drunk, I use real-life experiences as examples of what can happen if they do decide to get behind the wheel in that state," said Aviation Ordnanceman 1st Class (AW/SW) Daniel Wickersham of the ship's Weapons Department.

 

"I really want them to realize the potential consequences of drunk driving. "I tell them if all they lose is money and rank, then they got lucky. I've seen too many shipmates and friends killed by driving drunk. I also tell them the when they leave here each day, it's all on them to be smart and make the right decisions when drinking." As a result of the communication, Lincoln Sailors have been embracing the designated driver system and making sure they plan each time they go out drinking.

 

Sailors are realizing the seriousness of a DUI, and take every precaution to avoid a charge that could cost them their career” (Ref. Story Number: NNS091223-02 - Release Date: 12/23/2009 7:57:00 AM - By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jordan Murzyn, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50327

 

Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Dollar operates an electrical paper cutter to produce DUI prevention plan cards.

 

091222-N-5386R-001 - BREMERTON, Wash (Dec. 22, 2009) - Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Dollar, from Roxboro, N.C., operates an electrical paper cutter to produce Driving Under the Influence (DUI) prevention plan cards for Sailors assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) is undergoing a major overhaul at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard . (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Robert Robbins/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=79521

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) JANUARY, 1 2010 REPORT

 

Mission. To support and operate naval aircraft at sea, maintain open sea-lanes for maritime traffic, project naval power at sea and ashore, and provide a formidable strike option in response to national tasking. Abraham Lincoln also serves as a flagship command and control platform, able to direct and support full battle group and joint operations. Wherever it goes, the ship serves as a symbol of U.S. resolve, acting both as an ambassador and as a sea-based deterrent to threats to our national interest” (Ref. 378B-2003).

 

“The Navy announced that it would reassign Abraham Lincoln Security Division from the Weapons Department to the Operations Department prior to October 2005. The ship proactively accomplished this move by August 2005, which thrust the division into a new environment. Abraham Lincoln redesignated her Ship Self Defense Force the Naval Security Force, and utilized ship’s company to augment the force. She thus established the Integrated Security Force; each department on board supported a team of 102 sailors who melded into the Security Division to protect the ship while she visited ports. This involved extensive training regimens for crewmembers that included tactical team movements and basic law enforcement procedures” (Ref. 378A).

 

Abe's Fast Cruise Preps Sailors for Underway

 

“Sailors aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) began simulating an at sea environment on 8 January 2010 in preparation for their first underway since April 2009.

This underway, known as a fast cruise, ensures the ship's equipment is in good working condition and personnel are fully trained and efficient in their duties.

"Fast cruise is here to help the crew get used to going underway," said Electrician's Mate 1st Class Diomel Laforteza, leading petty officer of
Engineering Division. "It's also the time for us to check all our equipment and make sure it's up and running. Firefighting equipment, alarms, and even the 1MC all need to be in good working order."

Lt. Cmdr. David C. Grattan, the engineering training coordinator who helped plan the fast cruise, said it's all about being able to operate independently. "We're taking small steps, and this is the first step out of dock training," he said. "Up until now, we could always call someone for help. Now we're going to be on our own, providing our own services."

The crew will perform several training evolutions including general quarters, flying squad and underway replenishment (UNREP) drills which prepare
Lincoln for many scenarios that take place underway, while also ensuring all Sailors are able to effectively man their watches. "We can't run some of these exercises in port," said Grattan. "We've only had personnel on the UNREP station once during the whole shipyard period. Fast cruise will help verify that we can accomplish our tasks proficiently by training personnel on those stations."

While fast cruise is important for training Sailors and testing their proficiency, it also prepares the crew in another way. "It gets people back in the mood of living on the ship," said Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Shea Kingston of
Deck department. "It's been a long time since the ship's been underway, people have to get used to it again."

Fast cruise will run approximately four days, with a pause in the middle to repair any discrepancies found during testing and training” (Ref. Story Number:
NNS100108-09 - Release Date: 1/8/2010 4:40:00 PM - By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary Hunt, USS Abraham Lincoln Public Affairs, BREMERTON, Wash. (NNS)).

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=50441

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter XXIV (16 April 2009 to 13 January 2010)

Part II of III - 27 August 2009 to 12 January 2010

 USS CORAL SEA (CV 43)

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

 

A Sailors Tale of His Tour of Duty in the U. S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983) Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw

(24 April 1980)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0454-5

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-329-15473-5

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to Present)

 

Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw (24 April 1980) Iran and Air Arm History (1941 to 2016)

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-19945-3

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA  Vol. I (10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA Vol. I

(10 July 1944 to 31 December 1975) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54596-0

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to 25 August 1981)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. II (1 January 1976 to

25 August 1981) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-54790-2

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990)

 

USS CORAL SEA CV-42, CVB-43, CVA-43 & CV-43 HISTORY, AND THOSE AIRCRAFT CARRIERS OPERATING WITH CORAL SEA DURING HER TOUR OF SERVICE Vol. III (20 August 1981 to 26 April 1990) -

 

Book ISBN NO.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EBook ISBN NO.

978-1-329-55111-4

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I (27 December 1982 to 6 May 2003)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. I  (27 December 1982 to

6 May 2003)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-73794-7

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. II (7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. II

(7 May 2003 to 13 January 2010)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-74027-5

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History Vol. III (14 January 2010 to 31 December 2012)

 

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History Vol. III

(14 January 2010 to

31 December 2012)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74145-6

 

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) History of Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH)  (1 January 2013 to 2017)

 

USS Abraham Lincoln

(CVN-72) History of

Refueling and Complex

Overhaul (RCOH)

(1 January 2013 to 2017

Sea Trials) Volume IV

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-74587-4

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER SHIP HISTORY (1920 to 2016)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0465-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25019-4

Library of Congress

Control Number: 

2008901616

(Book Version)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS REDESIGNATED AND OR RECLASSIFIED (1953 to 2016)

 

U. S. AIRCRAFT

CARRIERS

REDESIGNATED

AND OR

RECLASSIFIED

(1953 to 2016)

 

BOOK - ISBN NO.

978-1-4276-0452-1

EBook - ISBN NO.

978-1-365-25041-5

Library of Congress

(Book Version)

2008901619

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENT HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS AND EBOOKS (48 Navy Books)

 

ENERGY QUEST AND U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOY. HISTORY INVESTMENT CAPITAL REQUIRED TO PUBLISH 55 EIGHTH HUNNDRED PAGE BOOKS, EBOOKS & CD’s (48 Navy Books)

 

Book - ISBN NO.

To Be Announced

EBook - ISBN No.

978-1-365-26038-4